LIPID TRANSPORT & STORAGE / 211
SMALL INTESTINE
Kidney
Bile C and
bile acids
Synthesis
Synthesis
A-1
C CE PL
C
LIVER
A-1
Preβ-HDL
Discoidal
HDL
PL
C
A-1
HDL
3
HDL
2
C
CE
PL
LCAT
C
Phospholipid
bilayer
TISSUES
A-1
LCAT
HEPATIC
LIPASE
SR-B1
C
CE
PL
A-1
PL C
ABC-1
Figure 25–5.
Metabolism of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in reverse cholesterol transport.
(LCAT, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase; C, cholesterol; CE, cholesteryl ester; PL, phospholipid;
A-I, apolipoprotein A-I; SR-B1, scavenger receptor B1; ABC-1, ATP binding cassette transporter 1.)
Preβ-HDL, HDL
2
, HDL
3
—see Table 25–1. Surplus surface constituents from the action of lipopro-
tein lipase on chylomicrons and VLDL are another source of preβ-HDL. Hepatic lipase activity is
increased by androgens and decreased by estrogens, which may account for higher concentra-
tions of plasma HDL
2
in women.
the blood of diet-induced hypercholesterolemic ani-
mals. It is rich in cholesterol, and its sole apolipopro-
tein is apo E. It appears that all plasma lipoproteins are
interrelated components of one or more metabolic cy-
cles that together are responsible for the complex
process of plasma lipid transport.
THE LIVER PLAYS A CENTRAL ROLE IN
LIPID TRANSPORT & METABOLISM
The liver carries out the following major functions in
lipid metabolism: (1) It facilitates the digestion and ab-
sorption of lipids by the production of bile, which con-
tains cholesterol and bile salts synthesized within the
liver de novo or from uptake of lipoprotein cholesterol
(Chapter 26). (2) The liver has active enzyme systems
for synthesizing and oxidizing fatty acids (Chapters 21
and 22) and for synthesizing triacylglycerols and phos-
pholipids (Chapter 24). (3) It converts fatty acids to ke-
tone bodies (ketogenesis) (Chapter 22). (4) It plays an
integral part in the synthesis and metabolism of plasma
lipoproteins (this chapter).
Hepatic VLDL Secretion Is Related 
to Dietary & Hormonal Status
The cellular events involved in VLDL formation and
secretion have been described above. Hepatic triacyl-
glycerol synthesis provides the immediate stimulus for
the formation and secretion of VLDL. The fatty acids
used are derived from two possible sources: (1) synthe-
sis within the liver from acetyl-CoA derived mainly
from carbohydrate (perhaps not so important in hu-
mans) and (2) uptake of free fatty acids from the circu-
lation. The first source is predominant in the well-fed
condition, when fatty acid synthesis is high and the
level of circulating free fatty acids is low. As triacylglyc-
erol does not normally accumulate in the liver under
this condition, it must be inferred that it is transported
from the liver in VLDL as rapidly as it is synthesized
and that the synthesis of apo B-100 is not rate-limiting.
Free fatty acids from the circulation are the main source
during starvation, the feeding of high-fat diets, or in di-
abetes mellitus, when hepatic lipogenesis is inhibited.
Factors that enhance both the synthesis of triacylglyc-
erol and the secretion of VLDL by the liver include (1)
To jpeg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
batch pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg image
To jpeg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf file to jpg on; convert pdf into jpg online
212 / CHAPTER 25
the fed state rather than the starved state; (2) the feed-
ing of diets high in carbohydrate (particularly if they
contain sucrose or fructose), leading to high rates of li-
pogenesis and esterification of fatty acids; (3) high lev-
els of circulating free fatty acids; (4) ingestion of
ethanol; and (5) the presence of high concentrations of
insulin and low concentrations of glucagon, which en-
hance fatty acid synthesis and esterification and inhibit
their oxidation (Figure 25–6).
CLINICAL ASPECTS
Imbalance in the Rate of Triacylglycerol
Formation & Export Causes Fatty Liver
For a variety of reasons, lipid—mainly as triacylglyc-
erol—can accumulate in the liver (Figure 25–6). Exten-
sive accumulation is regarded as a pathologic condition.
When accumulation of lipid in the liver becomes
chronic, fibrotic changes occur in the cells that progress
to cirrhosisand impaired liver function.
Fatty livers fall into two main categories. The first
type is associated with raised levels of plasma free
fatty acidsresulting from mobilization of fat from adi-
pose tissue or from the hydrolysis of lipoprotein triacyl-
glycerol by lipoprotein lipase in extrahepatic tissues.
The production of VLDL does not keep pace with the
increasing influx and esterification of free fatty acids, al-
lowing triacylglycerol to accumulate, causing a fatty
liver. This occurs during starvationand the feeding of
high-fat diets.The ability to secrete VLDL may also be
impaired (eg, in starvation). In uncontrolled diabetes
mellitus, twin lamb disease, and ketosis in cattle,
fatty infiltration is sufficiently severe to cause visible
pallor (fatty appearance) and enlargement of the liver
with possible liver dysfunction.
The second type of fatty liver is usually due to a
metabolic block in the production of plasma lipo-
proteins,thus allowing triacylglycerol to accumulate.
Theoretically, the lesion may be due to (1) a block in
apolipoprotein synthesis, (2) a block in the synthesis of
the lipoprotein from lipid and apolipoprotein, (3) a
failure in provision of phospholipids that are found in
lipoproteins, or (4) a failure in the secretory mechanism
itself.
One type of fatty liver that has been studied exten-
sively in rats is due to a deficiency of choline, which
has therefore been called a lipotropic factor.The an-
tibiotic puromycin, ethionine (α-amino-γ-mercaptobu-
tyric acid), carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, phospho-
rus, lead, and arsenic all cause fatty liver and a marked
reduction in concentration of VLDL in rats. Choline
will not protect the organism against these agents but
appears to aid in recovery. The action of carbon tetra-
chloride probably involves formation of free radicals
causing lipid peroxidation. Some protection against this
is provided by the antioxidant action of vitamin E-sup-
plemented diets. The action of ethionine is thought to
be due to a reduction in availability of ATP due to its
replacing methionine in S-adenosylmethionine, trap-
ping available adenine and preventing synthesis of
ATP. Orotic acid also causes fatty liver; it is believed to
interfere with glycosylation of the lipoprotein, thus in-
hibiting release, and may also impair the recruitment of
triacylglycerol to the particles. A deficiency of vitamin
E enhances the hepatic necrosis of the choline defi-
ciency type of fatty liver. Added vitamin E or a source
of selenium has a protective effect by combating lipid
peroxidation. In addition to protein deficiency, essen-
tial fatty acid and vitamin deficiencies (eg, linoleic acid,
pyridoxine, and pantothenic acid) can cause fatty infil-
tration of the liver. 
Ethanol Also Causes Fatty Liver
Alcoholismleads to fat accumulation in the liver, hy-
perlipidemia, and ultimately cirrhosis. The exact
mechanism of action of ethanol in the long term is still
uncertain. Ethanol consumption over a long period
leads to the accumulation of fatty acids in the liver that
are derived from endogenous synthesis rather than from
increased mobilization from adipose tissue. There is no
impairment of hepatic synthesis of protein after ethanol
ingestion. Oxidation of ethanol by alcohol dehydrogen-
aseleads to excess production of NADH.
The NADH generated competes with reducing
equivalents from other substrates, including fatty acids,
for the respiratory chain, inhibiting their oxidation, and
decreasing activity of the citric acid cycle. The net effect
of inhibiting fatty acid oxidation is to cause increased
esterification of fatty acids in triacylglycerol, resulting
in the fatty liver. Oxidation of ethanol leads to the for-
mation of acetaldehyde, which is oxidized by aldehyde
dehydrogenase, producing acetate. Other effects of
ethanol may include increased lipogenesis and choles-
terol synthesis from acetyl-CoA, and lipid peroxidation.
The increased [NADH]/[NAD
+
] ratio also causes in-
creased [lactate]/[pyruvate], resulting in hyperlactic-
acidemia,which decreases excretion of uric acid, aggra-
vating gout. Some metabolism of ethanol takes place
via a cytochrome P450-dependent microsomal ethanol
oxidizing system (MEOS) involving NADPH and O
2
.
This system increases in activity in chronic alcoholism
ALCOHOL
DEHYDROGENASE
CH
3
CH
2
OH
Ethanol
CH
3
CHO
Acetaldehyde
NAD
+
NADH + H
+
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
c# convert pdf to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert pdf pages to jpg online; changing pdf to jpg
LIPID TRANSPORT & STORAGE / 213
Nascent
VLDL
Nascent
VLDL
Golgi complex
Orotic acid
HDL
VLDL
Smooth
endoplasmic
reticulum
Carbon
tetrachloride
Glycosyl
residues
Amino
acids
Protein
synthesis
Rough
endoplasmic
reticulum
Polyribosomes
Nascent
polypeptide
chains of
apo B-100
Carbon tetrachloride
Puromycin
Ethionine
Apo B-100
Apo C
Apo E
Destruction
of surplus apo B-100
Cholesterol
Cholesteryl
ester
M
e
m
b
r
a
n
e
s
y
n
t
h
e
s
i
s
Phospholipid
CDP-choline
Phosphocholine
Choline
Lipid
Insulin
Ethanol
EFA
Cholesterol feeding
EFA deficiency
Glucagon
1,2-Diacylglycerol
Acyl-CoA
Oxidation
FFA
Lipogenesis from
carbohydrate
Triacylglycerol
*
+
+
+
LIVER
HEPATOCYTE
BLOOD
M
M
TRIACYLGLYCEROL
Insulin
Insulin
Choline
deficiency
Apo C
Apo E
Figure 25–6.
The synthesis of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) in the liver and the possible loci of action of
factors causing accumulation of triacylglycerol and a fatty liver. (EFA, essential fatty acids; FFA, free fatty acids;
HDL, high-density lipoproteins; Apo, apolipoprotein; M, microsomal triacylglycerol transfer protein.) The pathways
indicated form a basis for eventsdepicted in Figure 25–2. The main triacylglycerol  pool in liver is not on the direct
pathway of VLDL synthesis from acyl-CoA. Thus, FFA, insulin, and glucagon have immediate effects on VLDL secre-
tion as their effects impinge directly on the small triacylglycerol* precursor pool. In the fully fed state, apo B-100 is
synthesized in excess of requirements for VLDL secretion and the surplus is destroyed in the liver. During transla-
tion of apo B-100, microsomal transfer protein-mediated lipid transport enables lipid to become associated with
the nascent polypeptide chain. After release from the ribosomes, these particles fuse with more lipids from the
smooth endoplasmic reticulum, producing nascent VLDL.
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Raster
Raster Images File Formats. • C#.NET RasterEdge HTML5 Viewer supports various images formats, including JPEG, GIF, BMP, PNG, etc. Loading & Viewing.
convert pdf pictures to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg format
C# Raster - Convert Image to JPEG in C#.NET
C# Raster - Convert Image to JPEG in C#.NET. Online C# Guide for Converting Image to JPEG in .NET Application. Convert RasterImage to JPEG.
changing file from pdf to jpg; pdf to jpeg
214 / CHAPTER 25
TG
NADPH + H
+
+
CO
2
CO
2
Acyl-CoA
Acetyl-CoA
ATP
CoA
ACYL-CoA
SYNTHETASE
PPP
Glycolysis
Glucose 6-phosphate
Glucose
Insulin
Glycerol
3-phosphate
HORMONE-
SENSITIVE
LIPASE
ADIPOSE TISSUE
BLOOD
BLOOD
LIPOPROTEIN
LIPASE
FFA
(pool 1)
FFA
(pool 2)
Glycerol
FFA
Glycerol
TG
(chylomicrons, VLDL)
FFA
Glycerol
Esterification
Lipolysis
Figure 25–7.
Metabolism of adipose tissue. Hor-
mone-sensitive lipase is activated by ACTH, TSH,
glucagon, epinephrine, norepinephrine, and vaso-
pressin and inhibited by insulin, prostaglandin E
1
, and
nicotinic acid. Details of the formation of glycerol 
3-phosphate from intermediates of glycolysis are
shown in Figure 24–2. (PPP, pentose phosphate path-
way; TG, triacylglycerol; FFA, free fatty acids; VLDL, very
low density lipoprotein.)
and may account for the increased metabolic clearance
in this condition. Ethanol will also inhibit the metabo-
lism of some drugs, eg, barbiturates, by competing for
cytochrome P450-dependent enzymes.
In some Asian populations and Native Americans,
alcohol consumption results in increased adverse reac-
tions to acetaldehyde owing to a genetic defect of mito-
chondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase.
ADIPOSE TISSUE IS THE MAIN STORE 
OF TRIACYLGLYCEROL IN THE BODY
The triacylglycerol stores in adipose tissue are continu-
ally undergoing lipolysis (hydrolysis) and reesterifica-
tion (Figure 25–7). These two processes are entirely dif-
ferent pathways involving different reactants and
enzymes. This allows the processes of esterification or
lipolysis to be regulated separately by many nutritional,
metabolic, and hormonal factors. The resultant of these
two processes determines the magnitude of the free
fatty acid pool in adipose tissue, which in turn deter-
mines the level of free fatty acids circulating in the
plasma. Since the latter has most profound effects upon
the metabolism of other tissues, particularly liver and
muscle, the factors operating in adipose tissue that reg-
ulate the outflow of free fatty acids exert an influence
far beyond the tissue itself.
The Provision of Glycerol 3-Phosphate
Regulates Esterification: Lipolysis Is
Controlled by Hormone-Sensitive Lipase
(Figure 25–7)
Triacylglycerol is synthesized from acyl-CoA and glyc-
erol 3-phosphate (Figure 24–2). Because the enzyme
glycerol kinaseis not expressed in adipose tissue, glyc-
erol cannot be utilized for the provision of glycerol 
3-phosphate, which must be supplied by glucose via
glycolysis.
Triacylglycerol undergoes hydrolysis by a hormone-
sensitive lipase to form free fatty acids and glycerol.
This lipase is distinct from lipoprotein lipase that cat-
alyzes lipoprotein triacylglycerol hydrolysis before its
uptake into extrahepatic tissues (see above). Since glyc-
erol cannot be utilized, it diffuses into the blood,
whence it is utilized by tissues such as those of the liver
and kidney, which possess an active glycerol kinase.
MEOS
CH
3
+ NADPH + H
+
+ O
2
+ NADP
+
+ 2H
2
O
CH
2
OH
Ethanol
CH
3
CHO
Acetaldehyde
.NET JPEG 2000 SDK | Encode & Decode JPEG 2000 Images
RasterEdge .NET Image SDK - JPEG 2000 Codec. Royalty-free JPEG 2000 Compression Technology Available for .NET Framework.
convert pdf images to jpg; best program to convert pdf to jpg
C# TIFF: How to Convert TIFF to JPEG Images in C# Application
C# Demo to Convert and Render TIFF to JPEG/Png/Bmp/Gif in Visual C#.NET Project. C#.NET Image: TIFF to Raster Images Overview. C#.NET Image: TIFF to JPEG Demo.
convert pdf to jpg converter; to jpeg
LIPID TRANSPORT & STORAGE / 215
The free fatty acids formed by lipolysis can be recon-
verted in the tissue to acyl-CoA by acyl-CoA syn-
thetase and reesterified with glycerol 3-phosphate to
form triacylglycerol. Thus, there is a continuous cycle
of lipolysis and reesterification within the tissue.
However, when the rate of reesterification is not suffi-
cient to match the rate of lipolysis, free fatty acids accu-
mulate and diffuse into the plasma, where they bind to
albumin and raise the concentration of plasma free fatty
acids.
Increased Glucose Metabolism Reduces
the Output of Free Fatty Acids
When the utilization of glucose by adipose tissue is in-
creased, the free fatty acid outflow decreases. However,
the release of glycerol continues, demonstrating that the
effect of glucose is not mediated by reducing the rate of
lipolysis. The effect is due to the provision of glycerol
3-phosphate, which enhances esterification of free fatty
acids. Glucose can take several pathways in adipose tis-
sue, including oxidation to CO
2
via the citric acid
cycle, oxidation in the pentose phosphate pathway,
conversion to long-chain fatty acids, and formation of
acylglycerol via glycerol 3-phosphate (Figure 25–7).
When glucose utilization is high, a larger proportion of
the uptake is oxidized to CO
2
and converted to fatty
acids. However, as total glucose utilization decreases,
the greater proportion of the glucose is directed to the
formation of glycerol 3-phosphate for the esterification
of acyl-CoA, which helps to minimize the efflux of free
fatty acids.
HORMONES REGULATE 
FAT MOBILIZATION
Insulin Reduces the Output 
of Free Fatty Acids
The rate of release of free fatty acids from adipose tissue
is affected by many hormones that influence either the
rate of esterification or the rate of lipolysis. Insulin in-
hibits the release of free fatty acids from adipose tissue,
which is followed by a fall in circulating plasma free
fatty acids. It enhances lipogenesis and the synthesis of
acylglycerol and increases the oxidation of glucose to
CO
2
via the pentose phosphate pathway. All of these ef-
fects are dependent on the presence of glucose and can
be explained, to a large extent, on the basis of the abil-
ity of insulin to enhance the uptake of glucose into adi-
pose cells via the GLUT 4 transporter. Insulin also in-
creases the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase, acetyl-
CoA carboxylase, and glycerol phosphate acyltrans-
ferase, reinforcing the effects of increased glucose up-
take on the enhancement of fatty acid and acylglycerol
synthesis. These three enzymes are now known to be
regulated in a coordinate manner by phosphorylation-
dephosphorylation mechanisms.
A principal action of insulin in adipose tissue is to
inhibit the activity of hormone-sensitive lipase,reduc-
ing the release not only of free fatty acids but of glycerol
as well. Adipose tissue is much more sensitive to insulin
than are many other tissues, which points to adipose
tissue as a major site of insulin action in vivo.
Several Hormones Promote Lipolysis
Other hormones accelerate the release of free fatty acids
from adipose tissue and raise the plasma free fatty acid
concentration by increasing the rate of lipolysis of the
triacylglycerol stores (Figure 25–8). These include epi-
nephrine, norepinephrine, glucagon, adrenocorticotro-
pic hormone (ACTH), α- and β-melanocyte-stimulat-
ing hormones (MSH), thyroid-stimulating hormone
(TSH), growth hormone (GH), and vasopressin. Many
of these activate the hormone-sensitive lipase. For an
optimal effect, most of these lipolytic processes require
the presence of glucocorticoids and thyroid hor-
mones. These hormones act in a facilitatoryor per-
missive capacity with respect to other lipolytic en-
docrine factors.
The hormones that act rapidly in promoting lipoly-
sis, ie, catecholamines, do so by stimulating the activity
of adenylyl cyclase,the enzyme that converts ATP to
cAMP. The mechanism is analogous to that responsible
for hormonal stimulation of glycogenolysis (Chap-
ter18). cAMP, by stimulating cAMP-dependent pro-
tein kinase, activates hormone-sensitive lipase. Thus,
processes which destroy or preserve cAMP influence
lipolysis. cAMP is degraded to 5′-AMP by the enzyme
cyclic 3,5-nucleotide phosphodiesterase. This en-
zyme is inhibited by methylxanthines such as caffeine
and theophylline.Insulinantagonizes the effect of the
lipolytic hormones. Lipolysis appears to be more sensi-
tive to changes in concentration of insulin than are glu-
cose utilization and esterification. The antilipolytic ef-
fects of insulin, nicotinic acid, and prostaglandin E
1
are
accounted for by inhibition of the synthesis of cAMP at
the adenylyl cyclase site, acting through a G
i
protein.
Insulin also stimulates phosphodiesterase and the lipase
phosphatase that inactivates hormone-sensitive lipase.
The effect of growth hormone in promoting lipolysis is
dependent on synthesis of proteins involved in the for-
mation of cAMP. Glucocorticoids promote lipolysis via
synthesis of new lipase protein by a cAMP-independent
pathway, which may be inhibited by insulin, and also
by promoting transcription of genes involved in the
cAMP signal cascade. These findings help to explain
the role of the pituitary gland and the adrenal cortex in
enhancing fat mobilization. The recently discovered
body weight regulatory hormone, leptin, stimulates
C# Word - Convert Word to JPEG in C#.NET
C# Word - Convert Word to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET Word to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Word to JPEG Conversion Overview. Convert Word to JPEG Using C#.NET
change format from pdf to jpg; convert pdf image to jpg image
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to JPEG in C#.NET
C# PowerPoint - Convert PowerPoint to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PowerPoint to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. PowerPoint to JPEG Conversion Overview.
pdf to jpg converter; convert pdf to jpg file
216 / CHAPTER 25
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
Insulin
TRIACYL-
GLYCEROL
FFA +
Diacylglycerol
FFA + glycerol
FFA +
2-Monoacylglycerol
2-Monoacylglycerol
lipase
Mg
2
+
P
PP
ATP
ADP
Lipase
phosphatase
Hormone-sensitive
lipase b
(inactive)
Hormone-sensitive
lipase a
(active)
Hormone-sensitive
lipase
cAMP-
dependent
protein
kinase
cAMP
c
A
M
P
-
i
n
d
e
p
e
n
d
e
n
t
p
a
t
h
w
a
y
5′ AMP
P
Glucocorticoids
Insulin
Insulin
Inhibitors of
protein synthesis
Adenosine
?
ATP
FFA
ADENYLYL
CYCLASE
GTP
Epinephrine,
norepinephrine
β-Adrenergic
blockers
Thyroid hormone
Thyroid hormone
Growth hormone
Inhibitors of
protein synthesis
Methyl-
xanthines
(eg, caffeine)
PHOSPHODI-
ESTERASE
Insulin, prostaglandin E
1
,
nicotinic acid
(
)
ACTH,
TSH,
glucagon
i
i
Figure 25–8.
Control of adipose tissue lipolysis. (TSH, thyroid-stimulating hormone; FFA, free fatty acids.)
Note the cascade sequence of reactions affording amplification at each step. The lipolytic stimulus is “switched
off” by removal of the stimulating hormone; the action of lipase phosphatase; the inhibition of the lipase and
adenylyl cyclase by high concentrations of FFA; the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase by adenosine; and the removal
of cAMP by the action of phosphodiesterase. ACTH, TSH, and glucagon may not activate adenylyl cyclase in vivo,
since the concentration of each hormone required in vitro is much higher than is found in the circulation. Posi-
tive (+) and negative () regulatory effects are represented by broken lines and substrate flow by solid lines.
lipolysis and inhibits lipogenesis by influencing the ac-
tivity of the enzymes in the pathways for the break-
down and synthesis of fatty acids.
The sympathetic nervous system, through liberation
of norepinephrine in adipose tissue, plays a central role
in the mobilization of free fatty acids. Thus, the in-
creased lipolysis caused by many of the factors de-
scribed above can be reduced or abolished by denerva-
tion of adipose tissue or by ganglionic blockade.
A Variety of Mechanisms Have Evolved for
Fine Control of Adipose Tissue Metabolism
Human adipose tissue may not be an important site of
lipogenesis. There is no significant incorporation of
glucose or pyruvate into long-chain fatty acids; ATP-
citrate lyase, a key enzyme in lipogenesis, does not ap-
pear to be present, and other lipogenic enzymes—eg,
glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and the malic en-
zyme—do not undergo adaptive changes. Indeed, it has
been suggested that in humans there is a “carbohydrate
excess syndrome” due to a unique limitation in ability
to dispose of excess carbohydrate by lipogenesis. In
birds, lipogenesis is confined to the liver, where it is
particularly important in providing lipids for egg for-
mation, stimulated by estrogens. Human adipose tissue
is unresponsive to most of the lipolytic hormones apart
from the catecholamines. 
On consideration of the profound derangement of
metabolism in diabetes mellitus (due in large part to
increased release of free fatty acids from the depots) and
the fact that insulin to a large extent corrects the condi-
LIPID TRANSPORT & STORAGE / 217
Thermogenin
F
0
F
0
Carnitine
transporter
F
1
ATP
synthase
Respiratory
chain
+
+
+
+
+
H
+
H
+
H
+
H
+
INNER
MITOCHONDRIAL
MEMBRANE
OUTSIDE
INSIDE
Norepinephine
cAMP
Hormone-
sensitive
lipase
Triacyl-
glycerol
FFA
Acyl-CoA
Heat
Heat
Purine
nucleotides
Reducing
equivalents
β
-
O
x
i
d
a
t
i
o
n
Figure 25–9.
Thermogenesis in brown adipose tis-
sue. Activity of the respiratory chain produces heat in
addition to translocating protons (Chapter 12). These
protons dissipate more heat when returned to the
inner mitochondrial compartment via thermogenin in-
stead of generating ATP when returning via the F
1
ATP
synthase. The passage of H
+
via thermogenin is inhib-
ited by purine nucleotides when brown adipose tissue
is unstimulated. Under the influence of norepinephrine,
the inhibition is removed by the production of free
fatty acids (FFA) and acyl-CoA. Note the dual role of
acyl-CoA in both facilitating the action of thermogenin
and supplying reducing equivalents for the respiratory
chain. and signify positive or negative regulatory
effects.
tion, it must be concluded that insulin plays a promi-
nent role in the regulation of adipose tissue metabolism.
BROWN ADIPOSE TISSUE 
PROMOTES THERMOGENESIS
Brown adipose tissue is involved in metabolism particu-
larly at times when heat generation is necessary. Thus,
the tissue is extremely active in some species in arousal
from hibernation, in animals exposed to cold (nonshiv-
ering thermogenesis), and in heat production in the
newborn animal. Though not a prominent tissue in hu-
mans, it is present in normal individuals, where it could
be responsible for “diet-induced thermogenesis.”It is
noteworthy that brown adipose tissue is reduced or ab-
sent in obese persons. The tissue is characterized by a
well-developed blood supply and a high content of mi-
tochondria and cytochromes but low activity of ATP
synthase. Metabolic emphasis is placed on oxidation of
both glucose and fatty acids. Norepinephrineliberated
from sympathetic nerve endings is important in increas-
ing lipolysis in the tissue and increasing synthesis of
lipoprotein lipase to enhance utilization of triacylglyc-
erol-rich lipoproteins from the circulation. Oxidation
and phosphorylation are not coupled in mitochondria
of this tissue, and the phosphorylation that does occur
is at the substrate level, eg, at the succinate thiokinase
step and in glycolysis. Thus, oxidation produces much
heat, and little free energy is trapped in ATP.A ther-
mogenic uncoupling protein, thermogenin, acts as a
proton conductance pathway dissipating the electro-
chemical potential across the mitochondrial membrane
(Figure 25–9).
SUMMARY
• Since nonpolar lipids are insoluble in water, for
transport between the tissues in the aqueous blood
plasma they are combined with amphipathic lipids
and proteins to make water-miscible lipoproteins.
• Four major groups of lipoproteins are recognized:
Chylomicrons transport lipids resulting from diges-
tion and absorption. Very low density lipoproteins
(VLDL) transport triacylglycerol from the liver. Low-
density lipoproteins (LDL) deliver cholesterol to the
tissues, and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) remove
cholesterol from the tissues in the process known as
reverse cholesterol transport. 
• Chylomicrons and VLDL are metabolized by hydrol-
ysis of their triacylglycerol, and lipoprotein remnants
are left in the circulation. These are taken up by liver,
but some of the remnants (IDL) resulting from
VLDL form LDL which is taken up by the liver and
other tissues via the LDL receptor.
+
218 / CHAPTER 25
• Apolipoproteins constitute the protein moiety of
lipoproteins. They act as enzyme activators (eg, apo
C-II and apo A-I) or as ligands for cell receptors (eg,
apo A-I, apo E, and apo B-100).
• Triacylglycerol is the main storage lipid in adipose
tissue. Upon mobilization, free fatty acids and glyc-
erol are released. Free fatty acids are an important
fuel source. 
• Brown adipose tissue is the site of “nonshivering
thermogenesis.” It is found in hibernating and new-
born animals and is present in small quantity in hu-
mans. Thermogenesis results from the presence of an
uncoupling protein, thermogenin, in the inner mito-
chondrial membrane.
REFERENCES
Chappell DA, Medh JD: Receptor-mediated mechanisms of
lipoprotein remnant catabolism. Prog Lipid Res 1998;37:
393.
Eaton S et al: Multiple biochemical effects in the pathogenesis of
fatty liver. Eur J Clin Invest 1997;27:719. 
Goldberg IJ, Merkel M: Lipoprotein lipase: physiology, biochem-
istry and molecular biology. Front Biosci 2001;6:D388.
Holm C et al: Molecular mechanisms regulating hormone sensitive
lipase and lipolysis. Annu Rev Nutr 2000;20:365. 
Kaikans RM, Bass NM, Ockner RK: Functions of fatty acid bind-
ing proteins. Experientia 1990;46:617.
Lardy H, Shrago E: Biochemical aspects of obesity. Annu Rev
Biochem 1990;59:689.
Rye K-A et al: Overview of plasma lipid transport. In: Plasma
Lipids and Their Role in Disease.Barter PJ, Rye K-A (editors).
Harwood Academic Publishers, 1999.
Shelness GS, Sellers JA: Very-low-density lipoprotein assembly and
secretion. Curr Opin Lipidol 2001;12:151.
Various authors: Biochemistry of Lipids, Lipoproteins and Mem-
branes.Vance DE, Vance JE (editors). Elsevier, 1996.
Various authors: Brown adipose tissue—role in nutritional energet-
ics. (Symposium.) Proc Nutr Soc 1989;48:165. 
Cholesterol Synthesis,Transport,
& Excretion
26
219
Peter A. Mayes, PhD, DSc, & Kathleen M. Botham, PhD, DSc
BIOMEDICAL IMPORTANCE
Cholesterol is present in tissues and in plasma either as
free cholesterol or as a storage form, combined with a
long-chain fatty acid as cholesteryl ester. In plasma,
both forms are transported in lipoproteins (Chapter
25). Cholesterol is an amphipathic lipid and as such is
an essential structural component of membranes and of
the outer layer of plasma lipoproteins. It is synthesized
in many tissues from acetyl-CoA and is the precursor of
all other steroids in the body such as corticosteroids, sex
hormones, bile acids, and vitamin D. As a typical prod-
uct of animal metabolism, cholesterol occurs in foods
of animal origin such as egg yolk, meat, liver, and
brain. Plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is the ve-
hicle of uptake of cholesterol and cholesteryl ester into
many tissues. Free cholesterol is removed from tissues
by plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and trans-
ported to the liver, where it is eliminated from the body
either unchanged or after conversion to bile acids in the
process known as reverse cholesterol transport.Cho-
lesterol is a major constituent of gallstones.However,
its chief role in pathologic processes is as a factor in the
genesis of atherosclerosisof vital arteries, causing cere-
brovascular, coronary, and peripheral vascular disease.
CHOLESTEROL IS DERIVED 
ABOUT EQUALLY FROM THE DIET 
& FROM BIOSYNTHESIS
A little more than half the cholesterol of the body arises
by synthesis (about 700 mg/d), and the remainder is
provided by the average diet. The liver and intestine ac-
count for approximately 10% each of total synthesis in
humans. Virtually all tissues containing nucleated cells
are capable of cholesterol synthesis, which occurs in the
endoplasmic reticulum and the cytosol. 
Acetyl-CoA Is the Source of All Carbon
Atoms in Cholesterol
The biosynthesis of cholesterol may be divided into five
steps: (1) Synthesis of mevalonate occurs from acetyl-
CoA (Figure 26–1). (2) Isoprenoid units are formed
from mevalonate by loss of CO
2
(Figure 26–2). (3) Six
isoprenoid units condense to form squalene. (4) Squa-
lene cyclizes to give rise to the parent steroid, lanos-
terol. (5) Cholesterol is formed from lanosterol (Figure
26–3).
Step 1—Biosynthesis of Mevalonate:HMG-CoA
(3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA) is formed by the re-
actions used in mitochondria to synthesize ketone bod-
ies (Figure 22–7). However, since cholesterol synthesis
is extramitochondrial, the two pathways are distinct.
Initially, two molecules of acetyl-CoA condense to
form acetoacetyl-CoA catalyzed by cytosolic thiolase.
Acetoacetyl-CoA condenses with a further molecule of
acetyl-CoA catalyzed by HMG-CoA synthaseto form
HMG-CoA, which is reduced to mevalonate by
NADPH catalyzed by HMG-CoA reductase.This is
the principal regulatory step in the pathway of choles-
terol synthesis and is the site of action of the most effec-
tive class of cholesterol-lowering drugs, the HMG-CoA
reductase inhibitors (statins) (Figure 26–1).
Step 2—Formation of Isoprenoid Units: Meval-
onate is phosphorylated sequentially by ATP by three
kinases, and after decarboxylation (Figure 26–2) the ac-
tive isoprenoid unit, isopentenyl diphosphate, is
formed.
Step 3—Six Isoprenoid Units Form Squalene:
Isopentenyl diphosphate is isomerized by a shift of the
double bond to form dimethylallyl diphosphate,then
condensed with another molecule of isopentenyl
diphosphate to form the ten-carbon intermediate ger-
anyl diphosphate(Figure 26–2). A further condensa-
tion with isopentenyl diphosphate forms farnesyl
diphosphate. Two molecules of farnesyl diphosphate
condense at the diphosphate end to form squalene.Ini-
tially, inorganic pyrophosphate is eliminated, forming
presqualene diphosphate, which is then reduced by
NADPH with elimination of a further inorganic py-
rophosphate molecule. 
Step 4—Formation of Lanosterol: Squalene can
fold into a structure that closely resembles the steroid
nucleus (Figure 26–3). Before ring closure occurs, squa-
lene is converted to squalene 2,3-epoxide by a mixed-
220 / CHAPTER 26
C
O
CoA
S
2 Acetyl-CoA
CH
3
Acetoacetyl-CoA
3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA)
C
O
CoA
S
Acetyl-CoA
CH
3
C
C
O
CoA
2NADPH 
+
2H
+
Statins, eg,
simvastatin
2NADP
+
+
CoA     SH
H
2
O
S
CH
2
CH
3
O
C
OOC
C
O
CoA
S
CH
2
CH
3
OH
CH
2
Mevalonate
OOC
C
CH
2
CH
3
OH
CH
2
OH
CH
2
CoA     SH
CoA     SH
THIOLASE
HMG-CoA SYNTHASE
HMG-CoA REDUCTASE
Bile acid, cholesterol
Mevalonate
Figure 26–1.
Biosynthesis of mevalonate. HMG-CoA
reductase is inhibited by atorvastatin, pravastatin, and
simvastatin. The open and solid circles indicate the fate
of each of the carbons in the acetyl moiety of acetyl-
CoA.
function oxidase in the endoplasmic reticulum, squa-
lene epoxidase.The methyl group on C
14
is transferred
to C
13
and that on C
8
to C
14
as cyclization occurs, cat-
alyzed by oxidosqualene:lanosterol cyclase.
Step 5—Formation of Cholesterol: The forma-
tion of cholesterol from lanosteroltakes place in the
membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum and involves
changes in the steroid nucleus and side chain (Figure
26–3). The methyl groups on C
14
and C
4
are removed
to form 14-desmethyl lanosterol and then zymosterol.
The double bond at C
8
–C
9
is subsequently moved to
C
5
–C
6
in two steps, forming desmosterol.Finally, the
double bond of the side chain is reduced, producing
cholesterol. The exact order in which the steps de-
scribed actually take place is not known with cer-
tainty.
Farnesyl Diphosphate Gives Rise 
to Dolichol & Ubiquinone 
The polyisoprenoids dolichol (Figure 14–20 and
Chapter 47) and ubiquinone(Figure 12–5) are formed
from farnesyl diphosphate by the further addition of up
to 16 (dolichol) or 3–7 (ubiquinone) isopentenyl
diphosphate residues, respectively. Some GTP-binding
proteins in the cell membrane are prenylated with far-
nesyl or geranylgeranyl (20 carbon) residues. Protein
prenylation is believed to facilitate the anchoring of
proteins into lipoid membranes and may also be in-
volved in protein-protein interactions and membrane-
associated protein trafficking. 
CHOLESTEROL SYNTHESIS IS
CONTROLLED BY REGULATION 
OF HMG-CoA REDUCTASE
Regulation of cholesterol synthesis is exerted near the
beginning of the pathway, at the HMG-CoA reductase
step. The reduced synthesis of cholesterol in starving
animals is accompanied by a decrease in the activity of
the enzyme. However, it is only hepatic synthesis that is
inhibited by dietary cholesterol. HMG-CoA reductase
in liver is inhibited by mevalonate, the immediate prod-
uct of the pathway, and by cholesterol, the main prod-
uct. Cholesterol (or a metabolite, eg, oxygenated sterol)
represses transcription of the HMG-CoA reductase
gene and is also believed to influence translation. A di-
urnal variation occurs in both cholesterol synthesis
and reductase activity. In addition to these mechanisms
regulating the rate of protein synthesis, the enzyme ac-
tivity is also modulated more rapidly by posttransla-
tional modification (Figure 26–4). Insulin or thyroid
hormone increases HMG-CoA reductase activity,
whereas glucagon or glucocorticoids decrease it. Activ-
ity is reversibly modified by phosphorylation-dephos-
phorylation mechanisms, some of which may be
cAMP-dependent and therefore immediately responsive
to glucagon. Attempts to lower plasma cholesterol in
humans by reducing the amount of cholesterol in the
diet produce variable results. Generally, a decrease of
100 mg in dietary cholesterol causes a decrease of ap-
proximately 0.13 mmol/L of serum.
MANY FACTORS INFLUENCE THE
CHOLESTEROL BALANCE IN TISSUES
In tissues, cholesterol balance is regulated as follows (Fig-
ure 26–5): Cell cholesterol increase is due to uptake of
cholesterol-containing lipoproteins by receptors, eg, the
LDL receptor or the scavenger receptor; uptake of free
cholesterol from cholesterol-rich lipoproteins to the cell
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested