asp.net mvc generate pdf : Change pdf file to jpg control Library utility azure .net html visual studio Harper%27s%20Illustrated%20Biochemistry%20-%20Robert%20K.%20Murray,%20Darryl%20K.%20Granner,%20Peter%20A.%20Mayes,%20Victor%20W.%20Rodwell28-part586

PORPHYRINS & BILE PIGMENTS / 271
C
2
C
C
CH
C
H
H
1
N
I
α
δ
HC
HC
8
HC
HC
7
C
C
NH
IV
γ
C
C
C
C
CH
5
H
H
6
N
III
β
CH
CH
3
4
C
C
HN
I
I
CH
HC
HC
CH
N
H
N
Porphin
(C
20
H
14
N
4
)
Pyrrole
Figure 32–1.
The porphin molecule. Rings are la-
beled I, II, III, and IV. Substituent positions on the rings
are labeled 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8. The methenyl
bridges (HC
) are labeled α, β, γ, and δ.
8
3
4
7
2
1
5
6
I
II
IV
III
A
A
P
P
P
A
A
P
I
II
IV
III
Figure 32–2.
Uroporphyrin III. A (acetate) =
CH
2
COOH; P (propionate) = CH
2
CH
2
COOH.
droxymethylbilane (HMB). The reaction is catalyzed by
uroporphyrinogen I synthase, also named PBG deami-
nase or HMB synthase. HMB cyclizes spontaneously to
form uroporphyrinogen I (left-hand side of Figure
32–6) or is converted to uroporphyrinogen IIIby the
action of uroporphyrinogen III synthase (right-hand side
of Figure 32–6). Under normal conditions, the uropor-
phyrinogen formed is almost exclusively the III isomer,
but in certain of the porphyrias (discussed below), the
type I isomers of porphyrinogens are formed in excess.
Note that both of these uroporphyrinogens have
the pyrrole rings connected by methylene bridges
(CH
), which do not form a conjugated ring sys-
tem. Thus, these compounds are colorless (as are all
porphyrinogens). However, the porphyrinogens are
readily auto-oxidized to their respective colored por-
phyrins. These oxidations are catalyzed by light and by
the porphyrins that are formed.
Uroporphyrinogen III is converted to copropor-
phyrinogen III by decarboxylation of all of the acetate
(A) groups, which changes them to methyl (M) sub-
stituents. The reaction is catalyzed by uroporphyrino-
gen decarboxylase,which is also capable of converting
uroporphyrinogen I to coproporphyrinogen I (Figure
32–7). Coproporphyrinogen III then enters the mito-
chondria, where it is converted to protoporphyrinogen
IIIand then to protoporphyrin III.Several steps are
involved in this conversion. The mitochondrial enzyme
coproporphyrinogen oxidasecatalyzes the decarboxy-
lation and oxidation of two propionic side chains to
form protoporphyrinogen. This enzyme is able to act
only on type III coproporphyrinogen, which would ex-
plain why type I protoporphyrins do not generally occur
in nature. The oxidation of protoporphyrinogen to pro-
toporphyrin is catalyzed by another mitochondrial en-
zyme, protoporphyrinogen oxidase. In mammalian
liver, the conversion of coproporphyrinogen to proto-
porphyrin requires molecular oxygen.
Formation of Heme Involves Incorporation
of Iron Into Protoporphyrin
The final step in heme synthesis involves the incorpora-
tion of ferrous iron into protoporphyrin in a reaction
catalyzed by ferrochelatase (heme synthase),another
mitochondrial enzyme (Figure 32–4). 
A summary of the steps in the biosynthesis of the
porphyrin derivatives from PBG is given in Figure
32–8. The last three enzymes in the pathway and ALA
synthase are located in the mitochondrion, whereas the
other enzymes are cytosolic. Both erythroid and non-
erythroid (“housekeeping”) forms of the first four en-
zymes are found. Heme biosynthesis occurs in most
mammalian cells with the exception of mature erythro-
cytes, which do not contain mitochondria. However,
Table 32–1. Examples of some important human
and animal hemoproteins.
1
Protein
Function
Hemoglobin
Transport of oxygen in blood
Myoglobin
Storage of oxygen in muscle
Cytochrome c
Involvement in electron transport chain
Cytochrome P450 0 Hydroxylation of xenobiotics
Catalase
Degradation of hydrogen peroxide
Tryptophan 
Oxidation of trypotophan
pyrrolase
1
The functions of the above proteins are described in various
chapters of this text.
Change pdf to jpg online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
bulk pdf to jpg converter online; convert pdf to jpg batch
Change pdf to jpg online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
conversion of pdf to jpg; change from pdf to jpg on
272 / CHAPTER 32
A
P
P
A
A
P
Uroporphyrin I
Uroporphyrin III
Coproporphyrin I
Coproporphyrin III
Uroporphyrins were first
found in the urine, but they
are not restricted to urine.
Coproporphyrins were first
isolated from feces, but they
are also found in urine.
P
A
M
P
P
M
M
P
P
M
M
P
P
M
M
P
M
P
A
P
P
A
A
P
A
P
Figure 32–3.
Uroporphyrins and coproporphyrins. A (acetate); P (propionate); M
(methyl) = CH
3
; V (vinyl) = CHCH
2
.
approximately 85% of heme synthesis occurs in eryth-
roid precursor cells in the bone marrowand the major-
ity of the remainder in hepatocytes.
The porphyrinogens described above are colorless,
containing six extra hydrogen atoms as compared with
the corresponding colored porphyrins. These reduced
porphyrins (the porphyrinogens) and not the corre-
sponding porphyrins are the actual intermediates in the
biosynthesis of protoporphyrin and of heme.
ALA Synthase Is the Key Regulatory
Enzyme in Hepatic Biosynthesis of Heme
ALA synthase occurs in both hepatic (ALAS1) and ery-
throid (ALAS2) forms. The rate-limiting reaction in the
synthesis of heme in liver is that catalyzed by ALAS1
(Figure 32–5), a regulatory enzyme. It appears that
heme, probably acting through an aporepressor mole-
cule, acts as a negative regulator of the synthesis of
ALAS1. This repression-derepression mechanism is de-
picted diagrammatically in Figure 32–9. Thus, the rate
of synthesis of ALAS1 increases greatly in the absence
of heme and is diminished in its presence. The turnover
rate of ALAS1 in rat liver is normally rapid (half-life
about 1 hour), a common feature of an enzyme catalyz-
ing a rate-limiting reaction. Heme also affects transla-
tion of the enzyme and its transfer from the cytosol to
the mitochondrion. 
Many drugs when administered to humans can re-
sult in a marked increase in ALAS1. Most of these
drugs are metabolized by a system in the liver that uti-
lizes a specific hemoprotein, cytochrome P450 (see
Chapter 53). During their metabolism, the utilization
of heme by cytochrome P450 is greatly increased,
which in turn diminishes the intracellular heme con-
centration. This latter event effects a derepression of
ALAS1 with a corresponding increased rate of heme
synthesis to meet the needs of the cells. 
M
M
V
P
V
M
M
P
M
M
V
P
V
M
M
P
Fe
2
+
Protoporphyrin III (IX)
(parent porphyrin of heme)
Heme
(prosthetic group of hemoglobin)
FERROCHELATASE
Fe
2
+
Figure 32–4.
Addition of iron to protoporphyrin to form heme.
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
changing pdf file to jpg; reader pdf to jpeg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert pdf to jpg for; convert multiple page pdf to jpg
PORPHYRINS & BILE PIGMENTS / 273
CH
2
CH
2
C
O
COOH
S
CoA
H
+
C
COOH
NH
2
H
CH
2
CH
2
C
O
COOH
C
COOH
NH
2
H
CH
2
CH
2
C
O
COOH
C
H
NH
2
H
Glycine
Succinyl-CoA
(“active”
succinate)
ALA
SYNTHASE
CoA • SH
Two molecules of
δ-aminolevulinate
Porphobilinogen
(first precursor pyrrole)
CH
2
NH
2
CH
2
CH
2
C
O
COOH
H
H
CH
2
CH
2
H
NH
C
O
C
COOH
C
C
C
CH
CH
2
N
H
CH
2
CH
2
COOH
CH
2
COOH
NH
2
ALA
DEHYDRATASE
2H
2
O
ALA
SYNTHASE
CO
2
δ-Aminolevulinate (ALA)
α-Amino-β-ketoadipate
Pyridoxal
phosphate
Figure 32–5.
Biosynthesis of porphobilinogen. ALA synthase occurs in the mitochon-
dria, whereas ALA dehydratase is present in the cytosol.
Several factors affect drug-mediated derepression of
ALAS1 in liver—eg, the administration of glucose can
prevent it, as can the administration of hematin (an ox-
idized form of heme). 
The importance of some of these regulatory mecha-
nisms is further discussed below when the porphyrias
are described.
Regulation of the erythroidform of ALAS (ALAS2)
differs from that of ALAS1. For instance, it is not in-
duced by the drugs that affect ALAS1, and it does not
undergo feedback regulation by heme. 
PORPHYRINS ARE COLORED 
& FLUORESCE
The various porphyrinogens are colorless, whereas the
various porphyrins are all colored. In the study of por-
phyrins or porphyrin derivatives, the characteristic ab-
sorption spectrum that each exhibits—in both the visible
and the ultraviolet regions of the spectrum—is of great
value. An example is the absorption curve for a solution
of porphyrin in 5% hydrochloric acid (Figure 32–10).
Note particularly the sharp absorption band near 400
nm. This is a distinguishing feature of the porphin ring
and is characteristic of all porphyrins regardless of the
side chains present. This band is termed the Soret band
after its discoverer, the French physicist Charles Soret. 
When porphyrins dissolved in strong mineral acids
or in organic solvents are illuminated by ultraviolet
light, they emit a strong red fluorescence.This fluores-
cence is so characteristic that it is often used to detect
small amounts of free porphyrins. The double bonds
joining the pyrrole rings in the porphyrins are responsi-
ble for the characteristic absorption and fluorescence of
these compounds; these double bonds are absent in the
porphyrinogens.
An interesting application of the photodynamic
properties of porphyrins is their possible use in the
treatment of certain types of cancer, a procedure called
cancer phototherapy.Tumors often take up more por-
phyrins than do normal tissues. Thus, hematopor-
phyrin or other related compounds are administered to
a patient with an appropriate tumor. The tumor is then
exposed to an argon laser, which excites the porphyrins,
producing cytotoxic effects.
Spectrophotometry Is Used to Test 
for Porphyrins & Their Precursors
Coproporphyrins and uroporphyrins are of clinical in-
terest because they are excreted in increased amounts in
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg. C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion.
convert .pdf to .jpg online; pdf to jpeg converter
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. C:\input.tif"; String outputDirectory = @"C:\output\"; // Convert tiff to jpg and show How to change Tiff image to Bmp image in your C#
change from pdf to jpg; batch pdf to jpg converter online
274 / CHAPTER 32
HOOC
COOH
CH
2
CH
2
H
2
C
C
C
CH
C
H
N
H
2
C
NH
2
Four molecules of
porphobilinogen
NH
3
4
Hydroxymethylbilane
(linear tetrapyrrole)
C
C
C
C
H
N
H
2
C
A
P
C
C
C
C
H
N
A
P
C
C
C
C
H
N
H
2
C
P
C
C
C
C
H
N
A
P
A
CH
2
CH
2
IV
III
C
C
C
C
H
N
H
2
C
A
P
C
C
C
C
H
N
A
P
C
C
C
C
H
N
H
2
C
P
C
C
C
C
H
N
A
P
A
CH
2
CH
2
IV
III
Type III
uroporphyrinogen
Type I
uroporphyrinogen
I
II
I
II
P
A
UROPORPHYRINOGEN I
SYNTHASE
UROPORPHYRINOGEN III
SYNTHASE
SPONTANEOUS
CYCLIZATION
Figure 32–6.
Conversion of porphobilinogen to uro-
porphyrinogens. Uroporphyrinogen synthase I is also
called porphobilinogen (PBG) deaminase or hydroxy-
methylbilane (HMB) synthase.
the porphyrias. These compounds, when present in
urine or feces, can be separated from each other by ex-
traction with appropriate solvent mixtures. They can
then be identified and quantified using spectrophoto-
metric methods.
ALA and PBG can also be measured in urine by ap-
propriate colorimetric tests.
THE PORPHYRIAS ARE GENETIC
DISORDERS OF HEME METABOLISM
The porphyriasare a group of disorders due to abnor-
malities in the pathway of biosynthesis of heme; they
can be genetic or acquired. They are not prevalent, but
it is important to consider them in certain circum-
stances (eg, in the differential diagnosis of abdominal
pain and of a variety of neuropsychiatric findings); oth-
erwise, patients will be subjected to inappropriate treat-
ments. It has been speculated that King George III had
a type of porphyria, which may account for his periodic
confinements in Windsor Castle and perhaps for some
of his views regarding American colonists. Also, the
photosensitivity(favoring nocturnal activities) and se-
vere disfigurementexhibited by some victims of con-
genital erythropoietic porphyria have led to the sugges-
tion that these individuals may have been the
prototypes of so-called werewolves. No evidence to sup-
port this notion has been adduced. 
Biochemistry Underlies the 
Causes, Diagnoses, & Treatments 
of the Porphyrias
Six major types of porphyria have been described, re-
sulting from depressions in the activities of enzymes 3
through 8 shown in Figure 32–9 (see also Table 32–2).
Assay of the activity of one or more of these enzymes
using an appropriate source (eg, red blood cells) is thus
important in making a definitive diagnosis in a sus-
pected case of porphyria. Individuals with low activities
of enzyme 1 (ALAS2) develop anemia, not porphyria
(see Table 32–2). Patients with low activities of enzyme
2 (ALA dehydratase) have been reported, but very
rarely; the resulting condition is called ALA dehy-
dratase-deficient porphyria. 
In general, the porphyrias described are inherited in
an autosomal dominant manner, with the exception of
congenital erythropoietic porphyria, which is inherited
in a recessive mode. The precise abnormalities in the
genes directing synthesis of the enzymes involved in
heme biosynthesis have been determined in some in-
stances. Thus, the use of appropriate gene probes has
made possible the prenatal diagnosis of some of the
porphyrias. 
As is true of most inborn errors, the signs and symp-
toms of porphyria result from either a deficiency of
metabolic products beyond the enzymatic block or
from an accumulation of metabolites behind the block.
If the enzyme lesion occurs early in the pathway
prior to the formation of porphyrinogens (eg, enzyme 3
of Figure 32–9, which is affected in acute intermittent
porphyria), ALA and PBG will accumulate in body tis-
sues and fluids (Figure 32–11). Clinically, patients
complain of abdominal pain and neuropsychiatric
symptoms. The precise biochemical cause of these
symptoms has not been determined but may relate to
elevated levels of ALA or PBG or to a deficiency of
heme. 
On the other hand, enzyme blocks later in the path-
way result in the accumulation of the porphyrinogens
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET program with this demo code.
change pdf file to jpg file; convert pdf image to jpg online
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
.pdf to .jpg online; best way to convert pdf to jpg
PORPHYRINS & BILE PIGMENTS / 275
Uroporphyrinogen I
Uroporphyrinogen III
P
P
P
P
A
A
A
A
I
III
II
IV
P
P
P
P
A
A
A
A
I
III
II
IV
Coproporphyrinogen I
Coproporphyrinogen III
P
P
P
P
M
M
M
M
I
III
II
IV
P
P
P
P
M
M
M
M
I
III
II
IV
UROPORPHYRINOGEN
DECARBOXYLASE
4CO
2
4CO
2
Figure 32–7.
Decarboxylation of uropor-
phyrinogens to coproporphyrinogens in cy-
tosol. (A, acetyl; M, methyl; P, propionyl.)
Porphobilinogen
Hydroxymethylbilane
SPONTANEOUS
Uroporphyrinogen
I
4CO
2
4CO
2
Protoporphyrinogen III
6H
Or light in vitro
Fe
2
+
Heme
Light
6H
Light
6H
Uroporphyrin
I
Coproporphyrinogen
III
Light
6H
Coproporphyrin
I
Uroporphyrinogen
III
Protoporphyrin III
Coproporphyrinogen
I
Coproporphyrin
III
Light
6H
Uroporphyrin
III
M
I
T
O
C
H
O
N
D
R
I
A
C
Y
T
O
S
O
L
PROTOPORPHYRINOGEN
OXIDASE
FERROCHELATASE
UROPORPHYRINOGEN I
SYNTHASE
UROPORPHYRINOGEN III
SYNTHASE
UROPORPHYRINOGEN 
DECARBOXYLASE
COPROPORPHYRINOGEN
OXIDASE
Figure 32–8.
Steps in the biosynthesis of the porphyrin derivatives from porphobilinogen. Uropor-
phyrinogen I synthase is also called porphobilinogen deaminase or hydroxymethylbilane synthase.
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
reader convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg on
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
convert .pdf to .jpg; advanced pdf to jpg converter
276 / CHAPTER 32
Protoporphyrinogen III
Coproporphyrinogen III
Protoporphyrin III
Heme
Uroporphyrinogen III
Hydroxymethylbilane
Porphobilinogen 
ALA
Succinyl-CoA + Glycine
Fe2
+
Proteins
Hemoproteins
Aporepressor
6. COPROPORPHYRINOGEN
OXIDASE
7. PROTOPORPHYRINOGEN
OXIDASE
8. FERROCHELATASE
5. UROPORPHYRINOGEN
DECARBOXYLASE
4. UROPORPHYRINOGEN III
SYNTHASE
3. UROPORPHYRINOGEN I
SYNTHASE
2. ALA
DEHYDRATASE
1. ALA
SYNTHASE
Figure 32–9.
Intermediates, enzymes, and regulation of heme syn-
thesis. The enzyme numbers are those referred to in column 1 of Table
32–2. Enzymes 1, 6, 7, and 8 are located in mitochondria, the others in
the cytosol. Mutations in the gene encoding enzyme 1 causes X-linked
sideroblastic anemia. Mutations in the genes encoding enzymes 2–8
cause the porphyrias, though only a few cases due to deficiency of en-
zyme 2 have been reported. Regulation of hepatic heme synthesis oc-
curs at ALA synthase (ALAS1) by a repression-derepression mecha-
nism mediated by heme and its hypothetical aporepressor. The
dotted lines indicate the negative (
−) regulation by repression. En-
zyme 3 is also called porphobilinogen deaminase or hydroxymethyl-
bilane synthase.
PORPHYRINS & BILE PIGMENTS / 277
300
1
2
3
L
o
g
a
b
s
o
r
b
e
n
c
y
4
5
400
500
Wavelength (nm)
600
700
Figure 32–10.
Absorption spectrum of hematopor-
phyrin (0.01% solution in 5% HCl).
Mutations in DNA
Photosensitivity
Abnormalities of the
enzymes of heme synthesis
Accumulation of
ALA and PBG and/or
decrease in heme in
cells and body fluids
Accumulation of
porphyrinogens in skin
and tissues
Neuropsychiatric signs
and symptoms
Spontaneous oxidation
of porphyrinogens to
porphyrins
Figure 32–11.
Biochemical causes of the major
signs and symptoms of the porphyrias.
Table 32–2. Summary of major findings in the porphyrias.
1
Enzyme Involved
2
Type, Class, and MIM Number
Major Signs and Symptoms
Results of Laboratory Tests
1. ALA synthase 
X-linked sideroblastic anemia
3
Anemia
Red cell counts and hemoglobin 
(erythroid form)
(erythropoietic) (MIM 
decreased
201300)
2. ALA dehydratase
ALA dehydratase deficiency 
Abdominal pain, neuropsychiatric  Urinary δ-aminolevulinic acid
(hepatic) (MIM 125270)
symptoms
3. Uroporphyrinogen I Acute intermittent porphyria 
Abdominal pain, neuropsychiatric Urinary porphobilinogen positive,
synthase
4
(hepatic) (MIM 176000)
symptoms
uroporphyrin positive
4. Uroporphyrinogen III Congenital erythropoietic 
No photosensitivity
Uroporphyrin positive, porpho-
synthase
(erythropoietic) (MIM 
bilinogen negative
263700)
5. Uroporphyrinogen 
Porphyria cutanea tarda (he-
Photosensitivity
Uroporphyrin positive, porpho-
decarboxylase
patic) (MIM 176100)
bilinogen negative
6. Coproporphyrinogen Hereditary coproporphyria 
Photosensitivity, abdominal pain, Urinary porphobilinogen posi-
oxidase
(hepatic) (MIM 121300)
neuropsychiatric symptoms
tive, urinary uroporphyrin 
positive, fecal protopor-
phyrin positive
7. Protoporphyrinogen Variegate porphyria (hepatic) Photosensitivity, abdominal pain, Urinary porphobilinogen posi-
oxidase
(MIM 176200)
neuropsychiatric symptoms
tive, fecal protoporphyrin 
positive
8. Ferrochelatase
Protoporphyria (erythropoietic) Photosensitivity
Fecal protoporphyrin posi-
`
(MIM 177000)
tive, red cell protoporphyrin 
positive
1Only the biochemical findings in the active stages of these diseases are listed. Certain biochemical abnormalities are detectable in the la-
tent stages of some of the above conditions. Conditions 3, 5, and 8 are generally the most prevalent porphyrias.
2The numbering of the enzymes in this table corresponds to that used in Figure 32-9.
3X-linked sideroblastic anemia is not a porphyria but is included here because δ−aminolevulinic acid synthase is involved.
4
This enzyme is also called porphobilinogen deaminase or hydroxymethylbilane synthase.
278 / CHAPTER 32
indicated in Figures 32–9 and 32–11. Their oxidation
products, the corresponding porphyrin derivatives,
cause photosensitivity, a reaction to visible light of
about 400 nm. The porphyrins, when exposed to light
of this wavelength, are thought to become “excited”
and then react with molecular oxygen to form oxygen
radicals. These latter species injure lysosomes and other
organelles. Damaged lysosomes release their degradative
enzymes, causing variable degrees of skin damage, in-
cluding scarring.
The porphyrias can be classifiedon the basis of the
organs or cells that are most affected. These are gener-
ally organs or cells in which synthesis of heme is partic-
ularly active. The bone marrow synthesizes considerable
hemoglobin, and the liver is active in the synthesis of
another hemoprotein, cytochrome P450. Thus, one
classification of the porphyrias is to designate them as
predominantly either erythropoietic or hepatic; the
types of porphyrias that fall into these two classes are so
characterized in Table 32–2. Porphyrias can also be
classified as acute or cutaneous on the basis of their
clinical features. Why do specific types of porphyria af-
fect certain organs more markedly than others? A par-
tial answer is that the levels of metabolites that cause
damage (eg, ALA, PBG, specific porphyrins, or lack of
heme) can vary markedly in different organs or cells de-
pending upon the differing activities of their heme-
forming enzymes. 
As described above, ALAS1 is the key regulatory en-
zyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway in liver. A large
number of drugs(eg, barbiturates, griseofulvin) induce
the enzyme. Most of these drugs do so by inducing cy-
tochrome P450 (see Chapter 53), which uses up heme
and thus derepresses (induces) ALAS1. In patients with
porphyria, increased activities of ALAS1 result in in-
creased levels of potentially harmful heme precursors
prior to the metabolic block. Thus, taking drugs that
cause induction of cytochrome P450 (so-called micro-
somal inducers) can precipitate attacks of porphyria. 
The diagnosisof a specific type of porphyria can
generally be established by consideration of the clinical
and family history, the physical examination, and ap-
propriate laboratory tests. The major findings in the six
principal types of porphyria are listed in Table 32–2.
High levels of leadcan affect heme metabolism by
combining with SH groups in enzymes such as fer-
rochelatase and ALA dehydratase. This affects por-
phyrin metabolism. Elevated levels of protoporphyrin
are found in red blood cells, and elevated levels of ALA
and of coproporphyrin are found in urine.
It is hoped that treatmentof the porphyrias at the
gene level will become possible. In the meantime, treat-
ment is essentially symptomatic. It is important for pa-
tients to avoid drugs that cause induction of cyto-
chrome P450. Ingestion of large amounts of carbohy-
drates (glucose loading) or administration of hematin (a
hydroxide of heme) may repress ALAS1, resulting in di-
minished production of harmful heme precursors. Pa-
tients exhibiting photosensitivity may benefit from ad-
ministration of β-carotene; this compound appears to
lessen production of free radicals, thus diminishing
photosensitivity. Sunscreens that filter out visible light
can also be helpful to such patients.
CATABOLISM OF HEME 
PRODUCES BILIRUBIN
Under physiologic conditions in the human adult, 1–2
×10
8
erythrocytes are destroyed per hour. Thus, in 1
day, a 70-kg human turns over approximately 6 g of he-
moglobin. When hemoglobin is destroyed in the body,
globin is degraded to its constituent amino acids,
which are reused, and the ironof heme enters the iron
pool, also for reuse. The iron-free porphyrinportion of
heme is also degraded, mainly in the reticuloendothelial
cells of the liver, spleen, and bone marrow.
The catabolism of heme from all of the heme pro-
teins appears to be carried out in the microsomal frac-
tions of cells by a complex enzyme system called heme
oxygenase.By the time the heme derived from heme
proteins reaches the oxygenase system, the iron has usu-
ally been oxidized to the ferric form, constituting
hemin. The heme oxygenase system is substrate-in-
ducible. As depicted in Figure 32–12, the hemin is re-
duced to heme with NADPH, and, with the aid of
more NADPH, oxygen is added to the α-methenyl
bridge between pyrroles I and II of the porphyrin. The
ferrous iron is again oxidized to the ferric form. With
the further addition of oxygen, ferric ionis released,
carbon monoxide is produced, and an equimolar
quantity of biliverdinresults from the splitting of the
tetrapyrrole ring.
In birds and amphibia, the green biliverdin IX is ex-
creted; in mammals, a soluble enzyme called biliverdin
reductasereduces the methenyl bridge between pyrrole
III and pyrrole IV to a methylene group to produce
bilirubin,a yellow pigment (Figure 32–12).
It is estimated that 1 g of hemoglobin yields 35 mg
of bilirubin. The daily bilirubin formation in human
adults is approximately 250–350 mg, deriving mainly
from hemoglobin but also from ineffective erythro-
poiesis and from various other heme proteins such as
cytochrome P450.
The chemical conversion of heme to bilirubin by
reticuloendothelial cells can be observed in vivo as the
purple color of the heme in a hematoma is slowly con-
verted to the yellow pigment of bilirubin.
PORPHYRINS & BILE PIGMENTS / 279
HN
HN
H
H
HN
HN
P
P
O
O
Bilirubin 
HN
HN
N
HN
P
P
O
O
Biliverdin
II
III
IV
I
NADP
NADPH
N II
N
N
I
III
IV N
Fe
3
+
P
P
N
II
N
N
I
III
N
IV
Fe
2
+
P
P
N
II
N
N
I
III
N
IV
Fe
3
+
P
P
NADPH
NADP
NADPH
NADP
O
2
OH
Hemin
Heme
α
Heme
O
2
Fe
3
+
(reutilized)
CO (exhaled)
α
M
i
c
r
o
s
o
m
a
l
h
e
m
e
o
x
y
g
e
n
a
s
e
s
y
s
t
e
m
Figure 32–12.
Schematic representation of the microsomal heme oxygenase system. (Modified from
Schmid R, McDonough AF in: The Porphyrins.Dolphin D [editor]. Academic Press, 1978.)
280 / CHAPTER 32
Bilirubin formed in peripheral tissues is transported
to the liver by plasma albumin. The further metabolism
of bilirubin occurs primarily in the liver. It can be di-
vided into three processes: (1) uptake of bilirubin by
liver parenchymal cells, (2) conjugation of bilirubin
with glucuronate in the endoplasmic reticulum, and (3)
secretion of conjugated bilirubin into the bile. Each of
these processes will be considered separately.
THE LIVER TAKES UP BILIRUBIN
Bilirubin is only sparingly soluble in water, but its solu-
bility in plasma is increased by noncovalent binding to
albumin. Each molecule of albumin appears to have
one high-affinity site and one low-affinity site for
bilirubin. In 100 mL of plasma, approximately 25 mg
of bilirubin can be tightly bound to albumin at its high-
affinity site. Bilirubin in excess of this quantity can be
bound only loosely and thus can easily be detached and
diffuse into tissues. A number of compounds such as
antibiotics and other drugs compete with bilirubin for
the high-affinity binding site on albumin. Thus, these
compounds can displace bilirubin from albumin and
have significant clinical effects.
In the liver, the bilirubin is removed from albumin
and taken up at the sinusoidal surface of the hepato-
cytes by a carrier-mediated saturable system. This facil-
itated transport system has a very large capacity, so
that even under pathologic conditions the system does
not appear to be rate-limiting in the metabolism of
bilirubin.
Since this facilitated transport system allows the
equilibrium of bilirubin across the sinusoidal mem-
brane of the hepatocyte, the net uptake of bilirubin will
be dependent upon the removal of bilirubin via subse-
quent metabolic pathways.
Once bilirubin enters the hepatocytes, it can bind to
certain cytosolic proteins, which help to keep it solubi-
lized prior to conjugation. Ligandin (a family of glu-
tathione S-transferases) and protein Y are the involved
proteins. They may also help to prevent efflux of biliru-
bin back into the blood stream. 
Conjugation of Bilirubin With Glucuronic
Acid Occurs in the Liver
Bilirubin is nonpolar and would persist in cells (eg,
bound to lipids) if not rendered water-soluble. Hepato-
cytes convert bilirubin to a polar form, which is readily
excreted in the bile, by adding glucuronic acid mole-
cules to it. This process is called conjugation and can
employ polar molecules other than glucuronic acid (eg,
sulfate). Many steroid hormones and drugs are also
converted to water-soluble derivatives by conjugation in
preparation for excretion (see Chapter 53).
The conjugation of bilirubin is catalyzed by a spe-
cific glucuronosyltransferase. The enzyme is mainly
located in the endoplasmic reticulum, uses UDP-
glucuronic acid as the glucuronosyl donor, and is re-
ferred to as bilirubin-UGT. Bilirubin monoglucuronide
is an intermediate and is subsequently converted to the
diglucuronide (Figures 32–13 and 32–14). Most of the
bilirubin excreted in the bile of mammals is in the form
of bilirubin diglucuronide. However, when bilirubin
conjugates exist abnormally in human plasma (eg, in
obstructive jaundice), they are predominantly mono-
glucuronides. Bilirubin-UGT activity can be induced
by a number of clinically useful drugs, including phe-
nobarbital. More information about glucuronosylation
is presented below in the discussion of inherited disor-
ders of bilirubin conjugation.
Bilirubin Is Secreted Into Bile
Secretion of conjugated bilirubin into the bile occurs by
an active transport mechanism, which is probably rate-
limiting for the entire process of hepatic bilirubin me-
tabolism. The protein involved is MRP-2 (multidrug
resistance-like protein 2), also called multispecific or-
ganic anion transporter (MOAT). It is located in the
plasma membrane of the bile canalicular membrane
and handles a number of organic anions. It is a member
of the family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) trans-
porters. The hepatic transport of conjugated bilirubin
into the bile is inducible by those same drugs that are
capable of inducing the conjugation of bilirubin. Thus,
the conjugation and excretion systems for bilirubin be-
have as a coordinated functional unit.
Figure 32–15 summarizes the three major processes
involved in the transfer of bilirubin from blood to bile.
Sites that are affected in a number of conditions caus-
ing jaundice (see below) are also indicated.
O
C
C
O
C
V
M
M
M
V
M
H
2
C
H
2
C
C
O
OOC(CH
2
O)
4
C
CH
2
CH
2
C
O
C(CH
2
O)
4
COO
O
O
II
III
IV
I
Figure 32–13.
Structure of bilirubin diglucuronide
(conjugated, “direct-reacting” bilirubin). Glucuronic
acid is attached via ester linkage to the two propionic
acid groups of bilirubin to form an acylglucuronide.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested