C
CH
2
CH
3
OH
OOC
CH
2
CH
2
OH
Mevalonate
C
CH
2
CH
3
OH
OOC
CH
2
CH
2
Mevalonate 5-phosphate
Mg
2
+
ADP
ATP
MEVALONATE
KINASE
Mg
2
+
ADP
ATP
DIPHOSPHOMEVALONATE
KINASE
SQUALENE SYNTHETASE
O
P
C
CH
2
CH
3
OH
OOC
CH
2
CH
2
Mevalonate 5-diphosphate
O
P
Mg
2
+
ADP
ATP
PHOSPHOMEVALONATE
KINASE
C
I
S
-PRENYL
TRANSFERASE
C
I
S
-PRENYL
TRANSFERASE
C
I
S
-PRENYL
TRANSFERASE
T
R
A
N
S
-PRENYL
TRANSFERASE
P
C
CH
2
CH
3
OOC
CH
2
CH
2
Mevalonate 3-phospho-5-diphosphate
HMG-CoA
t
r
a
n
s
-Methyl-
glutaconate 
shunt
Isopentenyl tRNA
P
r
e
n
y
l
a
t
e
d
p
r
o
t
e
i
n
s
Side chain of
ubiquinone
Heme a
Geranyl diphosphate
PP
i
O
P
O
P
P
C
CH
3
CH
CH
2
3,3-Dimethylallyl
diphosphate
O
P
P
CH
3
C
C
CH
2
CH
2
CH
2
Isopentenyl
diphosphate
O
P
P
CH
3
CO
2
+ P
i
C
C
CH
3
CH
CH
2
CH
3
C
C
CH
2
CH
CH
2
O
P
P
CH
2
O
P
P
CH
3
C
DIPHOSPHO-
MEVALONATE
DECARBOXYLASE
ISOPENTENYL-
DIPHOSPHATE
ISOMERASE
PP
i
2PP
i
NADP
+
Squalene
NADPH 
+
H
+
Mg
2
+
, Mn
2
+
Farnesyl diphosphate
Dolichol
*
CH
2
*
CH
2
*
Figure 26–2.
Biosynthesis of squalene, ubiquinone, dolichol, and other polyisoprene derivatives. (HMG,
3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl;⋅×
⋅, cytokinin.) A farnesyl residue is present in heme a of cytochrome oxidase.
The carbon marked with asterisk becomes C
11
or C
12
in squalene. Squalene synthetase is a microsomal en-
zyme; all other enzymes indicated are soluble cytosolic proteins, and some are found in peroxisomes.
221
Convert .pdf to .jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi
Convert .pdf to .jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
changing pdf file to jpg; convert pdf image to jpg
222 / CHAPTER 26
C
CH
3
O
CoA
OOC
C
CH
3
C
CH
2
CO
2
H
2
O
CH
2
CH
2
OH
CH
CH
2
CH
2
CH
3
C
HC
C
CH
2
CH
CH
2
CH
2
S
OH
CH
3
CH
CH
3
Acetyl-CoA
Mevalonate
Isoprenoid unit
CH
3
CH
2
*
CH
2
*
C
CH
CH
2
CH
3
C
CH
3
CH
3
CH
3
24
14
13
12
8
11
CH
2
C
CH
CH
2
H
2
C
C
HC
3
CH
3
CH
3
1
CH
2
CH
3
C
HC
C
CH
2
CH
CH
2
CH
2
CH
CH
3
CH
2
CH
2
C
CH
CH
2
CH
3
C
CH
3
CH
3
CH
3
24
14
13
12
8
11
CH
2
C
CH
CH
2
H
2
C
C
HC
3
CH
3
CH
3
O
1
SQUALENE
EPOXIDASE
ISOMERASE
24-REDUCTASE
OXIDOSQUALENE:
LANOSTEROL
CYCLASE
1
/
2
O
2
HO
Squalene
Squalene
epoxide
Lanosterol
14
8
4
COOH
NADPH
O
2
H
HO
14-Desmethyl
lanosterol
14
2CO
2
O
2
, NADPH
NAD
+
HO
Zymosterol
8
HO
Cholesterol
15
16
17
22
20
23
24
25
26
27
8
10
4
6
B
C
D
3
2
1
9
11
12
18
21
13
14
5
7
19
A
NADPH
HO
Desmosterol
(24-dehydrocholesterol)
NADPH
O
2
HO
7,24
-Cholestadienol
24
24
5
3
Triparanol
X6
NADPH
FAD
7
Figure 26–3.
Biosynthesis of cholesterol. The numbered positions are those of the steroid nucleus and the
open and solid circles indicate the fate of each of the carbons in the acetyl moiety of acetyl-CoA. Asterisks: Refer
to labeling of squalene in Figure 26–2.
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
bulk pdf to jpg converter online; convert pdf pages to jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Easy converting! We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your PDF files to JPG.
convert pdf to jpeg on; batch convert pdf to jpg
CHOLESTEROL SYNTHESIS, TRANSPORT, & EXCRETION / 223
REDUCTASE
KINASE
KINASE
HMG-CoA
REDUCTASE
(active)
PROTEIN
PHOSPHATASES
PROTEIN
PHOSPHATASES
+
+
+
+
H
2
O
H
2
O
P
P
ATP
ATP
ADP
ADP
Insulin
?
Insulin
Inhibitor-1-
phosphate
*
Glucagon
cAMP
?
HMG-CoA
LDL-cholesterol
Cholesterol
Oxysterols
E
n
z
y
m
e
s
y
n
t
h
e
s
i
s
REDUCTASE
KINASE
(inactive)
REDUCTASE
KINASE
(active)
P
HMG-CoA
REDUCTASE
(inactive)
P
i
i
Figure 26–4.
Possible mechanisms in the regulation of cholesterol synthesis by HMG-CoA reductase. Insulin
has a dominant role compared with glucagon. Asterisk: See Figure 18–6.
membrane; cholesterol synthesis; and hydrolysis of cho-
lesteryl esters by the enzyme cholesteryl ester hydrolase.
Decrease is due to efflux of cholesterol from the mem-
brane to HDL, promoted by LCAT(lecithin:cholesterol
acyltransferase) (Chapter 25); esterification of cholesterol
by ACAT(acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase); and uti-
lization of cholesterol for synthesis of other steroids, such
as hormones, or bile acids in the liver.
The LDL Receptor Is Highly Regulated
LDL (apo B-100, E) receptors occur on the cell surface
in pits that are coated on the cytosolic side of the cell
membrane with a protein called clathrin. The glycopro-
tein receptor spans the membrane, the B-100 binding
region being at the exposed amino terminal end. After
binding, LDL is taken up intact by endocytosis. The
apoprotein and cholesteryl ester are then hydrolyzed in
the lysosomes, and cholesterol is translocated into the
cell. The receptors are recycled to the cell surface. This
influx of cholesterol inhibits in a coordinated man-
ner HMG-CoA synthase, HMG-CoA reductase, and,
therefore, cholesterol synthesis; stimulates ACAT activ-
ity; and down-regulates synthesis of the LDL receptor.
Thus, the number of LDL receptors on the cell surface
is regulated by the cholesterol requirement for mem-
branes, steroid hormones, or bile acid synthesis (Figure
26–5). The apo B-100, E receptor is a “high-affinity”
LDL receptor, which may be saturated under most cir-
cumstances. Other “low-affinity” LDL receptors also
appear to be present in addition to a scavenger path-
way, which is not regulated.
CHOLESTEROL IS TRANSPORTED
BETWEEN TISSUES IN PLASMA
LIPOPROTEINS 
(Figure26–6)
In Western countries, the total plasma cholesterol in
humans is about 5.2 mmol/L, rising with age, though
there are wide variations between individuals. The
greater part is found in the esterified form. It is trans-
ported in lipoproteins of the plasma, and the highest
proportion of cholesterol is found in the LDL. Dietary
cholesterol equilibrates with plasma cholesterol in days
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
This demo code just converts first page to jpeg image. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
batch pdf to jpg online; bulk pdf to jpg converter
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code will convert first page to jpeg image. C:\input.tif"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert tiff to jpg.
convert pdf into jpg format; convert pdf file to jpg online
224 / CHAPTER 26
A-1
ABC-1
CE
HDL
3
CELL MEMBRANE
Cholesterol
synthesis
LDL (apo B-100, E)
receptors
(in coated pits)
LDL
LDL
C
Lysosome
Preβ-HDL
Synthesis
of steroids
LDL
VLDL
A-1
Lysosome
Endosome
Recycling
vesicle
Receptor
synthesis
D
o
w
n
-
r
e
g
u
l
a
t
i
o
n
Coated
vesicle
C
C
Scavenger receptor or
nonregulated pathway
Unesterified
cholesterol
pool
(mainly in membranes)
CE
HYDROLASE
CE
CE
CE
PL
CE
CE
CE
ACAT
LCAT
+
PL C
Figure 26–5.
Factors affecting cholesterol balance at the cellular level. Reverse cholesterol transport may
be initiated by preβHDL binding to the ABC-1 transporter protein via apo A-I. Cholesterol is then moved out
of the cell via the transporter, lipidating the HDL, and the larger particles then dissociate from the ABC-1 mol-
ecule. (C, cholesterol; CE, cholesteryl ester; PL, phospholipid; ACAT, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase; LCAT,
lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase; A-I, apolipoprotein A-I; LDL, low-density lipoprotein; VLDL, very low den-
sity lipoprotein.) LDL and HDL are not shown to scale.
and with tissue cholesterol in weeks. Cholesteryl ester
in the diet is hydrolyzed to cholesterol, which is then
absorbed by the intestine together with dietary unesteri-
fied cholesterol and other lipids. With cholesterol syn-
thesized in the intestines, it is then incorporated into
chylomicrons. Of the cholesterol absorbed, 80–90% is
esterified with long-chain fatty acids in the intestinal
mucosa. Ninety-five percent of the chylomicron choles-
terol is delivered to the liver in chylomicron remnants,
and most of the cholesterol secreted by the liver in
VLDL is retained during the formation of IDL and ul-
timately LDL, which is taken up by the LDL receptor
in liver and extrahepatic tissues (Chapter 25).
Plasma LCAT Is Responsible for Virtually
All Plasma Cholesteryl Ester in Humans
LCAT activity is associated with HDL containing apo
A-I. As cholesterol in HDL becomes esterified, it cre-
ates a concentration gradient and draws in cholesterol
from tissues and from other lipoproteins (Figures 26–5
and 26–6), thus enabling HDL to function in reverse
cholesterol transport(Figure 25–5).
Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein
Facilitates Transfer of Cholesteryl Ester
From HDL to Other Lipoproteins
This protein is found in plasma of humans and many
other species, associated with HDL. It facilitates transfer
of cholesteryl ester from HDL to VLDL, IDL, and LDL
in exchange for triacylglycerol, relieving product inhibi-
tion of LCAT activity in HDL. Thus, in humans, much
of the cholesteryl ester formed by LCAT finds its way to
the liver via VLDL remnants (IDL) or LDL (Figure
26–6). The triacylglycerol-enriched HDL
2
delivers its
cholesterol to the liver in the HDL cycle (Figure 25–5). 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
change pdf file to jpg online; change pdf to jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
convert pdf file to jpg file; convert pdf file into jpg
CHOLESTEROL SYNTHESIS, TRANSPORT, & EXCRETION / 225
C
CE
C
LDL
(apo B-100, E)
receptor
EXTRAHEPATIC
TISSUES
Synthesis
LDL
C
E
T
G
T
G
C
E
LRP receptor
IDL
(VLDL remnant)
Chylomicron
remnant
C
C
C
CE
Synthesis
Bile acids
(total pool, 3–5 g)
BILE DUCT
VLDL
Chylomicron
Bile
acids
CE
C
CE
Diet (0.4 g/d)
HEPATIC PORTAL VEIN
GALL
BLADDER
ENTEROHEPATIC CIRCULATION
C
(0.6 g/d)
Bile acids
(0.4 g/d)
Feces
ILEUM
Unesterified
cholesterol
pool
CE
HDL
A-I
L
C
A
T
C
E
T
P
LPL
ACAT
HL
CE
C
TG
CE
C
LIVER
TG
CE
C
TG
CE
C
C
E
T
G
,
C
E
T
G
TG
CE
C
C
8
9
9
9
%
CE
C
C
LDL
(apo B-100, E)
receptor
Figure 26–6.
Transport of cholesterol between the tissues in humans. (C, unesterified cholesterol; CE, cho-
lesteryl ester; TG, triacylglycerol; VLDL, very low density lipoprotein; IDL, intermediate-density lipoprotein; LDL,
low-density lipoprotein; HDL, high-density lipoprotein; ACAT, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase; LCAT,
lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase; A-I, apolipoprotein A-I; CETP, cholesteryl ester transfer protein; LPL, lipopro-
tein lipase; HL, hepatic lipase; LRP, LDL receptor-related protein.)
CHOLESTEROL IS EXCRETED FROM THE
BODY IN THE BILE AS CHOLESTEROL OR
BILE ACIDS (SALTS)
About 1 g of cholesterol is eliminated from the body
per day. Approximately half is excreted in the feces after
conversion to bile acids. The remainder is excreted as
cholesterol. Coprostanolis the principal sterol in the
feces; it is formed from cholesterol by the bacteria in
the lower intestine. 
Bile Acids Are Formed From Cholesterol
The primary bile acidsare synthesized in the liver from
cholesterol. These are cholic acid(found in the largest
amount) and chenodeoxycholic acid (Figure 26–7).
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff. string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object.
convert pdf to jpg c#; convert multi page pdf to single jpg
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF. Copyright © <2000-2015> by <RasterEdge.com>. All Rights Reserved.
.pdf to jpg converter online; changing pdf to jpg on
226 / CHAPTER 26
The 7α-hydroxylation of cholesterol is the first and
principal regulatory step in the biosynthesis of bile acids
catalyzed by 7α-hydroxylase,a microsomal enzyme. A
typical monooxygenase, it requires oxygen, NADPH,
and cytochrome P450. Subsequent hydroxylation steps
are also catalyzed by monooxygenases. The pathway of
bile acid biosynthesis divides early into one subpathway
leading to cholyl-CoA,characterized by an extra α-OH
group on position 12, and another pathway leading to
chenodeoxycholyl-CoA(Figure 26–7). A second path-
way in mitochondria involving the 27-hydroxylation of
cholesterol by sterol 27-hydroxylaseas the first step is
responsible for a significant proportion of the primary
bile acids synthesized. The primary bile acids (Figure
26–7) enter the bile as glycine or taurine conjugates.
Conjugation takes place in peroxisomes. In humans, the
ratio of the glycine to the taurine conjugates is normally
3:1. In the alkaline bile, the bile acids and their conju-
HO
Cholesterol
3
7
12
17
HO
NADPH 
+
H
+
NADPH 
+
H
+
Taurine
Glycine
Propionyl-CoA
Vitamin C
Bile
acids
Vitamin C
deficiency
7α-HYDROXYLASE
12α-HYDROX-
YLASE
NADP
+
O
2
O
2
(Several
steps)
NADPH 
+
H
+
Propionyl-CoA
O
2
OH
7α-Hydroxycholesterol
7
HO
OH
H
C
O
Chenodeoxycholyl-CoA
Tauro- and glyco-
chenodeoxycholic acid
(primary bile acids)
Deconjugation
+ 7α-dehydroxylation
Deconjugation
+ 7α-dehydroxylation
*
*
CoA
S
HO
OH
H
C
O
Cholyl-CoA
CoA
S
HO
H
COOH
Lithocholic acid
(secondary bile acid)
HO
H
OH
OH
COOH
Deoxycholic acid
(secondary bile acid)
12
HO
OH
H
C
O
Taurocholic acid
(primary bile acid)
(CH
2
)
2
SO
3
H
N
H
OH
HO
OH
H
C
O
Glycocholic acid
(primary bile acid)
CH
2
COOH
N
H
OH
CoA     SH
CoA     SH
2 CoA     SH
2 CoA     SH
Figure 26–7.
Biosynthesis and degradation of bile acids. A second pathway in mitochondria involves hy-
droxylation of cholesterol by sterol 27-hydroxylase. Asterisk: Catalyzed by microbial enzymes.
CHOLESTEROL SYNTHESIS, TRANSPORT, & EXCRETION / 227
gates are assumed to be in a salt form—hence the term
“bile salts.”
A portion of the primary bile acids in the intestine is
subjected to further changes by the activity of the in-
testinal bacteria. These include deconjugation and 7α-
dehydroxylation, which produce the secondary bile
acids,deoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid.
Most Bile Acids Return to the Liver 
in the Enterohepatic Circulation
Although products of fat digestion, including choles-
terol, are absorbed in the first 100 cm of small intestine,
the primary and secondary bile acids are absorbed al-
most exclusively in the ileum, and 98–99% are re-
turned to the liver via the portal circulation. This is
known as the enterohepatic circulation (Figure 26–6).
However, lithocholic acid, because of its insolubility, is
not reabsorbed to any significant extent. Only a small
fraction of the bile salts escapes absorption and is there-
fore eliminated in the feces. Nonetheless, this represents
a major pathway for the elimination of cholesterol.
Each day the small pool of bile acids (about 3–5 g) is
cycled through the intestine six to ten times and an
amount of bile acid equivalent to that lost in the feces is
synthesized from cholesterol, so that a pool of bile acids
of constant size is maintained. This is accomplished by
a system of feedback controls.
Bile Acid Synthesis Is Regulated 
at the 7α-Hydroxylase Step
The principal rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of
bile acids is at the cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase reac-
tion(Figure 26–7). The activity of the enzyme is feed-
back-regulated via the nuclear bile acid-binding recep-
tor farnesoid X receptor (FXR).When the size of the
bile acid pool in the enterohepatic circulation increases,
FXR is activated and transcription of the cholesterol
7α-hydroxylase gene is suppressed. Chenodeoxycholic
acid is particularly important in activating FXR. Cho-
lesterol 7α-hydroxylase activity is also enhanced by
cholesterol of endogenous and dietary origin and regu-
lated by insulin, glucagon, glucocorticoids, and thyroid
hormone.
CLINICAL ASPECTS
The Serum Cholesterol Is Correlated With
the Incidence of Atherosclerosis &
Coronary Heart Disease
While cholesterol is believed to be chiefly concerned in
the relationship, other serum lipids such as triacylglyc-
erols may also play a role. Atherosclerosis is character-
ized by the deposition of cholesterol and cholesteryl
ester from the plasma lipoproteins into the artery wall.
Diseases in which prolonged elevated levels of VLDL,
IDL, chylomicron remnants, or LDL occur in the
blood (eg, diabetes mellitus, lipid nephrosis, hypothy-
roidism, and other conditions of hyperlipidemia) are
often accompanied by premature or more severe ather-
osclerosis. There is also an inverse relationship between
HDL (HDL
2
) concentrations and coronary heart dis-
ease, and some consider that the most predictive rela-
tionship is the LDL:HDL cholesterol ratio. This is
consistent with the function of HDL in reverse choles-
terol transport. Susceptibility to atherosclerosis varies
widely among species, and humans are one of the few
in which the disease can be induced by diets high in
cholesterol.
Diet Can Play an Important Role in
Reducing Serum Cholesterol
Hereditary factors play the greatest role in determining
individual serum cholesterol concentrations; however,
dietary and environmental factors also play a part, and
the most beneficial of these is the substitution in the
diet of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty
acidsfor saturated fatty acids. Plant oils such as corn oil
and sunflower seed oil contain a high proportion of
polyunsaturated fatty acids, while olive oil contains a
high concentration of monounsaturated fatty acids. On
the other hand, butterfat, beef fat, and palm oil contain
a high proportion of saturated fatty acids. Sucrose and
fructose have a greater effect in raising blood lipids, par-
ticularly triacylglycerols, than do other carbohydrates.
The reason for the cholesterol-lowering effect of
polyunsaturated fatty acids is still not fully understood.
It is clear, however, that one of the mechanisms in-
volved is the up-regulation of LDL receptors by poly-
and monounsaturated as compared with saturated fatty
acids, causing an increase in the catabolic rate of LDL,
the main atherogenic lipoprotein. In addition, saturated
fatty acids cause the formation of smaller VLDL parti-
cles that contain relatively more cholesterol, and they
are utilized by extrahepatic tissues at a slower rate than
are larger particles—tendencies that may be regarded as
atherogenic.
Lifestyle Affects the Serum 
Cholesterol Level
Additional factors considered to play a part in coronary
heart disease include high blood pressure, smoking,
male gender, obesity (particularly abdominal obesity),
lack of exercise, and drinking soft as opposed to hard
water. Factors associated with elevation of plasma FFA
followed by increased output of triacylglycerol and cho-
228 / CHAPTER 26
lesterol into the circulation in VLDL include emotional
stress and coffee drinking. Premenopausal women ap-
pear to be protected against many of these deleterious
factors, and this is thought to be related to the benefi-
cial effects of estrogen. There is an association between
moderate alcohol consumption and a lower incidence
of coronary heart disease. This may be due to elevation
of HDL concentrations resulting from increased syn-
thesis of apo A-I and changes in activity of cholesteryl
ester transfer protein. It has been claimed that red wine
is particularly beneficial, perhaps because of its content
of antioxidants. Regular exercise lowers plasma LDL
Table 26–1. Primary disorders of plasma lipoproteins (dyslipoproteinemias).
Name
Defect
Remarks
Hypolipoproteinemias
No chylomicrons, VLDL, or LDL are 
Rare; blood acylglycerols low; intestine and liver 
Abetalipoproteinemia
formed because of defect in the 
accumulate acylglycerols. Intestinal malabsorp-
loading of apo B with lipid.
tion. Early death avoidable by administration of 
large doses of fat-soluble vitamins, particularly 
vitamin E.
Familial alpha-lipoprotein deficiency y All have low or near absence of HDL. . Tendency toward hypertriacylglycerolemia as a 
Tangier disease
result of absence of apo C-II, causing inactive 
Fish-eye disease
LPL. Low LDL levels. Atherosclerosis in the el-
Apo-A-I deficiencies
derly.
Hyperlipoproteinemias
Hypertriacylglycerolemia due to de- - Slow clearance of chylomicrons and VLDL. Low 
Familial lipoprotein lipase
ficiency of LPL, abnormal LPL, or apo levels of LDL and HDL. No increased risk of coro-
deficiency (type I)
C-II deficiency causing inactive LPL.
nary disease.
Familial hypercholesterolemia 
Defective LDL receptors or mutation n Elevated LDL levels and hypercholesterolemia, 
(type IIa)
in ligand region of apo B-100.
resulting in atherosclerosis and coronary disease.
Familial type IIIhyperlipoprotein-
Deficiency in remnant clearance by
Increase in chylomicron and VLDL remnants of 
emia (broad beta disease, rem-
the liver is due to abnormality in apo o density < 1.019 (β-VLDL). Causes hypercholes-
nant removal disease, familial 
E. Patients lack isoforms E3 and E4 
terolemia, xanthomas, and atherosclerosis.
dysbetalipoproteinemia)
and have only E2, which does not 
react with the E receptor.
1
Familial hypertriacylglycerolemia 
Overproduction of VLDL often 
Cholesterol levels rise with the VLDL concentra-
(type IV)
associated with glucose intolerance tion. LDL and HDL tend to be subnormal. This 
and hyperinsulinemia.
type of pattern is commonly associated with 
coronary heart disease, type IIdiabetes mellitus, 
obesity, alcoholism, and administration of 
progestational hormones.
Familial hyperalphalipoproteinemia a Increased concentrations of HDL.
A rare condition apparently beneficial to health 
and longevity.
Hepatic lipase deficiency
Deficiency of the enzyme leads to 
Patients have xanthomas and coronary heart 
accumulation of large triacylgly-
disease.
cerol-rich HDL and VLDLremnants.
Familial lecithin:cholesterol 
Absence of LCAT leads to block in 
Plasma concentrations of cholesteryl esters and 
acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency
reverse cholesterol transport. HDL 
lysolecithin are low. Present is an abnormal LDL 
remains as nascent disks incapable 
fraction, lipoprotein X, found also in patients 
of taking up and esterifying choles-
with cholestasis. VLDL is abnormal (β-VLDL).
terol.
Familial lipoprotein(a) excess
Lp(a) consists of 1 mol of LDL 
Premature coronary heart disease due to athero-
attached to 1 mol of apo(a). Apo(a) 
sclerosis, plus thrombosis due to inhibition of 
shows structural homologies to plas- - fibrinolysis.
minogen.
1There is an association between patients possessing the apo E4 allele and the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease. Apparently, apo E4 binds
more avidly to β-amyloid found in neuritic plaques.
but raises HDL. Triacylglycerol concentrations are also
reduced, due most likely to increased insulin sensitivity,
which enhances expression of lipoprotein lipase.
When Diet Changes Fail, Hypolipidemic
Drugs Will Reduce Serum Cholesterol
& Triacylglycerol
Significant reductions of plasma cholesterol can be ef-
fected medically by the use of cholestyramine resinor
surgically by the ileal exclusion operations. Both proce-
dures block the reabsorption of bile acids, causing in-
creased bile acid synthesis in the liver. This increases
cholesterol excretion and up-regulates LDL receptors,
lowering plasma cholesterol. Sitosterolis a hypocholes-
terolemic agent that acts by blocking the absorption of
cholesterol from the gastrointestinal tract.
Several drugs are known to block the formation of
cholesterol at various stages in the biosynthetic path-
way. The statinsinhibit HMG-CoA reductase, thus
up-regulating LDL receptors. Statins currently in use
include atorvastatin, simvastatin,and pravastatin.Fi-
brates such as clofibrateand gemfibrozilact mainly to
lower plasma triacylglycerols by decreasing the secretion
of triacylglycerol and cholesterol-containing VLDL by
the liver. In addition, they stimulate hydrolysis of
VLDL triacylglycerols by lipoprotein lipase. Probucol
appears to increase LDL catabolism via receptor-
independent pathways, but its antioxidant properties
may be more important in preventing accumulation of
oxidized LDL, which has enhanced atherogenic proper-
ties, in arterial walls. Nicotinic acidreduces the flux of
FFA by inhibiting adipose tissue lipolysis, thereby in-
hibiting VLDL production by the liver.
Primary Disorders of the Plasma
Lipoproteins (Dyslipoproteinemias) 
Are Inherited
Inherited defects in lipoprotein metabolism lead to the
primary condition of either hypo- or hyperlipopro-
teinemia(Table 26–1). In addition, diseases such as
diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, kidney disease
(nephrotic syndrome), and atherosclerosis are associ-
ated with secondary abnormal lipoprotein patterns that
are very similar to one or another of the primary inher-
ited conditions. Virtually all of the primary conditions
are due to a defect at a stage in lipoprotein formation,
transport, or destruction (see Figures 25–4, 26–5, and
26–6). Not all of the abnormalities are harmful.
SUMMARY
• Cholesterol is the precursor of all other steroids in
the body, eg, corticosteroids, sex hormones, bile
acids, and vitamin D. It also plays an important
structural role in membranes and in the outer layer of
lipoproteins.
• Cholesterol is synthesized in the body entirely from
acetyl-CoA. Three molecules of acetyl-CoA form
mevalonate via the important regulatory reaction for
the pathway, catalyzed by HMG-CoA reductase.
Next, a five-carbon isoprenoid unit is formed, and
six of these condense to form squalene. Squalene un-
dergoes cyclization to form the parent steroid lanos-
terol, which, after the loss of three methyl groups,
forms cholesterol.
• Cholesterol synthesis in the liver is regulated partly
by cholesterol in the diet. In tissues, cholesterol bal-
ance is maintained between the factors causing gain
of cholesterol (eg, synthesis, uptake via the LDL or
scavenger receptors) and the factors causing loss of
cholesterol (eg, steroid synthesis, cholesteryl ester for-
mation, excretion). The activity of the LDL receptor
is modulated by cellular cholesterol levels to achieve
this balance. In reverse cholesterol transport, HDL
(preβ-HDL, discoidal, or HDL
3
) takes up cholesterol
from the tissues and LCAT esterifies it and deposits
it in the core of HDL, which is converted to HDL
2
.
The cholesteryl ester in HDL
2
is taken up by the
liver, either directly or after transfer to VLDL, IDL,
or LDL via the cholesteryl ester transfer protein.
• Excess cholesterol is excreted from the liver in the
bile as cholesterol or bile salts. A large proportion of
bile salts is absorbed into the portal circulation and
returned to the liver as part of the enterohepatic cir-
culation.
• Elevated levels of cholesterol present in VLDL, IDL,
or LDL are associated with atherosclerosis, whereas
high levels of HDL have a protective effect.
• Inherited defects in lipoprotein metabolism lead to a
primary condition of hypo- or hyperlipoproteinemia.
Conditions such as diabetes mellitus, hypothy-
roidism, kidney disease, and atherosclerosis exhibit
secondary abnormal lipoprotein patterns that resem-
ble certain primary conditions.
REFERENCES
Illingworth DR: Management of hypercholesterolemia. Med Clin
North Am 2000;84:23.
Ness GC, Chambers CM: Feedback and hormonal regulation of
hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase:
the concept of cholesterol buffering capacity. Proc Soc Exp
Biol Med 2000;224:8.
Parks DJ et al: Bile acids: natural ligands for a nuclear orphan re-
ceptor. Science 1999;284:1365. 
Princen HMG: Regulation of bile acid synthesis. Curr Pharm De-
sign 1997;3:59.
CHOLESTEROL SYNTHESIS, TRANSPORT, & EXCRETION / 229
230 / CHAPTER 26
Russell DW: Cholesterol biosynthesis and metabolism. Cardiovas-
cular Drugs Therap 1992;6:103.
Spady DK, Woollett LA, Dietschy JM: Regulation of plasma LDL-
cholesterol levels by dietary cholesterol and fatty acids. Annu
Rev Nutr 1993;13:355.
Tall A: Plasma lipid transfer proteins. Annu Rev Biochem 1995;
64:235.
Various authors: Biochemistry of Lipids, Lipoproteins and Mem-
branes.Vance DE, Vance JE (editors). Elsevier, 1996.
Various authors: The cholesterol facts. A summary of the evidence
relating dietary fats, serum cholesterol, and coronary heart
disease. Circulation 1990;81:1721.
Zhang FL, Casey PJ: Protein prenylation: Molecular mechanisms
and functional consequences. Annu Rev Biochem 1996;
65:241. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested