asp.net mvc pdf editor : Convert pdf to jpg SDK software service wpf windows html dnn good-and-cheap1-part284

Chocolate
Zucchini 
Muffins
makes
twenty
-
four
small
muffins
Preheat the oven to 350 °F.
Cut off the round end of the zucchini 
(which is a little tough), but keep the 
stem to use as a handhold. Shred the 
zucchini with a box grater, stopping 
when you get to the stem.
Butter or oil 24 muffin tins, or just line 
them with muffin cups.
Measure the dry ingredients (flour, oats, 
cocoa powder, sugar, cinnamon, baking 
soda, and salt) into a medium bowl.
Mix the zucchini, eggs, and yogurt in 
a larger bowl. Add the dry ingredients, 
then mix until everything is just 
combined. Add the chocolate chips if 
you’re using them, then stir once.
With a spoon, dollop the batter into the 
muffin tins until each cup is about ¾ 
full and bake for 20 minutes.
Pull the muffins out and poke with a 
toothpick or knife. If it comes out wet, 
bake the muffins for 5 more minutes.
Let the muffins cool in their tins for 20 
to 30 minutes, then eat them warm!
$4.80
total
$0.20
/
muffin
When my friend Michael challenged 
me to create a recipe that used dark 
chocolate, I got a little worried: dark 
chocolate is expensive!
But then I remembered that cocoa 
powder is deeply, darkly chocolaty, 
without the expense. I thought of the 
chocolate zucchini cake my mother 
made when I was growing up and 
knew I had something.
This is a great breakfast treat that 
uses staples you should generally have 
on hand like flour, oats, and yogurt. 
The yogurt and zucchini make these 
muffins super moist and yummy, but 
still a reasonably nutritious (if slightly 
sugary) choice for breakfast.
Make these in mid-summer, during the 
height of zucchini season, when larger 
zucchini are really cheap. Big zucchini 
are generally a bit woodier, but they’re 
still great for baking.
2 cups grated zucchini
1½ cups all-purpose flour 
1½ cups oats
½ cup cocoa powder
1½ cups sugar
1 tbsp cinnamon (optional)
2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt
4 eggs
1 cup plain yogurt
½ cup dark chocolate chips (optional)
breakfast
21
breakfast
20
Changing pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi; convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg
Changing pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf file to jpg format; change from pdf to jpg
Whole-Wheat Jalapeño 
Cheddar Scones
makes
six
These are delicious for breakfast or with 
a plate of beans, a pile of vegetables, or 
alongside a chili or stew. Spicy, cheesy, 
flaky—these are best eaten straight out 
of the oven.
½ cup butter
2½ cups whole-wheat flour
1 tbsp baking powder
1 tsp salt
4 oz sharp cheddar, diced
1 jalapeño, finely diced
2 eggs, lightly beaten
½ cup milk
egg
wash
1 egg
salt and pepper
Place the butter in the freezer for 30 minutes.
Turn the oven to 400 °F. Line a baking sheet with 
parchment paper, or lightly grease the pan if you don’t 
have the paper.
In a large bowl, combine the flour, baking powder, and 
salt. 
Prepare your jalapeño and cheese. Cutting the cheese 
into cubes rather than grating it means you’ll have 
pockets of gooey cheese that contrast nicely with the 
scone. If you want the spice of the jalapeño, leave the 
seeds and membrane; if you like it milder, remove them 
and chop up only the pepper itself.
Remove the butter from the freezer and grate it directly 
into the flour mixture. (Use a cheese grater—it’s the 
best way to break up butter without melting it.) Using 
your hands, gently squish the butter into the flour until 
everything is incorporated but not smooth. The chunks 
of butter will create flaky scones. Add the jalapeño, 
cheese, eggs, and milk to the bowl, then use your hands 
to gently mix everything until it just comes together. It 
will probably be a little shaggy, but that’s just fine.
Sprinkle flour on a clean countertop and dump the 
dough onto it. Gently shape the dough into a disc about 
1½” thick. Cut the dough into six triangles, like a pizza, 
and move them to the cookie sheet.
In a small bowl, gently beat the egg for the egg wash. 
Brush it over the scones, then sprinkle salt and pepper 
over each one. Bake for 25 minutes or until the scones 
are golden brown.
$4.50
total
$0.75
/
scone
breakfast
23
breakfast
22
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
combine various scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif PDF together and save as new PDF, without changing the previous two PDF documents at
best pdf to jpg converter online; best program to convert pdf to jpg
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
PDF. Supports tiff compression selection. Supports for changing image size. Also supports convert PDF files to jpg, jpeg images. C#
convert pdf to jpg batch; change file from pdf to jpg on
Peanut Butter 
and Jelly 
Granola Bars
makes
twelve
Heat the oven to 350 °F.
Butter or oil an 8” x 11” baking pan. If you have a 
different size pan, that’s fine—it’ll just change how 
thick the bars are.
Pour the oats into a large bowl. You can use quick oats 
if they’re all you have, but I prefer the bite and chew 
of rolled oats. For a different texture, you can also 
substitute a cup of oats with a cup of Rice Krispies, but 
the bars are great either way.
Add the peanut butter, half the jelly, the water, and the 
salt to a small pan. Stir over low heat until it’s smooth.
Mix the peanut butter and jelly concoction into the oats 
until all the oats are coated and you have a sticky mass. 
Dump the mixture into the oiled pan and press it into 
an even layer. Spread the remaining jelly over the top.
Pop the pan into the oven for 25 minutes, until it’s 
toasty and brown around the edges. Mmm. Crunchy.
Leave the bars in the pan until they cool completely, 
about an hour, then slice into 12 bars.
$3.60
total
$0.30
/
bar
Tired of endless PB+J sandwiches? Give 
these bars a try instead! I designed them 
for my friend Alex, who is allergic to 
gluten and is the best long-distance 
runner I know. I wanted to create a 
simple but nutritious breakfast that he 
could grab on his way out for a run. 
They are a little more crumbly than a 
store-bought granola bar, however.
As a bonus, these are made entirely 
from ingredients that you can find in 
any corner store or food pantry. Any 
kind of jam or jelly will do; I used 
blueberry, but grape or strawberry or 
any other flavor would be tasty.
3 cups rolled oats (or 2 cups 
oats and 1 cup Rice Krispies)
½ cup peanut butter
½ cup jelly or jam
¼ cup hot water
¼ tsp salt
butter or vegetable oil
additions
nuts
coconut
dried fruit
honey
breakfast
25
breakfast
24
VB.NET Image: PDF to Image Converter, Convert Batch PDF Pages to
used commonly in daily life (like tiff, jpg, png, bitmap format in VB programming code, like changing "tif" to users are also allowed to convert PDF to other
change file from pdf to jpg; convert multipage pdf to jpg
C# Tiff Convert: How to Convert Raster Images (Jpeg/Png/Bmp/Gif)
Give You Sample Codes for Changing and Converting Jpeg, Png RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.jpg"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output
best pdf to jpg converter for; convert .pdf to .jpg
Egg Sandwich with 
Mushroom Hash
for
two
Egg sandwiches are a mainstay of every corner deli in NYC, and for good reason: they’re cheap and easy, 
fast and delicious. I knew I had to include one when Charlene, one of my early supporters, asked for a 
recipe with eggs and mushrooms. (I’m thankful she did! Because I don’t really like mushrooms, they’re 
scarce in this book, even though plenty of people love them.) Like most sandwiches, this recipe is really 
flexible. In particular, you can change the hash to use whatever you have around. Sad leftovers can take 
on new life when turned into a hash and matched with the rich fattiness of a morning egg.
$3.60
total
$1.80
/
sandwich
2 tsp butter
1 small potato, diced
½ lb mushrooms, sliced
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 eggs
salt and pepper
2 rolls, 2 English muffins, 
or 4 slices of bread
additions
tomato, sliced
avocado
cheese
variations
potato and onion
potato and pea
collards and bacon
zucchini 
chorizo and green chili
Melt half the butter in a pan on medium heat, then throw in the potato 
and cook for 5 minutes, stirring minimally. Season with salt and 
pepper. Add the mushrooms and garlic, as well as a splash of water if 
the potatoes are getting stuck to the pan. Cook for another 5 minutes, 
until the mushrooms are brown and have shrunk down.
Test the potato by piercing one piece with a fork. If it goes through 
easily, you’re done. If not, cook for a few more minutes. (The smaller 
the potatoes are chopped, the quicker they’ll cook.) Taste and adjust the 
seasoning to your preferences.
Melt the other teaspoon of butter in another pan on medium heat. Crack 
the eggs into the pan and dust with salt and pepper again. Salt and 
pepper are critical to these ingredients, so don’t worry about overdoing it.
If you like your eggs sunny-side up, place a lid over the pan to ensure 
the whites will cook through without making the yolks hard. Once the 
whites are no longer translucent, take them off the heat. 
If you like eggs over-easy (my favorite), wait until the yolks are cooked 
but still look runny, then flip each egg with a spatula and let the other 
side cook for about 15 seconds. That’ll get your whites fully cooked, but 
keep the yolks runny—the best. If you prefer hard yolks (please no!), 
then cook for a little longer.
Toast the bread or bun, then assemble it into a sandwich, using any 
condiments you like. Way better than what you’ll find at the corner deli.
breakfast
27
breakfast
26
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
PowerPoint: PPT, PPTX, PPS, PPSX; PDF: Portable Document Raster Image Files: BMP, GIF, JPG, PNG, JBIG2PDF in or zoom out functions, and changing file rotation
convert pdf file to jpg on; best pdf to jpg converter
This basic recipe can be dressed 
up in so many ways, you’ll 
never get bored. Oatmeal makes 
a hot and comforting breakfast; 
it’ll give you energy for a great 
morning. It’s also extremely 
inexpensive, so you can spend a 
bit more on lunch and dinner.
In a small pot, add the oats, 
water and salt. Place it on 
medium-high heat, just until 
the water comes to a boil. 
Immediately turn the heat to 
low and place a lid on the pot. 
Cook for 5 minutes, until the 
oats are soft and tender and 
most of the water has cooked 
off. You can add more water if 
you like your oatmeal smooth 
and thin, or use slightly less if 
you want a thick oatmeal. 
This is just the basic recipe; 
several ideas for how to make 
it your own follow on the next 
pages. Whether it’s milky and 
sweet or savory and salty, I’m 
sure you can find a favorite 
way to enjoy a hot bowl of oats 
in the morning!
ideas
Oatmeal 
1 cup rolled oats
2 cups water
¼ tsp salt
½ cup berries, fresh or frozen
1 tbsp sugar
coconut
and
lime
oatmeal
: Add 
the coconut and sugar to the 
oatmeal, water, and salt. Cook 
as normal. Turn off the heat 
and squeeze the juice of half a 
lime over the top.
¼ cup coconut, shredded
2 tbsp sugar
½ lime, juiced 
berry
oatmeal
: Cook the oatmeal 
as usual, but 2 minutes before 
it’s ready, add some fresh or 
frozen berries and the sugar, 
then stir to combine. There’s 
nothing more to the recipe than 
that, but it’s surprising how 
many variations you can come 
up with just by trying a new 
type of berry or combining 
several varieties.
$1.50
total
$0.75
/
serving
$1.10
total
$0.55
/
serving
$0.25
total
$0.13
/
serving
breakfast
29
breakfast
28
½ cup canned pumpkin
¾ cup milk (or almond / soy milk)
1¼ cups water
2 tbsp brown sugar
1 tsp cinnamon
optional
¼ tsp ginger powder
¼ tsp clove powder
maple syrup
pumpkin
oatmeal
: Whisk the 
pumpkin, milk, and water in 
a pot. Add the oats, salt, sugar, 
and spices, but use just 1¼ cups 
water. Cook on medium-low 
until it bubbles. Turn to low for 
5 more minutes. Add syrup or 
more sugar to taste.
1 tsp cinnamon 
1 tbsp orange zest, finely grated
4 tbsp honey
2 tbsp almonds or pistachios, chopped
baklava
oatmeal
: Before cooking 
the oatmeal as normal, add the 
cinnamon, orange zest and 2 
tablespoons of honey. Once it’s 
cooked, top each bowl with 
another tablespoon of honey 
and a tablespoon of nuts.
2 cups apple juice or cider
1 tsp cinnamon
1 apple, cored and chopped
apple
cinnamon
oatmeal
: Cook 
the oats in juice and cinnamon 
instead of water. Top with the 
apple. If you want the apple to 
be soft and warm, cook it along 
with the oats.
2-3 scallions, finely chopped
¼ cup sharp cheddar, grated
1 tsp butter
2 eggs
savory
oatmeal
: Cook the 
oatmeal with scallions. 
Just before it’s done, 
add cheese. Melt the 
butter in a pan on 
medium heat. Crack in 
the eggs, then cover. 
Fry until the yolks are 
runny but the whites 
are cooked, then top 
each bowl of oats with 
one fried egg!
$1.50
total
$0.75
/
serving
$1.50
total
$0.75
/
serving
$2
total
$1
/
serving
$1.50
total
$0.75
/
serving
breakfast
31
breakfast
30
ideas
Yogurt
Smash!
There are so many types of yogurt in 
the grocery store: some low in fat and 
high in sugar, some with cute animal 
pictures. Some are Greek. Some have 
chocolate shavings and candy. Some 
have names like “key lime pie.”
Now forget about all of that. The 
best value for your money are the 
big buckets of plain yogurt. The fat 
content is your choice—just check that 
it doesn’t contain gelatin and you’re 
all set. Starting with plain yogurt, 
you can make super flavors in your 
own kitchen, where you know exactly 
what’s going into it.
If you have kids, ask them what 
flavors they can imagine and go make 
it! It’s a lot more fun than letting 
the supermarket choose for you. Try 
something new and smash it in! Check 
out the ideas on the adjoining page.
If you want a thicker Greek-style 
yogurt, all you have to do is strain 
regular American yogurt through 
cheesecloth to remove the extra water.
Yogurt’s versatility makes it a great 
staple to keep in the fridge. Mix it with 
some of the items you see on the next 
page or turn it into a savory sauce like 
raita (p. 164) or tzatziki (p. 165).
raspberry!
coconut!
honey!
jam!
yogurt
breakfast
33
breakfast
32
Soup
It’s a cliché, but as soon as the weather 
gets cold, my apartment fills with the 
smell of vegetables simmering for soup. 
Vegetable soups are so simple that you 
can easily invent your own, using the 
stuff you and your family like. Start 
with some onion, carrot, celery, maybe 
a pepper; then add broth and a large 
amount of, say, spinach, and suddenly 
you have spinach soup! It’s a great way 
for new cooks to gain some confidence. 
Just remember to season it enough. 
Dunk a grilled-cheese sandwich in it 
and even mediocre soup tastes great.
Dal 
for
four
You can use any type of lentil you like. If you’re 
using larger lentils (like chana dal, french 
lentils, or split mung beans), soak them for 
30 minutes to start. If you’re using the small 
orange lentils, then don’t bother soaking them; 
they cook very quickly.
Melt butter in a saucepan on medium heat. Add 
the onion and let it cook for 1 minute, then add 
the cumin and mustard seeds and stir them 
around with the onions until they sizzle. Toss 
in the turmeric powder, garlic, and chili and 
cook for 3 to 4 more minutes. Add the ginger 
root and stir fry quickly for about 30 seconds. 
Add the lentils along with enough water 
to cover them, then place a lid on top. Let 
everything cook for 20 to 45 minutes, or until 
the lentils are tender. Taste the dal and add salt 
and pepper. You’ll probably need a fair bit of salt 
to bring out all the flavors—a teaspoon or so.
If you have them available, top the dish with a 
splash of cream or some chopped fresh cilantro.
This thick lentil soup is a flavor-packed staple 
of the Indian table. There are a ton of ways to 
prepare dal, but the core—beyond the lentils 
themselves—is usually ginger, garlic, and chili, 
along with some dry spices.
$2.40
total
$0.60
/
serving
2 cups lentils
1 tbsp butter
1 onion, finely chopped
1 tsp cumin seeds
1 tsp black mustard seeds
1 tsp turmeric powder
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 green chili, finely chopped
½ inch ginger root, grated
salt and pepper
34
soup
35
4 cups corn, fresh, canned, or frozen
1 tbsp butter
1 onion, finely chopped
2 sticks celery, finely chopped
1 green or red bell pepper, finely chopped
1 small potato, diced
4 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 chili pepper, finely chopped (optional)
1 tbsp cornmeal or flour
salt and pepper
corn
broth
4 to 8 cobs corn, with corn removed
2 bay leaves (optional)
salt 
alternate
broth
5 cups vegetable broth or chicken stock
If you’re making this soup with corn on the cob, the 
first step is to make corn broth. If you’re using canned 
or frozen corn, you’ll also need chicken or vegetable 
broth instead. In that case, skip the next paragraph.
To make corn broth, place the cobs and bay leaves in a 
large stockpot and cover with water. Bring to a boil over 
high heat, then turn the heat down to medium and let 
the water boil for about 30 minutes. Taste the broth and 
add salt and pepper until it tastes lightly corny. Boil it 
down until you have about 5 cups of liquid. The broth 
will keep for several months if frozen, or a few weeks in 
the refrigerator.
To make the soup, melt the butter in a large pot or 
Dutch oven on medium heat. Add onion, celery, bell 
pepper, and potato, then stir. Cover the pot and let 
everything fry and steam for about 5 minutes.
Take the lid off the pot and add the garlic and chili 
pepper, if using. Stir the vegetables, using a splash of 
water or broth to free any that get stuck to the bottom 
of the pot.
Let the vegetables cook, stirring occasionally, for 
another 5 minutes. They should be lightly browned and 
soft, although the potatoes will not be fully cooked yet. 
Add the corn and cornmeal or flour to the pot and stir. 
Cover with about 5 cups of broth and bring to a boil, 
then turn the heat down to low and simmer for about 
30 minutes. The broth will thicken and become opaque. 
Add salt and pepper to taste. If you made your own 
corn broth, you’ll probably need at least a teaspoon of 
salt; if you used store-bought broth, you’ll need less.
Serve with a slice of garlic bread or add a hard-boiled 
egg for extra protein.
This thick, sweet, satisfying soup is 
a favorite of kids and adults. This is 
wonderful to make at the beginning of 
autumn when corn on the cob is at its 
peak, but canned corn can also make 
it a warm reminder of summer in the 
depths of winter.
Corn Soup
for
four
to
six
$5
total
$1.25
/
serving
soup
37
soup
36
French 
Onion 
Soup
for
six
4 lb onions, any type
4 cloves garlic
2 tbsp butter
2 bay leaves
1 tbsp vinegar, any type (optional)
3 tsp salt
pepper
8 cups water
6 slices bread
1½ cups cheddar, grated
additions
beef or chicken stock instead of water 
red wine 
chili flakes
fresh thyme
$9
total
$1.50
/
serving
Best if you accept it now: you are going 
to cry making this recipe, since the first 
step is to chop a mountain of onions. 
But crying is good for us from time 
to time. Soon you will be on to the 
magical part, watching a colossal pile of 
onions shrink and caramelize to make 
a sweet, flavorful, wonderful soup. 
Save this recipe for the winter, when 
other vegetables are out of season and 
you want to fill your home with warm 
aromas. As my friend Marilyn, who 
suggested this recipe, said, “the smell in 
your kitchen is absolute heaven.”
Chop each onion in half lengthwise, 
peel them, then cut them into half-
moon slices. These big slices are fine 
since you’re cooking the onions for so 
long. Slice the garlic as well.
Melt the butter in a large pot on 
medium heat. Add the onions, garlic, 
and bay leaves. Cover the pot with a 
lid and leave it for 10 minutes. When 
you come back, the onions should have 
released a lot of moisture. Give them a 
stir. Pour in the vinegar and put the lid 
back on.
Cook for 1 hour, stirring every 20 
minutes. When the onions at the 
bottom start to stick and turn dark, 
add a splash of water to unstick them. 
Don’t worry, the onions aren’t burning, 
just caramelizing. The water helps lift 
off the sticky, delicious, sweet part!
Once the onions are very dark and 
about a quarter the volume they once 
were, add all the water and a bunch of 
salt and pepper. Cover the pot again, 
turn the heat down to low, and let it 
simmer for another hour. Taste and 
adjust salt and pepper as needed.
Ladle the soup into bowls.
Now it’s time to make cheese toast! If 
you want classic French onion soup—
with the toast directly in the soup, 
which makes it a bit soggy—place a 
piece of bread on top of each bowl of 
soup, sprinkle with cheese, then heat 
the bowls under your oven’s broiler 
until the cheese is bubbly.
If you don’t like soggy toast, just make 
the cheese toast on its own and serve it 
on the side to dunk.
soup
39
soup
38
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested