asp.net mvc pdf generator : C# convert pdf to jpg Library control component .net azure wpf mvc Katalog_D21.1_2006_eng48-part2096

Further information
System description
Motors
6/15
Siemens D 21.1 · 2006
6
Configuration
Motor selection
The motor is selected on the basis of the required torque, which 
is defined by the application, e.g. traveling drives, hoisting 
drives, test stands, centrifuges, paper and rolling mill drives, 
feed drives or main spindle drives. Gear units for movement con-
version or for adapting the motor speed and motor torque to the 
load conditions must also be considered.
As well as the load torque, which is determined by the applica-
tion, the following mechanical data are among those required to 
calculate the torque to be provided by the motor:
• Masses to be moved
• Diameter of the drive wheel/diameter
• Leadscrew pitch, gear ratios
• Frictional resistance data
• Mechanical efficiency
• Traversing paths
• Maximum velocity
• Maximum acceleration and maximum deceleration
• Cycle time
You must decide whether synchronous or asynchronous motors 
(induction motors) are to be used.
Synchronous motors should be selected for compact construc-
tion volume, low rotor moment of inertia and therefore maximum 
dynamic response.
In this context, suitable motors would be the 1FT and 1FK, which 
can operate in "Servo" control mode.
Asynchronous motors (induction motors) can be used to in-
crease maximum speeds in the field-weakening range. Asyn-
chronous motors (induction motors) for higher powers are also 
available.
In this context, suitable motors would be the 1PL, 1PH, 1LA and 
1LG, which can operate in "Vector" control mode.
The following factors are of prime importance during configura-
tion:
• The type of line supply, when using specific types of motor 
and/or line filters on IT systems (non-grounded systems)
• The ambient temperatures and the installation altitude of the 
motors and drive components
The motor-specific limiting characteristics provide the basis for 
defining the motors.
These define the torque or power characteristic over speed and 
take into account the motor limits based on the DC-link voltage 
of the Power or Motor Module. The DC-link voltage in turn is de-
pendent on the line voltage and, with multi-motor drives, on the 
type of Line Module.
Limiting characteristics for asynchronous motors (induction motors) (ex-
ample)
Limiting characteristics for synchronous motors (example)
S6-40%
S6-60%
S1
S6-25%
n
2
Voltage
limiting characteristic 
G
_
D
2
1
1
_
E
N
_
0
0
0
3
0
a
Constant
torque
range
Constant power range 
(field weakening operation) 
n
rated
P
rated
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
0
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
3000
3500
S3-25%
S3-40%
S3-60%
S1-100 K
S1-60 K
0 (100 K)
(1)
(2)
T
o
r
q
u
e
i
n
N
m
Motor speed in rpm
M
max
governed by converter/motor
(1) Voltage limit curve for Basic Line Module and Smart Line Module 
(governed by DC link voltage)
(2) Voltage limit curve for Active Line Module 
(governed by DC link voltage)
G
_
D
2
1
2
_
E
N
_
0
0
0
0
4
a
Error processing SSI file
Further information
System description
Motors
6/16
Siemens D 21.1 · 2006
6
Configuration (continued)
Duty cycles
The motor is defined on the basis of the type of duty prescribed 
by the application. Different characteristics must be used for dif-
ferent duty requirements. The following operating scenarios 
have been defined:
• Duty cycles with constant ON duration
• Duty cycles with varying ON duration
• Free duty cycle
The aim is to identify characteristic torque and speed operating 
points, on the basis of which the suitable motor can be selected 
for a particular duty cycle.
Once the operating scenario has been defined and specified, 
the maximum motor torque is calculated. In general, this takes 
place during the acceleration phase. The load torque and the 
torque required to accelerate the motor are added together.
The maximum motor torque is then verified with the limiting char-
acteristics of the motors.
The following applies to 1PL and 1PH asynchronous motors 
(induction motors): Maximum motor torque=2×rated torque.
The following criteria must be taken into account when defining 
the motor:
• The dynamic limits must be observed, i.e. all speed-torque 
points of the relevant duty cycle must lie below the relevant 
limiting chacteristic.
• The thermal limits must be observed, i.e. for synchronous 
motors, the effective motor torque at the average motor speed 
resulting from the duty cycle must lie below the S1 character-
istic (continuous duty). For asynchronous motors (induction 
motors), the rms value of the motor current within a load duty 
cycle must be less than the rated motor current.
• It should be noted that the maximum permissible motor torque 
on synchronous motors at higher speeds is reduced as a re-
sult of the voltage limiting characteristic. In addition, a margin 
of 10% below the voltage limiting characteristic should be ob-
served to safeguard against voltage fluctuations.
• When using asynchronous motors (induction motors), the 
permissible motor torque in the field-weakening range is 
restricted by the voltage limiting characteristic (stability limit). 
A margin of 30% should be observed.
• When using an absolute encoder, the rated torque of the motor 
is reduced by 10% due to the thermal limits of the encoder.
Duty cycles with constant ON duration
Duty cycles with constant ON duration place specific require-
ments on the torque characteristic as a function of the speed, 
e.g.M=constant, M~n
2
,M~n or P=constant.
These drives typically work at a steady-state operating point. 
Base load dimensioning is applied. The base load torque must 
lie below the S1 characteristic.
In the event of transient overloads (e.g. when accelerating) an 
overload has to be taken into consideration. The peak torque 
must lie below the voltage limiting characteristic on synchronous 
motors or below the stability limit on asynchronous motors (in-
duction motors).
In summary, the dimensioning is as follows:
Selection of motors for duty cycles with constant ON duration (example)
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
0
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
3000
3500
0 (100 K)
(1)
S1
(2)
T
o
r
q
u
e
i
n
N
m
Motor speed in rpm
M
max
governed by converter/motor
(1) Voltage limit curve for Basic Line Module and Smart Line Module 
(governed by DC link voltage)
(2) Voltage limit curve for Active Line Module 
(governed by DC link voltage)
G
_
D
2
1
2
_
E
N
_
0
0
0
0
5
a
M = const. (basic load)
M = const. (overload)
Error processing SSI file
Further information
System description
Motors
6/17
Siemens D 21.1 · 2006
6
Configuration(continued)
Duty cycles with varying ON duration
As well as continuous duty (S1), standardized intermittent duty 
types (S3) are also defined for duty cycles with varying ON 
durations. S3 duty is an operation which comprises of a 
sequence of similar cycles, each of which comprises of a 
time with constant load and a break.
S1 duty (continuous operation)
S3 duty (intermittent duty without affecting the starting process)
Fixed variables are usually used for the relative ON duration:
• S3 – 60%
• S3 – 40%
• S3 – 25%
Corresponding motor characteristics are provided for these 
specifications. The load torque must lie below the correspond-
ing thermal limiting characteristic of the motor. Overload dimen-
sioning is taken into account for duty cycles with varying ON 
duration.
Free duty cycle
A load duty cycle defines the characteristics of the motor speed 
and the torque with respect to time.
A load torque is set for each time period. In addition to the load 
torque, the average load moment of inertia and motor moment of 
inertia must be taken into account for acceleration. A friction 
torque, which works in opposition to the direction of movement, 
may be required.
The gear ratio and gear efficiency must be taken into account 
when calculating the load and/or acceleration torque to be pro-
vided by the motor. A higher gear ratio increases positioning 
accuracy in terms of encoder resolution. At the given motor en-
coder resolution, as the gear ratio increases, so should the 
resolution of the machine position to be detected.
For further information about the importance of gearboxes, see 
the motor descriptions.
The effective torque M
eff
must lie below the S1 characteristic.
The maximum torque M
max
is reached during the acceleration 
process and must lie below the voltage limiting characteristic on 
synchronous motors and below the stability limit on asynchro-
nous motors (induction motors).
Motor selection
Based on the motor data it is now possible to identify a motor 
which meets the requirements of the application.
In a second step, a check is made as to whether the thermal 
limits are maintained. For this purpose, the motor current at base 
load must be calculated. For configuration based on duty cycle 
with constant ON duration with overload, the overload current 
based on the required overload torque must be calculated. The 
calculation rules for this purpose depend on the type of motor 
used (synchronous motor, asynchronous motor) (induction mo-
tors) and the operating scenario (duty cycles with constant ON 
duration, duty cycles with varying ON duration, free duty cycle).
Finally, the other characteristics of the motor must be defined. 
This is done by configuring the motor options (see motor 
description).
P
v
P
T
T
max
t
G_D212_XX_00008a
P
v
t
L
t
B
P
T
T
max
t
G_D212_XX_00009a
t
B
+t
L
t
B
t
r
=
n
M
t
∆ t
i
∆ t
i-1
∆ t
1
G_D212_XX_00010a
Error processing SSI file
Further information
System description
Motors
6/18
Siemens D 21.1 · 2006
6
Configuration(continued)
Drives with quadratic load torque
Drives with a quadratic load torque (M~n
2
), such as drives for 
pumps and ventilators, require the full torque at the rated speed. 
Increased starting torques or high load surges do not usually 
occur. It is therefore unnecessary to provide a higher overload 
capability for the Motor Module.
The following applies to selection of a suitable Motor Module for 
drives with a quadratic load torque: The rated current of the 
Motor Module must be at least as large as the motor current at 
full torque in the required load point.
When using standard 1LG and 1LA motors, these motors can 
also be loaded with the full rated power even in converter mode. 
They are then utilized according to temperature class F. How-
ever, if the motors may only be used according to temperature 
class B, the motor output must be derated by 10%.
Selection of suitable motors and power units for a specific appli-
cation is supported by the SIZER configuring tool.
Typical response of the permissible torque with self-cooled motors 
(e.g. 1LG/1LA) with a rated frequency of 50 Hz
Drives with constant load torque
The 1LG and 1LA self-cooled motors cannot produce their full 
rated torques throughout the complete speed range in continu-
ous operation. The continuous permissible torque decreases as 
the speed decreases because of the reduced cooling effect 
(see diagram).
Depending on the speed range, the torque, and thus the output, 
must be derated for self-cooled motors.
In the case of 1PL, 1PH and 1PQ forced-ventilated motors, no 
derating or only relatively minor derating (depending on their 
speed range) is required.
In the case of frequencies above the rated frequency f
rated
, the 
motors are operated in the field-weakening range. The usable 
torque is reduced in this case by approx. f
rated
/f, and the output 
remains constant. Especially in the control modes with V/f char-
acteristic, a sufficient margin of ≥30% from the breakdown 
torque, which decreases as a function of (f
rated
/f)
2
, must be 
provided.
The selected basic load current of the Power Module or Motor 
Module should be at least as high as the motor current at full 
torque in the required load point.
Selection of suitable motors and power units for a specific appli-
cation is supported by the SIZER configuring tool.
%
100
90
80
70
60
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
f
Hz
Constant flux range
Field weakening range
With forced ventilation
Utilization in acc. with
temperature class F
G
_
D
0
1
1
_
E
N
_
0
0
0
2
4
d
Utilization in acc. with
temperature class B
M/M
rated
Error processing SSI file
Further information
System description
Motors
6/19
Siemens D 21.1 · 2006
6
Configuration(continued)
Motor types
1LA and 1LG standard motors are recommended for applica-
tions with no special mechanical requirements. With regard to 
the voltage stress, the standard insulation of the motors is de-
signed such that operation on the converter is possible without 
limitation at voltages V≤500V (corresponding to a DC link volt-
age of V
d
≤720V).
1LA8, 1PQ8, 1LG6, 1PH7 and 1PL6 motors with shaft height 280 
are also available with a higher winding insulation resistance for 
converter-fed operation with supply voltages up to a line voltage 
of 690 V (corresponding to a DC link voltage of V
d
≤1035V) and 
do not require a filter.
With the reinforced insulation system, there is less slot space for 
the same number of winding turns as compared to normal insu-
lation; this means that the rated output of these motors is slightly 
lower.
For higher torque requirements, self-cooled motors 1LA4 or 
forced-ventilated motors 1PQ4 (IP55 degree of protection) from 
the H-compact II series are available for the higher output range.
1PH7 and 1PL6 motors are recommended where a wide speed 
range and high maximum speeds are required, but mounting 
space is limited. 1PH7/1PL6 motors with the same rated power 
are on average 1 to 2 shaft heights smaller than comparable 
standard asynchronous motors (induction motors).
For more information about motor types 1LA, 1LG and 1PQ8, 
please refer to Catalog D 81.1.
The full performance capability of the SINAMICS S120 drive sys-
tem can be utilized when it is combined with 1FT6 and 1FK7 syn-
chronous motors, 1FW3 torque motors and 1PH7, 1PL6 and 
1PH4 asynchronous motors (induction motors). The Control Unit 
evaluates the electronic rating plate and the motor-integrated 
encoders via the DRIVE-CLiQ interface. This means that motor 
and encoder data do not need to be parameterized when the 
system is commissioned or serviced. 
The following motor types are available with integrated 
DRIVE-CLiQ interface:
• 1FT6, 1FK7 synchronous motors
• 1FW3 torque motors
• 1PH7, 1PL6, 1PH4 asynchronous motors (induction motors)
The DRIVE-CLiQ interface is supplied with 24 V DC via the 
encoder cable.
For further information see three-phase Motors.
Motor protection
The Control Units which control the Power and Motor Modules 
contain a I
2
t detection circuit with which they supply a thermal 
model for calculating the motor temperature. These units there-
fore provide a simple, thermal motor protection function which 
requires no external components.
If necessary, more precise motor protection can be afforded by 
direct temperature measurement using KTY84 sensors or PTC 
thermistors in the motor winding.
When using KTY84 sensors, A23 is the relevant motor option 
which must be specified when ordering the 1LA8 and 
1LG4/1LG6 motors. These sensors are fitted as standard in 1FK, 
1FT, 1FW3, 1PH and 1PL motors.
If PTC thermistors are required, the motor option A11 or A12
must be specified when ordering the 1LG4/1LG6 motors. With 
1LA8/1PQ8 motors, the sensors are fitted as standard.
Bearing currents
In order to apply currents to the motor which are as sinusoidal as 
possible (smooth running, oscillation torques, stray losses), a 
high clock frequency is required for the output voltage. The 
steep voltage pulses generated at this frequency cause 
charge/discharge currents in the motor winding capacitance, 
which in turn generate circular magnetic flux in the motor. This 
physical effect is particularly evident with larger motors. As a 
result, the circuit can close via the two motor bearings, resulting 
in dangerous bearing currents. To eliminate the risk of these so-
called circular currents, it is advisable to insulate the bearings at 
the NDE on converter-fed motors.
The insulated bearing is standard for all 1LA8 motors which are 
designated for converter operation.
With the 1LG4/1LG6 motors of size 280 and above, an insulated 
bearing at the NDE is available as an option (order code L27).
With the 1PH7 and 1PL6 motors of size 180 and above, an insu-
lated bearing at the NDE is available as an option (order code 
L27).
Grounding deficiencies can cause rotor ground currents to flow 
from the motor shaft to the connected load. To prevent this type 
of bearing current, it is essential to ground the motor casing ef-
fectively, e.g. by means of a shielded motor cable. The motor 
housing and the housing of the Power Module or Motor Module 
must be coupled with the lowest possible resistance for the high-
frequency charge/discharge currents.
For this purpose, it is advisable to use a symmetrical, shielded 
three-core motor cable in which the PE conductor is arranged 
symmetrically around the conductors.
Motor reactors are also a suitable means of reducing the types 
of bearing current described above.
The motors must be mounted in the machine in such a way that 
no axial forces can act on the motor shaft and that vibration 
transfer to the shaft is eliminated as far as possible.
Operation of motors with type of protection "d"
Siemens 1MJ asynchronous motors can be connected as explo-
sion-proof motors with "flameproof enclosure" Eex de IIC both to 
the mains supply and to Power Modules or Motor Modules.
In accordance with the test directives, 1MJ motors must be 
equipped with PTC thermistors.
If 1MJ motors are connected to Power Modules or Motor Mod-
ules, their maximum permissible torque must be reduced and 
according to the load characteristic, when utilized according to 
temperature class B; this also applies to the 1LA motors of the 
same output.
1MJ motors have a terminal box with "increased safety" EEx e II 
as standard.
For further information about these motors, please refer to 
Catalog D 81.1.
Error processing SSI file
Further information
System description
Power Units
6/20
Siemens D 21.1 · 2006
6
Configuration (continued)
Overload capability
The power units of the Line Modules, Motor Modules and Power 
Modules are designed for brief overloads, i.e. the Modules are 
capable of supplying more than the rated current I
rated
for short 
periods. In this instance, the thermal storage capacity of the heat 
sink is utilized, allowing for the relevant thermal time constants. 
The power semiconductors and actual current sensing circuit 
are rated for a maximum current I
max
which must not be ex-
ceeded. The overload capability is determined by I
max
,I
rated
and the thermal time constants. A number of characteristic duty 
cycles are specified in the technical data for the power units. The 
SIZER configuring tool calculates the load on the basis of a 
specified duty cycle with optional time characteristic and then 
identifies the power unit which is required.
Derating characteristic curves
The power units can be operated with rated current or power 
and the specified pulse frequency up to an ambient temperature 
of 40 °C (104°F). The heat sink reaches the maximum permissi-
ble temperature at this operating point. If the ambient tempera-
ture increases above 40 °C (104°F), the resulting heat loss must 
be reduced to prevent the heat sink from overheating.
At a given current, the heat loss increases in proportion to the 
pulse frequency. The rated output current I
rated
must be reduced 
to ensure that the maximum heat loss or heat sink temperature 
for higher pulse frequencies is not exceeded. When the correc-
tion factor k
f
for the pulse frequency is applied, the rated output 
current I
ratedf
that is valid for the selected pulse frequency is 
adjusted.
When configuring a drive, please note that power units may not 
be capable of supplying the full current or power in the temper-
ature range between 40°C (104°F) and 55°C (131°F). The 
power units measure the heat sink temperature and protect 
themselves against thermal overloading at temperatures 
>40°C (104°F).
The air pressure, and therefore air density, drop at altitudes 
above sea level. At these altitudes, the same quantity of air does 
not have the same cooling effect and the air gap between two 
electrical conductors can only insulate a lower voltage. Typical 
air pressure values are:
0 m above sea level: 100kPa
2000 m (6562 ft) above sea level: 80kPa
3000 m (9843 ft) above sea level: 70kPa
4000 m (13124 ft) above sea level: 62kPa
5000 m (16405 ft) above sea level: 54kPa
At installation altitudes above 2000 m (6562 ft), the line voltage 
must not exceed certain limits to ensure that surge voltages can 
be insulated in accordance with EN60664-1 for surge voltage 
category III. If the line voltage is higher than this limit at installa-
tion altitudes > 2000 m (6562 ft), measures must be taken to re-
duce transient category III surge voltages to category II values, 
e.g. equipment must be supplied via an isolating transformer.
In order to calculate the permissible output current or power, the 
derating factors must be multiplied for the effects described 
above. The derating factor k
I
for current as a function of installa-
tion altitude can be offset against the derating factor k
T
for am-
bient temperature. If the result of multiplying derating factor k
T
by derating factor k
I
is greater than 1, then the calculation must 
be based on a rated current of I
rated
or I
ratedf
. If the result is <1, 
then it must be multiplied by the rated current I
rated
or I
ratedf
to 
calculate the maximum permissible continuous current. The de-
rating factor k=k
f
×k
T
×k
I
calculated by this method to obtain 
the total derating value must be applied to all current values in 
the specified duty cycles I
rated
,I
H
,I
L
).
The derating characteristics of Power Modules, Line Modules 
and Motor Modules can be found in the technical data of the 
relevant Module (see component descriptions).
I
T
t
t
G
_
D
2
1
1
_
E
N
_
0
0
1
2
0
I
rated
J av
T
J
T       medial junction temperature of the power semiconductor
T       junction temperature of the power semiconductor
J av
J
Error processing SSI file
Further information
System description
Power Units
6/21
Siemens D 21.1 · 2006
6
Configuration (continued)
Examples of derating characteristic curves and calculation of 
the permissible output current:
Current derating as a function of the ambient temperature
Current derating as a function of the installation altitude
Voltage derating as a function of the installation altitude
Example 1
A drive system is to be operated at an altitude of 2500 m 
(8202.5ft) at a maximum ambient temperature of 30 °C (86°F) 
and rated pulse frequency.
Since the ambient temperature is below 40 °C (104°F), a com-
pensation calculation (installation altitude/ambient temperature) 
can be applied.
Installation altitude 2500 m (8202.5 ft): Derating factor 
k
I
=0.965, k
U
=0.94
Max. ambient temperature 30 °C (86°F): Derating factor 
k
T
=1.133
k
I
×k
T
=0.965×1.133=1.093⇒1.0 due to installation 
altitude/ambient temperature compensation
k=k
f
×(k
I
×k
T
)=1.0×(1.0)=1.0
Result
: Current derating is not required.
However, IEC60664-1 stipulates that voltage derating is 
required.
The units in voltage range 380V to 480V can be operated up to 
a voltage of 480 V x 0.94 = 451 V, and the units in voltage range 
660 V to 690 V up to 690V×0.94=648V.
Example 2
When a drive group is configured, a Motor Module with the order 
number 6SL3320-1TE32-1AA0 is selected (rated output current 
210A, base load current for high overload 178 A). The drive 
group is to be operated at an altitude of 3000 m (9843 ft) where 
ambient temperatures could reach 35 °C (95°F) as a result of 
the installation conditions. The pulse frequency must be set to 
4kHz to provide the required dynamic response.
Installation altitude 3000 m (9843 ft): Derating factor k
I
=0.925, 
k
U
=0.88
Max. ambient temperature 35 °C (95°F): Derating factor 
k
T
=1.066
k
I
×k
T
=0.925×1.066=0.987⇒not fully compensated by 
installation altitude/ambient temperature
k=k
f
×(k
I
×k
T
)=0.82×(0.925×1.066)=0.809
Result
: Current derating is required.
Where these boundary conditions apply,
• the max. permissible continuous current of the Motor Module 
is: 210A×0.809=170A
• the base load current for high overloading is: 
178A×0.809=144A
IEC60664-1 stipulates that voltage derating is required.
The selected unit can be operated up to a voltage of 480 V 
3AC×0.88 or 720 V DC×0.88=422 V 3 AC or634V DC, i.e. 
under these conditions, a 400 V asynchronous motor (induction 
motors) can be operated without restriction. Due to the 
installation altitude, however, derating might be required for the 
asynchronous motor (induction motors).
Ambient temperature
G
_
D
2
1
1
_
E
N
_
0
0
0
0
4
k
T
D
e
r
a
t
i
n
g
f
a
c
t
o
r
1.3
1.2
1.1
1.0
0.9
0.8
o    55
13)        (122)   (
oF) (131)
l
l
l
1000
2000
m
0
3000
4000
G
_
D
2
1
1
_
E
N
_
0
0
0
0
5
P
e
r
m
i
s
s
i
b
l
e
c
o
n
t
i
n
u
o
u
s
c
u
r
r
e
n
t
i
n
%
o
f
r
a
t
e
d
c
u
r
r
e
n
t
D
e
r
a
t
i
n
g
f
a
c
t
o
r
k
l
1.00
0.95
0.90
0.85
100
95
90
85
Installation altitude above sea level
t)     (13126)
P
e
r
m
i
s
s
i
b
l
e
i
n
p
u
t
v
o
l
t
a
g
e
i
n
%
o
f
r
a
t
e
d
v
o
l
t
a
g
e
G
_
D
2
1
1
_
E
N
_
0
0
0
0
6
(3282) 
(6563) 
(9845) (ft) ) (13126)
100
90
80
70
1.0
0.9
0.7
0.8
Installation altitude above sea level
D
e
r
a
t
i
n
g
f
a
c
t
o
r
k
U
1000 
2000 
m
0
3000
4000
Error processing SSI file
Further information
System description
Power Units
6/22
Siemens D 21.1 · 2006
6
Configuration (continued)
Selection of the Power Module or Motor Module
The Motor Module is selected initially on the basis of standstill 
current I
0100K
(rated current for winding temperature rise 100 K) 
for synchronous motors and the rated current I
rated
for asynchro-
nous motors (induction motors), and is specified in the motor de-
scription. Dynamic overloads, e.g. during acceleration, must be 
taken into account by duty cycles and may demand a more pow-
erful Power Module or Motor Module. In this context, it is also im-
portant to remember that the output current of the Power Module 
or Motor Module decreases as a function of installation altitude, 
ambient temperature and pulse frequency setting (see explana-
tions of derating characteristics).
For an optimum configuration, the rms motor current I
load
calculated from the duty cycle is replicated on the Power Module 
or Motor Module. The following must apply:
I
rated, module
≥I
load
I
rated, module
=permissible continuous current of Power Module 
or Motor Module taking derating characteristic curves into 
account
The Power Modules or Motor Modules can be required to supply 
a higher output current for specific time periods. To configure an 
overload, the following must apply:
I
rated, module
×overload factor<I
overload
Overload factor = ratio I
rated, module
/I
max
, taking switching cycles 
into account (see component descriptions).
SIZER is capable of performing precise overload calculations.
Rated current – permissible and non-permissible motor/con-
verter combinations
• Motor rated current higher than rated output current of the 
Power Module or Motor Module:
In cases where a motor with a higher rated current than the 
rated output current of the Power Module or Motor Module is 
to be connected, the motor will only be able to operate under 
partial load. The following limit applies:
The short-time current (=1.5×base load current I
H
) should be 
higher or equal to the rated current of the connected motor.
Adhering to this dimensioning rule is important because the 
low leakage inductance of large motors causes current peaks 
which may result in drive system shutdown or in continuous 
output limiting by the internal protective electronic circuitry.
• Motor rated current significantly lower than rated output cur-
rent of the Power Module or Motor Module:
With the sensorless Vector control system used, the motor 
rated current must equal at least ¼ of the rated output current 
of the Power Module or Motor Module. With smaller motor cur-
rents, the drive can be operated in V/f control mode.
Using pulse width modulation, the Power Modules or Motor Mod-
ules generate an AC voltage to feed the connected motor from 
the DC voltage of the DC link. The magnitude of the DC link volt-
age is determined by the line voltage and, in the case of a Motor 
Module, by the Line Module used and thus the maximum possi-
ble output voltage (see component descriptions). The speed 
and loading of the connected motor define the required motor 
voltage. The maximum possible output voltage must be greater 
than or equal to the required motor voltage; it may be necessary 
to select a motor with a different winding.
It is not possible to utilize all modes of pulse width modulation 
when a sinusoidal filter is connected. The maximum possible 
output voltage (see sinusoidal filter) is lower as a result.
Long motor cables
Using pulse width modulation, the Power Modules or Motor Mod-
ules generate an AC voltage to feed the connected motor from 
the DC voltage of the DC link. Capacitive leakage currents are 
generated in clocked operation and these limit the permissible 
length of the motor cable. The maximum permissible motor ca-
ble length is specified for each Power Module or Motor Module 
in the component description.
Motor reactors limit the rate of rise and magnitude of the capac-
itive leakage currents, thereby allowing longer motor cables to 
be used. The motor reactor and motor cable capacitance form 
an oscillating circuit which must not be stimulated by the pulse 
pattern of the output voltage. The resonant frequency of this os-
cillating circuit must therefore be significantly higher than the 
pulse frequency. The longer the motor cable, the higher the ca-
ble capacitance and the lower the resonant frequency. To pro-
vide a sufficient safety margin between this resonant frequency 
and the pulse frequency, the maximum possible motor cable 
length is limited, even when several motor reactors are con-
nected in series. The maximum cable lengths in combination 
with motor reactors are specified in the technical data for the mo-
tor reactors.
Error processing SSI file
Further information
System description
Power Units
6/23
Siemens D 21.1 · 2006
6
Configuration (continued)
Booksize format Motor Modules
Where a long motor cable is required, a higher rating of Motor 
Module must be selected or the permissible continuous output 
current I
continuous
must be reduced in relation to the rated output 
current I
rated
. The configuring data for booksize format Motor 
Modules are given in the following table:
The permissible cable length for an unshielded motor cable is 
150% of the length for a shielded motor cable.
Motor reactors can also be used on motors operating in Vector 
andV/f control modes to allow the use of longer motor cables.
Line Modules
In multi-axis drive applications, a number of Motor Modules are 
operated on a common DC link, which is supplied with power by 
a Line Module.
The first task is to decide whether a Basic Line Module, 
Smart Line Module or an Active Line Module will be used. On the 
one hand, this depends on whether the drive must be capable 
of regenerative feedback to the supply and, on the other hand, 
whether the power supply infeed is to be unregulated and there-
fore dependent on the power supply voltage, or regulated to a 
constant DC link voltage.
Booksize Line Modules are available in smart and active formats 
and are both regenerative back to the supply.
The chassis format units are available in the 380 V to 480 V 
voltage range, but also include units in the 660 V to 690 V range. 
Basic Line Modules are designed for infeed operation only. 
Active Line Modules have regulated infeeds which feature a 
step-up function.
In order to calculate the required DC link power and select the 
correct Line Module, it is important to analyse the entire operat-
ing sequence of the drive group connected to the DC link. Fac-
tors such as partial load, redundancies, duty cycles, coinci-
dence factors and the operating mode (motor / generator mode) 
must be taken into account.
The DC link power P
d
of a single Motor Module is calculated from 
the shaft output P
mech
of the motor and the efficiency of the 
motor
η
m
and Motor Module 
η
wr
The following applies in motor mode: P
d
=P
mech
/(
η
m
×
η
wr
)
The following applies in generator mode: P
d
=P
mech
×
η
m
×
η
wr
The motor and generator outputs must be added with the corre-
sponding sign in order to calculate the total DC link power.
The rated infeed power of the Line Module refers to a line voltage 
of 380V, 460 V or 690V (690V applies only to chassis format 
Line Modules). Fluctuations in line voltage can affect the output 
power of the Line Modules. However, the maximum possible out-
put corresponds to the rated power of the relevant type size.
Depending on the ambient conditions (installation altitude, am-
bient temperature), the rated infeed power of the Line Modules 
may need to be reduced (see component description).
The coincidence factor takes into account the time characteristic 
of the torque for each individual axis.
On the basis of these principles, the following procedure can be 
used to dimension the Line Module:
Motor
Module
Length of motor cable (shielded)
Rated
output
current 
I
rated
>50 m 
(165 ft) to 
100 m 
(328 ft)
>100m 
(328 ft) to 
150m 
(492 ft)
>150 m 
(492 ft) to
200 m 
(656 ft)
>200m 
(656 ft)
3A/5A Use Motor 
Module 9A
Use Motor 
Module 9A
Not permissible e Not per-
missible
9 A
Use Motor 
Module 18A
Use Motor 
Module 18A
Not permissible e Not per-
missible
18 A
Use Motor 
Module 30A or
I
max
≤1.5×
I
rated
I
continuous
≤0.95×I
rated
Use Motor 
Module 30A
Not permissible e Not per-
missible
30 A
Permissible
I
max
≤1.35 
×I
rated
I
continuous
≤0.9
×I
rated
I
max
≤1.1
×I
rated
I
continuous
≤0.8
5×I
rated
Not per-
missible
45A/
60A
Permissible
I
max
≤1.75×
I
rated
I
continuous
≤0.9
×I
rated
I
max
≤1.5×
I
rated
I
continuous
≤0.85
×I
rated
Not per-
missible
85A/
132A
Permissible
I
max
≤1.35×
I
rated
I
continuous
≤0.95
×I
rated
I
max
≤1.1×
I
rated
I
continuous
≤0.9
×I
rated
Not per-
missible
200 A
Permissible
I
max
≤1.25×
I
rated
I
continuous
≤0.95
×I
rated
I
max
≤1.1×
I
rated
I
continuous
≤0.9
×I
rated
Not per-
missible
Required DC link power determined for each 
axis (taking into account the speed ratio, if 
required)
Axes categorized 
according to output class 
Simultaneity factor used for each output 
class and the required DC link power 
determined for each output class 
Total required DC link power determined 
Selection of Line Module taking into 
account the supply voltage and ambient 
conditions
G
_
D
2
1
2
_
E
N
_
0
0
0
1
2
Error processing SSI file
Further information
System description
Power Units
6/24
Siemens D 21.1 · 2006
6
Configuration (continued)
The following factors must also be taken into account when 
dimensioning the DC link:
7
Braking operation
As device losses are important in motor mode, the dimensioning 
for motor mode is also applicable to generator mode. With re-
spect to motor braking operation, check that the energy fed 
back into the DC link does not exceed the permissible peak load 
capability of the Line Module.
In the case of higher regenerative outputs and to control the "line 
failure" operating scenario, a Braking Module must be provided, 
the Smart or Active Line Module must be overdimensioned or the 
regenerative output reduced by longer braking times.
For the configuration of the "EMERGENCY STOP" operating sce-
nario, the Line Module must either be overdimensioned or an ad-
ditional Braking Module must be used, so that the DC link energy 
can be dissipated as quickly as possible.
7
Checking the DC link capacitance
During power-up, the Line Modules limit the charging current for 
the DC link capacitors. Due to the limits imposed by the pre-
charging circuit, it is essential to observe the maximum permis-
sible DC link capacitance values for the drive group specified in 
the technical data.
7
DC link pre-charging frequency
The pre-charging frequency of the DC link via a booksize format 
Line Module is calculated using the following formula:
For chassis format Line Modules, the maximum permissible DC 
link pre-charging interval is 3 minutes.
7
Special considerations for operation on Basic or Smart 
Line Module
Basic Line Modules and Smart Line Modules provide a lower DC 
link voltage than Active Line Modules. As a result, the following 
boundary conditions apply:
• When operating asynchronous motors (induction motors), a 
lower maximum motor power is available at high speeds at the 
same line voltage.
• On synchronous motors, a reduction in the dynamic drive 
characteristics must be expected at high speeds.
• On synchronous motors, the rated motor speed cannot be 
fully utilized when an overload capability is required.
Basic Line Modules
The DC link voltage U
d
of the Basic Line Modules is load-depen-
dent. Under no-load conditions, the DC link is charged to the line 
voltage crest value U
L
, i.e. U
d
=√2×U
L
, e.g. U
d
=650V when 
a 460 V supply system is connected.
Under load conditions, the DC link voltage reaches the average 
value of the rectified line voltage applied to the terminals. This 
average value is determined by the line voltage x factor 1.35. 
Owing to the voltage drop across the line reactor and in the line 
feeder cable, the DC link voltage under full load conditions is 
slightly lower than the theoretical value. In practice, the range of 
the DC link voltage U
d
is as follows:
1.41×U
L
>U
d
>1.32×U
L
(no load→rated output)
Smart Line Modules
The DC link voltage U
d
of Smart Line Modules is regulated to the 
average value of the rectified line voltage U
L
, i.e. U
d
≈1.35×U
L
Due to the voltage drop across the line reactor and in the line 
feeder cable, the DC link voltage decreases in motor operation 
and increases in generator operation. The DC link voltage U
d
thus varies within the same range as on drives with a Basic Line 
Module:
1.41×U
L
>U
d
>1.32×U
L
(rated output generator mode→
rated output motor mode)
Active Line Modules
The DC link voltage U
d
is regulated to an adjustable value 
(Active Mode). An Active Line Module can also be switched to 
Smart Mode and then operates like a Smart Line Module. In 
Active Mode, the Active Line Module draws a virtually sinusoidal 
current from the supply system.
Parallel connection of power units
Up to 4 Motor Modules or Line Modules in chassis format can be 
connected in parallel. Parallel connections can operate only in 
Vector control mode.
Parallel connections may only include Motor Modules or Line 
Modules of the same type and with the same voltage and output 
ratings. Mixtures of different modules, e.g. Basic Line Modules 
and Active Line Modules, cannot be connected in parallel. The 
CU320 or SIMOTION D Control Unit can control only one drive 
object of type "Parallel connection Line Modules" and one of type 
"Parallel connection Motor Modules". It is assumed that all Line 
Modules or Motor Modules linked to the Control Unit are con-
nected in parallel. A Control Unit can control, for example, the 
following components:
1 Line Module + 2 Motor Modules connected in parallel, 2 Line 
Modules connected in parallel + 3 Motor Modules connected in 
parallel. Combinations such as the following are not permissible: 
2 Line Modules + 2 Motor Modules connected in parallel + 1 
Motor Module
In order to ensure symmetrical current distribution among all 
parallel-connected modules, inductances must be provided for 
subsystem decoupling. However, the current compensatory 
control cannot completely prevent asymmetrical current distri-
bution, which means that the following derating factors apply to 
parallel connections:
Number of pre-charges
within 8 mins
=
max. permissible DC link
capacity infeed unit in 
µ
F
Σ DC link capacity of configured 
drive line – up in 
µ
F
Designation
Derating factor for 
parallel connection of 
2 to 4 Modules
Max. permissible 
number of parallel-
connected Modules
Active Line Modules
0.95
4
Basic Line Modules
0.925
4
Motor Modules
0.95
4
Error processing SSI file
Error processing SSI file