asp.net mvc generate pdf : C# open source pdf to image control SDK utility azure wpf asp.net visual studio Harper%27s%20Illustrated%20Biochemistry%20-%20Robert%20K.%20Murray,%20Darryl%20K.%20Granner,%20Peter%20A.%20Mayes,%20Victor%20W.%20Rodwell18-part575

THE PENTOSE PHOSPHATE PATHWAY & OTHER PATHWAYS OF HEXOSE METABOLISM
/ 171
UTP
UDP-
glucosamine
*
Glycosaminoglycans
(eg, heparin)
Glycosaminoglycans
(hyaluronic acid),
glycoproteins
Glycogen
Glucose 1-phosphate
Fructose 6-phosphate
Glucosamine
6-phosphate
Glucosamine
N
-Acetyl-
glucosamine
N
-Acetyl-
glucosamine
6-phosphate
N
-Acetyl-
mannosamine
6-phosphate
N
-Acetyl-
neuraminic acid
9-phosphate
Glucose 6-phosphate
ATP
ADP
ATP
ADP
ATP
ADP
Glutamine
Glutamate
Glucose
Acetyl-CoA
Acetyl-CoA
Phosphoenolpyruvate
Sialic acid,
gangliosides,
glycoproteins
Glycosaminoglycans
(chondroitins),
glycoproteins
EPIMERASE
EPIMERASE
AMIDOTRANSFERASE
PHOSPHOGLUCO-
MUTASE
PP
PP 
N
-Acetyl-
glucosamine
1-phosphate
UTP
UDP-
N
-acetylglucosamine
*
UDP-
N
-acetylgalactosamine
*
NAD
+
Inhibiting
allosteric
effect
Glucosamine
1-phosphate
i
i
Figure 20–7.
Summary of the interrelationships in metabolism of amino sugars. (At asterisk: Analo-
gous to UDPGlc.) Other purine or pyrimidine nucleotides may be similarly linked to sugars or amino sug-
ars. Examples are thymidine diphosphate (TDP)-glucosamine and TDP-N-acetylglucosamine.
creased, causing hyperuricemia, which is a cause of gout
(Chapter 34).
Defects in Fructose Metabolism Cause
Disease (Figure 20–5)
Lack of hepatic fructokinase causes essential fructo-
suria,and absence of hepatic aldolase B, which cleaves
fructose 1-phosphate, leads to hereditary fructose in-
tolerance.Diets low in fructose, sorbitol, and sucrose
are beneficial for both conditions. One consequence of
hereditary fructose intolerance and of another condi-
tion due to fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase deficiencyis
fructose-induced hypoglycemiadespite the presence of
high glycogen reserves. The accumulation of fructose 
1-phosphate and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate allosterically
Change pdf file to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
batch pdf to jpg; convert pdf pages to jpg online
Change pdf file to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf to jpeg; best pdf to jpg converter for
172 / CHAPTER 20
inhibits the activity of liver phosphorylase. The seques-
tration of inorganic phosphate also leads to depletion of
ATP and hyperuricemia.
Fructose & Sorbitol in the Lens Are
Associated With Diabetic Cataract
Both fructose and sorbitol are found in the lens of the
eye in increased concentrations in diabetes mellitus and
may be involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic
cataract.The sorbitol (polyol) pathway(not found in
liver) is responsible for fructose formation from glucose
(Figure 20–5) and increases in activity as the glucose
concentration rises in diabetes in those tissues that are
not insulin-sensitive, ie, the lens, peripheral nerves, and
renal glomeruli. Glucose is reduced to sorbitol by al-
dose reductase, followed by oxidation of sorbitol to
fructose in the presence of NAD
+
and sorbitol dehydro-
genase (polyol dehydrogenase). Sorbitol does not dif-
fuse through cell membranes easily and accumulates,
causing osmotic damage. Simultaneously, myoinositol
levels fall. Sorbitol accumulation, myoinositol deple-
tion, and diabetic cataract can be prevented by aldose
reductase inhibitors in diabetic rats, and promising re-
sults have been obtained in clinical trials.
When sorbitol is administered intravenously, it is
converted to fructose rather than to glucose. It is poorly
absorbed in the small intestine, and much is fermented
by colonic bacteria to short-chain fatty acids, CO
2
, and
H
2
, leading to abdominal pain and diarrhea (sorbitol
intolerance).
Enzyme Deficiencies in the Galactose
Pathway Cause Galactosemia
Inability to metabolize galactose occurs in the galac-
tosemias,which may be caused by inherited defects in
galactokinase, uridyl transferase, or 4-epimerase (Figure
20–6A), though a deficiency in uridyl transferase is
the best known cause. The galactose concentration in
the blood and in the eye is reduced by aldose reductase
to galactitol, which accumulates, causing cataract. In
uridyl transferase deficiency, galactose 1-phosphate ac-
cumulates and depletes the liver of inorganic phos-
phate. Ultimately, liver failure and mental deterioration
result. As the epimerase is present in adequate amounts,
the galactosemic individual can still form UDPGal
from glucose, and normal growth and development can
occur regardless of the galactose-free diets used to con-
trol the symptoms of the disease. 
SUMMARY
• The pentose phosphate pathway, present in the cy-
tosol, can account for the complete oxidation ofglu-
cose, producing NADPH and CO
2
but not ATP.
• The pathway has an oxidative phase, which is irre-
versible and generates NADPH; and a nonoxidative
phase, which is reversible and provides ribose precur-
sors for nucleotide synthesis. The complete pathway
is present only in those tissues having a requirement
for NADPH for reductive syntheses, eg, lipogenesis
or steroidogenesis, whereas the nonoxidative phase is
present in all cells requiring ribose.
• In erythrocytes, the pathway has a major function in
preventing hemolysis by providing NADPH to
maintain glutathione in the reduced state as the sub-
strate for glutathione peroxidase.
• The uronic acid pathway is the source of glucuronic
acid for conjugation of many endogenous and exoge-
nous substances before excretion as glucuronides in
urine and bile.
• Fructose bypasses the main regulatory step in glycol-
ysis, catalyzed by phosphofructokinase, and stimu-
lates fatty acid synthesis and hepatic triacylglycerol
secretion. 
• Galactose is synthesized from glucose in the lactating
mammary gland and in other tissues where it is re-
quired for the synthesis of glycolipids, proteoglycans,
and glycoproteins.
REFERENCES
Couet C, Jan P, Debry G: Lactose and cataract in humans: a re-
view. J Am Coll Nutr 1991;10:79.
Cox TM: Aldolase B and fructose intolerance. FASEB J 1994;8:62.
Cross NCP, Cox TM: Hereditary fructose intolerance. Int J
Biochem 1990;22:685.
Kador PF: The role of aldose reductase in the development of dia-
betic complications. Med Res Rev 1988;8:325.
Kaufman FR, Devgan S: Classical galactosemia: a review. Endocri-
nologist 1995;5:189.
Macdonald I, Vrana A (editors): Metabolic Effects of Dietary Carbo-
hydrates.Karger, 1986.
Mayes PA: Intermediary metabolism of fructose. Am J Clin Nutr
1993(5 Suppl);58:754S.
Van den Berghe G: Inborn errors of fructose metabolism. Annu
Rev Nutr 1994;14:41.
Wood T: Physiological functions of the pentose phosphate path-
way. Cell Biol Funct 1986;4:241. 
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start immediately to sort the files, try out some settings and then create the PDF files with the
change pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
.net convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg batch
Biosynthesis of Fatty Acids
21
173
Peter A. Mayes, PhD, DSc, & Kathleen M. Botham, PhD, DSc
BIOMEDICAL IMPORTANCE
Fatty acids are synthesized by an extramitochondrial
system, which is responsible for the complete synthesis
of palmitate from acetyl-CoA in the cytosol. In the rat,
the pathway is well represented in adipose tissue and
liver, whereas in humans adipose tissue may not be an
important site, and liver has only low activity. In birds,
lipogenesis is confined to the liver, where it is particu-
larly important in providing lipids for egg formation. In
most mammals, glucose is the primary substrate for
lipogenesis, but in ruminants it is acetate, the main fuel
molecule produced by the diet. Critical diseases of the
pathway have not been reported in humans. However,
inhibition of lipogenesis occurs in type 1 (insulin-de-
pendent) diabetes mellitus,and variations in its activ-
ity may affect the nature and extent of obesity.
THE MAIN PATHWAY FOR DE NOVO
SYNTHESIS OF FATTY ACIDS
(LIPOGENESIS) OCCURS 
IN THE CYTOSOL
This system is present in many tissues, including liver,
kidney, brain, lung, mammary gland, and adipose tis-
sue. Its cofactor requirements include NADPH, ATP,
Mn
2+
, biotin, and HCO
3
(as a source of CO
2
). Acetyl-
CoAis the immediate substrate, and free palmitateis
the end product.
Production of Malonyl-CoA Is 
the Initial & Controlling Step 
in Fatty Acid Synthesis
Bicarbonate as a source of CO
2
is required in the initial
reaction for the carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to mal-
onyl-CoAin the presence of ATP and acetyl-CoA car-
boxylase. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase has a requirement
for the vitamin biotin(Figure 21–1). The enzyme is a
multienzyme proteincontaining a variable number of
identical subunits, each containing biotin, biotin car-
boxylase, biotin carboxyl carrier protein, and transcar-
boxylase, as well as a regulatory allosteric site. The reac-
tion takes place in two steps: (1) carboxylation of biotin
involving ATP and (2) transfer of the carboxyl to
acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA.
The Fatty Acid Synthase Complex 
Is a Polypeptide Containing 
Seven Enzyme Activities
In bacteria and plants, the individual enzymes of the
fatty acid synthase system are separate, and the acyl
radicals are found in combination with a protein called
the acyl carrier protein (ACP). However, in yeast,
mammals, and birds, the synthase system is a multien-
zyme polypeptide complex that incorporates ACP,
which takes over the role of CoA. It contains the vita-
min pantothenic acidin the form of 4′-phosphopan-
tetheine (Figure 45–18). The use of one multienzyme
functional unit has the advantages of achieving the ef-
fect of compartmentalization of the process within the
cell without the erection of permeability barriers, and
synthesis of all enzymes in the complex is coordinated
since it is encoded by a single gene.
In mammals, the fatty acid synthase complex is a
dimer comprising two identical monomers, each con-
taining all seven enzyme activities of fatty acid synthase
on one polypeptide chain (Figure 21–2). Initially, a
priming molecule of acetyl-CoA combines with a cys-
teine SH group catalyzed by acetyl transacylase
(Figure 21–3, reaction 1a). Malonyl-CoA combines
with the adjacent SH on the 4′-phosphopantetheine
of ACP of the other monomer, catalyzed by malonyl
transacylase(reaction 1b), to form acetyl (acyl)-mal-
onyl enzyme.The acetyl group attacks the methylene
group of the malonyl residue, catalyzed by 3-ketoacyl
synthase, and liberates CO
2
, forming 3-ketoacyl en-
zyme (acetoacetyl enzyme) (reaction 2), freeing the cys-
teine SH group. Decarboxylation allows the reaction
to go to completion, pulling the whole sequence of re-
actions in the forward direction. The 3-ketoacyl group
is reduced, dehydrated, and reduced again (reactions 3,
4, 5) to form the corresponding saturated acyl-S-
enzyme. A new malonyl-CoA molecule combines with
the SH of 4′-phosphopantetheine, displacing the sat-
urated acyl residue onto the free cysteine SH group.
The sequence of reactions is repeated six more times
until a saturated 16-carbon acyl radical (palmityl) has
been assembled. It is liberated from the enzyme com-
plex by the activity of a seventh enzyme in the complex,
thioesterase(deacylase). The free palmitate must be ac-
tivated to acyl-CoA before it can proceed via any other
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
change pdf file to jpg; convert pdf document to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Dicom Image File to Raster Images
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc. PowerPoint.dll. This demo code convert dicom file all pages to jpg images.
c# convert pdf to jpg; reader convert pdf to jpg
174 / CHAPTER 21
Hydratase
Malonyl
transacylase
Acetyl
transacylase
Ketoacyl
synthase
Enoyl
reductase
Ketoacyl
reductase
ACP
Thioesterase
ACP
Ketoacyl
reductase
Thioesterase
Enoyl
reductase
Hydratase
Malonyl
transacylase
Acetyl
transacylase
Ketoacyl
synthase
1.
2.
Subunit
division
F
u
n
c
t
i
o
n
a
l
d
i
v
i
s
i
o
n
Cys
SH
SH
4′-Phospho-
pantetheine
Cys
SH
SH
4′-Phospho-
pantetheine
Figure 21–2.
Fatty acid synthase multienzyme complex. The complex is a dimer of two identical polypeptide
monomers, 1 and 2, each consisting of seven enzyme activities and the acyl carrier protein (ACP). (CysSH, cys-
teine thiol.) The SH of the 4′-phosphopantetheine of one monomer is in close proximity to the SH of the cys-
teine residue of the ketoacyl synthase of the other monomer, suggesting a “head-to-tail” arrangement of the two
monomers. Though each monomer contains all the partial activities of the reaction sequence, the actual func-
tional unit consists of one-half of one monomer interacting with the complementary half of the other. Thus, two
acyl chains are produced simultaneously. The sequence of the enzymes in each monomer is based on Wakil.
CH
3
CO
CoA
S
OOC
CO
Malonyl-CoA
Acetyl-CoA
Enz     biotin     COO
CH
2
CoA
S
ATP + HCO
3
ADP + P
Enz     biotin
i
Figure 21–1.
Biosynthesis of malonyl-CoA. (Enz, acetyl-CoA carboxylase.)
metabolic pathway. Its usual fate is esterification into
acylglycerols, chain elongation or desaturation, or ester-
ification to cholesteryl ester. In mammary gland, there
is a separate thioesterase specific for acyl residues of C
8
,
C
10
, or C
12
, which are subsequently found in milk
lipids. 
The equation for the overall synthesis of palmitate
from acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA is: 
The acetyl-CoA used as a primer forms carbon
atoms 15 and 16 of palmitate. The addition of all the
subsequent C
2
units is via malonyl-CoA. Propionyl-
CoA acts as primer for the synthesis of long-chain fatty
CHCO S S CoA
HOOC CHCO S S CoA
NADPH
H
CH CH
COOH
CO
HO
CoA SH
NADP
2
2
3
2 14
2
2
7
14
14
7
6
8
14
⋅ ⋅
+
⋅ ⋅
+
+
+
+
+
⋅ +
+
+
(
)
C# TIFF: How to Use C#.NET Code to Compress TIFF Image File
C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object. List<Bitmap> images = new List<Bitmap>(); / Step1: Load image to REImage object. foreach (string file in
pdf to jpeg converter; convert pdf file to jpg format
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")); images.Add PDFDocument(images.ToArray()); / Save document to a file. Program.RootPath + "\\output.pdf"; doc.Save
batch convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf into jpg format
Cys
S
C
CH
3
O
Pan
S
C
CH
2
*
COO
O
(C
3
)
Acyl(acetyl)-malonyl enzyme
*CO
2
Cys
SH
Pan
S
C
CH
2
C
O
3-Ketoacyl enzyme
(acetoacetyl enzyme)
CH
3
O
NADPH 
+
H
+
NADP
+
Cys
SH
Pan
S
C
CH
2
CH
O
(–)-3-Hydroxyacyl enzyme
CH
3
D
Cys
SH
Pan
S
C
CH
CH
O
2,3-Unsaturated acyl enzyme
CH
3
NADPH 
+
H
+
NADP
+
Cys
SH
Pan
S
C
CH
O
Acyl enzyme
2
CH
2
CH
3
(C
n
)
H
2
O
H
2
O
Palmitate
THIOESTERASE
After cycling through
steps 2 2 – 5 5 seven times
Cys
SH
Pan
SH
Pan
Cys
HS
HS
CoA
Acetyl-CoA
C
2
*
CO
2
*
Malonyl-CoA
C
3
CoA
C
n
transfer from
to
4
3
2
1a
1b
Fatty acid synthase
multienzyme complex
OH
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
ACETYL
TRANSACYLASE
ACETYL-CoA
CARBOXYLASE
1
2
MALONYL
TRANSACYLASE
2
1
1
2
3-KETOACYL
SYNTHASE
3-KETOACYL
REDUCTASE
HYDRATASE
ENOYL REDUCTASE
NADPH
GENERATORS
Pentose phosphate
pathway
Isocitrate
dehydrogenase
Malic
enzyme
1
2
,
,
individual monomers of fatty acid synthase
KEY:
C
2
Figure 21–3.
Biosynthesis of long-chain fatty acids. Details of how addition of a malonyl residue
causes the acyl chain to grow by two carbon atoms. (Cys, cysteine residue; Pan, 4′-phosphopante-
theine.) The blocks shown in dark blue contain initially a C
2
unit derived from acetyl-CoA (as illustrated)
and subsequently the C
n
unit formed in reaction 5.
175
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET program with this demo code.
bulk pdf to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter online
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG
convert pdf into jpg; change format from pdf to jpg
176 / CHAPTER 21
acids having an odd number of carbon atoms, found
particularly in ruminant fat and milk.
The Main Source of NADPH 
for Lipogenesis Is the Pentose 
Phosphate Pathway
NADPH is involved as donor of reducing equivalents
in both the reduction of the 3-ketoacyl and of the 2,3-
unsaturated acyl derivatives (Figure 21–3, reactions 3
and 5). The oxidative reactions of the pentose phos-
phate pathway (see Chapter 20) are the chief source of
the hydrogen required for the reductive synthesis of
fatty acids. Significantly, tissues specializing in active
lipogenesis—ie, liver, adipose tissue, and the lactating
mammary gland—also possess an active pentose phos-
phate pathway. Moreover, both metabolic pathways are
found in the cytosol of the cell, so there are no mem-
branes or permeability barriers against the transfer of
NADPH. Other sources of NADPH include the reac-
tion that converts malate to pyruvate catalyzed by the
“malic enzyme”(NADP malate dehydrogenase) (Fig-
ure 21–4) and the extramitochondrial isocitrate dehy-
drogenasereaction (probably not a substantial source,
except in ruminants).
Acetyl-CoA Is the Principal Building 
Block of Fatty Acids
Acetyl-CoA is formed from glucose via the oxidation of
pyruvate within the mitochondria. However, it does
not diffuse readily into the extramitochondrial cytosol,
Malic
enzyme
NAD
+
NADH 
+
H
+
NADH 
+
H
+
NADPH
+
H
+
NADPH 
+
H
+
H
+
NAD
+
NADP
+
NADP
+
PYRUVATE
DEHYDROGENASE
T
T
K
P
MITOCHONDRION
Oxaloacetate
Malate
α-Ketoglutarate
α-Ketoglutarate
Citric acid cycle
Pyruvate
Acetyl-CoA
Citrate
Malate
INNER MITOCHONDRIAL MEMBRANE
Outside
Inside
Acetyl-CoA
Malonyl-CoA
Palmitate
Glucose
Glucose 6-phosphate
Fructose 6-phosphate
Glyceraldehyde
3-phosphate
PPP
Malate
Oxaloacetate
CO
2
CO
2
ATP
MALATE
DEHYDROGENASE
GLYCERALDEHYDE-
3-PHOSPHATE
DEHYDROGENASE
Pyruvate
Citrate
Citrate
Isocitrate
CYTOSOL
CoA
ATP
CoA
ATP
ACETYL-
CoA
CARBOXY-
LASE
ATP-
CITRATE
LYASE
Acetate
ISOCITRATE
DEHYDROGENASE
Figure 21–4.
The provision of acetyl-CoA and NADPH for lipogenesis. (PPP, pentose phosphate path-
way; T, tricarboxylate transporter; K, α-ketoglutarate transporter; P, pyruvate transporter.)
BIOSYNTHESIS OF FATTY ACIDS / 177
CH
2
CoA     SH 
 
CO
2
3-KETOACYL-CoA
SYNTHASE
CH
2
R
C
O
CoA
S
C
O
CoA
S
COOH
Malonyl-CoA
Acyl-CoA
CH
2
CH
2
R
C
O
C
O
CoA
S
3-Ketoacyl-CoA
CH
2
CH
2
R
CH
OH
C
O
CoA
S
3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA
CH
CH
2
R
CH
C
O
CoA
S
2-trans-Enoyl-CoA
3-KETOACYL-CoA
REDUCTASE
NADP
+
NADPH 
+
H
+
CH
2
CH
2
R
CH
2
C
O
CoA
S
Acyl-CoA
2-trans-ENOYL-CoA
REDUCTASE
NADP
+
NADPH 
+
H
+
3-HYDROXYACYL-CoA
DEHYDRASE
H
2
O
+
Figure 21–5.
Microsomal elongase system for fatty
acid chain elongation. NADH is also used by the reduc-
tases, but NADPH is preferred.
the principal site of fatty acid synthesis. Citrate, formed
after condensation of acetyl-CoA with oxaloacetate in
the citric acid cycle within mitochondria, is translo-
cated into the extramitochondrial compartment via the
tricarboxylate transporter, where in the presence of
CoA and ATP it undergoes cleavage to acetyl-CoA and
oxaloacetate catalyzed by ATP-citrate lyase,which in-
creases in activity in the well-fed state. The acetyl-CoA
is then available for malonyl-CoA formation and syn-
thesis to palmitate (Figure 21–4). The resulting ox-
aloacetate can form malate via NADH-linked malate
dehydrogenase, followed by the generation of NADPH
via the malic enzyme. The NADPH becomes available
for lipogenesis, and the pyruvate can be used to regen-
erate acetyl-CoA after transport into the mitochon-
drion. This pathway is a means of transferring reducing
equivalents from extramitochondrial NADH to NADP.
Alternatively, malate itself can be transported into the
mitochondrion, where it is able to re-form oxaloacetate.
Note that the citrate (tricarboxylate) transporter in the
mitochondrial membrane requires malate to exchange
with citrate (see Figure 12-10). There is little ATP-
citrate lyase or malic enzyme in ruminants, probably
because in these species acetate (derived from the
rumen and activated to acetyl CoA extramitochondri-
ally) is the main source of acetyl-CoA. 
Elongation of Fatty Acid Chains Occurs 
in the Endoplasmic Reticulum
This pathway (the “microsomal system”) elongates sat-
urated and unsaturated fatty acyl-CoAs (from C
10
up-
ward) by two carbons, using malonyl-CoA as acetyl
donor and NADPH as reductant, and is catalyzed by
the microsomal fatty acid elongasesystem of enzymes
(Figure 21–5). Elongation of stearyl-CoA in brain in-
creases rapidly during myelination in order to provide
C
22
and C
24
fatty acids for sphingolipids.
THE NUTRITIONAL STATE 
REGULATES LIPOGENESIS
Excess carbohydrate is stored as fat in many animals in
anticipation of periods of caloric deficiency such as star-
vation, hibernation, etc, and to provide energy for use
between meals in animals, including humans, that take
their food at spaced intervals. Lipogenesis converts sur-
plus glucose and intermediates such as pyruvate, lactate,
and acetyl-CoA to fat, assisting the anabolic phase of
this feeding cycle. The nutritional state of the organism
is the main factor regulating the rate of lipogenesis.
Thus, the rate is high in the well-fed animal whose diet
contains a high proportion of carbohydrate. It is de-
pressed under conditions of restricted caloric intake, on
a fat diet, or when there is a deficiency of insulin, as in
diabetes mellitus. These latter conditions are associated
with increased concentrations of plasma free fatty acids,
and an inverse relationship has been demonstrated be-
tween hepatic lipogenesis and the concentration of
serum-free fatty acids. Lipogenesis is increased when su-
178 / CHAPTER 21
+
+
+
+
PROTEIN
PHOSPHATASE
AMPK
(active)
AMPKK
AMPK
(inactive)
ATP
ATP
cAMP
ADP
P
i
H
2
O
H
2
O
P
i
Acyl-CoA
Acetyl-
CoA
Malonyl-
CoA
ACETYL-CoA
CARBOXYLASE
(active)
ACETYL-CoA
CARBOXYLASE
(inactive)
cAMP-DEPENDENT
PROTEIN KINASE
Glucagon
P
P
Figure 21–6.
Regulation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase
by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. The enzyme is
inactivated by phosphorylation by AMP-activated pro-
tein kinase (AMPK), which in turn is phosphorylated
and activated by AMP-activated protein kinase kinase
(AMPKK). Glucagon (and epinephrine), after increasing
cAMP, activate this latter enzyme via cAMP-dependent
protein kinase. The kinase kinase enzyme is also be-
lieved to be activated by acyl-CoA. Insulin activates
acetyl-CoA carboxylase, probably through an “activa-
tor” protein and an insulin-stimulated protein kinase.
crose is fed instead of glucose because fructose bypasses
the phosphofructokinase control point in glycolysis and
floods the lipogenic pathway (Figure 20–5).
SHORT- & LONG-TERM MECHANISMS
REGULATE LIPOGENESIS
Long-chain fatty acid synthesis is controlled in the
short term by allosteric and covalent modification of
enzymes and in the long term by changes in gene ex-
pression governing rates of synthesis of enzymes.
Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Is the Most
Important Enzyme in the Regulation 
of Lipogenesis
Acetyl-CoA carboxylase is an allosteric enzyme and is
activated by citrate,which increases in concentration in
the well-fed state and is an indicator of a plentiful sup-
ply of acetyl-CoA. Citrate converts the enzyme from an
inactive dimer to an active polymeric form, having a
molecular mass of several million. Inactivation is pro-
moted by phosphorylation of the enzyme and by long-
chain acyl-CoA molecules, an example of negative feed-
back inhibition by a product of a reaction. Thus, if
acyl-CoA accumulates because it is not esterified
quickly enough or because of increased lipolysis or an
influx of free fatty acids into the tissue, it will automati-
cally reduce the synthesis of new fatty acid. Acyl-CoA
may also inhibit the mitochondrial tricarboxylate
transporter,thus preventing activation of the enzyme
by egress of citrate from the mitochondria into the cy-
tosol.
Acetyl-CoA carboxylase is also regulated by hor-
mones such as glucagon, epinephrine, andinsulinvia
changes in its phosphorylation state (details in Figure
21–6).
Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Is Also
Regulated by Acyl-CoA
Acyl-CoA causes an inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogen-
ase by inhibiting the ATP-ADP exchange transporter of
the inner mitochondrial membrane, which leads to in-
creased intramitochondrial [ATP]/[ADP] ratios and
therefore to conversion of active to inactive pyruvate
dehydrogenase (see Figure 17–6), thus regulating the
availability of acetyl-CoA for lipogenesis. Furthermore,
oxidation of acyl-CoA due to increased levels of free
fatty acids may increase the ratios of [acetyl-CoA]/
[CoA] and [NADH]/[NAD
+
] in mitochondria, inhibit-
ing pyruvate dehydrogenase.
Insulin Also Regulates Lipogenesis 
by Other Mechanisms
Insulinstimulates lipogenesis by several other mecha-
nisms as well as by increasing acetyl-CoA carboxylase
activity. It increases the transport of glucose into the
cell (eg, in adipose tissue), increasing the availability of
both pyruvate for fatty acid synthesis and glycerol 
3-phosphate for esterification of the newly formed fatty
acids, and also converts the inactive form of pyruvate
dehydrogenase to the active form in adipose tissue but
not in liver. Insulin also—by its ability to depress the
level of intracellular cAMP—inhibits lipolysisin adi-
pose tissue and thereby reduces the concentration of
BIOSYNTHESIS OF FATTY ACIDS / 179
plasma free fatty acids and therefore long-chain acyl-
CoA, an inhibitor of lipogenesis. 
The Fatty Acid Synthase Complex 
& Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Are 
Adaptive Enzymes
These enzymes adapt to the body’s physiologic needs
by increasing in total amount in the fed state and by
decreasing in starvation, feeding of fat, and in diabetes.
Insulinis an important hormone causing gene expres-
sion and induction of enzyme biosynthesis, and
glucagon (via cAMP) antagonizes this effect. Feeding
fats containing polyunsaturated fatty acids coordinately
regulates the inhibition of expression of key enzymes of
glycolysis and lipogenesis. These mechanisms for
longer-term regulation of lipogenesis take several days
to become fully manifested and augment the direct and
immediate effect of free fatty acids and hormones such
as insulin and glucagon.
SUMMARY
• The synthesis of long-chain fatty acids (lipogenesis) is
carried out by two enzyme systems: acetyl-CoA car-
boxylase and fatty acid synthase.
• The pathway converts acetyl-CoA to palmitate and
requires NADPH, ATP, Mn2
+
, biotin, pantothenic
acid, and HCO
3
as cofactors.
• Acetyl-CoA carboxylase is required to convert acetyl-
CoA to malonyl-CoA. In turn, fatty acid synthase, a
multienzyme complex of one polypeptide chain with
seven separate enzymatic activities, catalyzes the as-
sembly of palmitate from one acetyl-CoA and seven
malonyl-CoA molecules.
• Lipogenesis is regulated at the acetyl-CoA carboxy-
lase step by allosteric modifiers, phosphorylation/de-
phosphorylation, and induction and repression of en-
zyme synthesis. Citrate activates the enzyme, and
long-chain acyl-CoA inhibits its activity. Insulin acti-
vates acetyl-CoA carboxylase whereas glucagon and
epinephrine have opposite actions.
REFERENCES
Hudgins LC et al: Human fatty acid synthesis is stimulated by a
eucaloric low fat, high carbohydrate diet. J Clin Invest
1996;97:2081.
Jump DB et al: Coordinate regulation of glycolytic and lipogenic
gene expression by polyunsaturated fatty acids. J Lipid Res
1994;35:1076.
Kim KH: Regulation of mammalian acetyl-coenzyme A carboxy-
lase. Annu Rev Nutr 1997;17:77.
Salati LM, Goodridge AG: Fatty acid synthesis in eukaryotes. In:
Biochemistry of Lipids, Lipoproteins and Membranes. Vance
DE, Vance JE (editors). Elsevier, 1996.
Wakil SJ: Fatty acid synthase, a proficient multifunctional enzyme.
Biochemistry 1989;28:4523.
180
Oxidation of Fatty Acids:
Ketogenesis
22
Peter A. Mayes, PhD, DSc, & Kathleen M. Botham, PhD, DSc
BIOMEDICAL IMPORTANCE
Although fatty acids are both oxidized to acetyl-CoA
and synthesized from acetyl-CoA, fatty acid oxidation is
not the simple reverse of fatty acid biosynthesis but an
entirely different process taking place in a separate com-
partment of the cell. The separation of fatty acid oxida-
tion in mitochondria from biosynthesis in the cytosol
allows each process to be individually controlled and
integrated with tissue requirements. Each step in fatty
acid oxidation involves acyl-CoA derivatives catalyzed
by separate enzymes, utilizes NAD
+
and FAD as coen-
zymes, and generates ATP. It is an aerobic process, re-
quiring the presence of oxygen.
Increased fatty acid oxidation is a characteristic of
starvation and of diabetes mellitus, leading to ketone
bodyproduction by the liver (ketosis).Ketone bodies
are acidic and when produced in excess over long peri-
ods, as in diabetes, cause ketoacidosis,which is ulti-
mately fatal. Because gluconeogenesis is dependent
upon fatty acid oxidation, any impairment in fatty acid
oxidation leads to hypoglycemia.This occurs in vari-
ous states of carnitine deficiencyor deficiency of es-
sential enzymes in fatty acid oxidation, eg, carnitine
palmitoyltransferase,or inhibition of fatty acid oxida-
tion by poisons, eg, hypoglycin.
OXIDATION OF FATTY ACIDS OCCURS 
IN MITOCHONDRIA
Fatty Acids Are Transported in the 
Blood as Free Fatty Acids (FFA)
Free fatty acids—also called unesterified (UFA) or non-
esterified (NEFA) fatty acids—are fatty acids that are in
the unesterified state.In plasma, longer-chain FFA are
combined with albumin, and in the cell they are at-
tached to a fatty acid-binding protein,so that in fact
they are never really “free.” Shorter-chain fatty acids are
more water-soluble and exist as the un-ionized acid or
as a fatty acid anion.
Fatty Acids Are Activated Before 
Being Catabolized
Fatty acids must first be converted to an active interme-
diate before they can be catabolized. This is the only
step in the complete degradation of a fatty acid that re-
quires energy from ATP. In the presence of ATP and
coenzyme A, the enzyme acyl-CoA synthetase (thioki-
nase) catalyzes the conversion of a fatty acid (or free
fatty acid) to an “active fatty acid” or acyl-CoA, which
uses one high-energy phosphate with the formation of
AMP and PP
i
(Figure 22–1). The PP
i
is hydrolyzed by
inorganic pyrophosphatasewith the loss of a further
high-energy phosphate, ensuring that the overall reac-
tion goes to completion. Acyl-CoA synthetases are
found in the endoplasmic reticulum, peroxisomes, and
inside and on the outer membrane of mitochondria.
Long-Chain Fatty Acids Penetrate the
Inner Mitochondrial Membrane as
Carnitine Derivatives
Carnitine (β-hydroxy-γ-trimethylammonium buty-
rate), (CH
3
)
3
N
+
CH
2
CH(OH)CH
2
COO, is
widely distributed and is particularly abundant in mus-
cle. Long-chain acyl-CoA (or FFA) will not penetrate
the inner membrane of mitochondria. However, car-
nitine palmitoyltransferase-I, present in the outer
mitochondrial membrane, converts long-chain acyl-
CoA to acylcarnitine, which is able to penetrate the
inner membrane and gain access to the β-oxidation
system of enzymes (Figure 22–1). Carnitine-acylcar-
nitine translocase acts as an inner membrane ex-
change transporter. Acylcarnitine is transported in,
coupled with the transport out of one molecule of car-
nitine. The acylcarnitine then reacts with CoA, cat-
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested