Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 355–359
Bahl et al. . Current Opinions on Usage and Regulation of Drug-Eluting Stents 359
and ostial lesions. Low incidence of stent thrombosis (0.7%)
and in-stent restenosis (1.5%) was observed in the study.
Hence the authors concluded that approved indications of
DES need updating.
There was difference of opinion whether the decision
regarding lesion location and type of stent should be left to
the discretion of treating physicians. Majority felt that if a
patient can afford through private means, DES might be
put for all lesions.
A clear majority of cardiologists felt that a regulatory
body be set up in India to decide whether a DES should be
permitted for general use. The next most favored choice was
allowing DES that are approved by international agencies
such as FDA or European CE mark agency. Large majority
felt that patients who cannot afford internationally
approved DES can be given other non-FDA/CE-approved
DES after obtaining informed consent. Majority of
cardiologists also expressed concern regarding high cost if
only internationally approved DES are permitted to be used
in India. Most cardiologists thought that sirolimus-eluting
stents were better than paclitaxel eluting stents for Indian
patients.
Large majority of cardiologists opined that a committee
could be formed in India for approving DES. Cardiological
Society of India was chosen by most for this purpose.
Hospital ethics committees also received favorable response
from cardiologists.
To conclude, our survey has revealed contemporary
opinion of Indian cardiologists on important issues
regarding usage of drug-eluting stents in India. These data
will be helpful in developing guidelines and formulating
future strategies to assist widespread use of this important
modality of treatment.
Acknowledgements
We thank all participant cardiologists for their help and
support.
References
1. Sousa JE, Costa MA, Abizaid A, Feres F, Seixas A, Tanajura LF, et al.
Four-year angiographic and intravascular ultrasound follow-up of
patients treated with sirolimus-eluting stents. Circulation 2005; 111:
2326–2329
2. Fajadet J, Morice MC, Bode C, Barragan P, Serruys PW, Wijns W, et
al. Maintenance of long-term clinical benefit with sirolimus-eluting
coronary stents: three-year results of the RAVEL trial. Circulation
2005; 111: 1040–1044
3. Babapulle MN, Joseph L, Belisle P, Brophy JM, Eisenberg MJ. A
hierarchical Bayesian meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials of
drug-eluting stents. Lancet 2004; 364: 583–591
4. Kaiser C, Brunner-La Rocca HP, Buser PT, Bonetti PO, Osswald S,
Linka A, et al. Incremental cost-effectiveness of drug-eluting stents
compared with a third-generation bare-metal stent in a real-world
setting: randomized Basel Stent Kosten Effektivitats Trial (BASKET).
Lancet 2005; 366: 921–929
5. Jurisdictional update: drug-eluting stents. 5th Mar 2003. http://
www.fda.gov/oc/combination/stents.html
6. FDA Approves Drug-Eluting Stent for Clogged Heart Arteries, 24th
April 2003. http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/NEWS/2003/
NEW00896.html
7. Muni NI, Gross TP. Problems with drug-eluting coronary stents –
the FDA perspective. N Engl J Med 2004; 351: 1593–1595
8. Hodgson JM. Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and
Interventions. The Survey. Catheter Cardiovasc Interv 2004; 61:
431–33
9. Drug-eluting stents adopted quickly, with early disparities. http://
dukemednews.duke.edu/news/article.php?id=8253
10. Zahn R, Hamm CW, Zeymer U, Schneider S, Nienaber CA, Richardt
G, et al. deutsche Cyper-Register. [Safety and current indications
during “real life” use of sirolimus-eluting coronary stents in
Germany. Results from the prospective multicenter German Cypher
Registry]. Herz 2004; 29: 181–186
11. Cohen DJ, Bakhai A, Shi C, Githiora L, Lavelle T, berezin RH, et al.
SIRIUS Investigators. Cost-effectiveness of sirolimus-eluting stents
for treatment of complex coronary stenoses: results from the
Sirolimus-Eluting Balloon Expandable Stent in the Treatment of
Patients With De Novo Native Coronary Artery Lesions (SIRIUS) trial.
Circulation 2004; 110: 508–514
12. Stone GW, Ellis SG, Cannon L, MannJT, Greenberg JD, Spriggs D, et
al. TAXUS V Investigators. Comparison of a polymer-based paclitaxel-
eluting stent with a bare metal stent in patients with complex
coronary artery disease: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA 2005;
294: 1215–1223
13. Hospital resports 54% of drug-eluting stents used off-label. http:/
www.tctmd.com
Current Perspective.p65
11/15/2005, 4:17 PM
359
Change pdf to jpg image - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert multiple pdf to jpg online; bulk pdf to jpg
Change pdf to jpg image - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
change pdf to jpg file; changing pdf to jpg on
360 Hayes et al. . Depression and Ischemic Heart Disease
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 360–363
Depression in Heart Disease – A Plea for Help!
Emily Hayes,  Paulette Mehta, Jawahar L Mehta
Departments of Internal Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine), Physiology and Biophysics, University of
Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Medicine, USA
Point of View
Correspondence: Dr JL Mehta, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham, Mail Slot
532, Little Rock, AR 72205-7199. e-mail: mehtajl@uams.edu
“L
aughter is the best medicine.” This proverb may have
a far greater bearing on contemporary medicine
than many are willing to recognize.
The history of medicine has been marked by a symbiotic
link between mental and physical health. However, the
development of modern medicine with its reliance on
technology and statistics has diverted physicians’ attention
from the link between mental health and physical
wellbeing. It is for this reason that impaired mental health
may be a greater public health concern than has been
generally recognized, particularly with regard to ischemic
heart disease (IHD).
Depression and Ischemic Heart Disease
Although it is not unusual to have a depressed state of mind
accompanying a myocardial infarction (MI) or coronary
artery bypass surgery (CABG), a persistent state of
depression has been identified as a strong and independent
risk factor for mortality, recurrent cardiac events, and lower
functional status in patients with MI, unstable angina, and
congestive heart failure (CHF).
1
Studies have shown that
patients with IHD are far less likely to recover from their
illness if they have a history of depression or experience
depression before, during, or after hospitalization than
patients without a history of depression.
2
Similarly,
hopelessness after MI is an independent predictor of patient
outcome after adjustment for left ventricular (LV) function
and extent of coronary artery disease (CAD),
3
implying that
while there is hope, there is life. Another study showed that
the number of support individuals in a patient’s
environment has a strong bearing on outcome after MI,
suggesting a feeling of isolation, an index of depression, as
a prognostic indicator.
4
Emotional stress often precedes the evolution of MI. In
one study, more than half of 224 patients reported being
stressed or “upset” in the 24 hours before MI.
5
The
Secondary Prevention Reinfarction Israeli Nifedipine  Trial
(SPRINT) involving 1818 patients found that the most
common triggers of MI were heavy physical work, quarrels
at work or home, and mental stress.
6
Related studies show
that the risk of MI increases within hours of an earthquake,
exciting sports events, or high-pressure deadlines at work.
7
The INTERHEART study, which involved subjects from 52
countries and a study population of 29,972 patients
targeting risk factors associated with the development of
first MI showed stress to increase the likelihood of heart
attack by 167%, a rate comparable with cigarette smoking
and greater than diabetes, hypertension, or obesity.
8
The most proximate cause of acute coronary syndrome
is rupture of the soft atherosclerotic plaque,
9
and it is not
inconceivable that the hemodynamic burden of mental and
emotional stress resulting in hemodynamic instability is
one of the underlying factors in plaque rupture. Emotional
imbalance is associated with release of catecholamines,
serotonin and other platelet aggregants, and it is possible
that a prothrombotic state is triggered by unsteady
emotional state.
Cultural Aspects of Depression
Depression is widespread across cultures although the ways
of defining depression vary depending on gender,
socioeconomic status and cultural factors. When
understood as the absence of stress, there may well be an
inverse correlation between wealth and happiness. A study
of 65 countries showed Nigeria and Bangladesh to be the
“happiest” countries in the world; people of these countries
lack everyday anxiety which characterizes the lives of
people in the Western society.
10
Although this study was
well publicized, it received criticism for its generalizing
manner and colonialist overtone. Nevertheless, the study
found that once basic needs are met, people with less
material wealth have less anxiety and depression. In 2003,
the Health Survey for England used the General Health
Questionnaire (GHQ12) to assess levels of depression,
anxiety, sleep disturbance and happiness in the population.  
A GHQ12 score of 4 or more - a ‘high GHQ12 score’ -
indicates a high level of psychological distress. The Health
Survey for England indicated no clear relationship between
GHQ12 scores and social class but an inverse relationship
between GHQ12 scores and income; people with low
IHJ-876-05 Point of View.p65
11/15/2005, 4:25 PM
360
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
try out some settings and then create the PDF files with the button at the bottom. The perfect conversion tool. JPG is the most widely used image format, but we
change pdf file to jpg; convert pdf into jpg online
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
JPG is the most common image format on the internet. The outputs of our conversion service are always JPG files to even if pictures are saved in a PDF in other
change pdf file to jpg file; c# convert pdf to jpg
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 360–363
Hayes et al. . Depression and Ischemic Heart Disease 361
incomes tended to have higher GHQ12 score.
11
The same survey also found that GHQ12 scores varied
by ethnicity. Chinese men and women were less likely to
have a high GHQ12 score – only 3% of men and 7% women
compared to 15% men and 19% of women in the general
population. The highest GHQ12 scores (hence the highest
levels of psychological distress) were found in the
Bangladeshi followed by the Pakistani communities; around
one in three Bangladeshi adults (28% men and 30%
women) was found to have a high GHQ12 score. Black
Caribbean and Indian women were also more likely to have
a high GHQ12 score.
However, the relationship between income and overall
mental state of health is not absolute. Beyond a certain level
of income, the stress may not decline. The overall state of
mind may be determined by a number of societal, economic,
cultural and gender-based factors.
One of the authors of this review article has treated
many patients of Indian origin in the US who generally
have high paying jobs and comfortable lifestyles and thus
ought to be satisfied and happy, yet have a high incidence
of triggers of IHD. The author saw a University professor
as a patient who exemplifies this phenomenon. The patient
was extremely agitated and distracted because his
successful 32-year-old daughter was still unmarried. He
presented with palpitations and non-specific chest pain
syndrome; he was given usual medical therapy and advised
“social support” by surrounding himself with family
members and friends. A few weeks later his daughter
announced her engagement, leading to a remarkable relief
of his symptoms. After a few months of extensive wedding
planning, complete with his wife’s trip to India to purchase
dowry items of over $50,000, the engaged couple called
off the wedding. The cancellation of the wedding caused
the patient to develop acute coronary syndrome. The
humiliation, anger, and sadness he experienced coupled
with the emotional isolation translated into a physical
response of very high blood pressure, tachycardia and
unstable blood sugar. This case illustrates the way in which
emotional experience take a large toll on the human body.
Indeed emotional stress can worsen pre-existing sub-
clinical disease.
Depression and Gender
Often, admission of an emotional problem such as
depression carries a stigma, particularly in the Eastern and
South American societies, more so in men as it degrades
their macho image. Great strides have been made in this
direction, but more must be done on the part of both health
care providers and patients to understand
"neurocardiology," the intrinsic link between physical and
mental health. Depression occurs in both sexes, yet like the
majority of studies, most studies on IHD and its relation to
stress and depression have also included predominantly
males. The low number of women in these studies most
likely reflects a lack of recognition of IHD in women. The
connection between cardiovascular disease and depression
is quite evident in studies that target women. Rozanski et
al.
12
found that women who were subjected to
maltreatment in childhood, a cause of depression and low
self-esteem in adolescence and adulthood, had a higher
likelihood of experiencing both depression and
cardiovascular disease.
Men are generally considered less prone to depression
than women, and therefore possibly less vulnerable to the
risk of depression. Mallik et al.
1
found that after CABG,
depressive symptoms were greater and the negative effects
more damaging in women than in men, a finding which
suggests greater vulnerability of women toward depression,
as well as toward the negative effects of depression on the
cardiovascular system. There is a growing body of literature
which contends that men are as affected by depression as
females. Male depression has been illustrated by Real.
13
Male depression is closely connected to stress and is
characterized by lack of intimate relationships, alcoholism
and drug abuse, workaholism, abusive behavior, and
excessive anger in the form of rage. These behaviors are
“manly” when compared to the current feminized view of
symptomatic depression. Men can be understood as
exhibiting their emotions as behaviors, while women’s
depression is generally displayed in more stereotypically
emotional ways. There is no compelling evidence to suggest
that depression is more prevalent in women than in men.
Lack of Recognition of Depression as a
Manifestation of IHD
Biddinger et al.
14
described the case of a 53-year-old man
with depression and sudden shortness of breath. After
losing his job 9 days ago, this man arrived at the emergency
room for psychiatric evaluation and treatment of his
depression. During the previous 9 days he had experienced
an uncharacteristic decrease in energy and appetite,
inability to concentrate, insomnia, and an inability to get
out of bed. The patient was found to have major depressive
disorder by the psychiatry service and admission into a
psychiatric care facility after medical clearance was
planned. The granting of medical clearance may be difficult
in a situation such as this when the episode of depression
IHJ-876-05 Point of View.p65
11/15/2005, 4:25 PM
361
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion.
convert pdf to jpeg on; pdf to jpg converter
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. C:\input.tif"; String outputDirectory = @"C:\output\"; // Convert tiff to jpg and show How to change Tiff image to Bmp image in your C#
.pdf to jpg converter online; batch convert pdf to jpg
362 Hayes et al. . Depression and Ischemic Heart Disease
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 360–363
is an interconnected element of the medical condition.
Clinical examination showed this patient to have
leukocytosis and anemia, and the transition of his care to
psychiatric service was delayed until his medical condition
improved. In the meanwhile, the patient was found to have
severe CAD and underwent CABG, but died after a month
of hospitalization. This case presented two common
challenges that a cardiologist is faced with: the request for
medical clearance of a patient with psychiatric symptoms
and the need to simultaneously treat and determine the
cause of acute, severe shortness of breath. This patient died
of cardiovascular disease, although it was the depressed
state that had initially brought him to the Emergency Room.
The case of this patient is a prime example of the conflict a
doctor faces when treating non-specific symptoms, IHD and
psychological issues.
Impact of Exercise on Psychological Health in
Patients with Heart Disease
An effective, but underutilized method to improve physical
health and quality of life after MI,
15
heart failure
16
or heart
transplantation is exercise.
17
Its efficacy ranges from lifting
one’s mood, increasing self-efficacy all the way to “runner’s
high”, and these effects are mediated through endorphins,
the naturally occurring morphine-like molecules. Low-
intensity aerobic exercise is as effective as high-intensity
aerobic exercise; flexibility and strength training add to the
benefits of aerobic exercise. Exercise also greatly increases
overall conditioning and greatly decreases the number of
cardiac events after MI, both through direct and indirect
actions. New methods of using Eastern-style exercise to
integrate the body, mind and soul may be even more
effective than exercise, although this has not been proven
yet.
18
Patients should be encouraged to try exercise as an
antidote to depression before starting on antidepressants,
which can take months before they work and which have
many side effects.
Treatment Challenges
Physicians face mumerous difficulties when treating
patients with depression and IHD. These patients are likely
not to adhere to their prescribed medications, adopt lifestyle
recommendations, and receive follow-up cardiac
rehabilitation, behaviors that reflect their hopelessness
regarding their situation and, more specifically, their
learned helplessness. Learned helplessness is the condition
that depressed individuals often adopt when they view
themselves as incapable of affecting their environment.
With a lack of control over their lives, they stop trying
to improve their own condition. Apathy and passivity
are characteristics of learned helplessness as well as
depression.
19
As mentioned earlier, the number of family members
perceived by the patient as support strongly correlates with
patient outcome.
4
Patients who feel the love and
encouragement of family and friends are far more hopeful
regarding their condition, look forward to recuperating
easily, and are able to return to a stable condition more
quickly than others. Wei and Levkoff
20
stress the
importance of a nurturing environment for the patient with
acute MI. The same could be said for patients undergoing
CABG or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).
Unfortunately, one cannot prescribe social support or the
care of family members, but the physicians and other health
care providers should recognize the need for social support
as part of the care of the patient.
Rozanski et al.
12
studied the emerging field of behavioral
cardiology, a field based on the understanding of the
psychosocial and behavioral risk factors for CAD, and stated
that these risk factors are not only interrelated, but
require a health care system which does not ignore these
factors. Of particular interest, they indicated that
depression can promote the onset of disease in apparently
healthy individuals or worsen the disease in patients with
pre-existing CAD. They offer simple strategies for the
incorporation of adequate mental health care into cardio-
vascular care, and recommend exercise for psychological
distress, nutrition, stress management, social support, and
providing direct information in regard to health inquiries.
Although not emotionally geared, these recommendations
allow the physician to reach the patient on a personal level
through his or her area of expertise.
Greer et al.
21
found that physicians in general identify
and diagnose only about 50% of patients with mental
illness. Although their study neither singled out depression
nor dealt specifically with cardiologists, it is an excellent
example of the physicians' lacunae in diagnosing and
treating depression. Interestingly, primary care physicians,
particularly family physicians, are more likely to diagnose
depression in their patients and offer treatment options,
including counseling and, at a lesser rate, anti-depressants.
On the other hand, sub-specialists and internists are more
likely to offer medication and are more eager to perform
procedures. The salutary effect of providing psychosocial
support cannot be overstated. Cousins
22
emphasized the
importance of caring in outcomes of patients with hyper-
tension and other cardiovascular diseases.
The large body
of data actually suggests that “belief affects biology”.
IHJ-876-05 Point of View.p65
11/15/2005, 4:25 PM
362
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
convert multiple page pdf to jpg; reader convert pdf to jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap programming sample code to convert PDF file to Png image. Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET
change format from pdf to jpg; best way to convert pdf to jpg
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 360–363
Hayes et al. . Depression and Ischemic Heart Disease 363
In this age of rising exorbitant health care costs attention
given to the risk of depression is not a secondary indulgence,
but may be an economic necessity. Lown
23
stressed the
need for a return to personal attention and empathy
toward patients in order to reverse the damaging trend in
medicine, as health care has grown into a multi-billion
dollar industry. Unfortunately, most cardiologists are not
trained to recognize the interconnection of IHD and
psychosocial factors, and are not comfortable with
management of lifestyle behaviors and emotional disorders.
Further, the insurance industry is unlikely to pay for an
hour of counseling, but quite willing to reimburse
thousands of dollars (or rupees) for technical procedures.
Unfortunately, all the advanced technology in the world
cannot act as a substitute for the compassion and attention
of a physician or a family member in the treatment of a
patient with IHD. A public health policy campaign on the
part of policy managers on the management of cardiac
patients by cardiologists and mental health professionals
may be a logical step for improvement in cardiovascular
health.
24
References
1. Mallik S, Krumholz HM, Lin ZQ, Kasl SV, Mattera JA, Roumains S, et
al. Patients with depressive symptoms have lower health status
benefits after coronary artery bypass surgery. Circulation 2005; 111:
271–277
2. Jiang W, Kuchibhatla M, Cuffe M, Christopher EJ, Alexander JD, Clary
GL, et al. Prognostic value of anxiety and depression in patients with
chronic heart failure. Circulation 2004; 3452–3456
3. Everson SA, Goldberg DE, Kaplan GA, Cohen RD, Pukkala E,
Tuomilehto J, et al. Hopelessness and risk of mortality and incidence
of myocardial infarction and cancer. Psychosom Med 1996; 58: 113–
121
4. Berkman LF, Leo-Summers L, Horwitz RI. Emotional support and
survival after myocardial infarction. A prospective, population-based
study of the elderly. Ann Intern Med 1992; 117: 1003–1009
5. Strike PC, Steptoe A. Behavioral and emotional triggers of acute
coronary syndromes: a systematic review and critique. Psychosom
Med 2005; 67: 179–186
6. Secondary prevention reinfarction Israeli nifedipine trial (SPRINT).
A randomized intervention trial of nifedipine in patients with acute
myocardial infarction. The Israeli Sprint Study Group. Eur Heart J
1988; 9: 354–364
7. Ogawa K, Tsuji I, Shiono K, Hisamichi S. Increased acute myocardial
infarction mortality following the 1995 Great Hanshin-Awaji
earthquake in Japan. Int J Epidemiol 2000; 29: 449–455
8. Rosengren A, Hawken S, Ounpuu S, Sliwa K, Zubaid M, Almahmeed
WA, et al. Association of psychosocial risk factors with risk of acute
myocardial infarction in 11,119 cases and 13,648 controls from
52 countries (the INTERHEART study): case-control study. Lancet
2004; 364: 953–962
9. Conti CR, Mehta JL. Acute myocardial ischemia: role of
atherosclerosis, thrombosis, platelet activation, coronary
vasospasm, and altered arachidonic acid metabolism. Circulation
1987; 75: V84–95
10. Bond M. The pursuit of happiness. New Scientist 2003; 180: 40–43
11. http://www.heartstats.org/datapage.asp?id=996
12. Rozanski A, Blumenthal JA, Davidson KW, Saab P, Kubzansky L. The
epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management of psycholosocial
risk factors in cardiac practice: the emerging field of behavioral
cardiology. J Am Coll Cardiol 2005; 45: 637–651
13. Real T. I Don’t Want to Talk About It. Overcoming the Secret
Legacy of Male Depression. FIRESIDE Rockefeller Center, New York,
NY 1997
14. Biddinger PD, Isselbacher EM, Fan D, Shepard JA. Case 5-2005; A
53 year-old man with depression and sudden shortness of breath.
N Engl J Med 2005; 352: 709–716
15. Blumenthal JA, Babyak MA, Carney RM, Huber M, Saab PG, Burg
MM, et al. Exercise, depression, and mortality after myocardial
infarction in the ENRICHD trial. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2004; 36:
746–755
16. Koukouvou G, Kouidi E, Iacovides A, Konstantinidou E, Kaprinis G,
Deligiannis A. Quality of life, psychological and physiological
changes following exercise training in patients with chronic heart
failure. J Rehab Med 2004; 36: 36–41
17. Saitoh K, Kobayashi N, Ueshima K, Kamata J, Saito M, Arakawa N.
The effects of aerobic training on the emotional response in
patients who underwent cardiac surgery. Kyobu Geka 2000; 53:
742–746
18. Taylor-Piliae RE. Tai Chi as an adjunct to cardiac rehabilitation
exercise training. J Cardiopulm Rehabil 2003; 23: 90–96
19. http://www.zonalatina.com/Zldata262.htm
20. Wei J, Levkoff S. Aging Well: The Complete Guide to Physical and
Emotional Health. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc 2000; pp
52–53
21. Greer J, Halgin R, Harvey E. Global versus specific symptom
attributions: predicting the recognition and treatment of
psychological distress in primary care. J Psychosom Res 2004; 57:
521–527
22. Cousins N. Head First: The Biology of Hope. New York: E.P. Dutton,
1989
23. Lown B. The Lost Art of Healing: Practicing Compassion in Medicine.
New York: Ballentine Books, 1999
24. Rumsfeld J, Ho PM. Depression and cardiovascular disease: a call
for recognition. Circulation 2005; 111: 250–253
IHJ-876-05 Point of View.p65
11/15/2005, 4:25 PM
363
C# TIFF: How to Use C#.NET Code to Compress TIFF Image File
C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object. List<Bitmap> images = new List<Bitmap>(); / Step1: Load image to REImage
convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg; changing pdf file to jpg
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
DotNetNuke), SharePoint. Get JPG, JPEG and other high quality image files from PDF document. Able to extract vector images from PDF. Extract
convert pdf to jpg batch; convert pdf file into jpg format
364 Aggarwal et al. . Mechanical Breakdown and Intraemobolus Thrombolysis
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 364–365
Mechanical Breakdown and Intraembolus
Thrombolysis in Massive Pulmonary Embolism
Tarun Aggarwal, Naveen Kumar, Bishav Mohan, Rajat Mohindra, Naved Aslam, Naresh K Sood, GS Wander
Department of Cardiology, Dayanand Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana
A
42-year-old male presented with sudden onset of
breathlessness and cough of 12 hours duration. There
was no history of chest pain, fever, trauma, prolonged
immobilization, edema feet or altered sensorium. He was
in cardiogenic shock with blood pressure (BP) of 80/50
mmHg, heart rate (HR) 170 beats per min (bpm) and
respiratory rate (RR) 44/min. He had mild cyanosis; the
jugular venous pressure (JVP) was raised and chest was
clear on examination. Cardiovascular examination
revealed S
3
gallop. The 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG)
showed right axis deviation with S
1
, Q
3
, T
3
pattern. Oxygen
saturation as measured by pulse oximeter was 84%. The
hemoglobin (Hb) was 17 gm/dl and liver function tests were
normal. Blood urea was 82 mg/dl and serum creatinine
was 2.2 mg/dl. The blood-gas analysis showed pH of 7.43,
PCO
2  
24.9 mmHg, PO
 
53.6 mmHg and HCO
3
16.8 mmol/
L. Chest X-ray showed cut off sign on right side. Two-
dimensional (2D) echocardiography revealed severe hypo-
kinesia of right ventricle (RV) with moderate tricuspid
Cardiovascular Images
Correspondence: Dr Bishav Mohan, Assistant Professor, Department of
Cardiology, Dayanand Medical College and Hospital, Hero DMC Heart Institute,
Ludhiana 141 001.  e-mail: info@hdhiheart.com
regurgitation, pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP)
was 80 mmHg, pulmonary artery was dilated and left
ventricular (LV) function was essentially normal. With the
suspected diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, pulmonary
angiography was done which revealed obstructing
thrombus in right pulmonary artery and no-flow was seen
beyond right main pulmonary artery (Fig. 1) .
After confirmation of pulmonary embolism, mechanical
breakdown of embolus was done with 5 F multipurpose
catheter. When minimal flow was seen across right
pulmonary artery, 2.5 lakh units of urokinase was given
intra-lesional over 10 min. This was followed by infusion
of urokinase at the rate of 2.5 lakh units/hour for 24 hours
through pigtail catheter kept in right pulmonary artery. The
condition of patient improved and his respiratory rate and
heart rate settled within 24 hours. Check pulmonary
angiography was done after 24 hours of infusion of
urokinase which revealed patent right pulmonary artery
(Fig.2) and pulmonary artery pressure decreased to 30/
16 mmHg. Patient was later started on oral anticoagulants.
Pulmonary embolism remains a clinically challenging
diagnosis, more often missed than confirmed. The 3-month
mortality after pulmonary embolism was 17% and the
Fig. 1. Pulmonary angiogram showing obstructing thrombus in right pulmo-
nary artery.
Fig. 2. Pulmonary angiogram (post-intervention) showing patent right
pulmonary artery.
IHJ-628-04 Cardiovascular Image.p65
11/15/2005, 4:19 PM
364
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 364–365
Aggarwal et al. . Mechanical Breakdown and Intraemobolus Thrombolysis 365
outcome was linked to degree of pulmonary vascular
obstruction and resulting RV strain.
1
Various methods to
intervene in cases of pulmonary embolism are available.
The FDA has approved use of urokinase (4400 IU/kg
intravenously over 10 min, then 4400 IU/kg per hour for
12 hours) and streptokinase (250000 IU intravenously
over 30 min and 100000 IU/hour for 24 hours).
Breakdown of thrombus provides a large exposed area
for subsequent thrombolysis. Mechanical fragmentation
and intrapulmonary arterial infusion of thrombolytics as
a combined approach has been successful and proved by
many studies.
2-8
Massive pulmonary embolism requires immediate
intervention. In the absence of treatment, mortality
remains high. Different treatment regimens with varying
results have been reported but no randomized trials are
available. The case treated by us favors combined approach
(mechanical fragmentation and intra-lesional throm-
bolysis) for massive pulmonary embolism.
References
1. Grifoni S, Olivotto I, Cecchini P, Pieralli F, Camaiti A, Santoro G, et al.
Short-term clinical outcome of patients with acute pulmonary
embolism, normal blood pressure and echocardiographic right
ventricular dysfunction. Circulation 2000; 101: 2817–2822
2. Rafique M, Middlemost S, Skoularigis J, Sareli P. Simultaneous
mechanical clot fragmentation and pharmacologic thrombolysis
in acute massive pulmonary embolism. Am J Cardiol 1992; 69:
427–430
3. Tapson VF, Gvrbe PA, Witty LA, Pieper KS, Stack RS. Pharmaco-
mechanical thrombolysis of experimental pulmonary embolism.
Rapid low dose intraembolic therapy. Chest 1994; 106: 1558–1562
4. Tapson VF, Witty LA. Massive pulmonary embolism: diagnostic and
therapeutic strategies. Clin Chest Med 1995; 16: 329–340
5. Fava M, Loyola S, Flores P, Huete I. Mechanical fragmentation and
pharmacologic thrombolysis in massive pulmonary embolism. J Vasc
Interv Radiol 1997; 8: 261–266
6. Schmitz-Rode T, Janssens U, Schild HH, Basche S, Hanrath P, Gunther
RW. Fragmentation of massive pulmonary embolism using a pigtail
rotation catheter. Chest 1998; 114: 1427–1436
7. Wong PS, Singh SP, Watson RD, Lip GY. Management of pulmonary
thromboembolism using catheter manipulation: a report of four
cases and review of the literature. Postgrad Med J 1999; 75:
737–741
8. De Gregorio MA, Gimeno MJ, Mainar A, Herrera M, Tobio R, Alfonso
R, et al. Mechanical and enzymatic thrombolysis for massive
pulmonary embolism. J Vasc Interv Radiol 2002; 13: 163–169
IHJ-628-04 Cardiovascular Image.p65
11/15/2005, 4:19 PM
365
366 Letters to the Editor
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 366
Increased Beat-to Beat QT Variability in
Patients with Congestive Cardiac Failure
Letter to the Editor
A
lthough written by authors from an outstanding
institutions, the article
1
on QT variability raises few
apprehensions about its wide acceptance.
1. It is well known that higher mortality is seen even
clinically by cardiologists in patients with psychological
and behavioral disturbances and depression. This fact
seems to have been ignored.
2. It is a very limited study with only 23 patients - there
was no follow-up in 9 patients. Statistically it is not
acceptable.
3. All patients received digoxin which comes in the way
of measuring QT variability. Lead II in patients with
congestive cardiac failure may not be accurate due to
low voltage in standard leads in many cases.
4. Besides, digoxin is vagotonic and seruim electrolytes
should also be monitored.
With due respects to authors and the institutions I am
afraid that this article may not receive required attention
from the readers.
References
1. Raghunandan DS, Desai Nagaraj, Mallavarapu Mallika, Berger RD,
Yeragani VK. Increased beat-to-beat QT variability in patients with
congestive cardiac failure. Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 138–142
DV Nair
Kalpana, South Janatha Road, Palarivattom, Kochi
Reply
W
e read with interest the comments on our recent
article
1
published in IHJ. The following is our re-
sponse to all the questions raised.
1. We completely agree with the comment that higher
cardiovascular mortality is seen in patients with
anxiety and depression. In fact our group is one of the
first to describe decreased R-R (inter-beat) and
increased QT variability in patients with anxiety and
depression.
2-5
However, this point has no relevance in
the present study, as we were not studying the effects
of anti-anxiety and anti-depressant drugs.
2. The primary aim of study was to show increased QT
variability in patients with congestive heart failure,
similar to the ones reported by Berger et al.
6
and Atiga
et al.
7
To our knowledge, there are no such studies in
the Indian population. For this comparison, a sample
size of 23 is quite adequate given the effect sizes (an
effect size of ≥ ≥ 0.5 is considered significant and 0.8 very
significant in biological studies). In present article, the
effect size for the difference between QT total power was
1.33 and for QTvi, 1.41. Thus having more subjects
would not have made any difference to the results. It is
always desirable to have more subjects but this should
not be the only criterion as the effect sizes help researchers
to use fewer patients, which may be time and cost
effective. Follow-up was not our main aim in the study.
The decrease in QT variability in patients that
responded is only a preliminary finding and we have
stressed upon this as a preliminary finding in the
article. However, such important data should not go
unreported, specially due to the fact that this area of
non-invasive cardiology is progressing at a rapid pace.
8
We would also like to bring to the attention of readers
that due to very stringent criteria of the sample size,
many important articles remain unpublished. If a
finding does not hold, it will eventually die a natural death.
The originator of the field of Fractal Physics, Benoit
Mandelbrot was unable to publish his findings for the
first time in a journal and had to publish them in a book.
3. It is true that digoxin has vagotonic effects and this
should actually bias the findings against our hypothesis
as we compared normal controls and patients with
congestive heart failure. In fact, if there is a vagotonic
effect in patients, this will increase R-R variability and
thus decrease the QTvi as this is corrected for R-R
variability. This should have resulted in no significant
difference between QTvi in patients and controls.
References
1. Raghunandan DS, Desai Nagaraj, Mallavarapu Mallika, Berger RD,
Yeragani VK. Increased beat-to-beat QT variability in patients with
congestive cardiac failure. Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 138-142
2. Yeragani VK, Balon R, Pohl R, Ramesh C, Glitz D, Weinberg P, Merlos
B. Decreased R-R variance in panic disorder patients. Acta Psychiatr
Scand 1990; 81: 554–559
3. Rao RK, Yeragani VK. Decreased chaos and increased nonlinearity
of heart rate time series in patients with panic disorder. Auton Neurosci
2001; 88: 99–108
4. Yeragani VK, Rao KA. Nonlinear measures of QT interval series:
novel indices of cardiac repolarization lability: MEDqthr and LLEqthr.
Psychiatry Res 2003; 117: 177–190
5. Yeragani VK, Rao RK, Smitha MR, Pohl RB, Balon R, Srinivasan K.
Diminished chaos of heart rate time series in patients with major
depression. Biol Psychiatry 2002; 51: 733–744
6. Berger RD, Kasper EK, Baughman KL, Marban E, Calkins H, Tomaselli
GF. Beat-to-beat QT interval variability: novel evidence for
repolarization lability in ischemic and nonischemic dilated
cardiomyopathy. Circulation 1997; 96: 1557–1565
7. Atiga WL, Calkins H, Lawrence JH, Tomaselli GF, Smith JM, Berger
RD. Beat-to-beat repolarization lability identifies patients at risk for
sudden cardiac death. J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol 1998; 9: 899–908
8. Haigney MC, Zareba W, Gentlesk PJ, Goldstein RE, Illovsky M, McNitt
S, et al. Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial
(MADIT) II investigators. QT interval variability and spontaneous
ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation in the MADIT II patients. J Am
Coll Cardiol 2004; 44: 1481–1487
Vikram K Yeragani
Flat No. 103, Embassy Orchid, 8 Main
Sadashiv Nagar, Bangalore
IHJ-905-05 Letter-to-Editor.p65
11/15/2005, 4:25 PM
366
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 367–369
Selected Summaries 367
Incremental Cost Effectiveness of Drug-Eluting Stents Compared with a Third Generation
Bare Metal Stent in a Real World Setting
Christoph Kaiser et al. For BASKET Investigators. Lancet 2005; 366 : 921-929
Summary
This prospective randomized controlled Basel stent cost-
effectiveness trial (BASKET) was conducted with the aim
to compare the clinical results and cost effectiveness of the
two available drug-eluting stents (DES) with that of a third
generation bare metal stent (BMS). The two drug-eluting
stents used were the sirolimus-coated Cypher stent (Cordis,
Johnson and Johnson) and the paclitaxel-coated Taxus stent
(Boston-Scientific). These were compared with each other
and each was further compared with the cobalt-chromium
Vision stent (Guidant Corporation). Eight hundred and
twenty-six consecutive patients who underwent
percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and stenting at
university hospital of Basel, Switzerland over a one-year
period, were included. The patients (1281, de novo lesions)
were randomized to one of the two DES (Cypher, n=264;
Taxus, n=281) or the cobalt-chromium Vision stent
(n=281). The exclusion criteria included target vessel size
> 4 mm because of the non-availability of that size in the
DES types. Also, restenotic lesions were not included in the
trial. The primary end point was cost effectiveness after 6
months. Costs were ascertained on the basis of procedures,
stents deployed and hospital stay based on the standard
costing in accordance with Swiss medical tariff.
Effectiveness of the PCI and stenting procedures was defined
as a reduction of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) that
included deaths due to cardiac cause, non-fatal myocardial
infarction (MI) and target vessel revascularization (TVR).
There was a MACE in 7.2% patients with DES and 12.1%
patients with BMS (p=0.02). The use of DES reduced the
rate of MACE by 44% that was largely driven by a lower
rate of TVR. Predictors of MACE were three vessel disease
(p=0.006), residual stenosis >50% (p=0.02), more than
one treated segment (p<0.05) and use of DES (p=0.03). In
the DES-treated patients, the stent cost was higher by a
mean of 1702 Euros. Though the follow-up costs were
slightly lower in the DES patients, the overall cost at 6
months was still 905 Euros higher. Incremental cost
effectiveness ratio of DES compared with BMS to avoid one
major event was 18311 Euros and cost per quality adjusted
life-year gained was more than 50,000 Euros. Subgroup
analysis indicated that DES would probably be more cost
effective in high risk patients such as those with triple vessel
disease, elderly, longer stents and smaller vessel diameter
or more than one segment treated.
Comments
The BASKET compared the incremental cost effectiveness
of DES with a cobalt-chromium BMS in a prospective
randomized manner on a real world setting. The study
confirmed a 44% reduction in the rate of MACE with DES
compared with the BMS. However despite the lower costs
on follow-up till a 6 months period, the initial cost of the
DES was not compensated for and there was a higher overall
cost of DES compared with the BMS. In previous
commentaries there have been suggestion to use the
markedly more expensive DES for specific target lesions or
patients. However, data from controlled studies is not
available and therefore it is left to the wise council of the
treating team to decide DES usage according to the available
budgets and beliefs. The BASKET trial attempts to answer
whether DES are good value for money in an everyday
setting. Previous studies have suggested that the use of DES
is associated with a similar or higher cost compared with
other accepted medical therapies and made a case for the
use of DES in high risk subgroups where it would make
good economic sense. Like in the APPROACH registry,
BASEL trial suggested that the DES would be more cost
effective on select high risk patients.  There are some
limitations to the study as the actual market rates may be
lower than those quoted and may vary in different regions.
The patients were admitted for a relatively longer time either
for PCI or diagnostic testing and the cost of hospitalization
has to be adjusted. The follow-up of 6 months is probably
less because  increased revascularization rates are known
beyond that period with DES. In conclusion, the results of
this study indicate that high stent cost of DES are not
compensated for by lower costs during a follow-up of up to
6 months. There are indications from the results that DES
would prove more cost effective if used for certain sub
groups like the elderly and those at a higher risk.
Selected Summaries
IHJ-Selected Sum.p65
11/15/2005, 4:26 PM
367
368 Selected Summaries
Indian Heart J 2005; 57: 367–369
Mechanical Reprefusion in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction Presenting
More Than12 hours after Symptom Onset
Schomig et al. For (BRAVE-2)  Investigators.  JAMA 2005; 293: 2865-2872
Summary
This randomized controlled Beyond 12 hours Reprefusion
AlternatiVe Evaluation (BRAVE-2) trial was conducted to
clarify the role of primary percutaneous coronary
intervention (PCI) in patients with acute ST elevation
myocardial infarction (STEMI) who present more than 12
hours after symptom onset. All patients between 18 and
80 years of age with acute STEMI were included in this
trial. Excluded patients were those who had ongoing
angina, electrical or hemodynamic instability, recent stroke
or had a recent PCI or thrombolysis. Patients were
randomized to either an invasive strategy (n=182) or a
conservative treatment strategy (n=183). In the
conservative arm, patients were sent for angiography only
if they had recurrent angina or if there was an evidence of
induced ischemia in the symptom-limited pre-discharge
exercise test. In the conservative arm, depending upon the
coronary anatomy the patients were sent for coronary
artery bypass grafting (CABG) or a PCI (with or without
stenting) was performed. Adjunctive abciximab was
administered in the standard dosage, started immediately
following angiography when an intervention was planned.
The infart size was measured using a single photon
emission-computed tomography (SPECT) study performed
5 and 10 days after randomizations – which was the
primary end point. The secondary end points were a
composite of all-cause mortality, recurrent MI or stroke
within 30 days. Following diagnostic angiography (invasive
arm) 159 (87.4%) patients underwent coronary stenting,
13 (7.2%) patients underwent plain balloon angioplasty, 7
(3.8%) underwent CABG and 3 (1.6%) patients had an open
infarct-related coronary artery and therefore required no
intervention. The infarct size was calculated by SPECT
using technetium Tc99m sestamibi performed after a
median of 7.1 days in the invasive group and 7.3 days in
the conservative group. The final left ventricular (LV) infarct
size was significantly smaller in the invasive group patients
(median: 8.0%) compared with the infarct size measured
in the conservative arm (median: 13%) (p<0.001). The
mean difference in final LV infarct size between the invasive
and the conservative groups was –6.8%. Over the 30 days
follow- up period there were 10 deaths, 7 in the conservative
group (p=0.21). The combined end point of death,
recurrent MI or stroke was similar in the 2 groups (8 in the
invasive group and 12 in the conservative group).
Comments
In the treatment of STEMI, time is of paramount
importance. Moreover, trials have indicated that there is
myocardial salvage, improved left ventricular function and
improved survival when patients of STEMI are reperfused
within 12 hours. Beyond that time period, reperfusion
therapies have not proved to be useful. However, there is
data to suggest that myocardial salvage may be possible
even after 12 hours and as opposed to thrombolysis, PCI
has shown utility and a relatively wider window period of
benefit to the patient. However, there is scant data to
support such treatment at present. Although large registry
data has demonstrated mortality benefit of angioplasty in
patients who present more than 12 hours after MI, no
randomized trial has shown such benefit. In fact, the studies
available are either those in which thrombolysis ineligible
patients were taken for angioplasty or those where
mechanical revascularization was performed days after MI.
This is probably the first prospective study to address the
use of invasive management of late presenters of STEMI.
The result of the study show a smaller infarct size in patients
who underwent revascularization as compared with the
currently recommended conservative management. This
can be explained by the reversing of stunned/hybernating
myocardium by an effective reperfusion strategy. Though
there was a trend toward clinical benefit, it is difficult to
comment because of the smaller numbers and the short
follow-up. However, infarct size and the left ventricular
function has prognostic implications on the clinical
outcome and in a larger study it may translate into a
favorable clinical outcome as well. The use of glycoprotein
IIb/IIIa inhibitors had previously demonstrated an additive
favorable effect on patients  undergoing PCI. In this study
it has shown to be useful even in the setting of a late
presentation. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated
the effectiveness of mechanical reperfusion in patients with
acute STEMI, without ongoing chest pain, presenting 12
to 48 hours after the onset of symptoms.
IHJ-Selected Sum.p65
11/15/2005, 4:26 PM
368
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested