asp.net mvc generate pdf : Batch pdf to jpg software Library cloud windows asp.net wpf class Harper%27s%20Illustrated%20Biochemistry%20-%20Robert%20K.%20Murray,%20Darryl%20K.%20Granner,%20Peter%20A.%20Mayes,%20Victor%20W.%20Rodwell27-part585

CATABOLISM OF THE CARBON SKELETONS OF AMINO ACIDS / 261
β-Methylcrotonyl-CoA
Biotinyl-*CO
2
Biotin
C
C
S
CH
H
3
C
O
CoA
CH
3
β-Methylglutaconyl-CoA
C
C
S
O
CH
CH
2
O
C*
O
4L
CoA
CH
3
β-Hydroxy-β-methylglutaryl-CoA
C
S
O
CH
2
H
2
O
CH
2
O
C*
O
CoA
H
3
C
OH
Acetoacetate
Acetyl-CoA
C
S
O
H
3
C
CH
2
O
C*
O
CoA
C
CH
3
O
5L
6L
Figure 30–20.
Catabolism of the β-methylcrotonyl-
CoA formed from 
L
-leucine. Asterisks indicate carbon
atoms derived from CO
2
.
Acetyl-CoA
C
S
H
3
C
O
C
H
3
C
O
CoA
C
S
CH
2
O
CoA
C
S
CH
O
CoA
CH
3
Propionyl-CoA
α-Methylacetoacetyl-CoA
α-Methyl-β-hydroxybutyryl-CoA
Tiglyl-CoA
+
CoASH
C
H
3
C
O
H
H
C
S
CH
O
CoA
H
2
O
[2H]
CH
3
CH
3
C
H
3
C
C
S
CH
O
CoA
CH
3
4I
5I
6I
Figure 30–21.
Subsequent catabolism of the tiglyl-
CoA formed from 
L
-isoleucine.
Convert pdf file to jpg file - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
change pdf to jpg file; changing file from pdf to jpg
Convert pdf file to jpg file - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf images to jpg; change pdf to jpg online
262 / CHAPTER 30
CH
C
C
CH
3
O
H C
2
Methacrylyl-CoA
4V
C
CH
3
O
H C
2
β-Hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA
HO
H
2
O
5V
CoASH
C
CH
3
O
O
H C
2
β-Hydroxyisobutyrate
HO
CH
6V
NADH + H
+
NAD
+
C
CH
3
O
O
HC
O
CH
Methylmalonate semialdehyde
8V
NADH + H
+
NAD
+
7V
α-AA
α-KA
C
CH
3
O
O
H C
2
β-Aminoisobutyrate
NH
O
CH
3
+
CH
2
C
CH
3
O
C
Methylmalonyl-CoA
O
CH
9V
B
12
COENZYME
C
Succinyl-CoA
O
O
H
2
C
C
O
CoASH
S
CoA
S
CoA
S
CoA
S
CoA
H
2
O
Figure 30–22.
Subsequent catabolism of the
methacrylyl-CoA formed from 
L
-valine (see Figure
30–19). (α-KA, α-keto acid; α-AA, α-amino acid.)
isovaleryl-CoA is hydrolyzed to isovalerate and ex-
creted.
SUMMARY
• Excess amino acids are catabolized to amphibolic in-
termediates used as sources of energy or for carbohy-
drate and lipid biosynthesis.
• Transamination is the most common initial reaction
of amino acid catabolism. Subsequent reactions re-
move any additional nitrogen and restructure the hy-
drocarbon skeleton for conversion to oxaloacetate, 
α-ketoglutarate, pyruvate, and acetyl-CoA.
• Metabolic diseases associated with glycine catabolism
include glycinuria and primary hyperoxaluria.
• Two distinct pathways convert cysteine to pyruvate.
Metabolic disorders of cysteine catabolism include
cystine-lysinuria, cystine storage disease, and the ho-
mocystinurias.
• Threonine catabolism merges with that of glycine
after threonine aldolase cleaves threonine to glycine
and acetaldehyde.
• Following transamination, the carbon skeleton of ty-
rosine is degraded to fumarate and acetoacetate.
Metabolic diseases of tyrosine catabolism include ty-
rosinosis, Richner-Hanhart syndrome, neonatal ty-
rosinemia, and alkaptonuria.
• Metabolic disorders of phenylalanine catabolism in-
clude phenylketonuria (PKU) and several hyper-
phenylalaninemias.
• Neither nitrogen of lysine undergoes transamination.
Metabolic diseases of lysine catabolism include peri-
odic and persistent forms of hyperlysinemia-
ammonemia. 
• The catabolism of leucine, valine, and isoleucine pre-
sents many analogies to fatty acid catabolism. Meta-
bolic disorders of branched-chain amino acid catabo-
lism include hypervalinemia, maple syrup urine
disease, intermittent branched-chain ketonuria, iso-
valeric acidemia, and methylmalonic aciduria.
REFERENCES
Blacher J, Safar ME: Homocysteine, folic acid, B vitamins and car-
diovascular risk. J Nutr Health Aging 2001;5:196.
Cooper AJL: Biochemistry of the sulfur-containing amino acids.
Annu Rev Biochem 1983;52:187.
Gjetting T et al: A phenylalanine hydroxylase amino acid polymor-
phism with implications for molecular diagnostics. Mol
Genet Metab 2001;73:280.
Harris RA et al: Molecular cloning of the branched-chain α-ke-
toacid dehydrogenase kinase and the CoA-dependent methyl-
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start immediately to sort the files, try out some settings and then create the
c# convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
change pdf to jpg image; convert pdf file to jpg online
malonate semialdehyde dehydrogenase. Adv Enzyme Regul
1993;33:255.
Scriver CR: Garrod’s foresight; our hindsight. J Inherit Metab Dis
2001;24:93.
Scriver CR et al (editors): The Metabolic and Molecular Bases of In-
herited Disease,8th ed. McGraw-Hill, 2001.
Waters PJ, Scriver CR, Parniak MA: Homomeric and heteromeric
interactions between wild-type and mutant phenylalanine hy-
droxylase subunits: evaluation of two-hybrid approaches for
functional analysis of mutations causing hyperphenylalanine-
mia. Mol Genet Metab 2001;73:230.
CATABOLISM OF THE CARBON SKELETONS OF AMINO ACIDS / 263
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
VB.NET Components to combine various scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif, bmp, etc. Append one PDF file to the end of another one in VB.NET.
change format from pdf to jpg; changing pdf to jpg on
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif, bmp, etc. Merge Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF form. Append one PDF file to the end
.net convert pdf to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter for
264
Conversion of Amino Acids 
to Specialized Products
31
Victor W. Rodwell, PhD
BIOMEDICAL IMPORTANCE
Important products derived from amino acids include
heme, purines, pyrimidines, hormones, neurotransmit-
ters, and biologically active peptides. In addition, many
proteins contain amino acids that have been modified
for a specific function such as binding calcium or as in-
termediates that serve to stabilize proteins—generally
structural proteins—by subsequent covalent cross-link-
ing. The amino acid residues in those proteins serve as
precursors for these modified residues. Small peptides
or peptide-like molecules not synthesized on ribosomes
fulfill specific functions in cells. Histamine plays a cen-
tral role in many allergic reactions. Neurotransmitters
derived from amino acids include γ-aminobutyrate, 
5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin), dopamine, norepi-
nephrine, and epinephrine. Many drugs used to treat
neurologic and psychiatric conditions affect the metab-
olism of these neurotransmitters.
Glycine
Metabolites and pharmaceuticals excreted as water-
soluble glycine conjugates include glycocholic acid
(Chapter 24) and hippuric acid formed from the food
additive benzoate (Figure 31–1). Many drugs, drug
metabolites, and other compounds with carboxyl
groups are excreted in the urine as glycine conjugates.
Glycine is incorporated into creatine (see Figure 31–6),
the nitrogen and α-carbon of glycine are incorporated
into the pyrrole rings and the methylene bridge carbons
of heme (Chapter 32), and the entire glycine molecule
becomes atoms 4, 5, and 7 of purines (Figure 34–1).
β-Alanine
β-Alanine, a metabolite of cysteine (Figure 34–9), is
present in coenzyme A and as β-alanyl dipeptides, prin-
cipally carnosine (see below). Mammalian tissues form
β-alanine from cytosine (Figure 34–9), carnosine, and
anserine (Figure 31–2). Mammalian tissues transami-
nate β-alanine, forming malonate semialdehyde. Body
fluid and tissue levels of β-alanine, taurine, and 
β-aminoisobutyrate are elevated in the rare metabolic
disorder hyperbeta-alaninemia.
β-Alanyl Dipeptides
The β-alanyl dipeptides carnosine and anserine 
(N-methylcarnosine) (Figure 31–2) activate myosin
ATPase, chelate copper, and enhance copper uptake. 
β-Alanyl-imidazole buffers the pH of anaerobically
contracting skeletal muscle. Biosynthesis of carnosine is
catalyzed by carnosine synthetase in a two-stage reac-
tion that involves initial formation of an enzyme-bound
acyl-adenylate of β-alanine and subsequent transfer of
the β-alanyl moiety to 
L
-histidine.
Hydrolysis of carnosine to β-alanine and 
L
-histidine is
catalyzed by carnosinase. The heritable disorder
carnosinase deficiency is characterized by carnosinuria.
Homocarnosine (Figure 31–2), present in human
brain at higher levels than carnosine, is synthesized in
brain tissue by carnosine synthetase. Serum carnosinase
does not hydrolyze homocarnosine. Homocarnosinosis,
a rare genetic disorder, is associated with progressive
spastic paraplegia and mental retardation.
Phosphorylated Serine, Threonine, 
& Tyrosine
The phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of seryl,
threonyl, and tyrosyl residues regulate the activity of
certain enzymes of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism
and the properties of proteins that participate in signal
transduction cascades.
Methionine
S-Adenosylmethionine, the principal source of methyl
groups in the body, also contributes its carbon skeleton
for the biosynthesis of the 3-diaminopropane portions
of the polyamines spermine and spermidine (Figure
31–4).
ATP
Alanine
Alanyl AMP
PP
Alanyl AMP
Histidine
Carno
e AMP
i
L
+
→+
+
+
β
β
β
-
-
-
-
sin
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
C# Create PDF from Raster Images, .NET Graphics and REImage File with XDoc Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp
convert pdf pages to jpg online; convert pdf pages to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
convert pdf to jpg converter; convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi
CONVERSION OF AMINO ACIDS TO SPECIALIZED PRODUCTS / 265
CoASH
ATP
AMP + PP
i
Glycine
CoASH
C
O
O
C
O
Benzoate
C
CH
2
O
C
O
N
H
Hippurate
Benzoyl-CoA
S
CoA
O
Figure 31–1.
Biosynthesis of hippurate. Analogous
reactions occur with many acidic drugs and catabolites.
SH
NH
2
+
N
CH
C
CH
2
O
N
O
+
Ergothioneine
NH
2
+
N
CH
C
CH
2
O
NH
O
Carnosine
C
NH
3
+
CH
2
CH
2
O
NH
2
+
N
CH
C
CH
2
O
NH
O
Homocarnosine
C
CH
2
CH
2
CH
2
NH
3
+
O
N
H
N
CH
C
CH
2
O
NH
O
Anserine
C
NH
3
+
CH
2
CH
3
CH
2
O
+
(CH
3
)
3
Figure 31–2.
Compounds related to histidine. The
boxes surround the components not derived from histi-
dine. The SH group of ergothioneine derives from cys-
teine.
Cysteine
L
-Cysteine is a precursor of the thioethanolamine por-
tion of coenzyme A and of the taurine that conjugates
with bile acids such as taurocholic acid (Chapter 26).
Histidine
Decarboxylation of histidine to histamine is catalyzed by
a broad-specificity aromatic 
L
-amino acid decarboxylase
that also catalyzes the decarboxylation of dopa, 5-hy-
droxytryptophan, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and trypto-
phan. α-Methyl amino acids, which inhibit decarboxy-
lase activity, find application as antihypertensive agents.
Histidine compounds present in the human body in-
clude ergothioneine, carnosine, and dietary anserine
(Figure 31–2). Urinary levels of 3-methylhistidine are
unusually low in patients with Wilson’s disease.
Ornithine & Arginine
Arginine is the formamidine donor for creatine synthe-
sis (Figure 31–6) and via ornithine to putrescine, sper-
mine, and spermidine (Figure 31–3) Arginine is also
the precursor of the intercellular signaling molecule ni-
tric oxide (NO) that serves as a neurotransmitter,
smooth muscle relaxant, and vasodilator. Synthesis of
NO, catalyzed by NO synthase, involves the NADPH-
dependent reaction of 
L
-arginine with O
2
to yield 
L
-cit-
rulline and NO.
Polyamines
The polyamines spermidine and spermine (Figure
31–4) function in cell proliferation and growth, are
growth factors for cultured mammalian cells, and stabi-
lize intact cells, subcellular organelles, and membranes.
Pharmacologic doses of polyamines are hypothermic
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Dicom Image File to Raster Images
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code convert dicom file all pages to jpg images.
batch pdf to jpg; convert pdf page to jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF documents to multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage. Turn multipage PDF file into image
changing pdf to jpg; convert pdf image to jpg
266 / CHAPTER 31
ARGININE
ORNITHINE
PROLINE
GLUTAMATE
PUTRESCINE,
SPERMIDINE,
SPERMINE
UREA
CREATINE
PHOSPHATE,
CREATININE
PROTEINS
ARGININE
PHOSPHATE
NITRIC OXIDE
Glutamate-γ-
semialdehyde
PROTEINS
Figure 31–3.
Arginine, ornithine, and proline metabolism. Reactions with solid ar-
rows all occur in mammalian tissues. Putrescine and spermine synthesis occurs in
both mammals and bacteria. Arginine phosphate of invertebrate muscle functions
asa phosphagen analogous to creatine phosphate of mammalian muscle (see
Figure31–6).
and hypotensive. Since they bear multiple positive
charges, polyamines associate readily with DNA and
RNA. Figure 31–4 summarizes polyamine biosynthesis.
Tryptophan
Following hydroxylation of tryptophan to 5-hydroxy-
tryptophan by liver tyrosine hydroxylase, subsequent
decarboxylation forms serotonin (5-hydroxytrypta-
SPERMINE
SYNTHASE
+
H
3
N
H
2
+
N
NH
3
+
Spermidine
Decarboxylated
S
-adenosylmethionine
Methylthio-
adenosine
+
H
3
N
H
2
+
N
N
H
2
+
NH
3
+
Spermine
Figure 31–4.
Conversion of spermidine to spermine.
Spermidine formed from putrescine (decarboxylated 
L
-ornithine) by transfer of a propylamine moiety from
decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine accepts a 
second propylamine moiety to form spermidine.
mine), a potent vasoconstrictor and stimulator of
smooth muscle contraction. Catabolism of serotonin is
initiated by monoamine oxidase-catalyzed oxidative
deamination to 5-hydroxyindoleacetate. The psychic
stimulation that follows administration of iproniazid
results from its ability to prolong the action of sero-
tonin by inhibiting monoamine oxidase. In carcinoid
(argentaffinoma), tumor cells overproduce serotonin.
Urinary metabolites of serotonin in patients with carci-
CONVERSION OF AMINO ACIDS TO SPECIALIZED PRODUCTS / 267
H
4
biopterin
H
2
biopterin
S
-Adenosylmethionine
S
-Adenosylhomocysteine
O
2
Cu
2
+
Vitamin C
CO
2
L
-Tyrosine
OH
HO
CH
C
CH
2
O
NH
3
+
O
Dopa
PLP
HO
CH
C
CH
2
O
NH
3
+
O
TYROSINE
HYDROXYLASE
DOPA
DECARBOXYLASE
OH
Dopamine
HO
CH
2
DOPAMINE
β-OXIDASE
CH
2
NH
3
+
OH
Norepinephrine
HO
PHENYLETHANOL-
AMINE 
N
-METHYL-
TRANSFERASE
CH
2
NH
3
+
CH
OH
OH
Epinephrine
HO
N
H
2
+
CH
2
CH
3
CH
OH
Figure 31–5.
Conversion of tyrosine to epinephrine
and norepinephrine in neuronal and adrenal cells. (PLP,
pyridoxal phosphate.)
noid include N-acetylserotonin glucuronide and the
glycine conjugate of 5-hydroxyindoleacetate. Serotonin
and 5-methoxytryptamine are metabolized to the corre-
sponding acids by monoamine oxidase. N-Acetylation
of serotonin, followed by O-methylation in the pineal
body, forms melatonin. Circulating melatonin is taken
up by all tissues, including brain, but is rapidly metabo-
lized by hydroxylation followed by conjugation with
sulfate or with glucuronic acid.
Kidney tissue, liver tissue, and fecal bacteria all con-
vert tryptophan to tryptamine, then to indole 3-acetate.
The principal normal urinary catabolites of tryptophan
are 5-hydroxyindoleacetate and indole 3-acetate.
Tyrosine
Neural cells convert tyrosine to epinephrine and norepi-
nephrine (Figure 31–5). While dopa is also an interme-
diate in the formation of melanin, different enzymes
hydroxylate tyrosine in melanocytes. Dopa decarboxy-
lase, a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzyme, forms
dopamine. Subsequent hydroxylation by dopamine 
β-oxidase then forms norepinephrine. In the adrenal
medulla, phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase uti-
lizes S-adenosylmethionine to methylate the primary
amine of norepinephrine, forming epinephrine (Figure
31–5). Tyrosine is also a precursor of triiodothyronine
and thyroxine (Chapter 42).
Creatinine
Creatinine is formed in muscle from creatine phosphate
by irreversible, nonenzymatic dehydration and loss of
phosphate (Figure 31–6). The 24-hour urinary excre-
tion of creatinine is proportionate to muscle mass.
Glycine, arginine, and methionine all participate in cre-
atine biosynthesis. Synthesis of creatine is completed by
methylation of guanidoacetate by S-adenosylmethio-
nine (Figure 31–6).
γ-Aminobutyrate
γ-Aminobutyrate (GABA) functions in brain tissue as
an inhibitory neurotransmitter by altering transmem-
brane potential differences. It is formed by decarboxyla-
tion of 
L
-glutamate, a reaction catalyzed by 
L
-glutamate
decarboxylase (Figure 31–7). Transamination of γ-
aminobutyrate forms succinate semialdehyde (Figure
31–7), which may then undergo reduction to γ-hydroxy-
butyrate, a reaction catalyzed by 
L
-lactate dehydro-
genase, or oxidation to succinate and thence via the cit-
ric acid cycle to CO
2
and H
2
O. A rare genetic disorder
of GABA metabolism involves a defective GABA amino-
transferase, an enzyme that participates in the catabo-
lism of GABA subsequent to its postsynaptic release in
brain tissue.
L
-Arginine
Creatinine
Glycine
Ornithine
Glycocyamine
(guanidoacetate)
ARGININE-GLYCINE
TRANSAMIDINASE
GUANIDOACETATE
METHYLTRANSFERASE
(Kidney)
NONENZYMATIC
IN MUSCLE
(Liver)
CH
2
CH
2
CH
2
CH
2
C
+
H
3
N
NH
3
+
H
COO
COO
C
H
2
N
NH
2
+
NH
C
H
2
N
NH
2
+
HN
CH
2
COO
Creatine phosphate
C
HN
NH
N
CH
2
COO
C
HN
H
N
N
C
O
ATP
S
-Adenosyl-
methionine
ADP
S
-Adenosyl-
homocysteine
P
i
+ H
2
O
CH
3
P
CH
3
CH
2
Figure 31–6.
Biosynthesis and metabolism of creatine and creatinine.
L
-Glutamate
LACTATE
DEHYDROGENASE
L
-GLUTAMATE
DECARBOXYLASE
SUCCINIC
SEMIALDEHYDE
DEHYDROGENASE
TRANSAMINASE
γ-Aminobutyrate
CH
2
+
H
3
N
CH
2
CH
2
COO
CH
2
CH
2
C
NH
3
+
H
COO
COO
α-Ketoglutarate
CH
2
CH
2
C
O
COO
COO
γ-Hydroxybutyrate
CH
2
CH
2
CH
2
OH
COO
Succinate semialdehyde
COO
NAD
+
NADH + H
+
Succinate
CH
2
CH
2
COO
COO
CH
2
C
H
CH
2
H
2
O
NADH + H
+
O
[O]
[NH
4
+
]
CO
2
CO
2
PLP
PLP
α-KA
α-AA
NAD
+
Figure 31–7.
Metabolism of γ-aminobutyrate. (α-KA, α-keto acids; α-AA, α-amino acids; PLP, pyri-
doxal phosphate.)
268
SUMMARY
• In addition to their roles in proteins and polypep-
tides, amino acids participate in a wide variety of ad-
ditional biosynthetic processes.
• Glycine participates in the biosynthesis of heme,
purines, and creatine and is conjugated to bile acids
and to the urinary metabolites of many drugs.
• In addition to its roles in phospholipid and sphingo-
sine biosynthesis, serine provides carbons 2 and 8 of
purines and the methyl group of thymine.
• S-Adenosylmethionine, the methyl group donor for
many biosynthetic processes, also participates directly
in spermine and spermidine biosynthesis.
• Glutamate and ornithine form the neurotransmitter
γ-aminobutyrate (GABA).
• The thioethanolamine of coenzyme A and the tau-
rine of taurocholic acid arise from cysteine.
• Decarboxylation of histidine forms histamine, and
several dipeptides are derived from histidine and 
β-alanine.
• Arginine serves as the formamidine donor for crea-
tine biosynthesis, participates in polyamine biosyn-
thesis, and provides the nitrogen of nitric oxide
(NO).
• Important tryptophan metabolites include serotonin,
melanin, and melatonin.
• Tyrosine forms both epinephrine and norepineph-
rine, and its iodination forms thyroid hormone.
REFERENCE
Scriver CR et al (editors): The Metabolic and Molecular Bases of
Inherited Disease,8th ed. McGraw-Hill, 2001.
CONVERSION OF AMINO ACIDS TO SPECIALIZED PRODUCTS / 269
BIOMEDICAL IMPORTANCE
The biochemistry of the porphyrins and of the bile pig-
ments is presented in this chapter. These topics are
closely related, because heme is synthesized from por-
phyrins and iron, and the products of degradation of
heme are the bile pigments and iron.
Knowledge of the biochemistry of the porphyrins
and of heme is basic to understanding the varied func-
tions of hemoproteins (see below) in the body. The
porphyriasare a group of diseases caused by abnormal-
ities in the pathway of biosynthesis of the various por-
phyrins. Although porphyrias are not very prevalent,
physicians must be aware of them. A much more preva-
lent clinical condition is jaundice,due to elevation of
bilirubin in the plasma. This elevation is due to over-
production of bilirubin or to failure of its excretion and
is seen in numerous diseases ranging from hemolytic
anemias to viral hepatitis and to cancer of the pancreas.
METALLOPORPHYRINS 
& HEMOPROTEINS ARE 
IMPORTANT IN NATURE
Porphyrins are cyclic compounds formed by the linkage
of four pyrrole rings through HC
methenyl
bridges (Figure 32–1). A characteristic property of the
porphyrins is the formation of complexes with metal
ions bound to the nitrogen atom of the pyrrole rings.
Examples are the iron porphyrinssuch as hemeof he-
moglobin and the magnesium-containing porphyrin
chlorophyll,the photosynthetic pigment of plants.
Proteins that contain heme (hemoproteins) are
widely distributed in nature. Examples of their impor-
tance in humans and animals are listed in Table 32–1.
Natural Porphyrins Have Substituent Side
Chains on the Porphin Nucleus
The porphyrins found in nature are compounds in
which various side chainsare substituted for the eight
hydrogen atoms numbered in the porphin nucleus
shown in Figure 32–1. As a simple means of showing
these substitutions, Fischer proposed a shorthand for-
mula in which the methenyl bridges are omitted and
each pyrrole ring is shown as indicated with the eight
substituent positions numbered as shown in Figure
32–2. Various porphyrins are represented in Figures
32–2, 32–3, and 32–4.
The arrangement of the acetate (A) and propionate
(P) substituents in the uroporphyrin shown in Figure
32–2 is asymmetric (in ring IV, the expected order of
the A and P substituents is reversed). A porphyrin with
this type of asymmetric substitution is classified as a
type III porphyrin. A porphyrin with a completely sym-
metric arrangement of the substituents is classified as a
type I porphyrin. Only types I and III are found in na-
ture, and the type III series is far more abundant (Figure
32–3)—and more important because it includes heme.
Heme and its immediate precursor, protoporphyrin
IX (Figure 32–4), are both type III porphyrins (ie, the
methyl groups are asymmetrically distributed, as in type
III coproporphyrin). However, they are sometimes
identified as belonging to series IX, because they were
designated ninth in a series of isomers postulated by
Hans Fischer, the pioneer worker in the field of por-
phyrin chemistry.
HEME IS SYNTHESIZED FROM 
SUCCINYL-COA & GLYCINE
Heme is synthesized in living cells by a pathway that has
been much studied. The two starting materials are suc-
cinyl-CoA,derived from the citric acid cycle in mito-
chondria, and the amino acid glycine.Pyridoxal phos-
phate is also necessary in this reaction to “activate”
glycine. The product of the condensation reaction be-
tween succinyl-CoA and glycine is α-amino-β-ketoadipic
acid, which is rapidly decarboxylated to form α-amino-
levulinate (ALA) (Figure 32–5). This reaction sequence
is catalyzed by ALA synthase,the rate-controlling en-
zyme in porphyrin biosynthesis in mammalian liver.
Synthesis of ALA occurs in mitochondria. In the cy-
tosol, two molecules of ALA are condensed by the en-
zyme ALA dehydrataseto form two molecules of water
and one of porphobilinogen(PBG) (Figure 32–5). ALA
dehydratase is a zinc-containing enzyme and is sensitive
to inhibition by lead,as can occur in lead poisoning.
The formation of a cyclic tetrapyrrole—ie, a por-
phyrin—occurs by condensation of four molecules of
PBG (Figure 32–6). These four molecules condense in a
head-to-tail manner to form a linear tetrapyrrole, hy-
Porphyrins & Bile Pigments
32
270
Robert K. Murray, MD, PhD
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested