THE RESPIRATORY CHAIN & OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION / 101
Oxidative
phosphorylation
ADP
ATP
Glycolysis
CK
g
CK
m
CK
c
CK
a
Creatine-P
Creatine
ADP
ATP
ATP
ADP
Energy-requiring
processes
(eg, muscle contraction)
Matrix
O
u
t
e
r
m
i
t
o
c
h
o
n
d
r
i
a
l
m
e
m
b
r
a
n
e
ADP
Cytosol
Inter-membrane
space
ATP
P
P
Adenine
nucleotide
transporter
I
n
n
e
r
m
i
t
o
c
h
o
n
d
r
i
a
l
m
e
m
b
r
a
n
e
Figure 12–14.
The creatine phosphate shuttle of
heart and skeletal muscle. The shuttle allows rapid
transport of high-energy phosphate from the mito-
chondrial matrix into the cytosol. CK
a
, creatine kinase
concerned with large requirements for ATP, eg, mus-
cular contraction; CK
c
, creatine kinase for maintaining
equilibrium between creatine and creatine phosphate
and ATP/ADP; CK
g
, creatine kinase coupling glycolysis
to creatine phosphate synthesis; CK
m
, mitochondrial
creatine kinase mediating creatine phosphate produc-
tion from ATP formed in oxidative phosphorylation; P,
pore protein in outer mitochondrial membrane.
tion in mitochondrial DNA and may be involved in
Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes mellitus. A number of
drugs and poisons act by inhibition of oxidative phos-
phorylation (see above).
SUMMARY 
• Virtually all energy released from the oxidation of
carbohydrate, fat, and protein is made available in
mitochondria as reducing equivalents (H or e).
These are funneled into the respiratory chain, where
they are passed down a redox gradient of carriers to
their final reaction with oxygen to form water.
• The redox carriers are grouped into respiratory chain
complexes in the inner mitochondrial membrane.
These use the energy released in the redox gradient to
pump protons to the outside of the membrane, creat-
ing an electrochemical potential across the membrane.
• Spanning the membrane are ATP synthase com-
plexes that use the potential energy of the proton gra-
dient to synthesize ATP from ADP and P
i
. In this
way, oxidation is closely coupled to phosphorylation
to meet the energy needs of the cell.
• Because the inner mitochondrial membrane is imper-
meable to protons and other ions, special exchange
transporters span the membrane to allow passage of
ions such as OH
, P
i
, ATP
4−
, ADP
3−
, and metabo-
lites, without discharging the electrochemical gradi-
ent across the membrane.
• Many well-known poisons such as cyanide arrest res-
piration by inhibition of the respiratory chain.
REFERENCES
Balaban RS: Regulation of oxidative phosphorylation in the mam-
malian cell. Am J Physiol 1990;258:C377.
Hinkle PC et al: Mechanistic stoichiometry of mitochondrial ox-
idative phosphorylation. Biochemistry 1991;30:3576.
Mitchell P: Keilin’s respiratory chain concept and its chemiosmotic
consequences. Science 1979;206:1148.
Smeitink J et al: The genetics and pathology of oxidative phosphor-
ylation. Nat Rev Genet 2001;2:342.
Tyler DD: The Mitochondrion in Health and Disease. VCH Pub-
lishers, 1992.
Wallace DC: Mitochondrial DNA in aging and disease. Sci Am
1997;277(2):22.
Yoshida M et al: ATP synthase—a marvellous rotary engine of the
cell. Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 2001;2:669.
Convert pdf pages to jpg online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf pages to jpg online; convert pdf file into jpg
Convert pdf pages to jpg online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
batch convert pdf to jpg; change from pdf to jpg on
102
Carbohydrates of 
Physiologic Significance
Peter A. Mayes, PhD, DSc, & David A. Bender, PhD
BIOMEDICAL IMPORTANCE
Carbohydrates are widely distributed in plants and ani-
mals; they have important structural and metabolic
roles. In plants, glucose is synthesized from carbon
dioxide and water by photosynthesis and stored as
starch or used to synthesize cellulose of the plant frame-
work. Animals can synthesize carbohydrate from lipid
glycerol and amino acids, but most animal carbohy-
drate is derived ultimately from plants. Glucoseis the
most important carbohydrate; most dietary carbohy-
drate is absorbed into the bloodstream as glucose, and
other sugars are converted into glucose in the liver.
Glucose is the major metabolic fuel of mammals (ex-
cept ruminants) and a universal fuel of the fetus. It is
the precursor for synthesis of all the other carbohy-
drates in the body, including glycogenfor storage; ri-
boseand deoxyribose in nucleic acids; and galactose
in lactose of milk, in glycolipids, and in combination
with protein in glycoproteins and proteoglycans. Dis-
eases associated with carbohydrate metabolism include
diabetes mellitus, galactosemia, glycogen storage
diseases,and lactose intolerance.
CARBOHYDRATES ARE ALDEHYDE 
OR KETONE DERIVATIVES OF
POLYHYDRIC ALCOHOLS
(1) Monosaccharidesare those carbohydrates that
cannot be hydrolyzed into simpler carbohydrates: They
may be classified as trioses, tetroses, pentoses, hex-
oses,or heptoses,depending upon the number of car-
bon atoms; and as aldosesor ketosesdepending upon
whether they have an aldehyde or ketone group. Exam-
ples are listed in Table 13–1.
(2)Disaccharidesare condensation products of two
monosaccharide units. Examples are maltose and su-
crose. 
(3)Oligosaccharidesare condensation products of
two to ten monosaccharides; maltotriose* is an exam-
ple.
13
*Note that this is not a true triose but a trisaccharide containing
three α-glucose residues.
(4) Polysaccharidesare condensation products of
more than ten monosaccharide units; examples are the
starches and dextrins, which may be linear or branched
polymers. Polysaccharides are sometimes classified as
hexosans or pentosans, depending upon the identity of
the constituent monosaccharides. 
BIOMEDICALLY, GLUCOSE IS THE MOST
IMPORTANT MONOSACCHARIDE
The Structure of Glucose Can Be
Represented in Three Ways
The straight-chain structural formula (aldohexose;
Figure 13–1A) can account for some of the properties
of glucose, but a cyclic structure is favored on thermo-
dynamic grounds and accounts for the remainder of its
chemical properties. For most purposes, the structural
formula is represented as a simple ring in perspective as
proposed by Haworth (Figure 13–1B). In this represen-
tation, the molecule is viewed from the side and above
the plane of the ring. By convention, the bonds nearest
to the viewer are bold and thickened. The six-mem-
bered ring containing one oxygen atom is in the form
of a chair (Figure 13–1C).
Sugars Exhibit Various Forms of Isomerism
Glucose, with four asymmetric carbon atoms, can form
16 isomers. The more important types of isomerism
found with glucose are as follows.
(1)
D
and 
L
isomerism:The designation of a sugar
isomer as the 
D
form or of its mirror image as the 
L
form
Table 13–1. Classification of important sugars.
Aldoses
Ketoses
Trioses (C
3
H
6
O
3
)
Glycerose Dihydroxyacetone
Tetroses (C
4
H
8
O
4
)
Erythrose Erythrulose
Pentoses (C
5
H
10
O
5
)
Ribose
Ribulose
Hexoses (C
6
H
12
O
6
)
Glucose
Fructose
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
change format from pdf to jpg; changing pdf to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code convert TIFF file all pages to jpg images.
convert multiple page pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg on
CARBOHYDRATES OF PHYSIOLOGIC SIGNIFICANCE / 103
O
H
H
HO
OH
H
H
HO
5
C
4
C
3
C
2
C
1
C
H
HO
6
CH
2
OH
L
-Glucose
O
H
OH
H
H
HO
OH
H
C
C
C
C
C
OH
H
CH
2
OH
D
-Glucose
O
H
2
C
1
C
H
HO
3
CH
2
OH
L
-Glycerose
(L
-glyceraldehyde)
O
H
C
C
OH
H
CH
2
OH
D
-Glycerose
(D
-glyceraldehyde
)
Figure 13–2.
D
- and 
L
-isomerism of glycerose and
glucose.
HO
H
HOCH
2
H
OH
H
H
OH
O
OH
H
O
C
H
C
OH
1
2
H
C
H
3
HO
C
OH
4
H
C
OH
5
H
6CH
2
OH
H
HO
HOCH
2
H
H
OH
H
HO
O
H
OH
3
2
1
5
6
4
3
2
1
5
6
4
C
B
A
Figure 13–1.
D
-Glucose. A: straight chain form. 
B: α-
D
-glucose; Haworth projection. C: α-
D
-glucose;
chair form.
OH
H
H
HCOH
OH
H
H
OH
α-
D
-Glucofuranose
HO
H
H
OH
H
H
O
OH
H
HOCH
2
HOCH
2
OH
Furan
Pyran
α-
D
-Glucopyranose
O
O
O
Figure 13–3.
Pyranose and furanose forms of glu-
cose.
HO
H
H
H
H
OH
HO
H
O
OH
4
3
2
6
5
HOCH
2
1
1
OH
2
HOCH
2
1
H
HOCH
2
6
H
OH
HO
H
5
3
4
α-
D
-Fructopyranose
α-
D
-Fructofuranose
O
HO
H
H
H
H
OH
HO
H
H
2
O
COH
4
3
2
6
5
OH
OH
2
H
HOCH
2
6
H
OH
HO
H
5
3
4
β-
D
-Fructopyranose
β-
D
-Fructofuranose
O
1
H
2
COH
Figure 13–4.
Pyranose and furanose forms of fruc-
tose.
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg; .pdf to .jpg converter online
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
bulk pdf to jpg converter; bulk pdf to jpg
104 / CHAPTER 13
H
HO
HOCH
2
H
OH
H
H
OH
O
OH
H
4
HOCH
2
H
OH
H
H
OH
O
OH
H
4
HOCH
2
H
OH
H
O
OH
H
α-
D
-Galactose
α-
D
-Glucose
α-
D
-Mannose
H
HO
2
2
H
OH
H
OH
Figure 13–5.
Epimerization of
glucose.
is determined by its spatial relationship to the parent
compound of the carbohydrates, the three-carbon
sugar glycerose (glyceraldehyde). The 
L
and 
D
forms of
this sugar, and of glucose, are shown in Figure 13–2.
The orientation of the H and OH groups around
the carbon atom adjacent to the terminal primary alco-
hol carbon (carbon 5 in glucose) determines whether
the sugar belongs to the 
D
or 
L
series. When the OH
group on this carbon is on the right (as seen in Figure
13–2), the sugar is the 
D
-isomer; when it is on the 
left, it is the 
L
-isomer. Most of the monosaccharides
occurring in mammals are 
D
sugars, and the enzymes
responsible for their metabolism are specific for this
configuration. In solution, glucose is dextrorotatory—
hence the alternative name dextrose, often used in
clinical practice.
The presence of asymmetric carbon atoms also con-
fers optical activityon the compound. When a beam
of plane-polarized light is passed through a solution of
an optical isomer,it will be rotated either to the right,
dextrorotatory (+); or to the left, levorotatory (−). The
direction of rotation is independent of the stereochem-
istry of the sugar, so it may be designated 
D
(−), 
D
(+),
L
(−), or 
L
(+). For example, the naturally occurring form
of fructose is the 
D
(−) isomer.
(2) Pyranose and furanose ring structures: The
stable ring structures of monosaccharides are similar to
the ring structures of either pyran (a six-membered
ring) or furan (a five-membered ring) (Figures 13–3
and 13–4). For glucose in solution, more than 99% is
in the pyranose form.
(3)Alpha and beta anomers:The ring structure of
an aldose is a hemiacetal, since it is formed by combina-
tion of an aldehyde and an alcohol group. Similarly, the
ring structure of a ketose is a hemiketal. Crystalline glu-
cose is α-
D
-glucopyranose. The cyclic structure is re-
tained in solution, but isomerism occurs about position
1, the carbonyl or anomeric carbon atom,to give a
mixture of α-glucopyranose (38%) and β-glucopyra-
nose (62%). Less than 0.3% is represented by αand β
anomers of glucofuranose. 
(4)Epimers:Isomers differing as a result of varia-
tions in configuration of the OH and H on car-
bon atoms 2, 3, and 4 of glucose are known as epimers.
Biologically, the most important epimers of glucose are
mannose and galactose, formed by epimerization at car-
bons 2 and 4, respectively (Figure 13–5).
(5) Aldose-ketose isomerism: Fructose has the
same molecular formula as glucose but differs in its
structural formula, since there is a potential keto group
in position 2, the anomeric carbon of fructose (Figures
13–4 and 13–7), whereas there is a potential aldehyde
group in position 1, the anomeric carbon of glucose
(Figures 13–2 and 13–6).
Many Monosaccharides Are
Physiologically Important
Derivatives of trioses, tetroses, and pentoses and of a
seven-carbon sugar (sedoheptulose) are formed as meta-
bolic intermediates in glycolysis and the pentose phos-
phate pathway. Pentoses are important in nucleotides,
OH
H
C
CHO
CH
2
OH
D
-Glycerose 
(
D
-glyceraldehyde)
OH
H
C
CHO
CH
2
OH
OH
H
C
D
-Erythrose
OH
H
C
CHO
CH
2
OH
H
HO
C
H
HO
C
D
-Lyxose
OH
H
C
CHO
CH
2
OH
OH
H
C
H
HO
C
D
-Xylose
OH
H
C
CHO
CH
2
OH
H
HO
C
OH
H
C
D
-Arabinose
OH
H
C
CHO
CH
2
OH
OH
H
C
OH
H
C
D
-Ribose
OH
H
C
CHO
CH
2
OH
OH
H
C
OH
H
C
H
HO
C
D
-Glucose
OH
H
C
CHO
CH
2
OH
H
HO
C
OH
H
C
H
HO
C
D
-Mannose
OH
H
C
CHO
CH
2
OH
OH
H
C
H
HO
C
H
HO
C
D
-Galactose
Figure 13–6.
Examples of aldoses of physiologic significance.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Create multiple pages Tiff file from PDF document. Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF.
convert .pdf to .jpg online; convert pdf into jpg online
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Components to batch convert PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class. Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
advanced pdf to jpg converter; convert pdf file to jpg file
CARBOHYDRATES OF PHYSIOLOGIC SIGNIFICANCE / 105
nucleic acids, and several coenzymes (Table 13–2).
Glucose, galactose, fructose, and mannose are physio-
logically the most important hexoses (Table 13–3). The
biochemically important aldoses are shown in Figure
13–6, and important ketoses in Figure 13–7.
In addition, carboxylic acid derivatives of glucose are
important, including 
D
-glucuronate (for glucuronide
formation and in glycosaminoglycans) and its meta-
bolic derivative, 
L
-iduronate (in glycosaminoglycans)
(Figure 13–8) and 
L
-gulonate (an intermediate in the
uronic acid pathway; see Figure 20–4).
Sugars Form Glycosides With Other
Compounds & With Each Other
Glycosidesare formed by condensation between the hy-
droxyl group of the anomeric carbon of a monosaccha-
ride, or monosaccharide residue, and a second compound
that may—or may not (in the case of an aglycone)—be
another monosaccharide. If the second group is a hy-
droxyl, the O-glycosidic bond is an acetallink because it
results from a reaction between a hemiacetal group
(formed from an aldehyde and an OH group) and an-
Table 13–2. Pentoses of physiologic importance.
Sugar
Where Found
Biochemical Importance
Clinical Significance
D
-Ribose
Nucleic acids.
Structural elements of nucleic acids and 
coenzymes, eg, ATP, NAD, NADP, flavo-
proteins. Ribose phosphates are inter-
mediates in pentose phosphate pathway.
D
-Ribulose
Formed in metabolic processes.
Ribulose phosphate is an intermediate in 
pentose phosphate pathway.
D
-Arabinose Gum arabic. Plum and cherry gums. . Constituent of glycoproteins.
D
-Xylose
Wood gums, proteoglycans, 
Constituent of glycoproteins.
glycosaminoglycans.
D
-Lyxose
Heart muscle.
A constituent of a lyxoflavin isolated from 
human heart muscle.
L
-Xylulose
Intermediate in uronic acid pathway.
Found in urine in essential 
pentosuria.
Table 13–3. Hexoses of physiologic importance.
Sugar
Source
Importance
Clinical Significance
D
-Glucose
Fruit juices. Hydrolysis of starch, cane e The “sugar” of the body. The sugar carried d Present in the urine (glycosuria)
sugar, maltose, and lactose.
by the blood, and the principal one used in diabetes mellitus owing to
by the tissues.
raised blood glucose (hyper-
glycemia).
D
-Fructose
Fruit juices. Honey. Hydrolysis of 
Can be changed to glucose in the liver 
Hereditary fructose intolerance
cane sugar and of inulin (from the 
and so used in the body.
leads to fructose accumulation
Jerusalem artichoke).
and hypoglycemia.
D
-Galactose Hydrolysis of lactose.
Can be changed to glucose in the liver
Failure to metabolize leads 
and metabolized. Synthesized in the 
to galactosemia and cataract.
mammary gland to make the lactose of 
milk. A constituent of glycolipids and 
glycoproteins.
D
-Mannose
Hydrolysis of plant mannans and 
A constituent of many glycoproteins.
gums.
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Supports for changing image size. Also supports convert PDF files to jpg, jpeg images. C# class source codes and online demos are provided for .NET.
c# pdf to jpg; convert pdf document to jpg
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff. string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object.
convert online pdf to jpg; convert pdf into jpg format
106 / CHAPTER 13
other OH group. If the hemiacetal portion is glucose,
the resulting compound is a glucoside; if galactose, a
galactoside;and so on. If the second group is an amine,
an N-glycosidic bond is formed, eg, between adenine and
ribose in nucleotides such as ATP (Figure 10–4).
Glycosides are widely distributed in nature; the agly-
cone may be methanol, glycerol, a sterol, a phenol, or a
base such as adenine. The glycosides that are important
in medicine because of their action on the heart (car-
diac glycosides) all contain steroids as the aglycone.
These include derivatives of digitalis and strophanthus
such as ouabain,an inhibitor of the Na
+
-K
+
ATPase of
cell membranes. Other glycosides include antibiotics
such as streptomycin.
Deoxy Sugars Lack an Oxygen Atom
Deoxy sugars are those in which a hydroxyl group has
been replaced by hydrogen. An example is deoxyribose
(Figure 13–9) in DNA. The deoxy sugar 
L
-fucose (Figure
13–15) occurs in glycoproteins; 2-deoxyglucose is used
experimentally as an inhibitor of glucose metabolism.
Amino Sugars (Hexosamines) Are
Components of Glycoproteins,
Gangliosides, & Glycosaminoglycans
The amino sugars include 
D
-glucosamine, a constituent
of hyaluronic acid (Figure 13–10), 
D
-galactosamine
(chondrosamine), a constituent of chondroitin; and 
D
-mannosamine. Several antibiotics(eg, erythromycin)
contain amino sugars believed to be important for their
antibiotic activity.
MALTOSE, SUCROSE, & LACTOSE ARE
IMPORTANT DISACCHARIDES
The physiologically important disaccharides are mal-
tose, sucrose, and lactose (Table 13–4; Figure 13–11).
Hydrolysis of sucrose yields a mixture of glucose and
HO
H
COO
COO
H
OH
H
H
OH
O
OH
H
HO
H
H
OH
H
H
OH
O
OH
H
Figure 13–8.
α-
D
-Glucuronate (left) and 
β-
L
-iduronate (right).
H
H
H
H
3
HOCH
2
O
HO
H
OH
NH
+
OH
Figure 13–10.
Glucosamine (2-amino-
D
-glucopyra-
nose) (α form). Galactosamine is 2-amino-
D
-galactopy-
ranose. Both glucosamine and galactosamine occur as
N-acetyl derivatives in more complex carbohydrates,
eg, glycoproteins.
H
H
OH
H
H
OH
H
2
3
4
HOCH
2
5
1
O
Figure 13–9.
2-Deoxy-
D
-ribofuranose (βform).
O
H
HO
OH
H
OH
H
C
C
C
C
C
OH
H
CH
2
OH
CH
2
OH
D
-Sedoheptulose
O
H
HO
OH
H
OH
H
C
C
C
C
CH
2
OH
CH
2
OH
D
-Fructose
O
OH
H
OH
H
C
C
C
CH
2
OH
CH
2
OH
D
-Ribulose
O
H
HO
OH
H
C
C
C
CH
2
OH
CH
2
OH
D
-Xylulose
O
C
CH
2
OH
CH
2
OH
Dihydroxyacetone
Figure 13–7.
Examples of ketoses of physiologic significance.
CARBOHYDRATES OF PHYSIOLOGIC SIGNIFICANCE / 107
fructose which is called “invert sugar” because the
strongly levorotatory fructose changes (inverts) the pre-
vious dextrorotatory action of sucrose.
POLYSACCHARIDES SERVE STORAGE 
& STRUCTURAL FUNCTIONS
Polysaccharides include the following physiologically
important carbohydrates.
Starchis a homopolymer of glucose forming an α-
glucosidic chain, called a glucosanor glucan.It is the
most abundant dietary carbohydrate in cereals, pota-
toes, legumes, and other vegetables. The two main con-
stituents are amylose (15–20%), which has a non-
branching helical structure (Figure 13–12); and amy-
lopectin(80–85%), which consists of branched chains
composed of 24–30 glucose residues united by 1 →4
linkages in the chains and by 1 →6 linkages at the
branch points.
Glycogen(Figure 13–13) is the storage polysaccha-
ride in animals. It is a more highly branched structure
than amylopectin, with chains of 12–14 α-
D
-glucopyra-
nose residues (in α[1 → 4]-glucosidic linkage), with
branching by means of α(1 → 6)-glucosidic bonds.
Table 13–4. Disaccharides.
Sugar
Source
Clinical Significance
Maltose
Digestion by amylase or hydrolysis of starch.
Germinating cereals and malt.
Lactose
Milk. May occur in urine during pregnancy. . In lactase deficiency, malabsorption leads to diarrhea and flatulence.
Sucrose
Cane and beet sugar. Sorghum. Pineapple. In sucrase deficiency, malabsorption leads to diarrhea and flatulence.
Carrot roots.
Trehalose
1
Fungi and yeasts. The major sugar of insect 
hemolymph.
1
O-α-
D
-Glucopyranosyl-(1 →1)-α-
D
-glucopyranoside.
HO
H
HOCH
2
H
OH
H
H
OH
O
H
O-α-
D
-Glucopyranosyl-(1 → 4)-α-
D
-glucopyranose
O-α-
D
-Glucopyranosyl-(1 → 2)-β-
D
-fructofuranoside
3
5
6
4
H
HOCH
2
H
OH
H
H
OH
O
OH
H
5
6
4
O
Maltose
*
*
1
1
2
3
2
HO
H
HOCH
2
H
OH
H
H
OH
O
H
3
5
6
4
O
Sucrose
1
2
*
HOCH
2
1
O
OH
H
H
COH
H
2
H
HO
2
5
6
3
4
O-β-
D
-Galactopyranosyl-(1 → 4)-β-
D
-glucopyranose
H
HO
HOCH
2
H
OH
H
H
OH
O
3
5
6
4
HOCH
2
H
OH
H
H
OH
O
H
OH
5
6
4
Lactose
*
*
1
1
2
3
2
H
H
O
*
Figure 13–11.
Structures of important disaccharides. The αand β
refer to the configuration at the anomeric carbon atom (asterisk). When
the anomeric carbon of the second residue takes part in the formation
of the glycosidic bond, as in sucrose, the residue becomes a glycoside
known as a furanoside or pyranoside. As the disaccharide no longer has
an anomeric carbon with a free potential aldehyde or ketone group, it
no longer exhibits reducing properties. The configuration of the 
β-fructofuranose residue in sucrose results from turning the β-fructofu-
ranose molecule depicted in Figure 13–4 through 180 degrees and in-
verting it.
108 / CHAPTER 13
4
1
4
1
HOCH
2
6
O
CH
2
6
4
1
HOCH
2
6
4
1
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
HOCH
2
6
O
O
O
4
1
4
1
H
O
C
H
2
6
O
H
O
C
H
2
6
O
O
O
A
B
O
O
O
O
O
O
Figure 13–12.
Structure of starch. A:Amylose, showing helical coil structure. B:Amylopectin, showing 1 →6
branch point.
O
HOCH
2
O
O
O
B
A
1
G
2
4
3
HOCH
2
O
O
H
O
C
6
H
2
H
O
C
6
H
2
6
CH
2
O
O
O
O
O
O
1
4
1
1
4
1
4
4
1
4
Figure 13–13.
The glycogen molecule. A:General structure. B:Enlargement of structure at a branch point. The
molecule is a sphere approximately 21 nm in diameter that can be visualized in electron micrographs. It has a mo-
lecular mass of 107Da and consists of polysaccharide chains each containing about 13 glucose residues. The
chains are either branched or unbranched and are arranged in 12 concentric layers (only four are shown in the
figure). The branched chains (each has two branches) are found in the inner layers and the unbranched chains
inthe outer layer. (G, glycogenin, the primer molecule for glycogen synthesis.)
CARBOHYDRATES OF PHYSIOLOGIC SIGNIFICANCE / 109
H
HOCH
2
H
OH
H
H
HN
O
H
H
H
Chitin
1
4
HOCH
2
O
OH
H
H
O
O
CO
CH
3
H
O
HN
CO
CH
3
n
N-Acetylglucosamine
N-Acetylglucosamine
H
COO
H
OH
H
H
OH
O
H
4
H
H
Hyaluronic acid
1
1
HOCH
2
O
O
H
H
O
H
O
HN
CO
CH
3
n
β-Glucuronic acid
β-Glucuronic acid
N-Acetylglucosamine
HO
3
H
COO
H
OH
H
H
OH
O
H
4
O
H
Chondroitin 4-sulfate
1
1
HOCH
2
O
O
H
H
O
H
O
HN
CO
CH
3
n
N-Acetylgalactosamine sulfate
3
(Note:  There is also a 6-sulfate)
H
SO
3
H
COSO
H
OH
H
H
O
COO
Heparin
H
O
H
H
O
H
O
OSO
n
Sulfated glucosamine
Sulfated iduronic acid
H
O
1
4
H
NH
SO
3
3
3
OH
Figure 13–14.
Structure of some complex polysac-
charides and glycosaminoglycans.
Inulinis a polysaccharide of fructose (and hence a fruc-
tosan) found in tubers and roots of dahlias, artichokes,
and dandelions. It is readily soluble in water and is used
to determine the glomerular filtration rate. Dextrinsare
intermediates in the hydrolysis of starch. Cellulose is
the chief constituent of the framework of plants. It is in-
soluble and consists of β-
D
-glucopyranose units linked
by β(1 → → 4) bonds to form long, straight chains
strengthened by cross-linked hydrogen bonds. Cellulose
cannot be digested by mammals because of the absence
of an enzyme that hydrolyzes the βlinkage. It is an im-
portant source of “bulk” in the diet. Microorganisms in
the gut of ruminants and other herbivores can hydrolyze
the βlinkage and ferment the products to short-chain
fatty acids as a major energy source. There is limited
bacterial metabolism of cellulose in the human colon.
Chitinis a structural polysaccharide in the exoskeleton
of crustaceans and insects and also in mushrooms. It
consists of N-acetyl-
D
-glucosamine units joined by 
β (1 →4)-glycosidic linkages (Figure 13–14).
Glycosaminoglycans (mucopolysaccharides) are
complex carbohydrates characterized by their content
of amino sugarsand uronic acids.When these chains
are attached to a protein molecule, the result is a pro-
teoglycan.Proteoglycans provide the ground or pack-
ing substance of connective tissues. Their property of
holding large quantities of water and occupying space,
thus cushioning or lubricating other structures, is due
to the large number of OH groups and negative
charges on the molecules, which, by repulsion, keep the
carbohydrate chains apart. Examples are hyaluronic
acid, chondroitin sulfate, and heparin (Figure
13–14).
Glycoproteins(mucoproteins) occur in many dif-
ferent situations in fluids and tissues, including the cell
membranes (Chapters 41 and 47). They are proteins
Table 13–5. Carbohydrates found in
glycoproteins.
Hexoses
Mannose (Man)
Galactose (Gal)
Acetyl hexosamines N-Acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)
N-Acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)
Pentoses
Arabinose (Ara)
Xylose (Xyl)
Methyl pentose
L
-Fucose (Fuc; see Figure 13–15)
Sialic acids
N-Acyl derivatives of neuraminic acid, 
eg, N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc; see
Figure 13–16), the predominant sialic 
acid.
containing branched or unbranched oligosaccharide
chains (see Table 13–5). The sialic acids are N- or 
O-acyl derivatives of neuraminic acid (Figure 13–16).
Neuraminic acidis a nine-carbon sugar derived from
mannosamine (an epimer of glucosamine) and pyru-
vate. Sialic acids are constituents of both glycoproteins
and gangliosides(Chapters 14 and 47).
CARBOHYDRATES OCCUR IN CELL
MEMBRANES & IN LIPOPROTEINS
In addition to the lipid of cell membranes (see Chapters
14 and 41), approximately 5% is carbohydrate in glyco-
proteins and glycolipids. Carbohydrates are also present
in apo B of lipoproteins. Their presence on the outer
surface of the plasma membrane (the glycocalyx) has
been shown with the use of plant lectins,protein agglu-
tinins that bind with specific glycosyl residues. For
example, concanavalin Abinds α-glucosyl and α-man-
nosyl residues. Glycophorinis a major integral mem-
brane glycoprotein of human erythrocytes and spans
the lipid membrane, having free polypeptide portions
outside both the external and internal (cytoplasmic)
surfaces. Carbohydrate chains are only attached to the
amino terminal portion outside the external surface
(Chapter 41).
SUMMARY
• Carbohydrates are major constituents of animal food
and animal tissues. They are characterized by the
type and number of monosaccharide residues in their
molecules.
• Glucose is the most important carbohydrate in mam-
malian biochemistry because nearly all carbohydrate
in food is converted to glucose for metabolism.
• Sugars have large numbers of stereoisomers because
they contain several asymmetric carbon atoms.
• The monosaccharides include glucose, the “blood
sugar”; and ribose, an important constituent of nu-
cleotides and nucleic acids.
• The disaccharides include maltose (glucosyl glucose),
an intermediate in the digestion of starch; sucrose
(glucosyl fructose), important as a dietary constituent
containing fructose; and lactose (galactosyl glucose),
in milk. 
• Starch and glycogen are storage polymers of glucose
in plants and animals, respectively. Starch is the
major source of energy in the diet.
• Complex carbohydrates contain other sugar deriva-
tives such as amino sugars, uronic acids, and sialic
acids. They include proteoglycans and glycosamino-
glycans, associated with structural elements of the tis-
sues; and glycoproteins, proteins containing attached
oligosaccharide chains. They are found in many situ-
ations including the cell membrane.
REFERENCES
Binkley RW: Modern Carbohydrate Chemistry. Marcel Dekker,
1988.
Collins PM (editor): Carbohydrates.Chapman & Hall, 1988.
El-Khadem HS: Carbohydrate Chemistry: Monosaccharides and
Their Oligomers.Academic Press, 1988.
Lehman J (editor) (translated by Haines A.): Carbohydrates: Struc-
ture and Biology.Thieme, 1998.
Lindahl U, Höök M: Glycosaminoglycans and their binding to bio-
logical macromolecules. Annu Rev Biochem 1978;47:385.
Melendes-Hevia E, Waddell TG, Shelton ED: Optimization of
molecular design in the evolution of metabolism: the glyco-
gen molecule. Biochem J 1993;295:477.
110 / CHAPTER 13
CHOH
CHOH
H
O
OH
OH
COO
CH
2
OH
H
NH
H
H
H
Ac
Figure 13–16.
Structure of N-acetylneuraminic acid,
a sialic acid (Ac = CH
3
CO).
HO
H
H
H
H
O
OH
H
CH
3
OH
HO
Figure 13–15.
β-
L
-Fucose (6-deoxy-β-
L
-galactose).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested