12 
BIRTH 
OF THE LIBERAL CREED 
ECONOMIC
LIBERALISM
was the organizing principle of a society en-
gaged in creating a market system. Born as a mere penchant for non-
bureaucratic methods, it evolved into a veritable faith in man's secular 
salvation through a self-regulating market. Such fanaticism was the 
result of the sudden aggravation of the task it found itself committed 
to: the magnitude of the sufferings that were to be inflicted on innocent 
persons as well as the vast scope of the interlocking changes involved in 
the establishment of the new order. The liberal creed assumed its 
evangelical fervor only in response to the needs of a fully deployed 
market economy. 
To antedate the policy of
laissez-faire,
as is often done, to the 
time when this catchword was first used in France in the middle of the 
eighteenth century would be entirely unhistorical; it can be safely said 
that not until two generations later was economic liberalism more than 
a spasmodic tendency. Only by the 182o's did it stand for the three 
classical tenets: that labor should find its price on the market; that the 
creation of money should be subject to an automatic mechanism; that 
goods should be free to flow from country to country without hindrance 
or preference; in short, for a labor market, the gold standard, and free 
trade. 
To credit Frangois Quesnay with having envisaged such a state of 
affairs would be little short of fantastic. All that the Physiocrats de-
manded in a mercantilists world was the free export of grain in order 
to ensure a better income to farmers, tenants, and landlords. For the 
rest their
ordre naturel
was no more than a directive principle for the 
regulation of industry and agriculture by a supposedly all-powerful and 
omniscient government. Quesnay's
Maximes
were intended to
pro-
vide such a government with the viewpoints needed to translate into 
practical policy the principles of the
Tableau
on the basis of statistical 
data which he offered to have furnished periodically. The idea of a 
self-regulating system of markets had never as much as entered his 
mind. 
*35 
Change pdf to jpg on - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert multiple page pdf to jpg; .pdf to jpg converter online
Change pdf to jpg on - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert multiple pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpeg on
136 
RISE AND FALL OF MARKET ECONOMY 
[Ch. 12 
In England, too, laissez-faire was interpreted narrowly; it meant 
freedom from regulations in production; trade was not comprised. 
Cotton manufactures, the marvel of the time, had grown from insig-
nificance into the leading export industry of the country—yet the im-
port of printed cottons remained forbidden by positive statute. Not-
withstanding the traditional monopoly of the home market an export 
bounty for calico or muslin was granted. Protectionism was so in-
grained that Manchester cotton manufacturers demanded, in 1800, the 
prohibition of the export of yarn, though they were conscious of the 
fact that this meant loss of business to them. An Act passed in 1791 
extended the penalties for the export of tools used in manufacturing 
cotton goods to the export of models or specifications. The free trade 
origins of the cotton industry are a myth. Freedom from regulation in 
the sphere of production was all the industry wanted; freedom in the 
sphere of exchange was still deemed a danger. 
One might suppose that freedom of production would naturally 
spread from the purely technological field to that of the employment 
of labor. However, only comparatively late did Manchester raise the 
demand for free labor. The cotton industry had never been subject to 
the Statute of Artificers and was consequently not hampered either by 
yearly wage assessments or by rules of apprenticeship. The Old Poor 
Law, on the other hand, to which latter-day liberals so fiercely objected, 
was a help to the manufacturers; it not only supplied them with parish 
apprentices, but also permitted them to divest themselves of responsi-
bility towards their dismissed employees, thus throwing much of the 
burden of unemployment on public funds. Not even the Speenham-
land system was at first unpopular with the cotton manufacturers; as 
long as the moral effect of allowances did not reduce the productive 
capacity of the laborer, the industry might have well regarded family 
endowment as a help in sustaining that reserve army of labor which 
was urgently required to meet the tremendous fluctuations of trade. 
At a time when employment in agriculture was still on a year's term, it 
was of great importance that such a fund of mobile labor should be 
available to industry in periods of expansion. Hence the attacks of the 
manufacturers on the Act of Settlement which hampered the physical 
mobility of labor. Yet not before 1795 was the
c
repeal of that Act car-
ried—only to be replaced by more, not less, paternalism in regard to 
the Poor Law. Pauperism still remained the concern of squire and 
countryside; and even harsh critics of Speenhamland like Burke, Ben-
tham, and Malthus regarded themselves less as representatives of in-
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. Web Security. All your JPG and PDF files will be permanently erased from our servers after one hour.
best program to convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg on
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Web Security. Your PDF and JPG files will be deleted from our servers an hour after the conversion.
convert pdf to jpg c#; .pdf to .jpg online
Ch.
12] 
BIRTH OF THE LIBERAL CREED 
137 
dustrial progress than as propounders of sound principles of rural ad-
ministration. 
Not until the 1830's did economic liberalism burst forth as a cru-
sading passion, and laissez-faire become a militant creed. The manu-
facturing class was pressing for the amendment of the Poor Law, since 
it prevented the rise of an industrial working class which depended for 
its income on achievement. The magnitude of the venture implied in 
the creation of a free labor market now became apparent, as well as 
the extent of the misery to be inflicted on the victims of improvement. 
Accordingly, by the early 1830's a sharp change of mood was mani-
fest. An 1817 reprint of Townsend's Dissertation contained a preface 
in praise of the foresight with which the author had borne down on 
the Poor Laws and demanded their complete abandonment; but the 
editors warned of his "rash and precipitate'' suggestion that outdoor re-
lief to the poor should be abolished within so short a term as ten years. 
Ricardo's Principles, which appeared in the same year, insisted on the 
necessity of abolishing the allowance system, but urged strongly that 
this should be done only very gradually. Pitt, a disciple of Adam 
Smith, had rejected such a course on account of the innocent suffer-
ing it would entail. And as late as 1829, Peel "doubted whether the 
allowance system could be safely removed otherwise than gradually."
Yet after the political victory of the middle class, in 1832, the Poor 
Law Amendment Bill was carried in its most extreme form and rushed 
into effect without any period of grace. Laissez-faire had been cata-
lyzed into a drive of uncompromising ferocity. 
A similar keying up of economic liberalism from academic interest 
to boundless activism occurred in the two other fields of industrial 
organization: currency and trade. In respect to both of these laissez-
faire waxed into a fervently held creed when the uselessness of any 
other but extreme solutions became apparent. 
The currency issue was first brought home to the English com-
munity in the form of a general rise in the cost of living. Between 
1790 and 1815 prices doubled. Real wages fell and business was hit by 
a slump in foreign exchanges. Yet not until the 1825 panic did sound 
currency become a tenet of economic liberalism, 
only when 
Ricardian principles were already so deeply impressed on the minds of 
politicians and businessmen alike that the "standard" was maintained 
in spite of the enormous number of financial casualties. This was the 
beginning of that unshakable belief in the automatic steering mecha-
1
Webb, S. and B., op. cit. 
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg. C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion.
.pdf to .jpg converter online; batch pdf to jpg converter online
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. C:\input.tif"; String outputDirectory = @"C:\output\"; // Convert tiff to jpg and show How to change Tiff image to Bmp image in your C#
convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg; pdf to jpeg
138 
RISE AND FALL OF MARKET ECONOMY 
[Ch. 12 
nism of the gold standard without which the market system could 
never have got under way. 
International free trade involved no less an act of faith. Its implica-
tions I ere entirely extravagant. It meant that England would depend 
for her food supply upon overseas sources; would sacrifice her agri-
culture, if necessary, and enter on a new form of life under which she 
would be part and parcel of some vaguely conceived world unity of the 
future; that this planetary community would have to be a peaceful 
one, or, if not, would have to be made safe for Great Britain by the 
power of the Navy; and that the English nation would face the pros-
pects of continuous industrial dislocations in the firm belief in its 
superior inventive and productive ability. However, it was believed 
that if only the grain of all the world could flow freely to Britain, then 
her factories would be able to undersell all the world. Again, the 
measure of the determination needed was set by the magnitude of the 
proposition and the vastness of the risks involved in complete accept-
ance. Yet less than complete acceptance would have spelt certain ruin. 
The Utopian springs of the dogma of
laissez-faire
are but incom-
pletely understood as long as they are viewed separately. The three tenets 
—competitive labor market, automatic gold standard, and international 
free trade—formed one whole. The sacrifices involved in achieving 
any one of them were useless, if not worse, unless the other two were 
equally secured. It was everything or nothing. 
Anybody could see that the gold standard, for instance, meant 
danger of deadly deflation and, maybe, of fatal monetary stringency 
in a panic. The manufacturer could, therefore, hope to hold his own 
only if he was assured of an increasing scale of production at remuner-
ative prices (in other words, only if wages fell at least in proportion to 
the general fall in prices, so as to allow the exploitation of an ever-
expanding world market). Thus the Anti-Corn Law Bill of 1846 was 
the corollary of Peel's Bank Act of 1844, and both assumed a laboring 
class which, since the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834, was forced 
to give their best under the threat of hunger, so that wages were regu-
lated by the price of grain. The three great measures formed a coherent 
whole. 
The global sweep of economic liberalism can now be taken in at 
a glance. Nothing less than a self-regulating market on a world scale 
could ensure the functioning of this stupendous mechanism. Unless 
the price of labor was dependent upon the cheapest grain available, 
there was no guarantee that the unprotected industries would not 
JPG to PNG Converter | Convert JPEG to PNG, Convert PNG to JPG
Allow to change converting image with adjusted width & height; Change image resolution Open JPEG to PNG Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in
convert pdf image to jpg online; convert pdf pages to jpg
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
convert pdf picture to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter
Ch.
12] 
BIRTH OF THE LIBERAL CREED 
139 
succumb in the grip of the voluntarily accepted task-master, gold. The 
expansion of the market system in the nineteenth century was synony-
mous with the simultaneous spreading of international free trade, com-
petitive labor market, and gold standard; they belonged together. No 
wonder that economic liberalism turned into a secular religion once the 
great perils of this venture were evident. 
There was nothing natural about
laissez-faire;
free markets could 
never have come into being merely by allowing things to take their 
course. Just as cotton manufactures—the leading free trade industry— 
were created by the help of protective tariffs, export bounties, and in-
direct wage subsidies,
laissez-faire
itself was enforced by the state. The 
thirties and forties saw not only an outburst of legislation repealing 
restrictive regulations, but also an enormous increase in the administra-
tive functions of the state, which was now being endowed with a cen-
tral bureaucracy able to fulfill the tasks set by the adherents of liberal-
ism. To the typical utilitarian, economic liberalism was a social project 
which should be put into effect for the greatest happiness of the great-
est number;
laissez-faire
was not a method to achieve a thing, it was 
the thing to be achieved. True, legislation could do nothing directly, 
except by repealing harmful restrictions. But that did not mean that 
government
could no nothing, especially indirectly. On the contrary, 
the utilitarian liberal saw in government the great agency for achieving 
happiness. In respect to material welfare, Bentham believed, the in-
fluence of legislation "is as nothing" in comparison with the uncon-
scious contribution of the "minister of the police." Of the three things 
needed for economic success—inclination, knowledge, and power— 
the private person possessed only inclination. Knowledge and power, 
Bentham taught, can be administered much cheaper by government 
than by private persons. It was the task of the executive to collect 
statistics and information, to foster science and experiment, as well as 
to supply the innumerable instruments of final realization in the field 
of government. Benthamite liberalism meant the replacing of Parlia-
mentary action by action through administrative organs. 
For this there was ample scope. Reaction in England had not 
governed—as it did in France—through administrative methods but 
used exclusively Parliamentary legislation to put political repression 
into effect. "The revolutionary movements of 1785 and of 1815-1820 
were combated, not by departmental action, but by Parliamentary 
legislation. The suspension of the Habeas Corpus Act, the passing of 
JPG to JBIG2 Converter | Convert JPEG to JBIG2, Convert JBIG2 to
Users may easily change image size, rotate image angle, set image rotation in dpi Covert JPG & JBIG2 image with high-quality; Provide user-friendly interface
convert .pdf to .jpg; convert pdf file to jpg file
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET program with this demo code.
batch pdf to jpg online; change pdf to jpg image
140 
RISE AND FALL OF MARKET ECONOMY 
[Ch. 12 
the Libel Act, and of the 'Six Acts' of 1819, were severely coercive 
measures; but they contain no evidence of any attempt to give a Con-
tinental character to administration. Insofar as individual liberty was 
destroyed, it was destroyed by and in pursuance of Acts of Parlia-
ment."
2
Economic liberals had hardly gained influence on government, 
in 1832, when the position changed completely in favor of administra-
tive methods. "The net result of the legislative activity which has char-
acterized, though with different degrees of intensity, the period since 
1832, has been the building up piecemeal of an administrative machine 
of great complexity which stands in as constant need of repair, renewal, 
reconstruction, and adaptation to new requirements as the plant of 
a modern manuf actury."
8
This growth of administration reflected the 
spirit of utilitarianism. Bentham's fabulous Panopticon, his most per-
sonal Utopia, was a star-shaped building from the center of which 
prison wardens could keep the greatest number of jailbirds under the 
most effective supervision at the smallest cost to the public. Similarly, 
in the utilitarian state his favorite principle of "inspectability" ensured 
that the Minister at the top should keep effective control over all local 
administration. 
The road to the free market was opened and kept open by an enor-
mous increase in continuous, centrally organized and controlled inter-
ventionism. To make Adam Smith's "simple and natural liberty" com-
patible with the needs of a human society was a most complicated 
affair. Witness the complexity of the provisions in the innumerable en-
closure laws; the amount of bureaucratic control involved in the ad-
ministration of the New Poor Laws which for the first time since Queen 
Elizabeth's reign were effectively supervised by central authority; or 
the increase in governmental administration entailed in the meritorious 
task of municipal reform. And yet all these strongholds of govern-
mental interference were erected with a view to the organizing of some 
simple freedom—such as that of land, labor, or municipal administra-
tion. Just as, contrary to expectation, the invention of labor-saving 
machinery had not diminished but actually increased the uses of human 
labor, the introduction of free markets, far from doing away with the 
need for control, regulation, and intervention, enormously increased 
their range. Administrators had to be constantly on the watch to en-
sure the free working of the system. Thus even those who wished most 
2
Redlich and Hirst, J., Local Government in England, Vol. II, p. 240, quoted 
Dicey, A. V., Law and Opinion in England, p. 305. 
8
Ilbert, Legislative Methods, pp. 212-3, quoted Dicey, A. V., op, cit* 
Ch. 12] 
BIRTH OF THE LIBERAL CREED 
141 
ardently to free the state from all unnecessary duties, and whose whole 
philosophy demanded the restriction of state activities, could not but 
entrust the self-same state with the new powers, organs, and instru-
ments required for the establishment of laissez-faire. 
This paradox was topped by another.. While laissez-faire economy 
was the product of deliberate state action, subsequent restrictions on 
laissez-faire started in a spontaneous way. Laissez-faire was planned; 
planning was not. The first half of this assertion was shown above to 
be true. If ever there was conscious use of the executive in the service 
of a deliberate government-controlled policy, it was on the part of the 
Benthamites in the heroic period of laissez-faire. The other half was 
first mooted by that eminent liberal, Dicey, who made it his task to 
inquire into the origins of the "anti-laissez-faire" or, as he called it, the 
"collectivist" trend in English public opinion, the existence of which 
was manifest since the late i86o's. He was surprised to find that no 
evidence of the existence of such a trend could be traced save the acts 
of legislation themselves. More exactly, no evidence of a "collectivist 
trend" in public opinion prior to the laws which appeared to represent 
such a trend could be found. As to later "collectivist" opinion, Dicey 
inferred that the "collectivist" legislation itself might have been its 
prime source. The upshot of his penetrating inquiry was that there had 
been complete absence of any deliberate intention to extend the func-
tions of the state, or to restrict the freedom of the individual, on the 
part of those who were directly responsible for the restrictive enact-
ments of the 1870's and 1880's. The legislative spearhead of the coun-
termovement against a self-regulating market as it developed in the half 
century following i860 turned out to be spontaneous, undirected by 
opinion, and actuated by a purely pragmatic spirit. 
Economic liberals must strongly take exception to this view. Their 
whole social philosophy hinges on the idea that laissez-faire was a 
natural development, while subsequent anti-laissez-faire legislation was 
the result of a purposeful action on the part of the opponents of liberal 
principles. In these two mutually exclusive interpretations of the double 
movement, it is not too much to say, the truth or untruth of the liberal 
position is involved today. 
Liberal writers like Spencer and Sumner, Mises and Lippmann 
offer an account of the double movement substantially similar to our 
own, but they put an entirely different interpretation on it. While in 
our view the concept of a self-regulating market was Utopian, and its 
progress was stopped by the realistic self-protection of society, in their 
142 
RISE AND FALL OF MARKET ECONOMY 
[Ch. 12 
view all protectionism was a mistake due to impatience, greed, and 
shortsightedness, but for which the market would have resolved its diffi-
culties. The question as to which of these two views is correct is per-
haps the most important problem of recent social history, involving as 
it does no less than a decision on the claim of economic liberalism to 
be the basic organizing principle in society. Before we turn to the testi-
mony of the facts, a more precise formulation of the issue is needed. 
In retrospect our age will be credited with having seen the end of 
the self-regulating market. The 1920's saw the prestige of economic 
liberalism at its height. Hundreds of millions of people had been af-
flicted by the scourge of inflation; whole social classes, whole nations 
had been expropriated. Stabilization of currencies became the focal 
point in the political thought of peoples and governments; the restora-
tion of the gold standard became the supreme aim of all organized 
effort in the economic field. The repayment of foreign loans and the 
return to stable currencies were recognized as the touchstones of ra-
tionality in politics; and no private suffering, no infringement of sover-
eignty, was deemed too great a sacrifice for the recovery of monetary 
integrity. The privations of the unemployed made jobless by deflation; 
the destitution of public servants dismissed without a pittance; even 
the relinquishment of national rights and the loss of constitutional 
liberties were judged a fair price to pay for the fulfillment of the re-
quirement of sound budgets and sound currencies, these
a
priori of 
economic liberalism. 
The thirties lived to see the absolutes of the twenties called in ques-
tion. After several years during which currencies were practically 
restored and budgets balanced, the two most powerful countries, Great 
Britain and the United States, found themselves in difficulties, dis-
missed the gold standard, and started out on the management of their 
currencies. International debts were repudiated wholesale and the 
tenets of economic liberalism were disregarded by the wealthiest and 
most respectable. By the middle of the thirties France and some other 
states still adhering to gold were actually forced off the standard by the 
Treasuries of Great Britain and the United States, formerly jealous 
guardians of the liberal creed. 
In the forties economic liberalism suffered an even worse defeat. 
Although Great Britain and the United States departed from monetary 
orthodoxy, they retained the principles and methods of liberalism in 
industry and commerce, the general organization of their economic 
life. This was to prove a factor in precipitating the war and a handicap 
Ch. 12] 
BIRTH OF THE LIBERAL CREED 
143 
in fighting it, since economic liberalism had created and fostered the 
illusion that dictatorships were bound for economic catastrophe. By 
virtue of this creed democratic governments were the last to understand 
the implications of managed currencies and directed trade, even when 
they happened by force of circumstances to be practicing these methods 
themselves; also, the legacy of economic liberalism barred the way to 
timely rearmament in the name of balanced budgets and free enter-
prise, which were supposed to provide the only secure foundations of 
economic strength in war. In Great Britain budgetary and monetary 
orthodoxy induced adherence to the traditional strategic principle of 
limited commitments upon a country actually faced with total war; in 
the United States vested interests—such as oil and aluminum—en-
trenched themselves behind the taboos of liberal business and success-
fully resisted preparations for an industrial emergency. But for the 
stubborn and impassioned insistence of economic liberals on their fal-
lacies, the leaders of the race as well as the masses of free men would 
have been better equipped for the ordeal of the age and might perhaps 
even have been able to avoid it altogether. 
Secular tenets of social organization embracing the whole civilized 
world are not dislodged by the events of a decade. Both in Great 
Britain and in the United States millions of independent business units 
derived their existence from the principle of laissez-faire* Its spectacu-
lar failure in one field did not destroy its authority in all. Indeed, its 
partial eclipse may have even strengthened its hold since it enabled its 
defenders to argue that the incomplete application of its principles was 
the reason for every and any difficulty laid to its charge. 
This, indeed, is the last remaining argument of economic liberalism 
today. Its apologists are repeating in endless variations that but for the 
policies advocated by its critics, liberalism would have delivered the 
goods; that not the competitive system and the self-regulating market, 
but interference with that system and interventions with that market 
are responsible for our ills. And this argument does not find support in 
innumerable recent infringements of economic freedom only, but also 
in the indubitable fact that the movement to spread the system of self-
regulating markets was met in the second half of the nineteenth century 
by a persistent countermove obstructing the free working of such an 
economy. 
The economic liberal is thus enabled to formulate a case which links 
the present with the past in one coherent whole. For who could deny 
that government intervention in business may undermine confidence ? 
144 
RISE AND FALL OF MARKET ECONOMY 
[Ch. 12 
Who could deny that unemployment would sometimes be less if it were 
not for out-of-work benefit provided by law? That private business 
is injured by the competition of public works? That deficit finance 
may endanger private investments ? That paternalism tends to damp 
business initiative? This being so in the present, surely it was no differ-
ent in the past. When around the 187o's a general protectionist move-
ment—social and national—started in Europe, who can doubt that it 
hampered and restricted trade? Who can doubt that factory laws, 
social insurance, municipal trading, health services, public utilities, 
tariffs, bounties and subsidies, cartels and trusts, embargoes on immi-
gration, on capital movements, on imports—not to speak of less open 
restrictions on the movements of men, goods, and payments—must 
have acted as so many hindrances to the functioning of the competitive 
system, protracting business depressions, aggravating unemployment, 
deepening financial slumps, diminishing trade, and damaging severely 
the self-regulating mechanism of the market? The root of all evil, the 
liberal insists, was precisely this interference with the freedom of em-
ployment, trade and currencies practiced by the various schools of 
social, national, and monopolistic protectionism since the third quarter 
of the nineteenth century; but for the unholy alliance of trade unions 
and labor parties with monopolistic manufacturers and agrarian inter-
ests, which in their shortsighted greed joined forces to frustrate eco-
nomic liberty, the world would be enjoying today the fruits of an 
almost automatic system of creating material welfare. Liberal leaders 
never weary of repeating that the tragedy of the nineteenth century 
sprang from the incapacity of man to remain faithful to the inspiration 
of the early liberals; that the generous initiative of our ancestors was 
frustrated by the passions of nationalism and class war, vested inter-
ests, and monopolists, and above all, by the blindness of the working 
people to the ultimate beneficence of unrestricted economic freedom to 
all human interests, including their own. A great intellectual and moral 
advance was thus, it is claimed, frustrated by the intellectual and moral 
weaknesses of the mass of the people; what the spirit of Enlightenment 
had achieved was put to nought by the forces of selfishness In a nut-
shell, this is the economic liberal's defense. Unless it is refuted, he will 
continue to hold the floor in the contest of arguments. 
Let us focus the issue. It is agreed that the liberal movement, intent 
on the spreading of the market system, was met by a protective counter-
movement tending towards its restriction; such an assumption, indeed, 
underlies our own thesis of the double movement. But while we assert 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested