asp.net mvc generate pdf : Batch pdf to jpg converter Library control class asp.net web page windows ajax Harper%27s%20Illustrated%20Biochemistry%20-%20Robert%20K.%20Murray,%20Darryl%20K.%20Granner,%20Peter%20A.%20Mayes,%20Victor%20W.%20Rodwell16-part573

METABOLISM OF GLYCOGEN / 151
cAMP
5′-AMP
Epinephrine
(liver, muscle)
Glucagon
(liver)
UDPGIc
Glycogen
Glucose 1-phosphate
Glucose
Lactate (muscle)
Glycogen
cycle
PHOSPHODIESTERASE
Inhibitor-1
Inhibitor-1
phosphate
cAMP-
DEPENDENT
PROTEIN KINASE
PHOSPHORYLASE
a
PROTEIN
PHOSPHATASE-1
PHOSPHORYLASE
KINASE a
GLYCOGEN
SYNTHASE a
PROTEIN
PHOSPHATASE-1
PHOSPHORYLASE
b
PROTEIN
PHOSPHATASE-1
PHOSPHORYLASE
KINASE b
GLYCOGEN
SYNTHASE b
Glucose (liver)
Figure 18–8.
Coordinated control of glycogenolysis and glycogenesis by cAMP-dependent protein ki-
nase. The reactions that lead to glycogenolysis as a result of an increase in cAMP concentrations are shown
with bold arrows, and those that are inhibited by activation of protein phosphatase-1 are shown as broken
arrows. The reverse occurs when cAMP concentrations decrease as a result of phosphodiesterase activity,
leading to glycogenesis.
the dephosphorylation of phosphorylase a, phosphory-
lase kinase a, and glycogen synthase b is catalyzed by
a single enzyme of wide specificity—protein phos-
phatase-1.In turn, protein phosphatase-1 is inhibited
by cAMP-dependent protein kinase via inhibitor-1.
Thus, glycogenolysis can be terminated and glycogenesis
can be stimulated synchronously, or vice versa, because
both processes are keyed to the activity of cAMP-depen-
dent protein kinase. Both phosphorylase kinase and
glycogen synthase may be reversibly phosphorylated in
more than one site by separate kinases and phosphatases.
These secondary phosphorylations modify the sensitivity
of the primary sites to phosphorylation and dephos-
phorylation (multisite phosphorylation). What is
more, they allow insulin, via glucose 6-phosphate eleva-
tion, to o have effects that act reciprocally to those of
cAMP (Figures 18–6 and 18–7).
CLINICAL ASPECTS
Glycogen Storage Diseases Are Inherited
“Glycogen storage disease” is a generic term to describe
a group of inherited disorders characterized by deposi-
tion of an abnormal type or quantity of glycogen in the
tissues. The principal glycogenoses are summarized in
Table 18–2. Deficiencies of adenylyl kinase and
cAMP-dependent protein kinase have also been re-
Change pdf to jpg image - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi; pdf to jpg converter
Change pdf to jpg image - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
best way to convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf image to jpg image
152 / CHAPTER 18
Table 18–2. Glycogen storage diseases.
Glycogenosis
Name
Cause of Disorder
Characteristics
Type I
Von Gierke’s disease
Deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase e Liver cells and renal tubule cells loaded 
with glycogen. Hypoglycemia, lactic-
acidemia, ketosis, hyperlipemia.
Type II
Pompe’s disease
Deficiency of lysosomal α-1→4- and Fatal, accumulation of glycogen in lyso-
1→6-glucosidase (acid maltase)
somes, heart failure.
Type III
Limit dextrinosis, Forbes’ or 
Absence of debranching enzyme
Accumulation of a characteristic 
Cori’s disease
branched polysaccharide.
Type IV
Amylopectinosis, Andersen’s Absence of branching enzyme
Accumulation of a polysaccharide hav-
disease
ing few branch points. Death due to 
cardiac or liver failure in first year of life.
Type V
Myophosphorylase deficiency, Absence of muscle phosphorylase
Diminished exercise tolerance; muscles 
McArdle’s syndrome
have abnormally high glycogen con-
tent (2.5–4.1%). Little or no lactate in 
blood after exercise.
Type VI
Hers’ disease
Deficiency of liver phosphorylase
High glycogen content in liver, ten-
dency toward hypoglycemia.
Type VII
Tarui’s disease
Deficiency of phosphofructokinase As for type V but also possibility of he-
in muscle and erythrocytes
molytic anemia.
Type VIII
Deficiency of liver phosphorylase 
As for type VI.
kinase
ported. Some of the conditions described have bene-
fited from liver transplantation.
SUMMARY
• Glycogen represents the principal storage form of
carbohydrate in the mammalian body, mainly in the
liver and muscle.
• In the liver, its major function is to provide glucose
for extrahepatic tissues. In muscle, it serves mainly as
a ready source of metabolic fuel for use in muscle.
• Glycogen is synthesized from glucose by the pathway
of glycogenesis. It is broken down by a separate path-
way known as glycogenolysis. Glycogenolysis leads to
glucose formation in liver and lactate formation in
muscle owing to the respective presence or absence of
glucose-6-phosphatase.
• Cyclic AMP integrates the regulation of glycogenoly-
sis and glycogenesis by promoting the simultaneous
activation of phosphorylase and inhibition of glyco-
gen synthase. Insulin acts reciprocally by inhibiting
glycogenolysis and stimulating glycogenesis.
• Inherited deficiencies in specific enzymes of glycogen
metabolism in both liver and muscle are the causes of
glycogen storage diseases.
REFERENCES
Bollen M, Keppens S, Stalmans W: Specific features of glycogen
metabolism in the liver. Biochem J 1998;336:19. 
Cohen P: The role of protein phosphorylation in the hormonal
control of enzyme activity. Eur J Biochem 1985;151:439.
Ercan N, Gannon MC, Nuttall FQ: Incorporation of glycogenin
into a hepatic proteoglycogen after oral glucose administra-
tion. J Biol Chem 1994;269:22328.
Geddes R: Glycogen: a metabolic viewpoint. Bioscience Rep
1986;6:415.
McGarry JD et al: From dietary glucose to liver glycogen: the full
circle round. Annu Rev Nutr 1987;7:51. 
Meléndez-Hevia E, Waddell TG, Shelton ED: Optimization of
molecular design in the evolution of metabolism: the glyco-
gen molecule. Biochem J 1993;295:477. 
Raz I, Katz A, Spencer MK: Epinephrine inhibits insulin-mediated
glycogenesis but enhances glycolysis in human skeletal mus-
cle. Am J Physiol 1991;260:E430.
Scriver CR et al (editors): The Metabolic and Molecular Bases of In-
herited Disease,8th ed. McGraw-Hill, 2001. 
Shulman GI, Landau BR: Pathways of glycogen repletion. Physiol
Rev 1992;72:1019. 
Villar-Palasi C: On the mechanism of inactivation of muscle glyco-
gen phosphorylase by insulin. Biochim Biophys Acta 1994;
1224:384. 
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
try out some settings and then create the PDF files with the button at the bottom. The perfect conversion tool. JPG is the most widely used image format, but we
change pdf to jpg format; .pdf to jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
JPG is the most common image format on the internet. The outputs of our conversion service are always JPG files to even if pictures are saved in a PDF in other
bulk pdf to jpg converter; batch convert pdf to jpg online
Gluconeogenesis & Control 
of the Blood Glucose
19
153
Peter A. Mayes, PhD, DSc, & David A. Bender, PhD
BIOMEDICAL IMPORTANCE
Gluconeogenesis is the term used to include all path-
ways responsible for converting noncarbohydrate pre-
cursors to glucose or glycogen. The major substrates are
the glucogenic amino acids and lactate, glycerol, and
propionate. Liver and kidney are the major gluco-
neogenic tissues. Gluconeogenesis meets the needs of
the body for glucose when carbohydrate is not available
in sufficient amounts from the diet or from glycogen
reserves. A supply of glucose is necessary especially for
the nervous system and erythrocytes. Failure of gluco-
neogenesis is usually fatal. Hypoglycemiacauses brain
dysfunction, which can lead to coma and death. Glu-
cose is also important in maintaining the level of inter-
mediates of the citric acid cycle even when fatty acids
are the main source of acetyl-CoA in the tissues. In ad-
dition, gluconeogenesis clears lactate produced by mus-
cle and erythrocytes and glycerol produced by adipose
tissue. Propionate, the principal glucogenic fatty acid
produced in the digestion of carbohydrates by rumi-
nants, is a major substrate for gluconeogenesis in these
species.
GLUCONEOGENESIS INVOLVES
GLYCOLYSIS, THE CITRIC ACID CYCLE, 
& SOME SPECIAL REACTIONS
(Figure19–1)
Thermodynamic Barriers Prevent 
a Simple Reversal of Glycolysis
Three nonequilibrium reactions catalyzed by hexoki-
nase, phosphofructokinase, and pyruvate kinase prevent
simple reversal of glycolysis for glucose synthesis
(Chapter 17). They are circumvented as follows:
A. P
YRUVATE
& P
HOSPHOENOLPYRUVATE
Mitochondrial pyruvate carboxylasecatalyzes the car-
boxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, an ATP-requir-
ing reaction in which the vitamin biotin is the co-
enzyme. Biotin binds CO
2
from bicarbonate as
carboxybiotin prior to the addition of the CO
2
to pyru-
vate (Figure 45–17). A second enzyme, phospho-
enolpyruvate carboxykinase,catalyzes the decarboxy-
lation and phosphorylation of oxaloacetate to phospho-
enolpyruvate using GTP (or ITP) as the phosphate
donor. Thus, reversal of the reaction catalyzed by pyru-
vate kinase in glycolysis involves two endergonic reac-
tions. 
In pigeon, chicken, and rabbit liver, phospho-
enolpyruvate carboxykinase is a mitochondrial enzyme,
and phosphoenolpyruvate is transported into the cy-
tosol for gluconeogenesis. In the rat and the mouse, the
enzyme is cytosolic. Oxaloacetate does not cross the mi-
tochondrial inner membrane; it is converted to malate,
which is transported into the cytosol, and converted
back to oxaloacetate by cytosolic malate dehydrogenase.
In humans, the guinea pig, and the cow, the enzyme is
equally distributed between mitochondria and cytosol.
The main source of GTP for phosphoenolpyruvate
carboxykinase inside the mitochondrion is the reaction
of succinyl-CoA synthetase (Chapter 16). This provides
a link and limit between citric acid cycle activity and
the extent of withdrawal of oxaloacetate for gluconeo-
genesis.
B. F
RUCTOSE
1,6-B
ISPHOSPHATE
& F
RUCTOSE
6-P
HOSPHATE
The conversion of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate to fructose
6-phosphate, to achieve a reversal of glycolysis, is cat-
alyzed by fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase. Its presence
determines whether or not a tissue is capable of synthe-
sizing glycogen not only from pyruvate but also from
triosephosphates. It is present in liver, kidney, and
skeletal muscle but is probably absent from heart and
smooth muscle.
C. G
LUCOSE
6-P
HOSPHATE
& G
LUCOSE
The conversion of glucose 6-phosphate to glucose is
catalyzed by glucose-6-phosphatase. It is present in
liver and kidney but absent from muscle and adipose
tissue, which, therefore, cannot export glucose into the
bloodstream. 
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion.
c# pdf to jpg; .pdf to .jpg online
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. C:\input.tif"; String outputDirectory = @"C:\output\"; // Convert tiff to jpg and show How to change Tiff image to Bmp image in your C#
change from pdf to jpg on; convert multiple pdf to jpg
GLUCOKINASE
HEXOKINASE
ATP
ADP
Glucose
Glucose 6-
phosphate
GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATASE
P
H
2
O
ATP
ADP
Fructose 6-
phosphate
Fructose 1,6-
bisphosphate
FRUCTOSE-1,6-
BISPHOSPHATASE
P
H
2
O
AMP
Glycogen
Fructose
2,6-bisphosphate
cAMP
(glucagon)
Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate
P
cAMP
(glucagon)
NAD
+
NADH + H
+
1,3-Bisphosphoglycerate
ADP
ATP
3-Phosphoglycerate
2-Phosphoglycerate
Phosphoenolpyruvate
Fructose
2,6-bisphosphate
ADP
ATP
Pyruvate
Dihydroxyacetone phosphate
GLYCEROL 3-PHOSPHATE
DEHYDROGENASE
NAD
+
Glycerol 3-phosphate
ADP
ATP
Glycerol
NADH + H
+
Pyruvate
NAD
+
Alanine
cAMP
(glucagon)
M
I
T
O
C
H
O
N
D
R
I
O
N
C
Y
T
O
S
O
L
Oxaloacetate
Citric acid cycle
Citrate
Ketoglutarate
α-
Fumarate
Malate
Succinyl-CoA
Malate
PHOSPHOENOLPYRUVATE
CARBOXYKINASE
Oxaloacetate
NAD
+
NADH + H
+
GDP + CO
2
GTP
NADH + H
+
NAD
+
ADP + P
CO
2
+ ATP
Acetyl-CoA
Fatty
acids
NADH + H
+
Citrate
AMP
Mg2
+
Propionate
PHOSPHOFRUCTOKINASE
GLYCEROL KINASE
PYRUVATE KINASE
Lactate
PYRUVATE CARBOXYLASE
PYRUVATE
DEHYDROGENASE
i
i
i
i
Figure 19–1.
Major pathways and regulation of gluconeogenesis and glycolysis in the liver. Entry
points of glucogenic amino acids after transamination are indicated by arrows extended from circles.
(See also Figure 16–4.) The key gluconeogenic enzymes are enclosed in double-bordered boxes. The
ATP required for gluconeogenesis is supplied by the oxidation of long-chain fatty acids. Propionate is
of quantitative importance only in ruminants. Arrows with wavy shafts signify allosteric effects; dash-
shafted arrows, covalent modification by reversible phosphorylation. High concentrations of alanine
act as a “gluconeogenic signal” by inhibiting glycolysis at the pyruvate kinase step.
154
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
changing file from pdf to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap programming sample code to convert PDF file to Png image. Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET
change pdf to jpg file; change pdf to jpg image
GLUCONEOGENESIS & CONTROL OF THE BLOOD GLUCOSE / 155
D. G
LUCOSE
1-P
HOSPHATE
& G
LYCOGEN
The breakdown of glycogen to glucose 1-phosphate is
catalyzed by phosphorylase. Glycogen synthesis in-
volves a different pathway via uridine diphosphate glu-
cose and glycogen synthase(Figure 18–1).
The relationships between gluconeogenesis and the
glycolytic pathway are shown in Figure 19–1. After
transamination or deamination, glucogenic amino acids
yield either pyruvate or intermediates of the citric acid
cycle. Therefore, the reactions described above can ac-
count for the conversion of both glucogenic amino
acids and lactate to glucose or glycogen. Propionate is a
major source of glucose in ruminants and enters gluco-
neogenesis via the citric acid cycle. Propionate is esteri-
fied with CoA, then propionyl-CoA, is carboxylated to
D
-methylmalonyl-CoA, catalyzed by propionyl-CoA
carboxylase,a biotin-dependent enzyme (Figure 19–2).
Methylmalonyl-CoA racemase catalyzes the conver-
sion of 
D
-methylmalonyl-CoA to 
L
-methylmalonyl-
CoA, which then undergoes isomerization to succinyl-
CoA catalyzed by methylmalonyl-CoA isomerase.
This enzyme requires vitamin B
12
as a coenzyme, and
deficiency of this vitamin results in the excretion of
methylmalonate (methylmalonic aciduria).
C
15
and C
17
fatty acids are found particularly in the
lipids of ruminants. Dietary odd-carbon fatty acids
upon oxidation yield propionate (Chapter 22), which is
a substrate for gluconeogenesis in human liver.
Glycerol is released from adipose tissue as a result of
lipolysis, and only tissues such as liver and kidney that
possess glycerol kinase,which catalyzes the conversion
of glycerol to glycerol 3-phosphate, can utilize it. Glyc-
erol 3-phosphate may be oxidized to dihydroxyacetone
phosphate by NAD
+
catalyzed by glycerol-3-phos-
phate dehydrogenase.
SINCE GLYCOLYSIS & GLUCONEOGENESIS
SHARE THE SAME PATHWAY BUT IN
OPPOSITE DIRECTIONS, THEY MUST 
BE REGULATED RECIPROCALLY
Changes in the availability of substrates are responsible
for most changes in metabolism either directly or indi-
rectly acting via changes in hormone secretion. Three
mechanisms are responsible for regulating the activity
of enzymes in carbohydrate metabolism: (1) changes in
the rate of enzyme synthesis, (2) covalent modification
by reversible phosphorylation, and (3) allosteric effects.
Induction & Repression of Key Enzyme
Synthesis Requires Several Hours
The changes in enzyme activity in the liver that occur
under various metabolic conditions are listed in Table
19–1. The enzymes involved catalyze nonequilibrium
(physiologically irreversible) reactions. The effects are
generally reinforced because the activity of the enzymes
catalyzing the changes in the opposite direction varies
reciprocally (Figure 19–1). The enzymes involved in
the utilization of glucose (ie, those of glycolysis and li-
pogenesis) all become more active when there is a su-
perfluity of glucose, and under these conditions the en-
zymes responsible for gluconeogenesis all have low
activity. The secretion of insulin, in response to in-
creased blood glucose, enhances the synthesis of the key
ACYL-CoA
SYNTHETASE
ATP
AMP + PP
Mg
2
+
CO
2
+ H
2
O
CH
3
S
CoA
CH
2
COO
CH
2
COO
CH
2
CO
S
CoA
CH
3
C
H
CO
PROPIONYL-CoA
CARBOXYLASE
METHYLMALONYL-
CoA ISOMERASE
METHYLMALONYL-CoA
RACEMASE
ATP
Biotin
ADP + P
B
12
coenzyme
Intermediates
of citric acid cycle
COO
D
-Methyl-
malonyl-CoA
S
CoA
CH
3
C
H
CO
OOC
L
-Methyl-
malonyl-CoA
Succinyl-CoA
S
CoA
CH
3
CH
2
CO
Propionyl-CoA
Propionate
i
i
CoA     SH
Figure 19–2.
Metabolism of propionate.
C# TIFF: How to Use C#.NET Code to Compress TIFF Image File
C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object. List<Bitmap> images = new List<Bitmap>(); / Step1: Load image to REImage
convert pdf to jpg; change file from pdf to jpg on
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
DotNetNuke), SharePoint. Get JPG, JPEG and other high quality image files from PDF document. Able to extract vector images from PDF. Extract
pdf to jpg; changing pdf to jpg
156 / CHAPTER 19
Table 19–1. Regulatory and adaptive enzymes of the rat (mainly liver).
Activity In
Carbo-
Starva-
hydrate tion and
Feeding Diabetes
Inducer
Repressor
Activator
Inhibitor
Enzymes of glycogenesis, glycolysis, and pyruvate oxidation
Glycogen synthase
Insulin
Insulin
Glucagon (cAMP) phos-
system
Glucose 6-
phorylase, glycogen
phosphate
1
Hexokinase
Glucose 6-phosphate
1
Glucokinase
Insulin
Glucagon
(cAMP)
Phosphofructokinase-1
Insulin
Glucagon
AMP, fructose 6-
Citrate (fatty acids, ketone
(cAMP)
phosphate, P
i,
fruc- bodies),
ATP,
1
glucagon
tose 2,6-bisphos-
(cAMP)
phate1
Pyruvate kinase
Insulin, fructose e Glucagon
Fructose 1,6-
ATP, alanine, glucagon 
(cAMP)
bisphosphate
1
, in- - (cAMP), epinephrine
sulin
Pyruvate dehydro-
CoA, NAD
+
, insu-
Acetyl-CoA, NADH, ATP 
genase
lin,2ADP, pyruvate e (fatty acids, ketone bodies)
Enzymes of gluconeogenesis
Pyruvate carboxylase
Glucocorticoids, Insulin
Acetyl-CoA
1
ADP
1
glucagon, epi-
nephrine (cAMP)
Phosphoenolpyruvate
Glucocorticoids, Insulin
Glucagon?
carboxykinase
glucagon, epi-
nephrine (cAMP)
Fructose-1,6-
Glucocorticoids, Insulin
Glucagon (cAMP)
Fructose 1,6- bisphosphate,
bisphosphatase
glucagon, epi-
AMP, fructose 2,6-bisphos-
nephrine (cAMP)
phate
1
Glucose-6-phosphatase
Glucocorticoids, Insulin
glucagon, epi-
nephrine (cAMP)
Enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway and lipogenesis
Glucose-6-phosphate
Insulin
dehydrogenase
6-Phosphogluconate
Insulin
dehydrogenase
“Malic enzyme”
Insulin
ATP-citrate lyase
Insulin
Acetyl-CoA carboxylase
Insulin?
Citrate,1insulin
Long-chain acyl-CoA, cAMP,
glucagon
Fatty acid synthase
Insulin?
1Allosteric.
2
In adipose tissue but not in liver.
GLUCONEOGENESIS & CONTROL OF THE BLOOD GLUCOSE / 157
enzymes in glycolysis. Likewise, it antagonizes the effect
of the glucocorticoids and glucagon-stimulated cAMP,
which induce synthesis of the key enzymes responsible
for gluconeogenesis. 
Both dehydrogenases of the pentose phosphate
pathway can be classified as adaptive enzymes, since
they increase in activity in the well-fed animal and
when insulin is given to a diabetic animal. Activity is
low in diabetes or starvation. “Malic enzyme” and
ATP-citrate lyase behave similarly, indicating that these
two enzymes are involved in lipogenesis rather than
gluconeogenesis (Chapter 21).
Covalent Modification by Reversible
Phosphorylation Is Rapid
Glucagon, and to a lesser extent epinephrine, hor-
mones that are responsive to decreases in blood glucose,
inhibit glycolysis and stimulate gluconeogenesis in the
liver by increasing the concentration of cAMP. This in
turn activates cAMP-dependent protein kinase, leading
to the phosphorylation and inactivation of pyruvate
kinase. They also affect the concentration of fructose
2,6-bisphosphate and therefore glycolysis and gluco-
neogenesis, as explained below.
Allosteric Modification Is Instantaneous
In gluconeogenesis, pyruvate carboxylase, which cata-
lyzes the synthesis of oxaloacetate from pyruvate, re-
quires acetyl-CoA as an allosteric activator.The pres-
ence of acetyl-CoA results in a change in the tertiary
structure of the protein, lowering the K
m
value for bi-
carbonate. This means that as acetyl-CoA is formed
from pyruvate, it automatically ensures the provision of
oxaloacetate and, therefore, its further oxidation in the
citric acid cycle. The activation of pyruvate carboxylase
and the reciprocal inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogen-
ase by acetyl-CoA derived from the oxidation of fatty
acids explains the action of fatty acid oxidation in spar-
ing the oxidation of pyruvate and in stimulating gluco-
neogenesis. The reciprocal relationship between these
two enzymes in both liver and kidney alters the meta-
bolic fate of pyruvate as the tissue changes from carbo-
hydrate oxidation, via glycolysis, to gluconeogenesis
during transition from a fed to a starved state (Figure
19–1). A major role of fatty acid oxidation in promot-
ing gluconeogenesis is to supply the requirement for
ATP. Phosphofructokinase (phosphofructokinase-1)
occupies a key position in regulating glycolysis and is
also subject to feedback control. It is inhibited by cit-
rate and by ATP and is activated by 5′-AMP. 5′-AMP
acts as an indicator of the energy status of the cell. The
presence of adenylyl kinase in liver and many other
tissues allows rapid equilibration of the reaction:
Thus, when ATP is used in energy-requiring processes
resulting in formation of ADP, [AMP] increases. As
[ATP] may be 50 times [AMP] at equilibrium, a small
fractional decrease in [ATP] will cause a severalfold in-
crease in [AMP]. Thus, a large change in [AMP] acts as
a metabolic amplifier of a small change in [ATP]. This
mechanism allows the activity of phosphofructokinase-1
to be highly sensitive to even small changes in energy
status of the cell and to control the quantity of carbohy-
drate undergoing glycolysis prior to its entry into the
citric acid cycle. The increase in [AMP] can also explain
why glycolysis is increased during hypoxia when [ATP]
decreases. Simultaneously, AMP activates phosphory-
lase, increasing glycogenolysis. The inhibition of phos-
phofructokinase-1 by citrate and ATP is another expla-
nation of the sparing action of fatty acid oxidation on
glucose oxidation and also of the Pasteur effect,
whereby aerobic oxidation (via the citric acid cycle) in-
hibits the anaerobic degradation of glucose. A conse-
quence of the inhibition of phosphofructokinase-1 is an
accumulation of glucose 6-phosphate that, in turn, in-
hibits further uptake of glucose in extrahepatic tissues
by allosteric inhibition of hexokinase.
Fructose 2,6-Bisphosphate Plays a Unique
Role in the Regulation of Glycolysis &
Gluconeogenesis in Liver
The most potent positive allosteric effector of phospho-
fructokinase-1 and inhibitor of fructose-1,6-bisphos-
phatase in liver is fructose 2,6-bisphosphate. It re-
lieves inhibition of phosphofructokinase-1 by ATP and
increases affinity for fructose 6-phosphate. It inhibits
fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase by increasing the K
m
for
fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. Its concentration is under
both substrate (allosteric) and hormonal control (cova-
lent modification) (Figure 19–3).
Fructose 2,6-bisphosphate is formed by phosphory-
lation of fructose 6-phosphate by phosphofructoki-
nase-2.The same enzyme protein is also responsible for
its breakdown, since it has fructose-2,6-bisphos-
phatase activity. This bifunctional enzyme is under
the allosteric control of fructose 6-phosphate, which
stimulates the kinase and inhibits the phosphatase.
Hence, when glucose is abundant, the concentration of
fructose 2,6-bisphosphate increases, stimulating glycol-
ysis by activating phosphofructokinase-1 and inhibiting
ATP AMP
ADP
+
↔2
158 / CHAPTER 19
Glucagon
cAMP
cAMP-DEPENDENT
PROTEIN KINASE
ATP
ADP
P
i
H
2
O
Fructose 2,6-bisphosphate
PFK-1
ATP
ADP
Fructose 1,6-bisphosphate
Fructose 6-phosphate
H
2
O
P
i
G
L
U
C
O
N
E
O
G
E
N
E
S
I
S
G
L
Y
C
O
L
Y
S
I
S
Glycogen
Glucose
Pyruvate
Citrate
F-1,6-Pase
PROTEIN
PHOSPHATASE-2
Inactive
F-2,6-Pase
Active
PFK-2
Active
F-2,6-Pase
Inactive
PFK-2
P
P
i
ADP
Figure 19–3.
Control of glycolysis and gluconeoge-
nesis in the liver by fructose 2,6-bisphosphate and the
bifunctional enzyme PFK-2/F-2,6-Pase (6-phospho-
fructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase). (PFK-1,
phosphofructokinase-1 [6-phosphofructo-1-kinase]; 
F-1,6-Pase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase. Arrows with
wavy shafts indicate allosteric effects.)
fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase. When glucose is short,
glucagon stimulates the production of cAMP, activat-
ing cAMP-dependent protein kinase, which in turn in-
activates phosphofructokinase-2 and activates fructose
2,6-bisphosphatase by phosphorylation. Therefore, glu-
coneogenesis is stimulated by a decrease in the concen-
tration of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate, which deactivates
phosphofructokinase-1 and deinhibits fructose-1,6-bis-
phosphatase. This mechanism also ensures that glu-
cagon stimulation of glycogenolysis in liver results in
glucose release rather than glycolysis.
Substrate (Futile) Cycles Allow Fine Tuning
It will be apparent that the control points in glycolysis
and glycogen metabolism involve a cycle of phosphory-
lation and dephosphorylation catalyzed by: glucokinase
and glucose-6-phosphatase; phosphofructokinase-1 and
fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase; pyruvate kinase, pyruvate
carboxylase, and phosphoenolypyruvate carboxykinase;
and glycogen synthase and phosphorylase. If these were
allowed to cycle unchecked, they would amount to fu-
tile cycles whose net result was hydrolysis of ATP. This
does not occur extensively due to the various control
mechanisms, which ensure that one reaction is inhib-
ited as the other is stimulated. However, there is a phys-
iologic advantage in allowing some cycling. The rate of
net glycolysis may increase several thousand-fold in re-
sponse to stimulation, and this is more readily achieved
by both increasing the activity of phosphofructokinase
and decreasing that of fructose bisphosphatase if both
are active, than by switching one enzyme “on” and the
other “off” completely. This “fine tuning” of metabolic
control occurs at the expense of some loss of ATP. 
THE CONCENTRATION OF BLOOD
GLUCOSE IS REGULATED WITHIN
NARROW LIMITS
In the postabsorptive state, the concentration of blood
glucose in most mammals is maintained between 4.5
and 5.5 mmol/L. After the ingestion of a carbohydrate
meal, it may rise to 6.5–7.2 mmol/L, and in starvation,
it may fall to 3.3–3.9 mmol/L. A sudden decrease in
blood glucose will cause convulsions, as in insulin over-
dose, owing to the immediate dependence of the brain
on a supply of glucose. However, much lower concen-
trations can be tolerated, provided progressive adapta-
tion is allowed. The blood glucose level in birds is con-
siderably higher (14.0 mmol/L) and in ruminants
considerably lower (approximately 2.2 mmol/L in
sheep and 3.3 mmol/L in cattle). These lower normal
levels appear to be associated with the fact that rumi-
nants ferment virtually all dietary carbohydrate to lower
(volatile) fatty acids, and these largely replace glucose as
the main metabolic fuel of the tissues in the fed condi-
tion.
BLOOD GLUCOSE IS DERIVED FROM 
THE DIET, GLUCONEOGENESIS, 
& GLYCOGENOLYSIS
The digestible dietary carbohydrates yield glucose,
galactose, and fructose that are transported via the
hepatic portal vein to the liver where galactose and
fructose are readily converted to glucose (Chapter 20).
GLUCONEOGENESIS & CONTROL OF THE BLOOD GLUCOSE / 159
Glucose is formed from two groups of compounds
that undergo gluconeogenesis (Figures 16–4 and 19–1):
(1) those which involve a direct net conversion to glu-
cose without significant recycling, such as some amino
acids and propionate; and (2) those which are the
products of the metabolism of glucose in tissues. Thus,
lactate, formed by glycolysis in skeletal muscle and
erythrocytes, is transported to the liver and kidney
where it re-forms glucose, which again becomes avail-
able via the circulation for oxidation in the tissues. This
process is known as the Cori cycle,or lactic acid cycle
(Figure 19–4). Triacylglycerol glycerol in adipose tissue
is derived from blood glucose. This triacylglycerol is
continuously undergoing hydrolysis to form free glyc-
erol,which cannot be utilized by adipose tissue and is
converted back to glucose by gluconeogenic mecha-
nisms in the liver and kidney (Figure 19–1).
Of the amino acids transported from muscle to the
liver during starvation, alanine predominates. The glu-
cose-alanine cycle (Figure 19–4) transports glucose
from liver to muscle with formation of pyruvate, fol-
lowed by transamination to alanine, then transports
alanine to the liver, followed by gluconeogenesis back
to glucose. A net transfer of amino nitrogen from mus-
cle to liver and of free energy from liver to muscle is ef-
fected. The energy required for the hepatic synthesis of
glucose from pyruvate is derived from the oxidation of
fatty acids.
Glucose is also formed from liver glycogen by
glycogenolysis (Chapter 18).
Metabolic & Hormonal Mechanisms
Regulate the Concentration 
of the Blood Glucose
The maintenance of stable levels of glucose in the blood
is one of the most finely regulated of all homeostatic
mechanisms, involving the liver, extrahepatic tissues,
and several hormones. Liver cells are freely permeable
to glucose (via the GLUT 2 transporter), whereas cells
of extrahepatic tissues (apart from pancreatic B islets)
are relatively impermeable, and their glucose trans-
porters are regulated by insulin. As a result, uptake
from the bloodstream is the rate-limiting step in the
utilization of glucose in extrahepatic tissues. The role of
various glucose transporter proteins found in cell mem-
branes, each having 12 transmembrane domains, is
shown in Table 19–2.
Glucokinase Is Important in Regulating
Blood Glucose After a Meal
Hexokinase has a low K
m
for glucose and in the liver is
saturated and acting at a constant rate under all normal
conditions. Glucokinase has a considerably higher K
m
(lower affinity) for glucose, so that its activity increases
over the physiologic range of glucose concentrations
(Figure 19–5). It promotes hepatic uptake of large
amounts of glucose at the high concentrations found in
the hepatic portal vein after a carbohydrate meal. It is
absent from the liver of ruminants, which have little
LIVER
MUSCLE
Pyruvate
Lactate
Lactate
Glycogen
Glucose 6-phosphate
Pyruvate
Glucose 6-phosphate
Glycogen
Urea
–NH
2
Alanine
–NH
2
Alanine
T
r
a
n
s
a
m
i
n
a
t
i
o
n
T
r
a
n
s
a
m
i
n
a
t
i
o
n
Lactate
BLOOD
Pyruvate
Alanine
BLOOD
Glucose
Figure 19–4.
The lactic acid (Cori) cycle and glucose-alanine cycle.
160 / CHAPTER 19
Table 19–2. Glucose transporters.
Tissue Location
Functions
Facilitative bidirectional transporters
GLUT 1 1 Brain, kidney, colon, placenta, erythrocyte
Uptake of glucose
GLUT 2 2 Liver, pancreatic B cell, small intestine, kidney y Rapid uptake and release of glucose
GLUT 3 3 Brain, kidney, placenta
Uptake of glucose
GLUT 4 4 Heart and skeletal muscle, adipose tissue
Insulin-stimulated uptake of glucose
GLUT 5 5 Small intestine
Absorption of glucose
Sodium-dependent unidirectional transporter
SGLT 1 1 Small intestine and kidney
Active uptake of glucose from lumen of intestine and 
reabsorption of glucose in proximal tubule of kidney 
against a concentration gradient
glucose entering the portal circulation from the intes-
tines.
At normal systemic-blood glucose concentrations
(4.5–5.5 mmol/L), the liver is a net producer of glu-
cose. However, as the glucose level rises, the output of
glucose ceases, and there is a net uptake. 
Insulin Plays a Central Role in
RegulatingBlood Glucose
In addition to the direct effects of hyperglycemia in en-
hancing the uptake of glucose into the liver, the hor-
mone insulin plays a central role in regulating blood glu-
cose. It is produced by the B cells of the islets of
Langerhans in the pancreas in response to hyper-
glycemia. The B islet cells are freely permeable to glu-
cose via the GLUT 2 transporter, and the glucose is
phosphorylated by glucokinase. Therefore, increasing
blood glucose increases metabolic flux through glycoly-
sis, the citric acid cycle, and the generation of ATP. In-
crease in [ATP] inhibits ATP-sensitive K
+
channels,
causing depolarization of the B cell membrane, which
increases Ca2
+
influx via voltage-sensitive Ca2
+
channels,
stimulating exocytosis of insulin. Thus, the concentra-
tion of insulin in the blood parallels that of the blood
glucose. Other substances causing release of insulin from
the pancreas include amino acids, free fatty acids, ketone
bodies, glucagon, secretin, and the sulfonylurea drugs
tolbutamide and glyburide. These drugs are used to
stimulate insulin secretion in type 2 diabetes mellitus
(NIDDM, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus);
they act by inhibiting the ATP-sensitive K
+
channels.
Epinephrine and norepinephrine block the release of in-
sulin. Insulin lowers blood glucose immediately by en-
hancing glucose transport into adipose tissue and muscle
by recruitment of glucose transporters (GLUT 4) from
the interior of the cell to the plasma membrane. Al-
though it does not affect glucose uptake into the liver
directly, insulin does enhance long-term uptake as a re-
sult of its actions on the enzymes controlling glycolysis,
glycogenesis, and gluconeogenesis (Chapter 18).
Glucagon Opposes the Actions of Insulin
Glucagon is the hormone produced by the A cells of
the pancreatic islets. Its secretion is stimulated by hypo-
glycemia. In the liver, it stimulates glycogenolysis by ac-
tivating phosphorylase. Unlike epinephrine, glucagon
does not have an effect on muscle phosphorylase.
Glucagon also enhances gluconeogenesis from amino
acids and lactate. In all these actions, glucagon acts via
generation of cAMP (Table 19–1). Both hepatic
glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis contribute to the
0
50
A
c
t
i
v
i
t
y
100
V
max
5
10
Blood glucose (mmol/L)
Glucokinase
Hexokinase
15
20
25
Figure 19–5.
Variation in glucose phosphorylating
activity of hexokinase and glucokinase with increase of
blood glucose concentration. The K
m
for glucose of
hexokinase is 0.05 mmol/L and of glucokinase is 10
mmol/L.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested