Ch. 21] 
FREEDOM IN A COMPLEX SOCIETY 
257 
liberty and welfare it offers are decried as a camouflage of slavery. In 
vain did socialists promise a realm of freedom, for means determine 
ends: the U.S.S.R., which used planning, regulation and control as its 
instruments, has not yet put the liberties promised in her Constitution 
into practice, and, probably, the critics add, never will. . . . But to 
turn against regulation means to turn against reform. With the liberal 
the idea of freedom thus degenerates into a mere advocacy of free 
enterprise—which is today reduced to a fiction by the hard reality of 
giant trusts and princely monopolies. This means the fullness of free-
dom for those whose income, leisure and security need no enhancing, 
and a mere pittance of liberty for the people, who may in vain attempt 
to make use of their democratic rights to gain shelter from the power 
of the owners of property. Nor is that all. Nowhere did the liberals in 
fact succeed in re-establishing free enterprise, which was doomed to 
fail for intrinsic reasons. It was as a result of their efforts that big busi-
ness was installed in several European countries and, incidentally, also 
various brands of fascism, as in Austria. Planning, regulation and con-
trol, which they wanted to see banned as dangers to freedom, were 
then employed by the confessed enemies of freedom to abolish it alto-
gether. Yet the victory of fascism was made practically unavoidable by 
the liberals' obstruction of any reform involving planning, regulation, 
or control. 
Freedom's utter frustration in fascism is, indeed, the inevitable 
result of the liberal philosophy, which claims that power and compul-
sion are evil, that freedom demands their absence from a human com-
munity. No such thing is possible; in a complex society this becomes 
apparent. This leaves no alternative but either to remain faithful to an 
illusionary idea of freedom and deny the reality of society, or to accept 
that reality and reject the idea of freedom. The first is the liberal's con-
clusion; the latter the fascist's. No other seems possible. 
Inescapably we reach the conclusion that the very possibility of 
freedom is in question. If regulation is the only means of spreading and 
strengthening freedom in a complex society, and yet to make use of 
this means is contrary to freedom per se, then such a society cannot 
be free. 
Clearly, at the root of the dilemma there is the meaning of freedom 
itself. Liberal economy gave a false direction to our ideals. It seemed 
to approximate the fulfilment of intrinsically Utopian expectations. No 
society is possible in which power and compulsion are absent, nor a 
world in which force has no function. It was an illusion to assume a 
Best pdf to jpg converter for - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf file into jpg; convert pdf page to jpg
Best pdf to jpg converter for - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
change pdf file to jpg file; convert multiple pdf to jpg
Ch.
21]
FREEDOM
IN A
COMPLEX SOCIETY
258A 
are, indeed, embodiments of opposite principles. And the ultimate on 
which they separate is again freedom. By fascists and socialists alike the 
reality of society is accepted with the finality with which the knowledge 
of death has molded human consciousness. Power and compulsion 
are a part of that reality; an ideal that would ban them from society 
must be invalid. The issue on which they divide is whether in the light 
of this knowledge the idea of freedom can be upheld or not; is freedom 
an empty word, a temptation, designed to ruin man and his works, or 
can man reassert his freedom in the face of that knowledge and strive 
for its fulfillment in society without lapsing into moral illusionism? 
This anxious question sums up the condition of man. The spirit 
and content of this study should indicate an answer. 
We invoked what we believed to be the three constitutive facts in 
the consciousness of Western man: knowledge of death, knowledge of 
freedom, knowledge of society. The first, according to Jewish legend, 
was revealed in the Old Testament story. The second was revealed 
through the discovery of the uniqueness of the person in the teachings 
of Jesus as recorded in the New Testament. The third revelation came 
to us through living in an industrial society. No one great name at-
taches to it; perhaps Robert Owen came nearest to becoming its 
vehicle. It is the constitutive element in modern man's consciousness. 
The fascist answer to the recognition of the reality of society is the 
rejection of the postulate of freedom. The Christian discovery of the 
uniqueness of the individual and of the oneness of mankind is negated 
by fascism. Here lies the root of its degenerative bent. 
Robert Owen was the first to recognize that the Gospels ignored 
the reality of society. He called this the "individualization" of man on 
the part of Christianity and appeared to believe that only in a co-opera-
tive commonwealth could "all that is truly valuable in Christianity" 
cease to be separated from man. Owen recognized that the freedom we 
gained through the teachings of Jesus was inapplicable to a complex 
society. His socialism was the upholding of man's claim to freedom in 
such a society. The post-Christian era of Western civilization had 
begun, in which the Gospels did not any more suffice, and yet 
remained the basis of our civilization. 
The discovery of society is thus either the end or the rebirth of free-
dom. While the fascist resigns himself to relinquishing freedom and 
glorifies power which is the reality of society, the socialist resigns him-
self to that reality and upholds the claim to freedom, in spite of it. Man 
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
.pdf to .jpg converter online; convert pdf file to jpg file
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
reader pdf to jpeg; change pdf file to jpg online
To Chap, 
BALANCE OF POWER AS POLICY, HISTORICAL LAW, 
PRINCIPLE, AND SYSTEM 
I.
Balance-of-power policy.
The balance-of-power
policy
is an 
English national institution. It is purely pragmatic and factual, and 
should not be confused either
with
the balance-of-power
principle
or 
with
the balance-of-power
system.
That policy was the outcome of her 
island position off a continental littoral occupied by organized political 
communities. "Her rising school of diplomacy, from Wolsey to Cecil, 
pursued the
Balance of Power
as England's
only
chance of security in 
face of the great Continental states being formed/' says Trevelyan. 
This policy was definitely established under the Tudors, was practiced 
by Sir William Temple, as well as by Canning, Palmerston, or Sir 
Edward Grey. It antedated the emergence of a balance-of-power sys-
tem on the Continent by almost two centuries, and was entirely inde-
pendent in its development from the Continental sources of the doctrine 
of the balance of power as a principle put forward by Fen61on or Vat-
tel. However, England's national policy was greatly assisted by the 
growth of such a system, as it eventually made it easier for her to 
organize alliances against any power leading on the Continent. Conse-
quently, British statesmen tended to foster the idea that England's 
balance-of-power policy was actually an expression of the balance-of-
power principle, and that England, by following such a policy, was 
only playing her part in a system based upon that principle. Still, the 
difference between her own policy of self-defense and any principle 
which would help its advancement was not purposely obscured by her 
statesmen. Sir Edward Grey wrote in his
Twenty-jive Years
as follows: 
"Great Britain has not, in theory, been adverse to the predominance of 
a strong group in Europe, when it seemed to make for stability and 
peace. To support such a combination has generally been the first 
choice. It is only when the dominant power becomes aggressive and 
she feels her own interests to be threatened that she, by an instinct of 
self-defence if not by deliberate policy, gravitates to anything that can 
be fairly described as a Balance of Power." 
259 
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Best PDF Viewer control as well as a powerful .NET WinForms application to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
c# convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf pages to jpg online
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Best PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET for converting PDF to image in C#.NET Support exporting PDF to multiple image forms, including Jpg, Png, Bmp
convert pdf into jpg online; convert pdf photo to jpg
260 
NOTES ON SOURCES 
It was thus in her own legitimate interest that England supported 
the growth of a balance-of-power system on the Continent, and upheld 
its principles. To do so was part of her policy. The confusion induced 
by such a dovetailing of two essentially different references of the 
balance of power is shown by these quotations: Fox, in 1787, indig-
nantly asked the government, "whether England were no longer in the 
situation to hold the balance of power in Europe and to be looked up to 
as the protector of her liberties ?" He claimed it as England's due to be 
accepted as the guarantor of the balance-of-power system in Europe. 
And Burke, four years later, described that system as the "public law of 
Europe" supposedly in force for two centuries. Such rhetorical identi-
fications of England's national policy with the European system of the 
balance of power would naturally make it more difficult for Americans 
to distinguish between two conceptions which were equally obnoxious 
to them. 
2. Balance of power as a historical law. Another meaning of the 
balance of power is based directly on the nature of power units. It has 
been first stated in modern thought by Hume. His achievement was lost 
again during the almost total eclipse of political thought which followed 
the Industrial Revolution. Hume recognized the political nature of 
the phenomenon and underlined its independence of psychological and 
moral facts. It went into effect irrespective of the motives of the actors, 
as long as they behaved as the embodiments of power. Experience 
showed, wrote Hume, that whether "jealous emulation or cautious 
politic" was their motive, "the effects were alike." F. Schuman says: 
"If one postulates a States System composed of three units, A, B, and 
C, it is obvious that an increase in the power of any one of them in-
volves a decrease in the power of the other two." He infers that the 
balance of power "in its elementary form is designed to maintain the 
independence of each unit of the State System." He might well have 
generalized the postulate so as to make it applicable to all kinds of 
power units, whether in organized political systems or not. That is, in 
effect, the way the balance of power appears in the sociology of history. 
Toynbee in his Study of History mentions the fact that power units are 
apt to expand on the periphery of power groups rather than at the cen-
ter where pressure is greatest. The United States, Russia, and Japan 
as well as the British Dominions expanded prodigiously at a time when 
even minor territorial changes were practically impossible of attain-
ment in Western and Central Europe. A historical law of a similar type 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Best and professional C# image to PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
convert .pdf to .jpg; convert from pdf to jpg
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Best WPF PDF Viewer control as well as a powerful PDF converter. PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF.
convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg; convert pdf to jpg
BALANCE OF POWER 
is adduced by Pirenne. He notes that in comparatively unorganized 
communities a core of resistance to external pressure is usually formed 
in the regions farthest removed from the powerful neighbor. Instances 
are the formation of the Frankish kingdom by Pipin of Heristal in the 
distant North, or the emergence of Eastern Prussia as the organizing 
center of the Germanies. Another law of this kind might be seen in the 
Belgian De Greefs law of the buffer state which appears to have 
influenced Frederick Turner's school and led to the concept of the 
American West as "a wandering Belgium." These concepts of the 
balance and imbalance of power are independent of moral, legal, or 
psychological notions. Their only reference is to power. This reveals 
their political nature. 
3. Balance of power as a principle and system. Once a human 
interest is recognized as legitimate, a principle of conduct is derived 
from it. Since 1648, the interest of the European states in the status 
quo as set up by the Treaties of Munster and Westphalia was acknowl-
edged, and the solidarity of the signatories in this respect was estab-
lished. The Treaty of 1648 was signed by practically all European 
Powers; they declared themselves its guarantors. The Netherlands and 
Switzerland date their international standing as sovereign states from 
this treaty. Henceforward, states were entitled to assume that any 
major change in the status quo would be of interest to all the rest. This 
is the rudimentary form of balance of power as a principle of the 
family of nations. No state acting upon this principle would, on that 
account, be thought of as behaving in a hostile fashion towards a 
power righdy or wrongly suspected by it of the intention of changing 
the status quo. Such a condition of affairs would, of course, enor-
mously facilitate the formation of coalitions opposed to such change. 
However, only after seventy-five years was the principle expressly 
recognized in the Treaty of Utrecht when "ad conservandum in 
Europa equilibrium" Spanish domains were divided between Bourbons 
and Hapsburgs. By this formal recognition of the principle Europe 
was gradually organized into a system based on this principle. As the 
absorption (or domination) of small powers by bigger ones would 
upset the balance of power, the independence of the small powers was 
indirectly safeguarded by the system. Shadowy as was the organization 
of Europe after 1648, and even after 1713, the maintenance of 
all states, great and small, over a period of some two hundred years 
must be credited to the balance-of-power system. Innumerable wars 
26
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Best and professional image to PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp
convert .pdf to .jpg online; pdf to jpg converter
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Best adobe PDF to image converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Convert PDF documents to multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap
convert pdf document to jpg; change pdf to jpg on
262 
NOTES ON SOURCES 
were fought in its name, and although they must without exception be 
regarded as inspired by consideration of power, the result was in many 
cases the same as if the countries had acted on the principle of collective 
guarantee against acts of unprovoked aggression. No other explanation 
will account for the continued survival of powerless political entities 
like Denmark, Holland, Belgium, and Switzerland over long stretches 
of time in spite of the overwhelming forces threatening their frontiers. 
Logically, the distinction between a principle and an organization 
based upon it, i.e., a system, seems definite. Yet we should not underrate 
the effectiveness of principles even in their suborganized condition, that 
is, when they have not yet reached the institutional stage, but merely 
supply a directive to conventional habit or custom. Even without an 
established center, regular meetings, common functionaries, or compul-
sory code of behavior, Europe had been formed into a system simply 
by the continuous close contact between the various chancelleries and 
members of the diplomatic bodies. The strict tradition regulating the 
inquiries, demarches, aide-memoire—jointly and separately delivered, 
in identical or in nonidentical terms—were so many means of express-
ing power situations without bringing them to a head, while opening 
up new avenues of compromise or, eventually, of joint action, in case 
negotiations failed. Indeed, the right to joint intervention in the 
affairs of small states, if legitimate interests of the Powers are threat-
ened, amounted to the existence of a European directorium in a sub-
organized form. 
Perhaps the strongest pillar of this informal system was the im-
mense amount of international private business very often transacted 
in terms of some trade treaty or other international instrument made 
effective by custom and tradition. Governments and their influential 
citizens were in innumerable ways enmeshed in the varied types of 
financial, economic, and juridical strands of such international trans-
actions. A local war merely meant a short interruption of some of 
these, while the interests vested in other transactions that remained 
permanently or at least temporarily unaffected formed an overwhelm-
ing mass as against those which might have been resolved to the 
enemy's disadvantage by the chances of war. This silent pressure of 
private interest which permeated the whole life of civilized communi-
ties and transcended national boundaries was the invisible mainstay of 
international reciprocity, and provided the balance-of-power prin-
ciple with effective sanctions, even when it did not take up the organ-
ized form of a Concert of Europe or a League of Nations. 
BALANCE OF POWER 
263 
BALANCE OF POWER AS HISTORICAL LAW: 
Hume. D., "On the Balance of Power/'
Works,
Vol. III (1854), 
p. 364. Schuman, F.,
International Politics
(1933),
p. 55. Toynbee, 
A.
 J.,
Study
of History,
Vol. Ill, p. 302. Pirenne, H.,
Outline of the 
History of Europe
from
the
Fall
of the Roman Empire to
1600
(Engl. 
1939). Barnes-Becker-Becker, on De Greef, Vol. II, p. 871. Hofmann, 
A.,
Das deutsche Land and die deutsche Geschichte
(1920). Also 
Haushofer's Geopolitical School. At the other extreme, Russell, B., 
Power.
Lasswell's
Psychopathology and Politics; World Politics and 
Personal Insecurity,
and other works. Cf. also Rostovtzeff,
Social and 
Economic History of the Hellenistic World,
Ch. 4, Part I. 
BALANCE OF POWER AS PRINCIPLE AND SYSTEM : 
Mayer,
J. P., Political Thought
(1939), p. 464. Vattel,
Le droit des 
gens
(1758).
Hershey A. S.,
Essentials of International Public Law 
and Organization
(1927),
pp. 567-69. Oppenheim, L.,
International 
Law.
Heatley, D. P.,
Diplomacy and the
Study
of International Rela-
tions (1919). 
HUNDRED YEARS' PEACE: 
Leathes, "Modern Europe,"
Cambridge Modern History,
Vol. XII, 
Ch. i. Toynbee, A. J.,
Study
of History,
Vol. IV(C), pp.
142-53. 
Schuman, F.,
International Politics,
Bk. I, Ch. 2. Clapham, J. H., 
Economic Development of France and Germany, 1815-1914, p. 3. 
Robbins, L.,
The Great Depression
(1934), p. 1. Lippmann, W.,
The 
Good
Society.
Cunningham, W.,
Growth of English
Industry
and 
Commerce in Modern Times.
Knowles, L. C. A.,
Industrial and Com-
mercial Revolutions in Great Britain during the igth Century (1927). 
Carr,
E. H.,
The
20
Tears' Crisis
1919-1939
(1940). Crossman, 
R. H. S.,
Government and the Governed
(1939)* p- 225. Hawtrey 
R. G., The Economic Problem (1925), p. 265. 
BAGHDAD RAILWAY: 
The conflict regarded as settled by the British-German agreement 
of
June
15, 1914: Buell, R. L.,
International Relations
(1929). 
Hawtrey, R. G.,
The Economic Problem
(1925).
Mowat, R.
B., The 
Concert of Europe
(1930), p. 313. Stolper, G.,
This Age of Fable 
(1942). For the contrary
view:
Fay, S.
B., Origins of the World War, 
p.
312. Feis,
H., Europe, The World's Banker, 1870-1914,
(1930), 
PP-
335
ff
-
NOTES ON SOURCES 
264 
To Chap. 
HUNDRED YEARS' PEACE 
1.
The facts.
The Great Powers of Europe were at war
with
one 
another during the century 1815 to 1914 only during three short 
periods: for six months in 1859, six weeks in 1866 and nine months in 
1870-71. The Crimean War, which lasted exactly two years, was of 
a peripheric and semicolonial character, as historians including Clap-
ham, Trevelyan, Toynbee, and Binkley agree. Incidentally, Russian 
bonds in the hands of British owners were honored in London during 
that war. The basic difference between the 19th and previous centuries 
is that between occasional general wars and complete absence of general 
wars. Major General Fuller's assertion that there was no year free of 
war in the nineteenth century appears as immaterial. Quincy Wright's 
comparison of the number of war years in the various centuries ir-
respective of the difference between general and local wars seems to 
by-pass the significant point. 
2.
The problem.
The cessation of the almost continuous trade wars 
I between England and France, a fertile source of general wars, stands 
1 primarily in need of explanation. It was connected with two facts in 
Mhe sphere of economic policy: (a) the passing of the old colonial em-
ipire, and (b) the era of free trade which passed into that of the inter-
1
national gold standard. While war interest fell off rapidly with the new 
forms of trade, a positive peace interest emerged in consequence of the 
CONCERT OF EUROPE : 
Langer, W. L.,
European Alliances and Alignments
(i8ji-*8go) 
(1931),
Sontag, R. J.,
European Diplomatic History
(1871-1932) 
(
x
933)- Onken, H., "The German Empire,"
Cambridge Modern His-
tory,
Vol. XII. Mayer,
 J.
P.,
Political Thought
(1939), p. 464. Mowat, 
R. B.,
The Concert of Europe
(1930), p. 23. Phillips, W. A.,
The 
Confederation of Europe
1914
(2d ed., 1920). Lasswell, H. D., 
Politics,
p. 53. Muir, R.,
Nationalism and Internationalism (1917),
p. 
176. Buell, R. L.,
International Relation
(1929), p. 512. 
HUNDRED YEARS' PEACE 
265 
new international currency and credit structure associated with the gold 
standard. The interest of whole national economies was now involved 
in the maintenance of stable currencies and the functioning of the world 
markets upon which incomes and employment depended. The tradi-
tional expansionism was replaced by an anti-imperialist trend which 
was almost general with the Great Powers up to 1880. (Of this we 
deal in Chapter 18.) 
There seems, however, to have been a hiatus of more than half a 
century (1815-80) between the period of trade wars when foreign| 
policy was naturally assumed to be concerned with the furtherance off 
gainful business and the later period in which foreign bondholders' 
and direct investors' interests were regarded as a legitimate concern of 
foreign secretaries. It was during this half century that the doctrine was 
established which precluded the influence of private business interests 
on the conduct of foreign affairs; and it is only by the end of this 
period that chancelleries again consider such claims as admissible but 
not without stringent qualifications in deference to the new trend of 
public opinion. We submit that this change was due to the character 
of trade which, under nineteenth century conditions, was no longer; 
dependent for its scope and success upon direct power policy; and that; 
the gradual return to business influence on foreign policy was due to 
the fact that the international currency and credit system had created! 
a new type of business interest transcending national frontiers. But as 
long as this interest was merely that of foreign bondholders, govern-
ments were extremely reluctant to allow them any say; for foreign 
loans were for a long time deemed purely speculative in the strictest 
sense of the term; vested income was regularly in home government 
bonds; no government thought it as worthy of support if its nationals 
engaged in the most risky job of loaning money to overseas govern-
ments of doubtful repute. Canning rejected peremptorily the impor-
tunities of investors who expected the British Government to take an 
interest in their foreign losses, and he categorically refused to make the 
recognition of Latin-American republics dependent upon their acknowl-
edgment of foreign debts. Palmerston's famous circular of 1848 is the 
first intimation of a changed attitude, but the change never went very 
far; for the business interests of the trading community were so widely 
spread that the Government could hardly afford to let any minor vested 
interest complicate the running of the affairs of a world empire. The I 
resumption of foreign policy interest in business ventures abroad was 
mainly the outcome of the passing of free trade and the consequent 
266 
NOTES ON SOURCES 
return to the methods of the eighteenth century. But as trade had now 
become closely linked with foreign investments of a nonspeculative but 
entirely normal character, foreign policy reverted to its traditional lines 
of being serviceable to the trading interests of the community. Not this 
latter fact, but the cessation of such interest during the hiatus stood in 
need of explanation. 
To Chap. 
THE SNAPPING 
OF THE 
GOLDEN THREAD 
The breakdown of the gold standard was precipitated by the forced 
stabilization of the currencies. The spearhead of the stabilization move-
ment was Geneva, which transmitted to the financially weaker states 
the pressures exerted by the City of London and Wall Street. 
The first group of states to stabilize was that of the defeated coun-
tries, the currencies of which had collapsed after World War I. The 
second group consisted of the European victorious states who stabilized 
their own currencies mainly after the first group. The third group con-
sisted of the chief beneficiary of the gold standard interest, the United 
States. 
I. Defeated 
Countries 
II. Victorious European 
Countries 
Went off 
Stabilized 
Stabilized 
gold 
1923 
Great Britain 1925 
1931 
1923 
Hungary 
•• 1924 
Belgium .... 1926 
1936 
Germany . 
.. 1924 
Bulgaria .. 
.. 1925 
Finland .. 
1925 
Esthonia .. 
.. 1926 
.. 1926 
III. Universal 
Lender 
Went off 
gold 
U.
S. A.
1933 
The imbalance of the first group was carried for a time by the 
second. As soon as this second group likewise stabilized its currency, 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested