Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 319–323
Jashnani et al. . Autopsy Study of Carotid IMT 319
Role of Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Assessment of
Atherosclerosis: An Autopsy Study
Kusum D Jashnani, Rohit R Kulkarni, Jaya R Deshpande
Department of Pathology, TN Medical College and BYL Nair Ch Hospital, Mumbai
Original Article
Background:  The non-invasive technique of measuring carotid artery intima-media thickness has generated
considerable interest as a marker of atherosclerosis, particularly in predicting clinical coronary events and
coronary artery disease. In the present study, a postmortem comparative analysis of intima-media thickness of
carotid artery with coronary artery atherosclerosis has been carried out. To date no such morphological tissue
studies are available from our country.
Methods and Results:  Right and left common carotid arteries with their branches were removed at postmortem
in 40 cases with history of diabetes, hypertension or both. Intima-media thickness was measured and compared
with coronary artery atherosclerosis. There were 10 control postmortem cases without history of diabetes or
hypertension. Common carotid artery and internal carotid artery intima-media thickness were found to be
good predictors of coronary events. There was also significant correlation (by Pearson’s correlation formula)
between the carotid artery intima-media thickness and the percentage of block in the coronary arteries.
Conclusions:   Internal carotid artery along with common carotid artery intima-media thickness measurement
is a good predictor of coronary artery disease. However, carotid artery intima-media thickness has no  bearing
on the status of collateral circulation of the coronary arteries. (Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 319–323)
Key Words: Carotid intima-media thickness, Coronary artery disease, Atherosclerosis
Correspondence: Dr Kusum D Jashnani, 8 Aashirvad, First Floor
Opp. Kakad Industrial Estate, Lady Jamshedji Cross Road 3, Mahim
Mumbai 400016. e-mail: kusumjash@hotmail.com
A
therosclerosis is a generalized disease. Carotid and
coronary vascular bed share the same risk factors and
manifest similar atherosclerotic changes. Hence,
considerable attention has been directed at the wall
thickness of the carotid arteries as an early marker of
atherosclerotic disease and as a means of showing the
effectiveness of medical therapies in the treatment of
atherosclerosis. Non-invasive techniques such as B-mode
ultrasound can directly assess the intima-media thickness
(IMT) of carotid arteries, which corresponds to the
histologic thickness of the intima and media.
1-3
Necropsy
surveys
4
have, however, suggested that the severity of
arterial disease may not be uniform. This has resulted in
conflicts between the clinical observations and the
pathological findings. There has been a paucity of autopsy
data on the correlation of carotid IMT and coronary
disease.
In this context, we did an autopsy evaluation study of
the extra cranial carotid arteries and coronary arteries. The
aims of this study were: (i) to establish whether carotid
artery IMT is a predictor of coronary artery disease (CAD),
and (ii) to examine whether IMT can be used to evaluate
the degree of atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries, and
if this can replace coronary angiography for assessing CAD.
All the reports so far have been antemortem studies
using B-mode ultrasound measurement. In the present
autopsy study, actual measurement of the atherosclerotic
plaque by micrometer has been done. This is the only
autopsy study as recorded in literature.
Methods
Fifty autopsy cases formed the material for the study; 40 of
these were in study group (age > 45 years), with clinical
presentation of either ischemic heart disease or syncopal
attacks. They had history of diabetes and/or hypertension,
which are established risk factors for the development of
atherosclerosis. Twenty-nine patients had both diabetes
and hypertension. Of the remaining 11 cases, five had
hypertension alone and six had diabetes only. Twenty-three
cases were smokers. No record of lipid profile or family
history of CAD was available in these 40 cases. The control
IHJ-777-04(OA).p65
11/15/2005, 4:20 PM
319
Convert pdf into jpg format - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf into jpg format; convert pdf images to jpg
Convert pdf into jpg format - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
reader convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf into jpg online
320 Jashnani et al. . Autopsy Study of Carotid IMT
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 319–323
group consisted of 10 age-matched vehicular accident
cases without the history of CAD or any known risk factor.
There were 31 males and 9 females in the study group.
During the postmortem examination, right and left
common carotid arteries (CCA) along with internal and
external carotid arteries were removed following the
standard midline incision without the need to extend or
take an additional incision. The skin flaps were dissected
up to the angles of the jaw and thus it was possible to access
the carotids and their major branches on either side.
Multiple sections of the carotid and coronary arteries were
studied. The sections given were as follows: (i) segments of
right and left CCAs with maximum thickness (with
maximal luminal narrowing), (ii) ) right and left CCA 1 cm
below maximum thickness, (iii) right and left CCA 1 cm
above maximum thickness, (iv) segments of right and left
external carotid arteries with maximum thickness, (v)
segments of right and left internal carotid arteries with
maximum thickness, (vi) right and left carotid bifurcation,
and (vii) segments of right and left coronary arteries at the
level of maximum narrowing.
Detailed gross examination of coronary arteries was
carried out to look for significant luminal narrowing (>40%
of narrowing). Sections were taken from the site of
maximum narrowing. None of the control cases had
significant narrowing.
All 5-micron thick sections of carotid and coronary
arteries were stained by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) as
well as elastic van gieson (EVG) stains. Histological
assessment of every section was done with respect to the
following: (i) Lumen – location of atherosclerotic plaque –
whether eccentric or  concentric, (ii) Percentage of block
in the coronary arteries only, (iii) Occlusion, if present, by
a thrombus, and (iv) IMT measurement with the help of
eyepiece micrometer lens on EVG and H&E sections.
Intima-media thickness is defined as the distance from
the leading edge of the lumen - intima interface of the far
wall
to the leading edge of the media-adventitia interface
of the far wall.
5,6
The definition of IMT of the 
CCA
is not
uniform and it includes two different pathological changes;
a general intima media thickening and a local
atherosclerotic plaque formation.
7
We followed the later
definition of IMT i.e. inclusive of atherosclerotic plaque.
There are no defined terms for carotid IMT in pathology.
We measured carotid IMT from the leading edge of lumen-
intima interface inclusive of the atherosclerotic plaque to
the leading edge of media-adventitia interface (Fig. 1).
Use of the eyepiece reticule: One of the eyepieces
contains a scale called a reticule. Reticules are designed for
the measurement of specific objects in the microscopic field
Fig. 1. Histological section of the carotid artery. Thicker arrow indicates
thickness of muscle layer of the carotid artery. Thinner arrow indicates thickened
intimal atherosclerotic plaque. Intima-media thickness was taken as a total of
both these measurements (H and E, 100×).
(Fig. 2). The reticule can be lined up with the object by
simply turning the eyepiece and moving the specimen on
the stage. The reticule calibration varies with the
magnification used i.e. the objective lens, since the actual
field diameter changes. For example:
1 division at 1000× = 1 µm
1 division at 400× = 2.5 µm
1 division at 100× = 10 µm
1 division at 40× = 25 µm
In the present study the magnification used was 40×.
Hence, 1 division = 25 µm
10 meter = 10
6
µm
1 mm = 10
µm
The present study required measurements of IMT in
mm. Therefore the values obtained, if considered X then, X
× 0.025=Y in mm. Thus, Y is the final value obtained after
its conversion into mm. The plaque measurements by
micrometer were taken only once by a single observer and
hence interobserver and intraobserver variations were not
available.
Statistical analysis: Data are reported as mean ± standard
deviation. The Chi square was used to compare categorical
Fig. 2. Ocular scale used in micrometry.
Ocular scale
IHJ-777-04(OA).p65
11/15/2005, 4:20 PM
320
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
So, feel free to convert them too with our tool. Easy converting! If you want to turn PDF file into image file format in C# application, then RasterEdge
change pdf into jpg; advanced pdf to jpg converter
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Description: Convert all the PDF pages to target format images and output into the directory. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value.
change pdf to jpg format; convert pdf page to jpg
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 319–323
Jashnani et al. . Autopsy Study of Carotid IMT 321
variables. A p value of < 0.05 was accepted as significant.
Pearson’s correlation coefficient was applied for associated
normally distributed variables.
Results
The age range was 45-75 years with 24 patients being in
the age group of 56-65 years. In none of the patients in
study and control groups was B-mode ultrasound carried
out, and therefore no information on correlation between
antemortem and postmortem findings was possible.
Description of various measurements among cases is given
in Table 1. Tables 2-4 show the mean values of internal
carotid artery IMT which are significantly different for the
cases and controls. It also shows the individual CCA IMT
as well as the average of three IMT values in the right and
left CCA. Both show significant difference in the IMT values
in cases and controls. Correlation between right and left
carotid maximum IMT and right and left coronary artery
occlusion percentage was found to be statistically
significant as seen in Table 5.
Discussion
Mean carotid IMT measurement is a valid marker of early
carotid atherosclerosis and is associated with risk factors
of atherosclerotic diseases. All the studies reported in
literature have used B-mode or Doppler studies to measure
carotid IMT. We attempted to study carotid IMT on
histological sections by using a micrometer scale.
The prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis based on the
criteria of Kawamori et al.
8
indicated that IMT above 1.1
mm was found in 1% of non-diabetic subjects and 20% in
diabetic subjects. At any age point, the IMT values of
diabetic subjects were significantly greater than among
non-diabetic subjects.
9,10 
In the present study, there was a
significant difference in the IMT measurements between
the cases (diabetics and hypertensives) and controls. The
cases had IMT values markedly >1.2 mm whereas the
controls showed IMT values ≤ ≤  0.6 mm.
There are various approaches to quantify IMT. One is to
use the mean of various measurements taken at different
segments to get an aggregate of all values of IMT. The
approach that quantifies mean IMT has the advantage of
stability of capturing extent of disease and is representative
of the entire vessel, whereas the second approach that
quantifies maximum thickness focuses on severity of
disease and probably better identifies arterial plaques. Both
approaches are likely to be informative in cross-sectional
studies. Right and left CCAs as well as internal carotid
artery showed significant difference in IMT in cases and
controls in the present study.
One study
11
has shown that the combined CCA and
internal carotid artery IMT measurement correlated more
strongly with the prevalence of cardiovascular disease and
with traditional risk factors than with either variable used
alone. No study has been reported until now regarding the
correlation between carotid artery bifurcation and the
degree of disease in coronary arteries. Hence the predictive
value of carotid artery bifurcation IMT measurements in
predicting CAD is not known. In a study by Kasliwal et al,
12
carotid IMT and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was
compared with CAD wherein carotid artery IMT was
estimated at carotid bifurcation also in addition to common
carotid and internal carotid artery but no predictive cutoff
value at the bifurcation could be derived.
In the present study, a definite significant difference was
found  between the carotid artery bifurcation IMT
measurements in cases and controls. There was also
significant correlation between the carotid artery
bifurcation IMT measurements and the percentage of block
in the coronary arteries.
Study limitations: Our study had certain limitations. Due
to non-availability of B-mode ultrasound findings,
antemortem correlation in cases was not possible. The
sample size was small (n=40) with unequally matched size
of controls (n=10). Wide age range (45-75 years) of study
group is possibly the single most significant factor affecting
Table 1. Mean values of various measurements among
cases
Descriptive statistics
Mean ± SD
Range
(min-max)
Right CCA max, mm
1.35 ± 0.61
0.60-2.80
Right CCA 1 cm below, mm
1.22 ± 0.51
0.58-2.48
Right CCA 1 cm above, mm
1.28 ± 0.44
0.50-2.35
Right ECA, mm
0.80 ± 0.50
0.05-2.75
Right ICA, mm
1.11 ± 0.79
0.18-3.88
Left CCA max, mm
1.47 ± 0.73
0.35-3.25
Left CCA 1 cm below, mm
1.42 ± 0.59
0.28-3.13
Left CCA 1 cm above, mm
1.30 ± 0.63
0.08-2.88
Left ECA, mm
0.81 ± 0.73
0.05-4.25
Left ICA, mm
1.14 ± 0.90
0.33-4.40
Right coronary, mm
1.02 ± 0.43
0.38-2.25
Left coronary, mm
1.12 ± 0.49
0.30-2.17
Right CBI, mm
1.68 ± 0.80
0.18-3.96
Left CBI, mm
2.06 ± 1.05
0.58-4.68
Right carotid average, mm
1.28 ± 0.42
0.80-2.38
Left carotid average, mm
1.47 ± 0.41
0.71-2.20
Right coronary %
59.86 ± 24.55
10.00-90.00
Left coronary %
59.38 ± 21.18
20.00-90.00
min: minimum; max:  maximum; CCA: common carotid artery; ECA:  external carotid
artery; ICA: internal carotid artery; CBI: carotid artery bifurcation
IHJ-777-04(OA).p65
11/15/2005, 4:20 PM
321
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET If you want to turn PDF file into image file
best convert pdf to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter for
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
with specified zoom value and save it into stream The magnification of the original PDF page size Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified resolution and
convert pdf to jpg batch; convert pdf file to jpg
322 Jashnani et al. . Autopsy Study of Carotid IMT
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 319–323
Table 2. Carotid intima-media thickness (in mm) in cases and controls
Group
CBI-Right
CBI-Left
ECA-Right
ECA-Left
ICA-Right
ICA-Left
Cases
Mean±SD
1.68±0.80
2.06±1.05
0.80±0.75
0.81±0.73
1.11±0.79
1.14±0.90
Controls
Mean±SD
1.10±0.66
0.93±0.50
0.28±0.17
0.28±0.17
0.37±0.35
0.43±0.20
Total
Mean±SD
1.56±0.80
1.84±1.06
0.69±0.70
0.71±0.69
0.98±0.78
1.00±0.86
p value
0.041
0.003
0.050
0.052
0.020
0.023
CBI: carotid artery  bifurcation; ECA: external carotid artery; ICA: internal carotid artery
Table 3. Carotid intima-media thickness (in mm) in cases and controls
Right CCA
Right CCA
Right CCA
Left CCA
Left CCA
Left CCA
max
1 cm below
1 cm above
max
1 cm below
1 cm above
Cases
Mean±SD
1.35±0.61
1.22±0.51
1.27±0.44
1.47±0.73
1.42±0.59
1.30±0.63
Controls
Mean±SD
0.62±0.24
0.59±0.20
0.72±0.35
0.69±0.39
0.58±0.29
0.82±0.44
Total
Mean±SD
1.20±0.63
1.09±0.53
1.16±0.48
1.31±0.74
1.25±0.64
1.20±0.63
p value
0.001
0.002
0.001
0.002
0.002
0.027
CCA: common carotid artery; max: maximum
Table 4. Carotid intima-media thickness (in mm) in cases and controls
Right
Left
Right carotid
Left carotid
coronary
coronary
average
average
Cases
Mean±SD
1.02±0.43
1.12±0.49
1.28±0.62
1.47±0.73
Controls
Mean±SD
0.70±0.41
0.75±0.42
0.88±0.11
1.02±0.16
Total
Mean±SD
0.95±0.44
1.04±0.49
1.25±0.42
1.43±0.41
p value
0.039
0.042
0.004
0.006
the carotid IMT. However, most of these patients had risk
factors in the form of diabetes and hypertension and hence,
were included as part of the study. As previously stated,
the interobserver and intraobserver variations are difficult
to predict.
Conclusions: Measurement of common carotid IMT offers
an excellent, quick, reliable and reproducible method of
assessing atherosclerosis. It correlates strongly with CAD,
is increased in diabetics as compared to non-diabetics and
being non-invasive procedure, it can be used for repeat
studies where invasive procedures like angiography may
not be preferred.
The cutoff value for high-risk group for CAD is 1.2±0.4
mm of the CCA IMT. The sensitivity and specificity cannot
Table 5. Univariate analysis of average of carotid max
thickness IMT with right and left coronary artery
occlusion percentage
Correlation
Right
Left
Carotid max
coronary %
coronary %  average
Right coronary % % Pearson's
correlation 1.000
0.840
0.575
p value
0
0.001*
Left coronary %
Pearson's
correlation 0.840
1.000
0.556
p value
0
0.003*
Carotid max
Pearson's
average
Correlation 0.575
0.556
1.000
p value
0.001*
0.003*
*statistically significant; IMT: intima-media thickness; max: maximum
IHJ-777-04(OA).p65
11/15/2005, 4:20 PM
322
JPEG Image Viewer| What is JPEG
is an easy-to-use interface enabling you to quickly convert your JPEG images into other file formats, including Bitmap, Png, Gif, Tiff, PDF, MS-Word
.pdf to jpg; convert multi page pdf to jpg
VB.NET Word: Word to JPEG Image Converter in .NET Application
NET example below on how to convert a local doc "Sample.docx" has been converted into an individual powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change pdf file to jpg online; pdf to jpeg converter
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 319–323
Jashnani et al. . Autopsy Study of Carotid IMT 323
be provided because antemortem B-mode ultrasound
studies on these cases is not available which could have been
a gold standard. In future studies when a correlation is
established between antemortem B-mode ultrasound and
postmortem carotid IMT, answers to such queries can be
provided.
Some studies advocate replacing coronary angiography
by common carotid artery IMT measurements as the sole
diagnostic tool to diagnose CAD.
10
However, present study
shows that common carotid artery IMT measurements can
only have a supportive rather than a primary role. This is
because, firstly it cannot comment about the degree of
narrowing of the coronary arteries and secondly, it cannot
tell us about the status of the collateral circulation of the
coronary arteries.
References
1. Jadhav UM, Kadam NN. Carotid intima-media thickness as an
independent predictor of coronary artery disease. Indian Heart J
2001; 53: 458–462
2. Murthy SV, Venkataramana K. Extra cerebral carotid atherosclerosis-
Doppler evaluation. Indian J Radiol Imag 1998; 8: 19–25
3. Jadhav UM. Non-invasive early prediction of atherosclerosis by
carotid intima media thickness. Asian J Clin Cardiol 2001; 4: 24–28
4. Mitchell JRA, Schwartz CJ. Relationship between arterial disease in
different sites. A study of the aorta and coronary, carotid and iliac
arteries. BMJ 1962; 5288: 1293–1301
5. Pignoli P, Longo T. Evaluation of atherosclerosis with B-mode
ultrasound imaging. J Nucl Med Allied Sci 1988; 32: 166–173
6. Pignoli P, Tremoli E, Poli A, Oreste P, Paoletti R. Intimal plus medial
thickness of the arterial wall: a direct measurement with ultrasound
imaging. Circulation 1986; 76: 1399–1406
7. Ando F, Takekuma K, Niino N, Shimokata H. Ultrasonic evaluation
of common carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) – influence of local
plaque on the relationship between IMT and age. J Epidemiol 2000;
10: S10–S17
8. Kawamori R, Yamasaki Y, Matsushima H, Nishizawa H, Nao K,
Hougaku H, et al. Prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis in diabetic
patients. Ultrasound high resolution B-mode imaging on carotid
arteries. Diabetes Care 1992; 15:1290–1294
9. Mohan V, Deepa R, Kumar RR. Role of carotid intimal-medial
thickness in assessment of pre-clinical atherosclerosis. Indian Heart
J 2000; 52: 395–399
10. Mohan V, Ravikumar R, Shanthirani S, Deepa R. Intimal medial
thickness of the carotid artery in South Indian diabetic and non-
diabetic subjects: the Chennai Urban Population Study (CUPS).
Diabetologia 2000; 43: 494–499
11. Hodis HN, Mack WJ, LaBree L, Selzer RH, Liu CR, Liu CH, et al. The
role of carotid arterial intima-media thickness in predicting clinical
coronary events. Ann Intern Med 1998; 128: 262–269
12. Kasliwal RR, Bansal M, Bhargava K, Gupta H, Tandon S, Agrawal V.
Carotid intima-media thickness and brachial-ankle pulse wave
velocity in patients with and without coronary artery disease. Indian
Heart J 2004; 56: 117–122
IHJ-777-04(OA).p65
11/15/2005, 4:20 PM
323
C# Image: How to Download Image from URL in C# Project with .NET
convert between different image formats or into other formats to byte, and how to convert an image powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
change pdf to jpg format; advanced pdf to jpg converter
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Components to batch convert PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class. If you want to turn PDF file into image file format in VB.NET class, then RasterEdge
best pdf to jpg converter; change from pdf to jpg
324 Rath et al. . Transulnar Coronary Interventions
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 324–326
Coronary Angiogram and Intervention through
Transulnar Approach
Pratap C Rath, Bharat V Purohit, Girish B Navasundi, Sitaram, A Mallikarjun Reddy
Department of Cardiology, Apollo Hospitals, Hyderabad
Original Article
Background: This study was conducted to assess the safety and feasibility of a transulnar approach in
performing diagnostic and interventional percutaneous coronary procedures.
Methods and Results: In the year 2004, a total of 100 patients underwent diagnostic angiography (n=64)
and percutaneous coronary interventions (n=36) through transulnar approach. The patients' age ranged from
40 to 70 years and male to female ratio was 7.3:1. The cases of percutaneous coronary interventions were
mostly elective procedures and emergency intervention was done in only 2 patients.  The procedure was successful
in 95 (95%) patients and unsuccessful in 5 (4 diagnostic and 1 percutaneous coronary intervention).  The
procedure was done through right ulnar artery in all except one patient in whom it was done through left ulnar
artery. The total procedure time ranged between 25 - 45 min.  Among the cases of percutaneous coronary
interventions, single vessel angioplasty was performed in 23 (65.7%) patients, double vessel in 11 (31.4%)
patients and triple vessel in 1 (3%) patient. All percutaneous coronary intervention  patients received aspirin,
clopidogrel and intravenous enoxaparin. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa  inhibitors were used in 7 patients. Complications
such as local hematoma, ulnar artery perforation and reversible parasthesia occurred in one patient each.
Conclusions:  Tansulnar approach is a safe and easy alternative technique to perform diagnostic and therapeutic
coronary interventions. (Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 324–326)
Key Words: Coronary angiography, Angioplasty, Coronary artery disease
Correspondence: Dr. Pratap C Rath, Director Cath Lab and
Interventional Cardiology, Apollo Hospitals, Jubilee Hills, Hyderabad
e-mail: drpcrath@hotmail.com
P
ercutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) are
commonly performed via the femoral route.  Frequent
bleeding and vascular access site complications with this
approach have led to the search for an alternate route.
These complications become more pronounced with use
of aggressive anticoagulant, antiplatelet and fibrinolytic
therapy.
1
Since its first description in 1989, transradial
approach is gaining popularity, because it overcomes many
of these limitations.
2
Transulnar route is another alternative to both
transfemoral and transradial approach. In many patients,
when the transradial cannulation is not feasible due to
anatomical aberration or any other difficulty, the
transulnar approach may be tried.
3
Here we report 100
cases in whom diagnostic and interventional procedures
were done through transulnar approach.
Methods
Applied anatomy: In the forearm, ulnar artery is larger
in caliber than the radial artery.  The ulnar nerve lies on
the  medial side of lower two-third
of the artery and the
palmar cutaneous branch of nerve descends on lower part
of vessel to the palm of the hand.
4
It  crosses  the flexor
retinaculum lateral to ulnar nerve and Pisiform bone.
4
Technique: In all patients the ulnar artery was first
palpated and modified Allen’s test was performed to assess
the patency of radial artery and palmar arch. The test is
performed  by  palpating both radial and ulnar arteries at
the wrist and then patient is asked to repeatedly clench the
fist so as to squeeze the blood out.  Then the radial artery
compression is released.  The test is considered normal if
hand color returned to normal within 10 s.
5
Then the wrist,
was hyper-extended by keeping a  gauze roll below the wrist
and fixed.  Then local anesthesia with 2.5 ml of 2%
lignocaine was administered and 20 G Jelco
TM 
needle-
mounted intravenous catheter (Johnson & Johnson) was
used to puncture and cannulate  the ulnar artery which
IHJ-837-05.p65
11/15/2005, 4:22 PM
324
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Support various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif Insert images into PDF form field in VB.NET. to provide users the most individualized PDF page image
conversion of pdf to jpg; changing pdf to jpg
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
View, Convert, Edit, Sign Documents and Images. By integrating this mature .NET SDK into your ASP.NET PowerPoint: PPT, PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document
convert pdf into jpg; batch pdf to jpg
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 324–326
Rath et al. . Transulnar Coronary Interventions 325
lies  just proximal and  lateral to Pisiform bone (Fig. 1A).
Care was taken to avoid injury to ulnar nerve which lay on
the medial aspect and parallel  to the artery.  Once free flow
was seen (Fig. 1B), the 0.014” percutaneous transluminal
coronary angioplasty (PTCA) wire was introduced (Fig. 1C).
Then skin incision was made for sheath insertion and a
radial  sheath (Cordis, Miami, FL) was inserted over this
PTCA wire. After this, a cocktail consisting of 200 µg of
nitroglycerine, 5 mg diltiazem and 2500 IU of
unfractionated heparin was given intra arterially.
Subsequently we gave intravenous enoxaparin 1 mg/kg
alone or 0.75 mg/kg + intravenous glycoprotein (Gp) IIb/
IIIa inhibitor to maintain anticoagulation during PCI. Same
PTCA wire or a 0.035” Terumo wire was used to reach
ascending aorta and procedure was completed (Fig. 1D).
Results
In the year 2004, 100 patients were taken up for coronary
angiography or intervention via transulnar approach.  The
baseline  characteristics of the patient are given  in Table 1.
Fig. 1. . A. Site for ulnar access ( just lateral to pisiform bone). B. Ulnar access
using 20 G JelcoTM intravenous catheter. C. Introducing 0.014" wire through
20 G JelcoTM intravenous catheter for sheath insertion. D.Negotiating 0.014"
wire to ascendig aorta.
Table 1. Patient characterstics  (n=100)
Male
88
Female
12
Age range (years)
40-73
Diabetes mellitus
36
Hypertension
40
Smoking
58
Dyslipidemia
52
Table 2. Details of interventional procedures
Indication
Recent MI
:
16
Unstable angina
:
6
Stable angina
:
12
Primary PCI
:
2
No. of vessel angioplastied
Single vessel disease
:
23
Double vessel disease
:
11
Triple vessel disease
:
1
Vessels treated
Left anterior descending
:
23
Left circumflex
:
12
Right coronary artery
:
11
Ramus intermedius
:
2
Anti-platelet/Anti-coagulant used
Aspirin and clopidogrel
:
All
Enoxaparin
:
All
Gp IIb / IIIa  inhibitor (eptifibatide)
:
7
MI: myocardial infarction; PCI: percutaneous coronary intervention;
Gp: glycoprotein
Out of 100 transulnar cases, 64 were for diagnostic
coronary angiography and 36 underwent PCI procedures.
Right  ulnar artery was used in 99 cases whereas left ulnar
was used in one case. In 5 cases, the procedure was
unsuccessful (4 during diagnostic and 1 during PCI), and
was completed via femoral approach.  The reason was
inability to puncture in 3 patients, and inability to negotiate
guidewire due to stenosis at origin of ulnar artery  in one
patient and due to spasm in another case.  The ulnar artery
was cannulated within 3 attempts. In majority of cases
(80%) we used a 6 F sheath. All the PCI cases were
performed via a 6 F sheath. The procedure time for
performing PCI ranged from 25-45 min.
Details of intervention procedure are given in Table 2.
PCI was performed in 35 out of 36 cases attempted.  In one
patient it was unsuccessful due to failure to puncture.
Majority of cases were  of  single vessel angioplasty  (65.7%),
two-vessel angioplasty in 31.4% and three-vessel angioplasty
in one patient. The procedure was elective in 34 patients and
emergency in 2 patients (primary PCI). In all patients, aspirin
and clopidogrel were used as antiplatelet agents and
IHJ-837-05.p65
11/15/2005, 4:22 PM
325
326 Rath et al. . Transulnar Coronary Interventions
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 324–326
intravenous enoxaparin was used as anticoagulant during
PCI. Gp IIb/IIIa inhibitor  (eptifibatide) was used in 7 patients.
Complications encountered  related to transulnar
approach are very uncommon. Only one patient developed
hematoma, one patient had ulnar artery  perforation (due
to diffuse atherosclerotic changes and tortuous vessel),  one
patient  developed transient reversible paraesthesia. There
were no cases of pseudoaneurysm or arteriovenous fistula
formation.
Discussion
Transfemoral route for coronary angiography and angio-
plasty is still the preferred approach among interventional
cardiologist; the reason being its large caliber and operator
experience.  This approach carries with it the inherent risk
of complications like pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous
fistula, retroperitoneal bleed etc. Kiemeneij et al.
5
compared
PCI from various routes and found 2% incidence of major
bleeding via femoral route. To overcome these
complications transradial approach started gaining
popularity.  However, some limitations also exist with this
approach. In a study by Yokoyama et al.
anatomic
variations in radial artery was found in 9.6% of patients
with failure to cannulate in 3.5%.
5
In another study,
inability to hook coronary artery via transradial route was
reported in 7% patients.
5
Success of transradial approach
depends on positive Allen’s test. Benit et al.
7
found that out
of 1000 patients, only 73% had normal modified Allen’s
test.
Recently a few studies have reported the feasibility of
performing coronary angiography
8
and angioplasty
3,9
using ulnar artery approach. In the study by Limbruno et
al.
9
where primary PCI was performed via ulnar approach,
the ulnar access was obtained in 10/13 patients. Only 2
patients developed subcutaneous hemorrhage of forearm,
and none developed pseudoaneurysm,  arteriovenous
fistula or thrombus. Terashima  et al.
8
studied 9 patients
who underwent coronary angiography and no patient had
bleeding, loss of ulnar pulse, ulnar nerve injury or
pseudoaneurysm. Proximity of ulnar nerve and palmar
cutaneous branch make it a matter of concern. We did not
experience such complication. The exact extent of nerve
injury can only be assessed after widespread use of this
procedure is reported.
The ulnar artery is usually larger than the radial
artery.
3,10
This make it less spasm-prone and easily
accessible with fewer complications.
In our report also the transulnar approach was used
successfully to perform both diagnostic and interventional
procedures. The success rate was 95%. Subcutaneous
hematoma, ulnar artery perforation, reversible
paraesthesia occurred in one patient each.
The variation adopted by us i.e. use of 20 G Jelco
TM
needle-mounted intravenous catheter for puncture and  use
of 0.014" PTCA wire for introduction of sheath improved
the success rate of this procedure. This also leads to less
spasm of artery.
Conclusions:  Use of ulnar artery in the current era of
interventional cardiology opens another alternate route to
heart and coronary arteries.  The procedure is simple and
technically feasible with fewer complications. The
modifications used by us can lead to increased success rate
of cannulation and reduce the incidence of spasm so that
more catheters can be exchanged.  This approach also leads
to sparing of the radial artery which can be used as a
conduit in subsequent revascularization procedures.
Thus, transulnar approach is a safe and useful
alternative approach for performing routine  diagnostic and
interventional coronary procedures.
References
1. Juran NB. Minimizing bleeding complications of percutaneous
coronary intervention and glycoprotein IIb- IIIa antiplatelet therapy.
Am Heart J 1999; 138: 297–306
2. Campeau L. Percutaneous radial artery approach for coronary
angiography.  Cathet Cardiovasc Diagn 1989; 16: 3–7
3.  Dashkoff N, Dashkoff PB, Zizzi JA Sr, Wadhwani J, Zizzi JA Jr. Ulnar
artery cannulation for coronary angiography and percutaneous
coronary intervention: case reports and anatomic considerations.
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv 2002; 55: 93–96
4. Giorgio Gabella. Cardiovascular, In: Peter L Williams (eds), Gray’s
Anatomy. 38th ed. New York: Churchill Livingstone; 1995 pp, 1451–
1626
5. Kiemeneij F, Laarman GJ, Odekerken D, Slagboom T, van der Wieken
R. A randomized comparison of percutaneous transluminal
coronary angioplasty by the radial, brachial and femoral approaches:
the ACCESS study. J Am Coll Cardiol 1997; 29: 1269–1275
6. Yokoyama N, Takeshita S, Ochiai M, Koyama Y, Hoshino S, Isshiki T,
et al. Anatomic variations of the radial artery in patients undergoing
transradial coronary intervention. Catheter Cardiovasc Interv 2000;
49: 357–362
7. Benit E, Vranckx P, Jaspers L, Jackmaert R, Poelmans C, Coninx R.
Frequency of a positive modified Allen’s test in 1,000 consecutive
patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. Cathet Cardiovasc Diagn
1996; 38: 352–354
8. Terashima M, Meguru T, Takeda H, Endoh N, Ito Y, Mitsuoka M, et
al. Percutaneous ulnar artery approach for coronary angiography:
a preliminary report in nine patients. Catheter Cardiovasc Interv 2001;
53: 410–414
9. Limbruno U, Rossini R, De Carlo M, Amoroso G, Ciabatti N, Petronio
AS,  et al. Percutaneous ulnar artery approach for primary coronary
angioplasty: safety and feasibility. Catheter Cardivasc Interv 2004; 61:
56-59
10. Vogelzang RL. Arteriography of the hand and wrist, Hand Clin 1991;
7: 63-86
IHJ-837-05.p65
11/15/2005, 4:22 PM
326
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 327–331
Jeyaraj et al. . Fish Oil Supplementation in Hypercholesterolemic Subjects 327
Effect of Combined Supplementation of Fish Oil
with Garlic Pearls on the Serum Lipid Profile  in
Hypercholesterolemic Subjects
Sheba Jeyaraj,  Gomathy Shivaji,  SD Jeyaraj,  A Vengatesan
Department of Home Science, Women’s Christian College; Department of Cardiology, Govt General Hospital; and Clinical
Epidemiology Unit, Stanley Medical College, Chennai
Original Article
Background: Elevated total cholesterol, especially low-density lipoprotein  has been documented as the leading
risk factor for the coronary artery disease among Indians. Studies with fish oil supplementation alone have
shown an increase in low-density lipoprotein, thereby enhancing the risk associated with incidence of coronary
artery disease in hypercholesterolemic  subjects.  In view of this, the effect of a combined supplementation of
fish oil  with garlic pearls on the serum lipid profile of hypercholesterolemic subjects was studied.
Methods and Results:  We  administered 600 mg of fish oil with 500 mg of garlic pearls (garlic oil)  per day to
16 hypercholesterolemic subjects (age range: 30-60 years)  with a total cholesterol  above 220 mg/dl for 60
days. The effect of this combined supplementation was compared with that of a control group (16 hyper-
cholesterolemic  subjects) without any supplementation. The baseline body height and weight of all the subjects
were recorded. Significant reductions were seen in all the lipid parameters (except high-density lipoprotein
which was increased)  in the test group after  60 days compared to that of the control group. The total cholesterol,
low-density lipoprotein, serum triglyceride, very low-density lipoprotein, and the total cholesterol: high-density
lipoprotein ratio reduced by 20%, 21%, 37%, 36.7%, and 23.4%, respectively,  and the high-density lipoprotein
increased by 5.1% after 60 days of supplementation.
Conclusions: The co-administration of garlic pearls with fish oil was found to be more effective than placebo in
the management of dyslipidemia. (Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 327–331)
Key Words: Coronary artery disease, Hypercholesterolemia, Fish oil
Correspondence: Dr Sheba Jeyaraj, ‘Madhuban’, 25, Ritherdon Road
Vepery, Chennai 600007, e-mail: sangeethajeyaraj@hotmail.com
C
oronary artery disease  (CAD) is the leading cause of
death in developed countries and is emerging as a major
cause of death even in developing countries.
1
Many
developing countries including India, face a major
challenge of adult morbidity and mortality due to non-
communicable diseases especially cardiovascular diseases
like CAD and hypertension.
2
Since a number of studies have revealed the central role
of elevated blood cholesterol [especially increased low-
density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol] in the pathogenesis
of CAD, it is clear that one of the biggest challenges facing
public health authorities and medical practitioners is the
control of blood cholesterol in individual patients and at
the population level.
3,4
Studies with fish oil supplementation [n-3 fatty acid
containing eicosapentenoic acid (EPA) and docosa-
hexenoic acid (DHA)] in hypercholesterolemic subjects have
shown significant reductions in the serum triglyceride and
very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) concentrations,
whereas there was a significant  increase in the serum LDL
concentration which plays a major role in the development
of atherosclerotic CAD.
5,6
Griffin
7
has reported that n-3 fatty
acids shift LDL away from harmful small dense particles to
larger, lighter less pathogenic ones.
The Framingham Heart
Study and the 4S study have reported that triglyceride levels
>100 mg/dl and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-
c) levels < 40 mg/dl are indicators of the presence of
harmful small dense LDL-c particles.
8
Fish oils have been
used in the Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della
Supravvivenza nell’Infarto Miocardico (GISSI) trial
involving survivors of myocardial infarction. After 3.5
IHJ-843-05.p65
11/15/2005, 4:22 PM
327
328 Jeyaraj et al. . Fish Oil Supplementation in Hypercholesterolemic Subjects
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 327–331
years of follow-up, the group that received fish oil had a
20% reduction in total mortality, a 30% reduction in
cardiovascular death and 45 % decrease in sudden death.
9
Garlic (or allium sativum) has been used as both food
and medicine in many parts of the world.
10
Garlic contains
an active substance called ‘allicin’ and sulphur compounds
like diallyl disulphide and allyl propyl disulphide which are
responsible for the therapeutic properties of garlic.
11,12
In order to provide a more complete management of
dyslipidemia with fish oil, it may be beneficial to use an
additional nutritional supplement to simultaneously lower
LDL concentrations. Supplementation with garlic alone has
been found to significantly lower LDL and total cholesterol
(TC) concentrations.
10,11
The purpose of this study was to determine whether fish
oil, when given in combination with garlic pearls  could
provide an effective and  well  tolerated  nutritional  regimen
for controlling dyslipidemia  which is a well established
major risk factor  for CAD.
Methods
The study was designed to investigate the effect of a
combined supplementation of fish oil capsule (Omega-3)
containing n-3 fatty acids (eicosapentenoic and docosa-
hexaenoic acid in the ratio 180:120 mg, respectively) with
garlic pearls containing 0.25% of pure garlic oil on the
serum lipid profile of hypercholesterolemic subjects. It was
a pre-test/post-test experimental design with a control
group without any supplementation.
The subjects were selected based on a simple random
sampling technique. The hypercholesterolemic subjects in
the age group of 30-60 years  with a serum TC level above
220 mg/dl registered as outpatients in the Institute of
Cardiology, Chennai (which is the apex tertiary care and
referral centre in public sector for Tamilnadu state), were
included in the study. The sample size was 32
hypercholesterolemic subjects and they were equally
divided into two groups (control and test) of 16 subjects in
each group. The test group consisted of 10 male and 6
female subjects, whereas in the control group there was an
equal distribution of male and female subjects.
Supplementation of fish oil with garlic  pearls was given to
the test group, whereas the control group did not receive
any supplementation. The study was unblinded and was
carried out for a period of 60 days.
An interview schedule was used to elicit personal and
dietary information / habits of the subjects. The serum lipid
profile comprising of serum TC, LDL-c, HDL-c, VLDL-c,
triglyceride and TC-HDL ratio was analyzed on the day 1
and   after 60 days of the study period.
The subjects were asked to consume two garlic pearls
and two fish oil capsules daily i.e. one of each after lunch
and dinner, respectively. Each gelatin capsule of garlic pearl
was of 250 mg and each fish oil capsule was 300 mg. At
the end of the study period, diet counseling was given to all
the subjects.
Statistical analysis: Demographic and baseline clinical
characteristics were summarized as mean±SD for
continuous variables and as a percentage of  the  group for
categorized  or dichotomous variables. Paired t test and
independent t test were performed to assess  the  changes
in lipid parameters  in both  the groups. Pearson’s Chi-
square test was used for the categorical variables
comparison.   Karl  Pearson’s co-efficient of correlation  was
performed between the LDL and  TC levels and  between
the serum triglyceride and VLDL levels. p-value of < 0.05
was considered statistically significant.
Results
Demographic and clinical profile (Table 1):  The mean
age  of the subjects in the control group was 43.5±9.0
years, while in the test group it was  46.1±6.9 years. The
mean height of the subjects in the control group was
Table 1.  Demographic profile of the subjects
Test group
Control  group
Characteristics
(n=16)
(n=16)
Age (years)
46.1±6.9
43.5±9.0
Height (cm)
155.7± 4.3
157.9±2.1
Weight (kg)
57.3 ±8.8
57.0±6.3
Gender
Male
10 (62.5%)
8 (50%)
Female
6 (37.5%)
8 (50%)
Occupation
Sedentary
10 (62.5%)
12 (75%)
Moderate
6 (37.5%)
4 (25%)
Income
Very low
4 (25%)
8 (50%)
Low                                             10 (62.5%)
4 (25%)
Middle
2 (12.5%)
4 (25%)
Habits
Smoking (men)
6 (60%)
8 (50%)
Alcohol   (men)
2 (20%)
4 (50%)
Physical exercise
2 (12.5%)
1 (6.25%)
Family history
CAD
2 (12.5%)
4 (25%)
Diabetes
6 (37.5%)
8 (50%)
Hypercholesterolemia
2 (12.5%)
2 (12.5%)
Diet history /type of cooking oil
Vegetarian
4 (25%)
6 (37.5%)
Palm oil
12 (75%)
10 (62.5%)
Groundnut oil
4 (25%)
4  (25%)
Gingelly oil
-
2 (12.5%)
CAD: coronary artery disease
IHJ-843-05.p65
11/15/2005, 4:22 PM
328
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested