LIPIDS OF PHYSIOLOGIC SIGNIFICANCE / 121
delivery of drugs and cosmetics. Emulsionsare much
larger particles, formed usually by nonpolar lipids in an
aqueous medium. These are stabilized by emulsifying
agents such as amphipathic lipids (eg, lecithin), which
form a surface layer separating the main bulk of the
nonpolar material from the aqueous phase (Figure
14–22).
SUMMARY
• Lipids have the common property of being relatively
insoluble in water (hydrophobic) but soluble in non-
polar solvents. Amphipathic lipids also contain one
or more polar groups, making them suitable as con-
stituents of membranes at lipid:water interfaces.
• The lipids of major physiologic significance are fatty
acids and their esters, together with cholesterol and
other steroids.
• Long-chain fatty acids may be saturated, monounsat-
urated, or polyunsaturated, according to the number
of double bonds present. Their fluidity decreases
with chain length and increases according to degree
of unsaturation.
• Eicosanoids are formed from 20-carbon polyunsatu-
rated fatty acids and make up an important group of
physiologically and pharmacologically active com-
pounds known as prostaglandins, thromboxanes,
leukotrienes, and lipoxins.
• The esters of glycerol are quantitatively the most sig-
nificant lipids, represented by triacylglycerol (“fat”),
a major constituent of lipoproteins and the storage
form of lipid in adipose tissue. Phosphoacylglycerols
are amphipathic lipids and have important roles—as
major constituents of membranes and the outer layer
of lipoproteins, as surfactant in the lung, as precur-
sors of second messengers, and as constituents of ner-
vous tissue.
• Glycolipids are also important constituents of ner-
vous tissue such as brain and the outer leaflet of the
cell membrane, where they contribute to the carbo-
hydrates on the cell surface.
• Cholesterol, an amphipathic lipid, is an important
component of membranes. It is the parent molecule
from which all other steroids in the body, including
major hormones such as the adrenocortical and sex
hormones, D vitamins, and bile acids, are synthe-
sized.
• Peroxidation of lipids containing polyunsaturated
fatty acids leads to generation of free radicals that
may damage tissues and cause disease.
REFERENCES
Benzie IFF: Lipid peroxidation: a review of causes, consequences,
measurement and dietary influences. Int J Food Sci Nutr
1996;47:233.
Christie WW: Lipid Analysis,2nd ed. Pergamon Press, 1982.
Cullis PR, Fenske DB, Hope MJ: Physical properties and func-
tional roles of lipids in membranes. In: Biochemistry of Lipids,
Lipoproteins and Membranes.Vance DE, Vance JE (editors).
Elsevier, 1996.
Gunstone FD, Harwood JL, Padley FB: The Lipid Handbook.
Chapman & Hall, 1986.
Gurr MI, Harwood JL: Lipid Biochemistry: An Introduction,4th ed.
Chapman & Hall, 1991.
Change pdf into jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
change file from pdf to jpg; .net pdf to jpg
Change pdf into jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
c# convert pdf to jpg; change file from pdf to jpg on
Overview of Metabolism
15
122
Peter A. Mayes, PhD, DSc, & David A. Bender, PhD
BIOMEDICAL IMPORTANCE
The fate of dietary components after digestion and ab-
sorption constitutes metabolism—the metabolic path-
ways taken by individual molecules, their interrelation-
ships, and the mechanisms that regulate the flow of
metabolites through the pathways. Metabolic pathways
fall into three categories: (1) Anabolic pathwaysare
those involved in the synthesis of compounds. Protein
synthesis is such a pathway, as is the synthesis of fuel
reserves of triacylglycerol and glycogen. Anabolic path-
ways are endergonic. (2) Catabolic pathwaysare in-
volved in the breakdown of larger molecules, com-
monly involving oxidative reactions; they are exergonic,
producing reducing equivalents and, mainly via the res-
piratory chain, ATP. (3) Amphibolic pathwaysoccur
at the “crossroads” of metabolism, acting as links be-
tween the anabolic and catabolic pathways, eg, the cit-
ric acid cycle.
A knowledge of normal metabolism is essential for
an understanding of abnormalities underlying disease.
Normal metabolism includes adaptation to periods of
starvation, exercise, pregnancy, and lactation. Abnor-
mal metabolism may result from nutritional deficiency,
enzyme deficiency, abnormal secretion of hormones, or
the actions of drugs and toxins. An important example
of a metabolic disease is diabetes mellitus.
PATHWAYS THAT PROCESS THE MAJOR
PRODUCTS OF DIGESTION
The nature of the diet sets the basic pattern of metabo-
lism. There is a need to process the products of diges-
tion of dietary carbohydrate, lipid, and protein. These
are mainly glucose, fatty acids and glycerol, and amino
acids, respectively. In ruminants (and to a lesser extent
in other herbivores), dietary cellulose is fermented by
symbiotic microorganisms to short-chain fatty acids
(acetic, propionic, butyric), and metabolism in these
animals is adapted to use these fatty acids as major sub-
strates. All the products of digestion are metabolized to
common product, acetyl-CoA, which is then oxi-
dized by the citric acid cycle(Figure 15–1).
Carbohydrate Metabolism Is Centered 
on the Provision & Fate of Glucose 
(Figure 15–2)
Glucose is metabolized to pyruvate by the pathway of
glycolysis,which can occur anaerobically (in the ab-
sence of oxygen), when the end product is lactate. Aero-
bic tissues metabolize pyruvate to acetyl-CoA, which
can enter the citric acid cyclefor complete oxidation
to CO
2
and H
2
O, linked to the formation of ATP
in the process of oxidative phosphorylation (Figure
16–2). Glucose is the major fuel of most tissues. 
Amino acids
Fatty acids
+ glycerol
Simple sugars
(mainly glucose)
Citric
acid
cycle
2CO
2
2H
ATP
Protein
Fat
Carbohydrate
Acetyl-CoA
Digestion and absorption
Catabolism
Figure 15–1.
Outline of the pathways for the catab-
olism of dietary carbohydrate, protein, and fat. All the
pathways lead to the production of acetyl-CoA, which is
oxidized in the citric acid cycle, ultimately yielding ATP
in the process of oxidative phosphorylation.
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Web Security. All your JPG and PDF files will be permanently erased from our servers after one hour. If you want to turn PDF file into image file format in
convert pdf file to jpg online; bulk pdf to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
PDF document can be easily loaded into your C# String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF
convert online pdf to jpg; to jpeg
OVERVIEW OF METABOLISM
/ 123
Pentose phosphate
pathway
Citric
acid 
cycle
P
r
o
t
e
i
n
A
m
i
n
o
a
c
i
d
s
A
m
i
n
o
a
c
i
d
s
Glucose
Diet
Glycogen
G
l
y
c
o
l
y
s
i
s
Glucose
phosphates
Triose
phosphates
Pyruvate
Acetyl-CoA
3CO
2
CO
2
2CO
2
Ribose
phosphate
RNA
DNA
Acylglycerols
(fat)
Lactate
Fatty 
acids
Cholesterol
Figure 15–2.
Overview of carbohydrate metabolism
showing the major pathways and end products. Gluco-
neogenesis is not shown.
Glucose and its metabolites also take part in other
processes. Examples: (1) Conversion to the storage
polymer glycogenin skeletal muscle and liver. (2) The
pentose phosphate pathway,an alternative to part of
the pathway of glycolysis, is a source of reducing equiv-
alents (NADPH) for biosynthesis and the source of ri-
bose for nucleotide and nucleic acid synthesis.
(3)Triose phosphate gives rise to the glycerol moiety
of triacylglycerols. (4) Pyruvate and intermediates of
the citric acid cycle provide the carbon skeletons for
thesynthesis of amino acids;and acetyl-CoA, the pre-
cursor of fatty acidsand cholesterol(and hence of all
steroids synthesized in the body). Gluconeogenesisis
the process of forming glucose from noncarbohydrate
precursors, eg, lactate, amino acids, and glycerol.
Lipid Metabolism Is Concerned Mainly
With Fatty Acids & Cholesterol 
(Figure 15–3)
The source of long-chain fatty acids is either dietary
lipid or de novo synthesis from acetyl-CoA derived from
carbohydrate. Fatty acids may be oxidized to acetyl-
CoA (β-oxidation) or esterified with glycerol, forming
triacylglycerol(fat) as the body’s main fuel reserve. 
Acetyl-CoA formed by β-oxidation may undergo
several fates:
(1) As with acetyl-CoA arising from glycolysis, it is
oxidizedto CO
2
+ H
2
O via the citric acid cycle.
Citric
acid
cycle
Acetyl-CoA
Fatty acids
Cholesterol
Diet
Steroids
S
t
e
r
o
i
d
o
g
e
n
e
s
i
s
Cholesterologenesis
Ketogenesis
Ketone 
bodies
2CO
2
β
-
O
x
i
d
a
t
i
o
n
Triacylglycerol
(fat)
Carbohydrate
Amino acids
E
s
t
e
r
i
f
i
c
a
t
i
o
n
L
i
p
o
l
y
s
i
s
L
i
p
o
g
e
n
e
s
i
s
Figure 15–3.
Overview of fatty acid metabolism
showing the major pathways and end products. Ketone
bodies comprise the substances acetoacetate, 3-hy-
droxybutyrate, and acetone.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in from local file or stream and convert it into BMP, GIF Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET
change pdf file to jpg; convert multi page pdf to jpg
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp Component for combining multiple image formats into one or multiple PDF file in C#
changing file from pdf to jpg; c# pdf to jpg
124 / CHAPTER 15
(2) It is the precursor for synthesis of cholesteroland
other steroids.
(3) In the liver, it forms ketone bodies(acetone, ace-
toacetate, and 3-hydroxybutyrate) that are impor-
tant fuels in prolonged starvation.
Much of Amino Acid Metabolism 
Involves Transamination 
(Figure 15–4)
The amino acids are required for protein synthesis.
Some must be supplied in the diet (the essential amino
acids) since they cannot be synthesized in the body.
The remainder are nonessential amino acidsthat are
supplied in the diet but can be formed from metabolic
intermediates by transamination,using the amino ni-
trogen from other amino acids. After deamination,
amino nitrogen is excreted as urea, and the carbon
skeletons that remain after transamination (1) are oxi-
dized to CO
2
via the citric acid cycle, (2) form glucose
(gluconeogenesis), or (3) form ketone bodies.
Several amino acids are also the precursors of other
compounds, eg, purines, pyrimidines, hormones such
as epinephrine and thyroxine, and neurotransmitters.
METABOLIC PATHWAYS MAY BE
STUDIED AT DIFFERENT LEVELS 
OF ORGANIZATION
In addition to studies in the whole organism, the loca-
tion and integration of metabolic pathways is revealed
by studies at several levels of organization. At the tissue
and organ level,the nature of the substrates entering
and metabolites leaving tissues and organs is defined. At
the subcellular level,each cell organelle (eg, the mito-
chondrion) or compartment (eg, the cytosol) has spe-
cific roles that form part of a subcellular pattern of
metabolic pathways.
At the Tissue and Organ Level, the Blood
Circulation Integrates Metabolism
Amino acids resulting from the digestion of dietary
protein and glucose resulting from the digestion of car-
bohydrate are absorbed and directed to the liver via the
hepatic portal vein.The liver has the role of regulating
the blood concentration of most water-soluble metabo-
lites (Figure 15–5). In the case of glucose, this is
achieved by taking up glucose in excess of immediate
requirements and converting it to glycogen (glycogene-
Diet protein
Amino acids
T R A N S A M I N A T I O N
Ketone bodies
Acetyl-CoA
Tissue protein
NH
3
2CO
2
Urea
Nonprotein
nitrogen derivatives
Amino nitrogen in
glutamate
Carbohydrate
(glucose)
Citric
acid
cycle
DEAMINATION
Figure 15–4.
Overview of amino acid metabolism showing the major pathways and end products.
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Support various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
convert pdf image to jpg; convert pdf picture to jpg
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Support various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
change pdf file to jpg online; advanced pdf to jpg converter
OVERVIEW OF METABOLISM
/ 125
sis) or to fat (lipogenesis). Between meals, the liver
acts to maintain the blood glucose concentration from
glycogen (glycogenolysis)and, together with the kid-
ney, by converting noncarbohydrate metabolites such
as lactate, glycerol, and amino acids to glucose (gluco-
neogenesis). Maintenance of an adequate concentra-
tion of blood glucose is vital for those tissues in which it
is the major fuel (the brain) or the only fuel (the eryth-
rocytes). The liver also synthesizes the major plasma
proteins(eg, albumin) and deaminates amino acids
that are in excess of requirements, forming urea, which
is transported to the kidney and excreted.
Skeletal muscleutilizes glucose as a fuel, forming
both lactate and CO
2
. It stores glycogen as a fuel for its
use in muscular contraction and synthesizes muscle
protein from plasma amino acids. Muscle accounts for
approximately 50% of body mass and consequently
represents a considerable store of protein that can be
drawn upon to supply amino acids for gluconeogenesis
in starvation.
Lipidsin the diet (Figure 15–6) are mainly triacyl-
glycerol and are hydrolyzed to monoacylglycerols and
fatty acids in the gut, then reesterified in the intestinal
mucosa. Here they are packaged with protein and se-
creted into the lymphatic system and thence into the
blood stream as chylomicrons,the largest of the plasma
lipoproteins. Chylomicrons also contain other lipid-
soluble nutrients, eg, vitamins. Unlike glucose and
amino acids, chylomicron triacylglycerol is not taken up
directly by the liver. It is first metabolized by tissues that
have lipoprotein lipase,which hydrolyzes the triacyl-
glycerol, releasing fatty acids that are incorporated into
tissue lipids or oxidized as fuel. The other major source
of long-chain fatty acid is synthesis (lipogenesis)from
carbohydrate, mainly in adipose tissue and the liver.
Adipose tissue triacylglycerol is the main fuel reserve
of the body. On hydrolysis (lipolysis)free fatty acids are
released into the circulation. These are taken up by most
tissues (but not brain or erythrocytes) and esterified to
acylglycerols or oxidized as a fuel. In the liver, triacyl-
glycerol arising from lipogenesis, free fatty acids, and
chylomicron remnants (see Figures 25–3 and 25–4) is se-
creted into the circulation as very low density lipopro-
tein(VLDL). This triacylglycerol undergoes a fate simi-
lar to that of chylomicrons. Partial oxidation of fatty
acids in the liver leads to ketone bodyproduction (keto-
H
e
p
a
t
i
c
p
o
r
t
a
l
v
e
i
n
LIVER
MUSCLE
Amino acids
Glycogen
Glucose
Glucose
Glucose
Lactate
Carbohydrate
Diet
ERYTHROCYTES
Protein
Amino acids
Protein
Protein
Amino acids
Amino
acids
Glycogen
Alanine, etc
Glucose
phosphate
Urea
SMALL INTESTINE
BLOOD PLASMA
CO
2
Plasma proteins
CO
2
Urea
Urine
KIDNEY
Figure 15–5.
Transport and fate of major carbohydrate and amino acid substrates and metabolites. Note that
there is little free glucose in muscle, since it is rapidly phosphorylated upon entry.
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff Turn multiple image formats into one or multiple PDF file.
reader pdf to jpeg; convert pdf to jpeg on
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
XDoc.Tiff for .NET, which can be stably integrated into C#.NET string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List
batch pdf to jpg; convert pdf to high quality jpg
126 / CHAPTER 15
genesis). Ketone bodies are transported to extrahepatic
tissues, where they act as a fuel source in starvation.
At the Subcellular Level, Glycolysis Occurs
in the Cytosol & the Citric Acid Cycle 
in the Mitochondria
Compartmentation of pathways in separate subcellular
compartments or organelles permits integration and
regulation of metabolism. Not all pathways are of equal
importance in all cells. Figure 15–7 depicts the subcel-
lular compartmentation of metabolic pathways in a he-
patic parenchymal cell.
The central role of the mitochondrionis immedi-
ately apparent, since it acts as the focus of carbohydrate,
lipid, and amino acid metabolism. It contains the en-
zymes of the citric acid cycle, β-oxidation of fatty acids,
and ketogenesis, as well as the respiratory chain and
ATP synthase. 
Glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and fatty
acid synthesis are all found in the cytosol. In gluconeo-
genesis, substrates such as lactate and pyruvate, which
are formed in the cytosol, enter the mitochondrion to
yield oxaloacetatebefore formation of glucose.
The membranes of the endoplasmic reticulumcon-
tain the enzyme system for acylglycerol synthesis,and
the ribosomesare responsible for protein synthesis.
THE FLUX OF METABOLITES IN
METABOLIC PATHWAYS MUST BE
REGULATED IN A CONCERTED MANNER
Regulation of the overall flux through a pathway is im-
portant to ensure an appropriate supply, when re-
quired, of the products of that pathway. Regulation is
achieved by control of one or more key reactions in
thepathway, catalyzed by “regulatory enzymes.”The
physicochemical factors that control the rate of an
CO
2
MUSCLE
BLOOD
PLASMA
Lipoprotein
TG
LIVER
SMALL INTESTINE
FFA
Fatty
acids
Glucose
TG
Ketone
bodies
L
i
p
o
l
y
s
i
s
E
s
t
e
r
i
f
i
c
a
t
i
o
n
Fatty
acids
TG
L
i
p
o
l
y
s
i
s
E
s
t
e
r
i
f
i
c
a
t
i
o
n
Fatty
acids
Glucose
TG
ADIPOSE
TISSUE
L
i
p
o
l
y
s
i
s
E
s
t
e
r
i
f
i
c
a
t
i
o
n
CO
2
LPL
LPL
V
L
D
L
C
h
y
l
o
m
i
c
r
o
n
s
MG 
+
fatty acids
Diet
TG
TG
Figure 15–6.
Transport and fate of major lipid substrates and metabolites. (FFA, free fatty acids; LPL, lipopro-
tein lipase; MG, monoacylglycerol; TG, triacylglycerol; VLDL, very low density lipoprotein.)
OVERVIEW OF METABOLISM
/ 127
Glycogen
Glycolysis
G
l
u
c
o
n
e
o
g
e
n
e
s
i
s
Glucose
Triose phosphate
Glycerol
Triacylglycerol
Glycerol phosphate
Fatty acids
CYTOSOL
Phosphoenolpyruvate
Lactate
Pyruvate
AA
Acetyl-CoA
L
i
p
o
g
e
n
e
s
i
s
β
-
O
x
i
d
a
t
i
o
n
Ketone
bodies
AA
MITOCHONDRION
AA
AA
AA
AA
CO
2
CO
2
CO
2
Pyruvate
AA
AA
Pentose
phosphate
pathway
Ribosome
AA
Protein
ENDOPLASMIC
RETICULUM
Oxaloacetate
Fumarate
AA
Citric acid
cycle
Citrate
Succinyl-CoA
α-Ketoglutarate
Figure 15–7.
Intracellular location and overview of major metabolic pathways in a liver parenchymal
cell. (AA →, metabolism of one or more essential amino acids; AA ↔, metabolism of one or more
nonessential amino acids.)
enzyme-catalyzed reaction, eg, substrate concentration,
areof primary importance in the control of the overall
rate of a metabolic pathway (Chapter 9).
“Nonequilibrium” Reactions Are
PotentialControl Points
In a reaction at equilibrium, the forward and reverse re-
actions occur at equal rates, and there is therefore no
net flux in either direction: 
A
B
C
D
In vivo, under “steady-state” conditions, there is a net
flux from left to right because there is a continuous sup-
ply of A and removal of D. In practice, there are invari-
ably one or more nonequilibrium reactionsin a meta-
bolic pathway, where the reactants are present in
concentrations that are far from equilibrium. In at-
tempting to reach equilibrium, large losses of free en-
ergy occur as heat, making this type of reaction essen-
tially irreversible, eg,
A
Heat
B
D
C
128 / CHAPTER 15
Enz
1
Enz
2
A
A
B
C
D
+
+
+
+
+
+
2
2
1
3
4
5
Ca
2+
/calmodulin
cAMP
Inactive
Enz
1
Cell
membrane
X
Y
Active
Positive allosteric
feed-forward
activation
Negative allosteric
feed-back
inhibition
Ribosomal synthesis
of new enzyme protein
or
or
Nuclear production
of mRNA
Induction
Repression
Figure 15–8.
Mechanisms of control of an enzyme-catalyzed reaction. Circled
numbers indicate possible sites of action of hormones. 
1
, Alteration of mem-
brane permeability; 
2
, conversion of an inactive to an active enzyme, usually in-
volving phosphorylation/dephosphorylation reactions; 
3
, alteration of the rate
of translation of mRNA at the ribosomal level; 
4
, induction of new mRNA forma-
tion; and 
5
, repression of mRNA formation. 
1
and 
2
are rapid, whereas 
3–
5
are slower ways of regulating enzyme activity.
OVERVIEW OF METABOLISM
/ 129
Such a pathway has both flow and direction. The
enzymes catalyzing nonequilibrium reactions are usu-
ally present in low concentrations and are subject to a
variety of regulatory mechanisms. However, many of
the reactions in metabolic pathways cannot be classified
as equilibrium or nonequilibrium but fall somewhere
between the two extremes.
The Flux-Generating Reaction 
Is the First Reaction in a Pathway 
That Is Saturated With Substrate
It may be identified as a nonequilibrium reaction in
which the K
m
of the enzyme is considerably lower than
the normal substrate concentration. The first reaction
in glycolysis, catalyzed by hexokinase(Figure 17–2), is
such a flux-generating step because its K
m
for glucose of
0.05 mmol/L is well below the normal blood glucose
concentration of 5 mmol/L.
ALLOSTERIC & HORMONAL
MECHANISMS ARE IMPORTANT 
IN THE METABOLIC CONTROL OF
ENZYME-CATALYZED REACTIONS
A hypothetical metabolic pathway is shown in Figure
15–8, in which reactions A ↔B and C ↔D are equi-
librium reactions and B →C is a nonequilibrium reac-
tion. The flux through such a pathway can be regulated
by the availability of substrate A. This depends on its
supply from the blood, which in turn depends on either
food intake or key reactions that maintain and release
substrates from tissue reserves to the blood, eg, the
glycogen phosphorylase in liver (Figure 18–1) and hor-
mone-sensitive lipase in adipose tissue (Figure 25–7).
The flux also depends on the transport of substrate A
across the cell membrane. Flux is also determined by
the removal of the end product D and the availability
of cosubstrate or cofactors represented by X and Y. En-
zymes catalyzing nonequilibrium reactions are often al-
losteric proteins subject to the rapid actions of “feed-
back” or “feed-forward” control by allosteric modifiers
in immediate response to the needs of the cell (Chap-
ter9). Frequently, the product of a biosynthetic path-
way will inhibit the enzyme catalyzing the first reaction
in the pathway. Other control mechanisms depend on
the action of hormonesresponding to the needs of the
body as a whole; they may act rapidly, by altering the
activity of existing enzyme molecules, or slowly, by al-
tering the rate of enzyme synthesis. 
SUMMARY
• The products of digestion provide the tissues with
the building blocks for the biosynthesis of complex
molecules and also with the fuel to power the living
processes.
• Nearly all products of digestion of carbohydrate, fat,
and protein are metabolized to a common metabo-
lite, acetyl-CoA, before final oxidation to CO
2
in the
citric acid cycle.
• Acetyl-CoA is also used as the precursor for biosyn-
thesis of long-chain fatty acids; steroids, including
cholesterol; and ketone bodies.
• Glucose provides carbon skeletons for the glycerol
moiety of fat and of several nonessential amino acids.
• Water-soluble products of digestion are transported
directly to the liver via the hepatic portal vein. The
liver regulates the blood concentrations of glucose
and amino acids.
• Pathways are compartmentalized within the cell.
Glycolysis, glycogenesis, glycogenolysis, the pentose
phosphate pathway, and lipogenesis occur in the cy-
tosol. The mitochondrion contains the enzymes of
the citric acid cycle, β-oxidation of fatty acids, and of
oxidative phosphorylation. The endoplasmic reticu-
lum also contains the enzymes for many other
processes, including protein synthesis, glycerolipid
formation, and drug metabolism.
• Metabolic pathways are regulated by rapid mecha-
nisms affecting the activity of existing enzymes, eg,
allosteric and covalent modification (often in re-
sponse to hormone action); and slow mechanisms af-
fecting the synthesis of enzymes. 
REFERENCES
Cohen P: Control of Enzyme Activity,2nd ed. Chapman & Hall,
1983.
Fell D: Understanding the Control of Metabolism. Portland Press,
1997.
Frayn KN: Metabolic Regulation—A Human Perspective.Portland
Press, 1996. 
Newsholme EA, Crabtree B: Flux-generating and regulatory steps
in metabolic control. Trends Biochem Sci 1981;6:53.
130
The Citric Acid Cycle:
TheCatabolism of Acetyl-CoA
16
Peter A. Mayes, PhD, DSc, & David A. Bender, PhD
BIOMEDICAL IMPORTANCE
The citric acid cycle (Krebs cycle, tricarboxylic acid
cycle) is a series of reactions in mitochondria that oxi-
dize acetyl residues (as acetyl-CoA) and reduce coen-
zymes that upon reoxidation are linked to the forma-
tion of ATP. 
The citric acid cycle is the final common pathway
for the aerobic oxidation of carbohydrate, lipid, and
protein because glucose, fatty acids, and most amino
acids are metabolized to acetyl-CoA or intermediates of
the cycle. It also has a central role in gluconeogenesis,
lipogenesis, and interconversion of amino acids. Many
of these processes occur in most tissues, but the liver is
the only tissue in which all occur to a significant extent.
The repercussions are therefore profound when, for ex-
ample, large numbers of hepatic cells are damaged as in
acute hepatitisor replaced by connective tissue (as in
cirrhosis). Very few, if any, genetic abnormalities of
citric acid cycle enzymes have been reported; such ab-
normalities would be incompatible with life or normal
development.
THE CITRIC ACID CYCLE PROVIDES
SUBSTRATE FOR THE 
RESPIRATORY CHAIN
The cycle starts with reaction between the acetyl moiety
of acetyl-CoA and the four-carbon dicarboxylic acid ox-
aloacetate, forming a six-carbon tricarboxylic acid, cit-
rate. In the subsequent reactions, two molecules of CO
2
are released and oxaloacetate is regenerated (Figure
16–1). Only a small quantity of oxaloacetate is needed
for the oxidation of a large quantity of acetyl-CoA; ox-
aloacetate may be considered to play a catalytic role.
The citric acid cycle is an integral part of the process
by which much of the free energy liberated during the
oxidation of fuels is made available. During oxidation
of acetyl-CoA, coenzymes are reduced and subsequently
reoxidized in the respiratory chain, linked to the forma-
tion of ATP (oxidative phosphorylation; see Figure
16–2 and also Chapter 12). This process is aerobic,re-
quiring oxygen as the final oxidant of the reduced
coenzymes. The enzymes of the citric acid cycle are lo-
*From Circular No. 200 of the Committee of Editors of Biochemi-
cal Journals Recommendations (1975): “According to standard
biochemical convention, the ending atein, eg, palmitate, denotes
any mixture of free acid and the ionized form(s) (according to pH)
in which the cations are not specified.” The same convention is
adopted in this text for all carboxylic acids.
cated in the mitochondrial matrix, either free or at-
tached to the inner mitochondrial membrane, where
the enzymes of the respiratory chain are also found.
REACTIONS OF THE CITRIC ACID 
CYCLE LIBERATE REDUCING
EQUIVALENTS & CO
2
(Figure16–3)*
The initial reaction between acetyl-CoA and oxaloac-
etate to form citrate is catalyzed by citrate synthase
which forms a carbon-carbon bond between the methyl
carbon of acetyl-CoA and the carbonyl carbon of ox-
aloacetate. The thioester bond of the resultant citryl-
CoA is hydrolyzed, releasing citrate and CoASH—an
exergonic reaction.
Citrate is isomerized to isocitrate by the enzyme
aconitase(aconitate hydratase); the reaction occurs in
two steps: dehydration to cis-aconitate, some of which
remains bound to the enzyme; and rehydration to isoci-
trate. Although citrate is a symmetric molecule, aconi-
tase reacts with citrate asymmetrically, so that the two
carbon atoms that are lost in subsequent reactions of
the cycle are not those that were added from acetyl-
CoA. This asymmetric behavior is due to channeling
transfer of the product of citrate synthase directly onto
the active site of aconitase without entering free solu-
tion. This provides integration of citric acid cycle activ-
ity and the provision of citrate in the cytosol as a source
of acetyl-CoA for fatty acid synthesis. The poison fluo-
roacetateis toxic because fluoroacetyl-CoA condenses
with oxaloacetate to form fluorocitrate, whichinhibits
aconitase, causing citrate to accumulate.
Isocitrate undergoes dehydrogenation catalyzed by
isocitrate dehydrogenaseto form, initially, oxalosucci-
nate, which remains enzyme-bound and undergoes de-
carboxylation to α-ketoglutarate. The decarboxylation
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested