METABOLISM OF ACYLGLYCEROLS & SPHINGOLIPIDS / 201
found in plasma, catalyzes the transfer of a fatty acid
residue from the 2 position of lecithin to cholesterol to
form cholesteryl ester and lysolecithin and is considered
to be responsible for much of the cholesteryl ester in
plasma lipoproteins. Long-chain saturated fatty acids
are found predominantly in the 1 position of phospho-
lipids, whereas the polyunsaturated acids (eg, the pre-
cursors of prostaglandins) are incorporated more into
the 2 position. The incorporation of fatty acids into
lecithin occurs by complete synthesis of the phospho-
lipid, by transacylation between cholesteryl ester and
lysolecithin, and by direct acylation of lysolecithin by
acyl-CoA. Thus, a continuous exchange of the fatty
acids is possible, particularly with regard to introducing
essential fatty acids into phospholipid molecules.
ALL SPHINGOLIPIDS ARE FORMED 
FROM CERAMIDE
Ceramideis synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum
from the amino acid serine according to Figure 24–7.
Ceramide is an important signaling molecule (second
messenger) regulating pathways including apoptosis
(processes leading to cell death), cell senescence, and
differentiation, and opposes some of the actions of di-
acylglycerol.
Sphingomyelins(Figure 14–11) are phospholipids
and are formed when ceramide reacts with phos-
phatidylcholine to form sphingomyelin plus diacylglyc-
erol (Figure 24–8A). This occurs mainly in the Golgi
apparatus and to a lesser extent in the plasma mem-
brane. 
Glycosphingolipids Are a Combination
of Ceramide With One or More 
Sugar Residues
The simplest glycosphingolipids (cerebrosides) are
galactosylceramide (GalCer) and glucosylceramide
(GlcCer). GalCer is a major lipid of myelin, whereas
GlcCer is the major glycosphingolipid of extraneural
tissues and a precursor of most of the more complex
glycosphingolipids. Galactosylceramide (Figure 24–8B)
is formed in a reaction between ceramide and UDPGal
(formed by epimerization from UDPGlc—Figure
20–6). Sulfogalactosylceramideand other sulfolipids
such as the sulfo(galacto)-glycerolipids and the
steroid sulfatesare formed after further reactions in-
volving 3′-phosphoadenosine-5′-phosphosulfate (PAPS;
“active sulfate”). Gangliosides are synthesized from
ceramide by the stepwise addition of activated sugars (eg,
UDPGlc and UDPGal) and a sialic acid, usually N-
acetylneuraminic acid(Figure 24–9). A large number
of gangliosides of increasing molecular weight may be
formed. Most of the enzymes transferring sugars from
R
2
H
2
C
O
H
P
C
O
C
O
Choline
Phosphatidylcholine
H
2
C
O
C
R
1
O
H
2
C
O
H
P
C
HO
Choline
Lysophosphatidylcholine (lysolecithin)
H
2
C
O
C
R
1
O
Acyl-CoA
H
2
O
PHOSPHOLIPASE A
2
ACYLTRANSFERASE
COOH
R
2
H
2
C
O
H
P
C
HO
Choline
Glycerylphosphocholine
H
2
C
OH
H
2
O
LYSOPHOSPHOLIPASE
COOH
R
1
H
2
C
O
H
+ Choline
P
C
HO
sn-Glycerol 3-phosphate
H
2
C
OH
H
2
O
GLYCERYLPHOSPHO-
CHOLINE HYDROLASE
Figure 24–5.
Metabolism of phosphatidylcholine
(lecithin).
R
2
H
2
C
O
H
P
C
O
C
O
O
H
2
C
O
C
R
1
O
O
O
PHOSPHOLIPASE A
1
PHOSPHOLIPASE B
PHOSPHOLIPASE A
2
PHOSPHOLIPASE C
PHOSPHOLIPASE D
N-BASE
Figure 24–6.
Sites of the hydrolytic activity of phos-
pholipases on a phospholipid substrate.
Change pdf to jpg online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
change pdf to jpg online; convert pdf to gif or jpg
Change pdf to jpg online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
reader convert pdf to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter online
202 / CHAPTER 24
nucleotide sugars (glycosyl transferases) are found in
the Golgi apparatus.
Glycosphingolipids are constituents of the outer
leaflet of plasma membranes and are important in cell
adhesionand cell recognition.Some are antigens, eg,
ABO blood group substances. Certain gangliosides
function as receptors for bacterial toxins (eg, for cholera
toxin, which subsequently activates adenylyl cyclase).
CLINICAL ASPECTS
Deficiency of Lung Surfactant Causes
Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Lung surfactant is composed mainly of lipid with
some proteins and carbohydrate and prevents the alve-
oli from collapsing. Surfactant activity is largely attrib-
uted to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, which is
synthesized shortly before parturition in full-term in-
fants. Deficiency of lung surfactant in the lungs of
many preterm newborns gives rise to respiratory dis-
tress syndrome.Administration of either natural or ar-
tificial surfactant has been of therapeutic benefit.
Phospholipids & Sphingolipids 
Are Involved in Multiple Sclerosis 
and Lipidoses
Certain diseases are characterized by abnormal quanti-
ties of these lipids in the tissues, often in the nervous
system. They may be classified into two groups: (1) true
demyelinating diseases and (2) sphingolipidoses.
In multiple sclerosis,which is a demyelinating dis-
ease, there is loss of both phospholipids (particularly
ethanolamine plasmalogen) and of sphingolipids from
white matter. Thus, the lipid composition of white
matter resembles that of gray matter. The cerebrospinal
fluid shows raised phospholipid levels.
The sphingolipidoses (lipid storage diseases)are a
group of inherited diseases that are often manifested in
childhood. These diseases are part of a larger group of
lysosomal disorders and exhibit several constant fea-
tures: (1) Complex lipids containing ceramide accumu-
late in cells, particularly neurons, causing neurodegen-
Ceramide
UDPGal UDP
Galactosylceramide
(cerebroside)
Sulfogalactosyl-
ceramide
(sulfatide)
PAPS
Ceramide
Sphingomyelin
Diacylglycerol
Phosphatidylcholine
A
B
Figure 24–8.
Biosynthesis of sphingomyelin (A),
galactosylceramide and its sulfo derivative (B). (PAPS,
“active sulfate,” adenosine 3′-phosphate-5′-phospho-
sulfate.)
(CH
2
)
14
CH
3
C
Palmitoyl-CoA
Pyridoxal phosphate, Mn
2
+
S
CoA
O
(CH
2
)
12
CH
3
C
CH
OH
NH
3
+
3-Ketosphinganine
CH
2
O
CH
2
CO
2
NADPH 
+
H
+
NADP
+
Acyl-CoA
CoA
S
CH
2
SERINE
PALMITOYLTRANSFERASE
3-KETOSPHINGANINE
REDUCTASE
OOC
CH
2
OH
CH
Serine
+
NH
3
CoA     SH
CH
3
(CH
2
)
12
CH
OH
OH
NH
3
+
Dihydrosphingosine (sphinganine)
CH
2
CH
2
CH
2
CO
R
CH
DIHYDROSPHINGOSINE
N-ACYLTRANSFERASE
CoA     SH
(CH
2
)
12
CH
3
CH
OH
NH
Dihydroceramide
CH
2
CH
2
CH
2
R
CO
DIHYDROCERAMIDE
DESATURASE
OH
CH
(CH
2
)
12
CH
3
CH
2H
OH
NH
Ceramide
CH
2
CH
CH
R
CO
OH
CH
Figure 24–7.
Biosynthesis of ceramide.
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
convert from pdf to jpg; convert pdf file into jpg format
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
.pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg
METABOLISM OF ACYLGLYCEROLS & SPHINGOLIPIDS / 203
Ceramide
Glucosyl
ceramide
(Cer-Glc)
UDPGlc
UDP
Cer-Glc-Gal
UDPGal
UDP
Cer-Glc-Gal
CMP-NeuAc
CMP
UDPGal
UDP
NeuAc
UDP
UDP-N-acetyl
galactosamine
Cer-Glc-Gal-GalNAc
(G
M3
)
NeuAc
(G
M2
)
Cer-Glc-Gal-GalNAc-Gal
Higher gangliosides
(disialo- and trisialo-
gangliosides)
NeuAc
(G
M1
)
Figure 24–9.
Biosynthesis of gangliosides. (NeuAc, N-acetylneuraminic acid.)
eration and shortening the life span. (2) The rate of
synthesisof the stored lipid is normal. (3) The enzy-
matic defect is in the lysosomal degradation pathway
of sphingolipids. (4) The extent to which the activity of
the affected enzyme is decreased is similar in all tissues.
There is no effective treatment for many of the diseases,
though some success has been achieved with enzymes
that have been chemically modified to ensure binding
to receptors of target cells, eg, to macrophages in the
liver in order to deliver β-glucosidase (glucocerebrosi-
dase) in the treatment of Gaucher’s disease. A recent
promising approach is substrate reduction therapy to
inhibit the synthesis of sphingolipids, and gene therapy
for lysosomal disorders is currently under investigation.
Some examples of the more important lipid storage dis-
eases are shown in Table 24–1.
Multiple sulfatase deficiencyresults in accumula-
tion of sulfogalactosylceramide, steroid sulfates, and
proteoglycans owing to a combined deficiency of aryl-
sulfatases A, B, and C and steroid sulfatase.
Table 24–1. Examples of sphingolipidoses.
Disease
Enzyme Deficiency
Lipid Accumulating
1
Clinical Symptoms
Tay-Sachs disease e Hexosaminidase A
Cer—Glc—Gal(NeuAc)—
:
:
GalNAc Mental retardation, blindness, muscular weakness.
G
M2
Ganglioside
Fabry’s disease
α-Galactosidase
Cer—Glc—Gal—
:
:
Gal 
Skin rash, kidney failure (full symptoms only in 
Globotriaosylceramide
males; X-linked recessive).
Metachromatic
Arylsulfatase A
Cer—Gal—
:
:
OSO
3
Mental retardation and psychologic disturbances in 
leukodystrophy
3-Sulfogalactosylceramide adults; demyelination.
Krabbe’s disease
β-Galactosidase
Cer—
:
:
Gal 
Mental retardation; myelin almost absent.
Galactosylceramide
Gaucher’s disease e β-Glucosidase
Cer—
:
:
Glc 
Enlarged liver and spleen, erosion of long bones, 
Glucosylceramide
mental retardation in infants.
Niemann-Pick 
Sphingomyelinase
Cer—
:
:
P—choline 
Enlarged liver and spleen, mental retardation; fatal in 
disease
Sphingomyelin
early life.
Farber’s disease
Ceramidase
Acyl—
:
:
Sphingosine 
Hoarseness, dermatitis, skeletal deformation, mental 
Ceramide
retardation; fatal in early life.
1
NeuAc, N-acetylneuraminic acid; Cer, ceramide; Glc, glucose; Gal, galactose. 
:
:
, site of deficient enzyme reaction.
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg. C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion.
.pdf to .jpg converter online; change file from pdf to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. C:\input.tif"; String outputDirectory = @"C:\output\"; // Convert tiff to jpg and show How to change Tiff image to Bmp image in your C#
convert pdf image to jpg online; convert pdf picture to jpg
204 / CHAPTER 24
SUMMARY
• Triacylglycerols are the major energy-storing lipids,
whereas phosphoglycerols, sphingomyelin, and gly-
cosphingolipids are amphipathic and have structural
functions in cell membranes as well as other special-
ized roles.
• Triacylglycerols and some phosphoglycerols are syn-
thesized by progressive acylation of glycerol 3-phos-
phate. The pathway bifurcates at phosphatidate,
forming inositol phospholipids and cardiolipin on
the one hand and triacylglycerol and choline and
ethanolamine phospholipids on the other.
• Plasmalogens and platelet-activating factor (PAF) are
ether phospholipids formed from dihydroxyacetone
phosphate.
• Sphingolipids are formed from ceramide (N-acyl-
sphingosine). Sphingomyelin is present in mem-
branes of organelles involved in secretory processes
(eg, Golgi apparatus). The simplest glycosphin-
golipids are a combination of ceramide plus a sugar
residue (eg, GalCer in myelin). Gangliosides are
more complex glycosphingolipids containing more
sugar residues plus sialic acid. They are present in the
outer layer of the plasma membrane, where they con-
tribute to the glycocalyx and are important as anti-
gens and cell receptors.
• Phospholipids and sphingolipids are involved in sev-
eral disease processes, including respiratory distress
syndrome (lack of lung surfactant), multiple sclerosis
(demyelination), and sphingolipidoses (inability to
break down sphingolipids in lysosomes due to inher-
ited defects in hydrolase enzymes).
REFERENCES
Griese M: Pulmonary surfactant in health and human lung dis-
eases: state of the art. Eur Respir J 1999;13:1455.
Merrill AH, Sweeley CC: Sphingolipids: metabolism and cell sig-
naling. In: Biochemistry of Lipids, Lipoproteins and Mem-
branes.Vance DE, Vance JE (editors). Elsevier, 1996.
Prescott SM et al: Platelet-activating factor and related lipid media-
tors. Annu Rev Biochem 2000;69:419.
Ruvolo PP: Ceramide regulates cellular homeostasis via diverse
stress signaling pathways. Leukemia 2001;15:1153.
Schuette CG et al: The glycosphingolipidoses—from disease to
basic principles of metabolism. Biol Chem 1999;380:759.
Scriver CR et al (editors): The Metabolic and Molecular Bases of In-
herited Disease,8th ed. McGraw-Hill, 2001.
Tijburg LBM, Geelen MJH, van Golde LMG: Regulation of the
biosynthesis of triacylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine and phos-
phatidylethanolamine in the liver. Biochim Biophys Acta
1989;1004:1.
Vance DE: Glycerolipid biosynthesis in eukaryotes. In: Biochem-
istry of Lipids, Lipoproteins and Membranes.Vance DE, Vance
JE (editors). Elsevier, 1996.
van Echten G, Sandhoff K: Ganglioside metabolism. Enzymology,
topology, and regulation. J Biol Chem 1993;268:5341.
Waite M: Phospholipases. In: Biochemistry of Lipids, Lipoproteins
and Membranes. Vance DE, Vance JE (editors). Elsevier,
1996. 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET program with this demo code.
convert pdf to high quality jpg; pdf to jpeg converter
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
c# pdf to jpg; conversion pdf to jpg
Lipid Transport & Storage
25
205
Peter A. Mayes, PhD, DSc, & Kathleen M. Botham, PhD, DSc
BIOMEDICAL IMPORTANCE
Fat absorbed from the diet and lipids synthesized by the
liver and adipose tissue must be transported between
the various tissues and organs for utilization and stor-
age. Since lipids are insoluble in water, the problem of
how to transport them in the aqueous blood plasma is
solved by associating nonpolar lipids (triacylglycerol
and cholesteryl esters) with amphipathic lipids (phos-
pholipids and cholesterol) and proteins to make water-
miscible lipoproteins.
In a meal-eating omnivore such as the human, ex-
cess calories are ingested in the anabolic phase of the
feeding cycle, followed by a period of negative caloric
balance when the organism draws upon its carbohy-
drate and fat stores. Lipoproteins mediate this cycle by
transporting lipids from the intestines as chylomi-
crons—and from the liver as very low density lipopro-
teins (VLDL)—to most tissues for oxidation and to
adipose tissue for storage. Lipid is mobilized from adi-
pose tissue as free fatty acids (FFA) attached to serum
albumin. Abnormalities of lipoprotein metabolism
cause various hypo- or hyperlipoproteinemias. The
most common of these is diabetes mellitus,where in-
sulin deficiency causes excessive mobilization of FFA
and underutilization of chylomicrons and VLDL, lead-
ing to hypertriacylglycerolemia. Most other patho-
logic conditions affecting lipid transport are due pri-
marily to inherited defects, some of which cause
hypercholesterolemia,and premature atherosclerosis.
Obesity—particularly abdominal obesity—is a risk fac-
tor for increased mortality, hypertension, type 2 dia-
betes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, and vari-
ous endocrine dysfunctions.
LIPIDS ARE TRANSPORTED IN THE
PLASMA AS LIPOPROTEINS
Four Major Lipid Classes Are Present 
in Lipoproteins
Plasma lipids consist of triacylglycerols(16%), phos-
pholipids (30%), cholesterol (14%), and cholesteryl
esters(36%) and a much smaller fraction of unesteri-
fied long-chain fatty acids (free fatty acids) (4%). This
latter fraction, the free fatty acids (FFA),is metaboli-
cally the most active of the plasma lipids.
Four Major Groups of Plasma Lipoproteins
Have Been Identified
Because fat is less dense than water, the density of a
lipoprotein decreases as the proportion of lipid to pro-
tein increases (Table 25–1). In addition to FFA, four
major groups of lipoproteins have been identified that
are important physiologically and in clinical diagnosis.
These are (1) chylomicrons, derived from intestinal
absorption of triacylglycerol and other lipids; (2) very
low density lipoproteins (VLDL, or pre-β-lipopro-
teins), derived from the liver for the export of triacyl-
glycerol; (3) low-density lipoproteins (LDL, or β-
lipoproteins), representing a final stage in the catabolism
of VLDL; and (4) high-density lipoproteins(HDL, or
α-lipoproteins), involved in VLDL and chylomicron
metabolism and also in cholesterol transport. Triacyl-
glycerol is the predominant lipid in chylomicrons and
VLDL, whereas cholesterol and phospholipid are the
predominant lipids in LDL and HDL, respectively
(Table 25–1). Lipoproteins may be separated according
to their electrophoretic properties into α-, β-,and pre-
β-lipoproteins.
Lipoproteins Consist of a Nonpolar 
Core & a Single Surface Layer of
Amphipathic Lipids 
The nonpolar lipid core consists of mainly triacylglyc-
eroland cholesteryl esterand is surrounded by a sin-
gle surface layer of amphipathic phospholipidand
cholesterolmolecules (Figure 25–1). These are oriented
so that their polar groups face outward to the aqueous
medium, as in the cell membrane (Chapter 14). The
protein moiety of a lipoprotein is known as an apo-
lipoproteinor apoprotein,constituting nearly 70% of
some HDL and as little as 1% of chylomicrons. Some
apolipoproteins are integral and cannot be removed,
whereas others are free to transfer to other lipoproteins.
The Distribution of Apolipoproteins
Characterizes the Lipoprotein
One or more apolipoproteins (proteins or polypeptides)
are present in each lipoprotein. The major apolipopro-
teins of HDL (α-lipoprotein) are designated A (Table
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
.net convert pdf to jpg; change pdf file to jpg
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
batch pdf to jpg converter; change pdf file to jpg file
206 / CHAPTER 25
Table 25–1. Composition of the lipoproteins in plasma of humans.
Composition
Diameter
Density
Protein Lipid
Main Lipid
Lipoprotein
Source
(nm)
(g/mL)
(%)
(%)
Components
Apolipoproteins
Chylomicrons Intestine
90–1000 < 0.95
1–2
98–99 Triacylglycerol l A-I, A-II, A-IV,
1
B-48, C-I, C-II, C-III, 
E
Chylomicron
Chylomicrons
45–150
< 1.006
6–8
92–94 Triacylglycerol, , B-48, E
remnants
phospholipids,
cholesterol
VLDL
Liver (intestine) ) 30–90
0.95–1.006
7–10 90–93 3 Triacylglycerol l B-100, C-I, C-II, C-III
IDL
VLDL
25–35
1.006–1.019
11
89
Triacylglycerol, B-100, E
cholesterol
LDL
VLDL
20–25
1.019–1.063
21
79
Cholesterol
B-100
HDL
Liver, intestine,
Phospholipids, A-I, A-II, A-IV, C-I, C-II, C-III, D,
2
E
HDL
1
VLDL, chylo-
20–25
1.019–1.063
32
68
cholesterol
HDL
2
microns
10–20
1.063–1.125
33
67
HDL
3
5–10
1.125–1.210
57
43
Preβ-HDL3
< 5
> 1.210
A-I
Albumin/free Adipose
> 1.281
99
1
Free fatty acids
fatty acids s tissue
Abbreviations: HDL, high-density lipoproteins; IDL, intermediate-density lipoproteins; LDL, low-density lipoproteins; VLDL, very low
density lipoproteins.
1Secreted with chylomicrons but transfers to HDL.
2Associated with HDL
2
and HDL
3
subfractions.
3
Part of a minor fraction known as very high density lipoproteins (VHDL).
25–1). The main apolipoprotein of LDL (β-lipopro-
tein) is apolipoprotein B (B-100) and is found also in
VLDL. Chylomicrons contain a truncated form of apo
B (B-48) that is synthesized in the intestine, while 
B-100 is synthesized in the liver. Apo B-100 is one of
the longest single polypeptide chains known, having
4536 amino acids and a molecular mass of 550,000 Da.
Apo B-48 (48% of B-100) is formed from the same
mRNA as apo B-100 after the introduction of a stop sig-
nal by an RNA editing enzyme. Apo C-I, C-II, and 
C-III are smaller polypeptides (molecular mass 7000–
9000 Da) freely transferable between several different
lipoproteins. Apo E is found in VLDL, HDL, chylomi-
crons, and chylomicron remnants; it accounts for 5–
10% of total VLDL apolipoproteins in normal subjects.
Apolipoproteins carry out several roles: (1) they can
form part of the structure of the lipoprotein, eg, apo B;
(2) they are enzyme cofactors, eg, C-II for lipoprotein
lipase, A-I for lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase, or en-
zyme inhibitors, eg, apo A-II and apo C-III for lipopro-
tein lipase, apo C-I for cholesteryl ester transfer protein;
and (3) they act as ligands for interaction with lipopro-
tein receptors in tissues, eg, apo B-100 and apo E for
the LDL receptor, apo E for the LDL receptor-related
protein (LRP), which has been identified as the rem-
nant receptor, and apo A-I for the HDL receptor. The
functions of apo A-IV and apo D, however, are not yet
clearly defined. 
FREE FATTY ACIDS ARE 
RAPIDLY METABOLIZED
The free fatty acids (FFA, nonesterified fatty acids, un-
esterified fatty acids) arise in the plasma from lipolysis
of triacylglycerol in adipose tissue or as a result of the
action of lipoprotein lipase during uptake of plasma tri-
acylglycerols into tissues. They are found in combina-
tion with albumin,a very effective solubilizer, in con-
centrations varying between 0.1 and 2.0 µeq/mL of
plasma. Levels are low in the fully fed condition and
rise to 0.7–0.8 µeq/mL in the starved state. In uncon-
trolled diabetes mellitus,the level may rise to as much
as 2 µeq/mL. 
LIPID TRANSPORT & STORAGE / 207
Monolayer of mainly
amphipathic lipids
Core of mainly
nonpolar lipids
Cholesteryl
ester
Phospholipid
Peripheral apoprotein
(eg, apo C)
Triacylglycerol
Integral
apoprotein
(eg, apo B)
Free
cholesterol
Figure 25–1.
Generalized structure of a plasma
lipoprotein. The similarities with the structure of the
plasma membrane are to be noted. Small amounts of
cholesteryl ester and triacylglycerol are to be found in
the surface layer and a little free cholesterol in the core.
Free fatty acids are removed from the blood ex-
tremely rapidly and oxidized (fulfilling 25–50% of en-
ergy requirements in starvation) or esterified to form
triacylglycerol in the tissues. In starvation, esterified
lipids from the circulation or in the tissues are oxidized
as well, particularly in heart and skeletal muscle cells,
where considerable stores of lipid are to be found.
The free fatty acid uptake by tissues is related di-
rectly to the plasma free fatty acid concentration, which
in turn is determined by the rate of lipolysis in adipose
tissue. After dissociation of the fatty acid-albumin com-
plex at the plasma membrane, fatty acids bind to a
membrane fatty acid transport proteinthat acts as a
transmembrane cotransporter with Na
+
. On entering
the cytosol, free fatty acids are bound by intracellular
fatty acid-binding proteins.The role of these proteins
in intracellular transport is thought to be similar to that
of serum albumin in extracellular transport of long-
chain fatty acids.
TRIACYLGLYCEROL IS TRANSPORTED
FROM THE INTESTINES IN
CHYLOMICRONS & FROM THE LIVER IN
VERY LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS
By definition, chylomicronsare found in chyleformed
only by the lymphatic system draining the intestine.
They are responsible for the transport of all dietary
lipids into the circulation. Small quantities of VLDL
are also to be found in chyle; however, most of the
plasma VLDLare of hepatic origin. They are the vehi-
cles of transport of triacylglycerol from the liver to
the extrahepatic tissues.
There are striking similarities in the mechanisms of
formation of chylomicrons by intestinal cells and of
VLDL by hepatic parenchymal cells (Figure 25–2), per-
haps because—apart from the mammary gland—the
intestine and liver are the only tissues from which par-
ticulate lipid is secreted. Newly secreted or “nascent”
chylomicrons and VLDL contain only a small amount
of apolipoproteins C and E, and the full complement is
acquired from HDL in the circulation (Figures 25–3
and 25–4). Apo B is essential for chylomicron and
VLDL formation. In abetalipoproteinemia(a rare dis-
ease), lipoproteins containing apo B are not formed and
lipid droplets accumulate in the intestine and liver. 
A more detailed account of the factors controlling
hepatic VLDL secretion is given below.
CHYLOMICRONS & VERY LOW 
DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS ARE 
RAPIDLY CATABOLIZED
The clearance of labeled chylomicrons from the blood
is rapid, the half-time of disappearance being under 1
hour in humans. Larger particles are catabolized more
quickly than smaller ones. Fatty acids originating from
chylomicron triacylglycerol are delivered mainly to adi-
pose tissue, heart, and muscle (80%), while about 20%
goes to the liver. However, the liver does not metabo-
lize native chylomicrons or VLDL significantly; thus,
the fatty acids in the liver must be secondary to their
metabolism in extrahepatic tissues.
Triacylglycerols of Chylomicrons & VLDL
Are Hydrolyzed by Lipoprotein Lipase
Lipoprotein lipaseis located on the walls of blood cap-
illaries, anchored to the endothelium by negatively
charged proteoglycan chains of heparan sulfate. It has
been found in heart, adipose tissue, spleen, lung, renal
medulla, aorta, diaphragm, and lactating mammary
gland, though it is not active in adult liver. It is not
normally found in blood; however, following injection
of heparin,lipoprotein lipase is released from its hep-
aran sulfate binding into the circulation. Hepatic li-
paseis bound to the sinusoidal surface of liver cells and
is released by heparin. This enzyme, however, does not
react readily with chylomicrons or VLDL but is con-
cerned with chylomicron remnant and HDL metabo-
lism.
Both phospholipidsand apo C-IIare required as
cofactors for lipoprotein lipase activity, while apo A-II
208 / CHAPTER 25
Lymph vessel leading
to thoracic duct
Lumen of blood sinusoid
Blood
capillary
SER
RER
G
C
RER
SER
SD
G
E
VLDL
Bile
canaliculus
Endothelial
cell
Fenestra
N
N
B
A
Intestinal lumen
Figure 25–2.
The formation and secretion of (A)chylomicrons by an intestinal cell and (B)very low density
lipoproteins by a hepatic cell. (RER, rough endoplasmic reticulum; SER, smooth endoplasmic reticulum; G, Golgi
apparatus; N, nucleus; C, chylomicrons; VLDL, very low density lipoproteins; E, endothelium; SD, space of Disse,
containing blood plasma.) Apolipoprotein B, synthesized in the RER, is incorporated into lipoproteins in the SER,
the main site of synthesis of triacylglycerol. After addition of carbohydrate residues in G, they are released from
the cell by reverse pinocytosis. Chylomicrons pass into the lymphatic system. VLDL are secreted into the space
of Disse and then into the hepatic sinusoids through fenestrae in the endothelial lining.
and apo C-III act as inhibitors. Hydrolysis takes place
while the lipoproteins are attached to the enzyme on
the endothelium. Triacylglycerol is hydrolyzed progres-
sively through a diacylglycerol to a monoacylglycerol
that is finally hydrolyzed to free fatty acid plus glycerol.
Some of the released free fatty acids return to the circu-
lation, attached to albumin, but the bulk is transported
into the tissue (Figures 25–3 and 25–4). Heart lipopro-
tein lipase has a low K
m
for triacylglycerol, about one-
tenth of that for the enzyme in adipose tissue. This en-
ables the delivery of fatty acids from triacylglycerol to
be redirected from adipose tissue to the heart in the
starved statewhen the plasma triacylglycerol decreases.
A similar redirection to the mammary gland occurs
during lactation, allowing uptake of lipoprotein triacyl-
glycerol fatty acid for milk fat synthesis. The VLDL re-
ceptorplays an important part in the delivery of fatty
acids from VLDL triacylglycerol to adipocytes by bind-
ing VLDL and bringing it into close contact with
lipoprotein lipase. In adipose tissue, insulin enhances
lipoprotein lipase synthesis in adipocytes and its
translocation to the luminal surface of the capillary en-
dothelium. 
The Action of Lipoprotein Lipase Forms
Remnant Lipoproteins
Reaction with lipoprotein lipase results in the loss of
approximately 90% of the triacylglycerol of chylomi-
crons and in the loss of apo C (which returns to HDL)
but not apo E, which is retained. The resulting chy-
lomicron remnantis about half the diameter of the
parent chylomicron and is relatively enriched in choles-
terol and cholesteryl esters because of the loss of triacyl-
glycerol (Figure 25–3). Similar changes occur to
VLDL, with the formation of VLDL remnants or IDL
(intermediate-density lipoprotein) (Figure 25–4).
The Liver Is Responsible for the Uptake 
of Remnant Lipoproteins
Chylomicron remnants are taken up by the liver by re-
ceptor-mediated endocytosis, and the cholesteryl esters
and triacylglycerols are hydrolyzed and metabolized.
Uptake is mediated by a receptor specific for apo E
(Figure 25–3), and both the LDL (apo B-100, E) re-
ceptorand the LRP (LDL receptor-related protein)
LIPID TRANSPORT & STORAGE / 209
Nascent
chylomicron
TG
C
A
A
A
PC
HDL
TG
C
C
E
Glycerol
Fatty acids
C
B-48
B-48
Chylomicron
SMALL
INTESTINE
Lymphatics
TG
C
B-48
E
E
LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE
Dietary TG
Cholesterol
Fatty acids
LIVER
LRP receptor
LDL
(apo B-100, E)
receptor
Chylomicron
remnant
EXTRAHEPATIC
TISSUES
H
L
A
p
o
C
,
A
p
o
E
A
p
o
A
,
A
p
o
C
Figure 25–3.
Metabolic fate of chylomicrons. (A, apolipoprotein A; B-48, apolipoprotein B-48; 
C,
apolipoprotein C; E, apolipoprotein E; HDL, high-density lipoprotein; TG, triacylglycerol; C, cholesterol and
cholesteryl ester; P, phospholipid; HL, hepatic lipase; LRP, LDL receptor-related protein.) Only the predominant
lipids are shown.
are believed to take part. Hepatic lipase has a dual role:
(1) in acting as a ligand to the lipoprotein and (2) in
hydrolyzing its triacylglycerol and phospholipid.
VLDL is the precursor of IDL, which is then con-
verted to LDL. Only one molecule of apo B-100 is
present in each of these lipoprotein particles, and this is
conserved during the transformations. Thus, each LDL
particle is derived from only one VLDL particle (Figure
25–4). Two possible fates await IDL. It can be taken up
by the liver directly via the LDL (apo B-100, E) recep-
tor, or it is converted to LDL. In humans, a relatively
large proportion forms LDL, accounting for the in-
creased concentrations of LDL in humans compared
with many other mammals.
LDL IS METABOLIZED VIA 
THE LDL RECEPTOR
The liver and many extrahepatic tissues express the
LDL (B-100, E) receptor.It is so designated because it
is specific for apo B-100 but not B-48, which lacks the
carboxyl terminal domain of B-100 containing the
LDL receptor ligand, and it also takes up lipoproteins
rich in apo E. This receptor is defective in familial hy-
percholesterolemia.Approximately 30% of LDL is de-
graded in extrahepatic tissues and 70% in the liver. A
positive correlation exists between the incidence of
coronary atherosclerosis and the plasma concentra-
tion of LDL cholesterol. For further discussion of the
regulation of the LDL receptor, see Chapter 26.
HDL TAKES PART IN BOTH 
LIPOPROTEIN TRIACYLGLYCEROL 
& CHOLESTEROL METABOLISM
HDL is synthesized and secreted from both liver and
intestine (Figure 25–5). However, apo C and apo E are
synthesized in the liver and transferred from liver HDL
to intestinal HDL when the latter enters the plasma. A
major function of HDL is to act as a repository for the
apo C and apo E required in the metabolism of chy-
lomicrons and VLDL. Nascent HDL consists of discoid
phospholipid bilayers containing apo A and free choles-
terol. These lipoproteins are similar to the particles
found in the plasma of patients with a deficiency of the
plasma enzyme lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase
(LCAT)and in the plasma of patients with obstructive
jaundice. LCAT—and the LCAT activator apo A-I—
bind to the disk, and the surface phospholipid and free
cholesterol are converted into cholesteryl esters and
210 / CHAPTER 25
Nascent
VLDL
TG
C
A
PC
HDL
C
C
E
Glycerol
Fatty acids
C
TG
C
E
B-100
VLDL
B-100
?
LDL
E
E
LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE
Cholesterol
Fatty acids
LIVER
LDL
(apo B-100, E)
receptor
IDL
(VLDL remnant)
EXTRAHEPATIC
TISSUES
A
p
o
C
,
A
p
o
E
A
p
o
C
TG
C
B-100
B-100
EXTRAHEPATIC
TISSUES
C
LDL
(apo B-100, E)
receptor
Final destruction in
liver, extrahepatic
tissues (eg, lympho-
cytes, fibroblasts)
via endocytosis
Figure 25–4.
Metabolic fate of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and production of low-density
lipoproteins (LDL). (A, apolipoprotein A; B-100, apolipoprotein B-100; 
C, apolipoprotein C; E, apolipoprotein
E; HDL, high-density lipoprotein; TG, triacylglycerol; IDL, intermediate-density lipoprotein; C, cholesterol and
cholesteryl ester; P, phospholipid.) Only the predominant lipids are shown. It is possible that some IDL is also
metabolized via the LRP.
lysolecithin (Chapter 24). The nonpolar cholesteryl es-
ters move into the hydrophobic interior of the bilayer,
whereas lysolecithin is transferred to plasma albumin.
Thus, a nonpolar core is generated, forming a spherical,
pseudomicellar HDL covered by a surface film of polar
lipids and apolipoproteins. In this way, the LCAT sys-
tem is involved in the removal of excess unesterified
cholesterol from lipoproteins and tissues. The class B
scavenger receptor B1 (SR-B1) has recently been
identified as an HDL receptor in the liver and in
steroidogenic tissues. HDL binds to the receptor via
apo A-I and cholesteryl ester is selectively delivered to
the cells, but the particle itself, including apo A-I, is not
taken up. The transport of cholesterol from the tissues
to the liver is known as reverse cholesterol transport
and is mediated by an HDL cycle (Figure 25–5). The
smaller HDL
3
accepts cholesterol from the tissues via
the ATP-binding cassette transporter-1 (ABC-1).
ABC-1 is a member of a family of transporter proteins
that couple the hydrolysis of ATP to the binding of a
substrate, enabling it to be transported across the mem-
brane. After being accepted by HDL
3
, the cholesterol is
then esterified by LCAT, increasing the size of the par-
ticles to form the less dense HDL
2
. The cycle is com-
pleted by the re-formation of HDL
3
, either after selec-
tive delivery of cholesteryl ester to the liver via the
SR-B1 or by hydrolysis of HDL
2
phospholipid and tri-
acylglycerol by hepatic lipase. In addition, free apo A-I
is released by these processes and forms preβ-HDL
after associating with a minimum amount of phospho-
lipid and cholesterol. Preβ-HDL is the most potent
form of HDL in inducing cholesterol efflux from the
tissues to form discoidal HDL. Surplus apo A-I is de-
stroyed in the kidney.
HDL concentrations vary reciprocally with plasma
triacylglycerol concentrations and directly with the ac-
tivity of lipoprotein lipase. This may be due to surplus
surface constituents, eg, phospholipid and apo A-I
being released during hydrolysis of chylomicrons and
VLDL and contributing toward the formation of preβ-
HDL and discoidal HDL. HDL
2
concentrations are in-
versely related to the incidence of coronary athero-
sclerosis,possibly because they reflect the efficiency of
reverse cholesterol transport. HDL
c
(HDL
1
) is found in
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested