Ch. 15] 
MARKET AND NATURE 
life. In the long run, the method chosen was bound to have the most 
nefarious results. Yet the squires would not have been able to main-
tain their practices, unless by doing so they had assisted the country 
as a whole to meet the ground swell of the Industrial Revolution. 
On the continent of Europe, again, agrarian protectionism was a 
necessity. But the most active intellectual forces of the age were 
engaged in an adventure which happened to shift their angle of vision 
so as to hide from them the true significance of the agrarian plight. 
Under the circumstances, a group able to represent the endangered 
rural interests could gain an influence out of proportion to their num-
bers. The protectionist countermovement actually succeeded in stabiliz-
ing the European countryside and in weakening that drift towards the 
towns which was the scourge of the time. Reaction was the beneficiary 
of a socially useful function which it happened to perform. The 
identical function which allowed reactionary classes in Europe to make 
play with traditional sentiments in their fight for agrarian tariffs was 
responsible in America about a half century later for the success of the 
TVA and other progressive social techniques. The same needs of 
society which benefited democracy in the New World strengthened the 
influence of the aristocracy in the Old. 
Opposition to mobilization of the land was the sociological back-
ground of that struggle between liberalism and reaction that made up 
the political history of Continental Europe in the nineteenth century. 
In this struggle, the military and the higher clergy were allies of the 
landed classes, who had almost completely lost their more immediate 
functions in society. These classes were now available for any reac-
tionary solution of the impasse to which market economy and its 
corollary, constitutional government, threatened to lead since they 
were not bound by tradition and ideology to public liberties and parlia-
mentary rule. 
Briefly, economic liberalism was wedded to the liberal state, while 
landed interests were not—this was the source of their permanent 
political significance on the Continent, which produced the cross-
currents of Prussian politics under Bismarck, fed clerical and militarist 
revanche in France, ensured court influence for the feudal aristocracy 
in the Hapsburg empire, made Church and Army the guardians of 
crumbling thrones. Since the connection oudasted the critical two 
generations once laid down by John Maynard Keynes as the practical 
alternative to eternity, land and landed property were now credited 
with a congenital bias for reaction. Eighteenth century England with 
185 
Batch pdf to jpg online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
.net pdf to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter for
Batch pdf to jpg online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf document to jpg; convert pdf pictures to jpg
RISE AND FALL OF MARKET ECONOMY 
[Ch. 15 
its Tory free traders and agrarian pioneers was as forgotten as the 
Tudor engrossers and their revolutionary methods of making money 
from the land; the Physiocratic landlords of France and Germany with 
their enthusiasm for free trade were obliterated in the public mind by 
the modern prejudice of the everlasting backwardness of the rural 
scene. Herbert Spencer, with whom one generation sufficed as a 
sample of eternity, simply identified militarism with reaction. The 
social and technological adaptability recently shown by the Nipponese, 
the Russian, or the Nazi army would have been inconceivable to him. 
Such thoughts were narrowly time-bound. The stupendous indus-
trial achievements of market economy had been bought at the price of 
great harm to the substance of society. The feudal classes found 
therein an occasion to retrieve some of their lost prestige by turning 
advocates of the virtues of the land and its cultivators. In literary 
romanticism Nature had made its alliance with the Past; in the 
agrarian movement of the nineteenth century feudalism was trying 
not unsuccessfully to recover its past by presenting itself as the guardian 
of man's natural habitat, the soil. If the danger had not been genuine, 
the stratagem could not have worked. 
But Army and Church gained prestige also by being available for 
the "defense of law and order," which now became highly vulnerable, 
while the ruling middle class was not fitted to ensure this requirement 
of the new economy. The market system was more allergic to rioting 
than any other economic system we know. Tudor governments relied 
on riots to call attention to local complaints; a few ringleaders might 
be hanged, otherwise no harm was done. The rise of the financial 
market meant a complete break with such an attitude; after 1797 
rioting ceases to be a popular feature of London life, its place is grad-
ually taken by meetings at which, at least in principle, the hands are 
counted which otherwise would be raining blows.
7
The Prussian king 
who proclaimed that to keep the peace was the subject's first and fore-
most duty, became famous for this paradox; yet very soon it was a 
commonplace. In the nineteenth century breaches of the peace, if 
committed by armed crowds, were deemed an incipient rebellion and 
an acute danger to the state; stocks collapsed and there was no bottom 
7
Trevelyan,
G.
M., History
of
England,
1926-,
p.
533.
"England under Walpole, 
was still an aristocracy,, tempered by rioting." Hannah More's "repository" song, 
"The Riot" was written "in ninety-five, a year of scarcity and alarm"—it was the 
year
of
Speenhamland.
Cf. The
Repository Tracts, Vol.
I,
New
York,
1835.
A*
50 
The Library, 1 1 9
4 0
, fourth series, VoL XX, p. 2
9
5
, on "Cheap Repository Tracts 
(
1
7
9
5
-
9
8
)
.
i186 
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
software; Support a batch conversion of JPG to PDF with amazingly high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after conversion; Support
c# pdf to jpg; convert .pdf to .jpg
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
speed JPEG to GIF Converter, faster than other JPG Converters; when you convert the files in batch; Storing conversion so the user who is not online still can
change from pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg online
Ch. 15] 
MARKET AND NATURE 
187 
in prices. A shooting affray in the streets of the metropolis might 
destroy a substantial part of the nominal national capital. And yet 
the middle classes were unsoldierly; popular democracy prided itself 
on making the masses vocal; and, on the Continent, the bourgeoisie 
still clung to the recollections of its revolutionary youth when it had 
itself faced a tyrannic aristocracy on the barricades. Eventually, the 
peasantry, least contaminated by the liberal virus, were reckoned the 
only stratum that would stand in their persons "for law and order." One 
of the functions of reaction was understood to be to keep the working 
classes in their place, so that markets should not be thrown into panic 
Though this service was only very infrequently required, the avail-
ability of the peasantry as the defenders of property rights was an asset 
to the agrarian camp. 
The history of the 1920's would be otherwise inexplicable. When, 
in Central Europe, the social structure broke down under the strain of 
war and defeat, the working class alone was available for the task of 
keeping things going. Everywhere power was thrust upon the trade 
unions and Social Democratic parties: Austria, Hungary, even Ger-
many, were declared republics although no active republican party had 
ever been known to exist in any of these countries before. But hardly 
had the acute danger of dissolution passed and the services of the trade 
unions become superfluous than the middle classes tried to exclude the 
working classes from all influence on public life. This is known as the 
counterrevolutionary phase of the postwar period. Actually, there was 
never any serious danger of a Communist regime since the workers 
were organized in parties and unions actively hostile to the Com-
munists. (Hungary had a Bolshevik episode literally forced upon the 
country when defense against French invasion left no alternative to the 
nation.) The peril was not Bolshevism, but disregard of the rules of 
market economy on the part of trade unions and working-class parties, 
in an emergency. For under a market economy otherwise harmless 
interruptions of public order and trading habits might constitute a 
lethal threat
8
since they could cause the breakdown of the economic 
regime upon which society depended for its daily bread. This ex-
plained the remarkable shift in some countries from a supposedly 
imminent dictatorship of the industrial workers to the actual dictator-
ship of the peasantry. Right through the twenties the peasantry deter-
8
Hayes, C, A Generation of Materialism, 1870-1890 remarks, that "most of 
the individual states, at least in Western and Central Europe, now possessed a 
seemingly superlative internal stability." 
JPG to DICOM Converter | Convert JPEG to DICOM, Convert DICOM to
Open JPEG to DICOM Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "DICOM" in
convert pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg on
JPG to JBIG2 Converter | Convert JPEG to JBIG2, Convert JBIG2 to
Ability to preserve original images without any affecting; Ability to convert image swiftly between JPG & JBIG2 in single and batch mode;
batch pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpeg on
188 
RISE AND FALL OF MARKET ECONOMY 
[Ch. 15 
mined economic policy in a number of states in which they normally 
played but a modest role. They now happened to be the only class 
available to maintain law and order in the modern high-strung sense 
of the term. 
The fierce agrarianism of postwar Europe was a side light on the 
preferential treatment accorded to the peasant class for political rea-
sons. From the Lappo movement in Finland to the Austrian Heimwehr 
the peasants proved the champions of market economy; this made 
them politically indispensable. The scarcity of food in the first postwar 
years to which their ascendency was sometimes credited had little to 
do with this. Austria, for instance, in order to benefit the peasants 
financially, had to lower her food standards by maintaining duties for 
grain, though she was heavily dependent upon imports for her food 
requirements. But the peasant interest had to be safeguarded at all 
cost even though agrarian protectionism might mean misery to the 
town dwellers and an unreasonably high cost of production to the 
exporting industries. The formerly uninfluential class of peasants 
gained in this manner an ascendency quite disproportionate to their 
economic importance. Fear of Bolshevism was the force which made 
their political position impregnable. And yet that fear, as we saw, was 
not fear of a working-class dictatorship—nothing faintly similar was 
on the horizon—but rather the dread of a paralysis of market economy, 
unless all forces were eliminated from the political scene that, under 
duress, might set aside the rules of the market game. As long as the 
peasants were the only class able to eliminate these forces, their 
prestige stood high and they could hold the urban middle class in 
ransom. As soon as the consolidation of the power of the state and—j 
even before that—the forming of the urban lower middle class into 
storm troops by the fascists, freed the bourgeoisie from dependence 
upon the peasantry, the latter's prestige was quickly deflated. Once 
the "internal enemy" in town and factory had been neutralized or 
subdued, the peasantry was relegated to its former modest position in 
industrial society. 
The big landowners' influence did not share in this eclipse. A 
more constant factor worked in their favor—the increasing military 
importance of agricultural self-sufficiency. The Great War had 
brought the basic strategic facts home to the public, and thoughtless 
reliance on the world market gave way to a panicky hoarding of food-
producing capacity. The "reagrarianization" of Central Europe started 
by the Bolshevik scare was completed in the sign of autarchy. Be-
JPG to Word Converter | Convert JPEG to Word, Convert Word to JPG
Open JPEG to Word Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "Word" in
convert multiple pdf to jpg online; reader pdf to jpeg
JPG to JPEG2000 Converter | Convert JPEG to JPEG2000, Convert
Open JPEG to JPEG2000 Converter first; ad JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "JPEG2000" in
batch pdf to jpg converter online; convert pdf image to jpg online
Ch.
15] 
MARKET AND NATURE 
sides the argument of the "internal enemy" there was now the argu-
ment of the "external enemy." Liberal economists, as usual, saw 
merely a romantic aberration induced by unsound economic doctrines, 
where in reality towering political events were awakening even the 
simplest minds to the irrelevance of economic considerations in the 
face of the approaching dissolution of the international system. Geneva 
continued its futile attempts to convince the peoples that they were 
hoarding against imaginary perils, and that if only all acted in unison 
free trade could be restored and would benefit all. In the curiously 
credulous atmosphere of the time many took for granted that the 
solution of the economic problem (whatever that may mean) would 
not only assuage the threat of war but actually avert that threat for-
ever. A hundred years' peace had created an insurmountable wall of 
illusions which hid the facts. The writers of that period excelled in lack 
of realism. The nation-state was deemed a parochial prejudice by 
A. J. Toynbee, sovereignty a ridiculous illusion by Ludwig von Mises, 
war a mistaken calculation in business by Norman Angell. Awareness 
of the essential nature of the problems of politics sank to an unprece-
dented low point. 
Free trade which, in 1846, had been fought and won on the Corn 
Laws, was eighty years later fought over again and this time lost on the 
same issue. The problem of autarchy haunted market economy from 
the start. Accordingly, economic liberals exorcised the specter of war 
and naively based their case on the assumption of an indestructible 
market economy. It went unnoticed that their arguments merely 
showed how great was the peril of a people which relied for its safety 
on an institution as frail as the self-regulating market. The autarchy 
movement of the twenties was essentially prophetic: it pointed to the 
need for adjustment to the vanishing of an order. The Great War had 
shown up the danger and men acted accordingly; but since they acted 
ten years later, the connection between cause and effect was discounted 
as unreasonable. "Why protect oneself against passed dangers?" was 
the comment of many contemporaries. This faulty logic befogged not 
only an understanding of autarchy but, even more important, that of 
fascism. Actually, both were explained by the fact that, once the com-
mon mind has received the impress of a danger, fear remains latent, as 
long as its causes are not removed. 
We claimed that the nations of Europe never overcame the shock 
of the war experience which unexpectedly confronted them with the 
perils of interdependence. In vain was trade resumed, in vain did 
i89 
JPG to PNG Converter | Convert JPEG to PNG, Convert PNG to JPG
Open JPEG to PNG Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "PNG" in "Output
change pdf file to jpg online; best pdf to jpg converter online
VB.NET Image: PDF to Image Converter, Convert Batch PDF Pages to
VB.NET > Convert PDF to Image. "This online guide content end users to convert PDF and PDF/A documents used commonly in daily life (like tiff, jpg, png, bitmap
change format from pdf to jpg; changing pdf to jpg file
190 
RISE AND FALL OF MARKET ECONOMY 
[Ch. 15 
swarms of international conferences display the idylls of peace, and 
dozens of governments declare for the principle of freedom of trade— 
no people could forget that unless they owned their food and raw 
material sources themselves or were certain of military access to them, 
neither sound currency nor unassailable credit would rescue them from 
helplessness. Nothing could be more logical than the consistency with 
which this fundamental consideration shaped the policy of communi-
ties. The source of the peril was not removed. Why then expect fear 
to subside? 
A similar fallacy tricked those critics of fascism—they formed the 
great majority—who described fascism as a freak devoid of all political 
ratio. Mussolini, it was said, claimed to have averted Bolshevism in 
Italy, while statistics proved that for more than a year before the March 
on Rome the strike wave had subsided. Armed workers, it was con-
ceded, occupied the factories in 1921. But was that a reason for dis-
arming them in 1923, when they had long climbed down again from 
the walls where they had mounted guard? Hitler claimed he had saved 
Germany from Bolshevism. But could it not be shown that the flood of 
unemployment which preceded his chancellorship had ebbed away be-
fore his rise to power ? To claim that he averted that which no longer 
existed when he came, as was argued, was contrary to the law of cause 
and effect, which must also hold in politics. 
Actually, in Germany as in Italy, the story of the immediate post-
war period proved that Bolshevism had not the slightest chance of 
success. But it also showed conclusively that in an emergency the work-
ing class, its trade unions and parties, might disregard the rules of the 
market which established freedom of contract and the sanctity of 
private property as absolutes—a possibility which must have the most 
deleterious effects on society, discouraging investments, preventing the 
accumulation of capital, keeping wages on an unremunerative level, 
endangering the currency, undermining foreign credit, weakening con-
fidence and paralyzing enterprise. Not the illusionary danger of a 
communist revolution, but the undeniable fact that the working classes 
were in the position to force possibly ruinous interventions, was the 
source of the latent fear which, at a crucial juncture, burst forth in the 
fascist panic. 
The dangers to man and nature cannot be neatly separated. The 
reactions of the working class and the peasantry to market economy 
both led to protectionism, the former mainly in the form of social legis-
Ch.
15] 
MARKET AND NATURE 
lation and factory laws, the latter in agrarian tariffs and land laws. Yet 
there was this important difference: in an emergency, the farmers and 
peasants of Europe defended the market system, which the working-
class policies endangered. While the crisis of the inherently unstable 
system was brought on by both wings of the protectionist movement, the 
social strata connected with the land were inclined to compromise with 
the market system, while the broad class of labor did not shrink from 
breaking its rules and challenging it outright. 
191 
16 
MARKET 
AND 
PRODUCTIVE 
ORGANIZATION 
Even capitalist
business itself had to be sheltered from the unre-
stricted working of the market mechanism. This should dispose of the 
suspicion which the very terms "man" and "nature" sometimes 
awaken in sophisticated minds, who tend to denounce all talk about 
protecting labor and land as the product of antiquated ideas if not as a 
mere camouflaging of vested interests. 
Actually, in the case of productive enterprise as in that of man and 
nature the peril was real and objective. The need for protection arose 
on account of the manner in which the supply of money was organized 
under a market system. Modern central banking, in effect, was essen-
tially a device developed for the purpose of offering protection without 
which the market would have destroyed its own children, the business 
enterprises of all kinds. Eventually, however, it was this form of pro-
tection which contributed most immediately to the downfall of the 
international system. 
While the perils threatening land and labor from the maelstrom of 
the market are fairly obvious, the dangers to business inherent in the 
monetary system are not as readily apprehended. Yet if profits depend 
upon prices, then the monetary arrangements upon which prices 
depend must be vital to the functioning of any system motivated by 
profits. While, in the long run, changes in selling prices need not affect 
profits, since costs will move up and down correspondingly, this is not 
true in the short run, since there must be a time-lag before contractually 
fixed prices change. Among them is the price of labor which, together 
with many other prices, would naturally be fixed by contract. Hence, 
if the price level was falling for monetary reasons over a considerable 
time, business would be in danger of liquidation accompanied by the 
dissolution of productive organization and massive destruction of 
capital. Not low prices, but falling prices were the trouble. Hume 
became the founder of the quantity theory of money with his discovery 
that business remains unaffected if the amount of money is halved since 
192 
Ch. 16] MARKET AND PRODUCTIVE ORGANIZATION 
193 
prices will simply adjust to half their former level. He forgot that 
business might be destroyed in the process. 
This is the easily understandable reason why a system of commodity 
money, such as the market mechanism tends to produce without out-
side interference, is incompatible with industrial production. Com-
modity money is simply a commodity which happens to function as 
money, and its amount, therefore, cannot, in principle, be increased 
at all, except by diminishing the amount of the commodities not func-
tioning as money. In practice commodity money is usually gold or 
silver, the amount of which can be increased, but not by much, within 
a short time. But the expansion of production and trade unaccom-
panied by an increase in the amount of money must cause a fall in the 
price level—precisely the type of ruinous deflation which we have in 
mind. Scarcity of money was a permanent, grave complaint with 
seventeenth century merchant communities. Token money was devel-
oped at an early date to shelter trade from the enforced deflations that 
accompanied the use of specie when the volume of business swelled. No 
market economy was possible without the medium of such artificial 
money. 
The real difficulty arose with the need for stable foreign exchanges 
and the consequent introduction of the gold standard, about the time 
of the Napoleonic Wars. Stable exchanges became essential to the very 
existence of English economy; London had become the financial center 
of a growing world trade. Yet nothing else but commodity money 
could serve this end for the obvious reason that token money, whether 
bank or fiat, cannot circulate on foreign soil. Hence, the gold standard 
—the accepted name for a system of international commodity money 
—came to the fore. 
But for domestic purposes, as we know, specie is an inadequate 
money just because it is a commodity and its amount cannot be in-
creased at will. The amount of gold available may be increased by a 
few per cent over a year, but not by as many dozen within a few weeks, 
as might be required to carry a sudden expansion of transactions. In 
the absence of token money business would have to be either curtailed 
or carried on at very much lower prices, thus inducing a slump and 
creating unemployment. 
In its simplest form the problem was this: commodity money was 
vital to the existence of foreign trade; token money, to the existence of 
domestic trade. How far did they agree with each other? 
Under nineteenth century conditions foreign trade and the gold 
194 
RISE AND FALL OF MARKET ECONOMY 
[Ch. 16 
standard had undisputed priority over the needs of domestic business. 
The working of the gold standard required the lowering of domestic 
prices whenever the exchange was threatened by depreciation. Since 
deflation happens through credit restrictions, it follows that the work-
ing of commodity money interfered with the working of the credit 
system. This was a standing danger to business. Yet, to discard token 
money altogether and restrict currency to commodity money was en-
tirely out of the question, since such a remedy would have been worse 
than the disease. 
Central banking mitigated this defect of credit money greatly. By 
centralizing the supply of credit in a country, it was possible to avoid 
the wholesale dislocation of business and employment involved in 
deflation and to organize deflation in such a way as to absorb the shock 
and spread its burden over the whole country. The bank in its normal 
function was cushioning the immediate effects of gold withdrawals on 
the circulation of notes as well as of the diminished circulation of notes 
on business. 
The bank might use various methods. Short-term loans might 
bridge the gap caused by short-run losses of gold, and avoid the need 
for credit restrictions altogether. But even when restrictions of credit 
were inevitable, as was often the case, the bank's action had a buffer 
effect: The raising of the bank rate as well as open-market operations 
spread the effects of restrictions to the whole community while shifting 
the burden of the restrictions to the strongest shoulders. 
Let us envisage the crucial case of transferring one-sided payments 
from one country to another, such as might be caused by a shift in 
demand from domestic to foreign types of food. The gold that now has 
to be sent abroad in payment for the imported food would otherwise 
be used for inland payments, and its absence must cause a falling off of 
domestic sales and a consequent drop in prices. We will call this type 
of deflation "transactional," since it spreads from individual firm to 
firm according to their fortuitous business dealings. Eventually, the 
spread of deflation will reach the exporting firms and thus achieve the 
export surplus which represents "real" transfer. But the harm and 
damage caused to the community at large will be much greater than 
that which was strictly necessary to achieve such an export surplus. 
For there are always firms just short of being able to export, which need 
only the inducement of a slight reduction of costs to "go over the top," 
and such a reduction can be most economically achieved by spreading 
the deflation thinly over the whole of the business community. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested