Online Catalogs: 
What Users and 
Librarians Want
An OCLC Report
.Pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf into jpg online; bulk pdf to jpg converter
.Pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf file into jpg format; pdf to jpeg
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. Web Security. All your JPG and PDF files will be permanently erased from our servers after one hour.
convert pdf to jpg for; convert pdf file into jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Web Security. Your PDF and JPG files will be deleted from our servers an hour after the conversion.
convert multi page pdf to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter online
Online Catalogs:
What Users and Librarians Want
An OCLC Report
Principal contributors
Karen Calhoun, Vice President, WorldCat and Metadata Services
Joanne Cantrell, Marketing Analyst
Peggy Gallagher, Market Analysis Manager
Janet Hawk, Director, Market Analysis and Sales Programs
Graphics, layout and editing
Brad Gauder, Creative Services Writer
Rick Limes, Art Director
Sam Smith, Art Director
Contributor
Diane Cellentani, Market Research Consultant to OCLC
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg. C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion.
.pdf to .jpg online; convert pdf file into jpg format
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.tif"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert tiff to jpg.
convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg; convert pdf to jpeg
Copyright © 2009, OCLC Online Computer Library Center, Inc.
6565 Kilgour Place
Dublin, Ohio 43017-3395
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a 
retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, 
photocopying or otherwise, without prior written permission of the copyright 
holder.
The following are trademarks and/or service marks of OCLC: Connexion, FirstSearch, 
OCLC, the OCLC logo, WorldCat, WorldCat.org, WorldCat Resource Sharing and 
“The World’s Libraries. Connected.” 
Third-party product, service, business and other proprietary names are trademarks 
and/or service marks of their respective owners.
Printed in the United States of America
Cataloged in WorldCat on March 3, 2009
OCLC Control Number: 311870930
ISBN: 1-55653-411-6
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
similar software; Support a batch conversion of JPG to PDF with amazingly high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after conversion; Support
advanced pdf to jpg converter; convert pdf images to jpg
JPG to JBIG2 Converter | Convert JPEG to JBIG2, Convert JBIG2 to
Image Converter Pro - JPEG to JBIG2 Converter. Convert JPEG (JPG) Images to, from JBIG2 Images on Windows.
batch convert pdf to jpg; pdf to jpg
Table of Contents
Executive Summary  
v
Introduction 
1
Methodology 
5
Data Quality:  What End Users Want  
11
Data Quality:  What Librarians Want  
23
Data Quality:  Librarians and End Users  
39
Conclusions 
49
Page
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
Converter. Convert JPEG (JPG) Images to, from GIF Images on Windows. JPEG to GIF Converter can directly convert GIF files to JPG files.
convert pdf photo to jpg; bulk pdf to jpg
JPG to DICOM Converter | Convert JPEG to DICOM, Convert DICOM to
Image Converter Pro - JPEG to DICOM Converter. Convert JPEG (JPG) Images to, from DICOM Images on Windows.
convert pdf into jpg online; convert multiple pdf to jpg
Online Catalogs: What Users and Librarians Want    v
Executive Summary
An end user’s expectations and work practices on the Web infl uence his or her 
decision to use a library online catalog. Catalog interfaces matter, but catalog data 
quality is also a driving factor of the catalog’s perceived utility—and not only for end 
users, but also for librarians and library staff. To gain a rounded, evidence-based 
understanding of what constitutes “quality” in catalog data, OCLC formed a research 
team to:
Identify and compare the data quality expectations of catalog end users and 
• 
librarians
Compare the catalog data quality expectations of types of librarians
• 
Recommend catalog data quality priorities, taking into account the perspectives of 
• 
both end users and librarians.
Readers who are seeking to defi ne requirements for improved catalog data (exposed 
in both end-user and staff interfaces) may fi nd this report helpful as a source of 
ideas. The same is true for readers who have a part to play in contributing, ingesting, 
syndicating, synchronizing or linking data from multiple sources in next-generation 
library catalogs and integrated library systems. 
Selected key research fi ndings:
The end user’s experience of the delivery of wanted items is as important, if not 
• 
more important, than his or her discovery experience.
End users rely on and expect enhanced content including summaries/abstracts 
• 
and tables of contents.
An advanced search option (supporting fi elded searching) and facets help end 
• 
users refi ne searches, navigate, browse and manage large result sets. 
Important differences exist between the catalog data quality priorities of end users 
• 
and those who work in libraries.
Librarians and library staff, like end users, approach catalogs and catalog data 
• 
purposefully. End users generally want to fi nd and obtain needed information; 
librarians and library staff generally have work responsibilities to carry out.  The 
vi   Online Catalogs: What Users and Librarians Want
Executive Summary
work roles of librarians and staff infl uence their data quality preferences.
Librarians’ choice of data quality enhancements refl ects their understanding of the 
• 
importance of accurate, structured data in the catalog. 
The fi ndings suggest two traditions of information organization at work—one from 
librarianship and the other from the Web. Librarians’ perspectives about data quality 
remain highly infl uenced by their profession’s classical principles of information 
organization, while end users’ expectations of data quality arise largely from their 
experiences of how information is organized on popular Web sites. What is needed 
now is to integrate the best of both worlds in new, expanded defi nitions of what 
“quality” means in library online catalogs. 
The report concludes with recommendations for a data quality program that balances 
what end users and librarians want and need from online catalogs, plus a few 
suggestions for further research.
Online Catalogs: What Users and Librarians Want   1
Introduction
“A persistent shortcoming in the decision-making process [about library 
database quality] that needs to be addressed is the lack of serious research 
into user needs and benefi ts, and the actual impact on users of database 
quality decisions.”
1
What constitutes “quality” in catalog data has been reasonably well-understood by 
library professionals. The informed librarian’s defi nition of catalog quality can be 
traced directly to Charles Cutter’s statement in 1876 of the objectives of a library 
catalog;
2
these objectives have guided librarians’ preferences for catalog design 
for over a hundred years. Thanks to Cutter and the theorists who followed,
3
today’s 
library catalogs are founded on predictable and consistent record and heading 
structures, which facilitate serendipitous discovery, effi cient known-item retrieval 
and many ways to browse. Library catalogs typically contain good metadata, in 
the sense that they use authority control, classifi cation and content standards to 
describe and collocate related materials—all practices founded on Cutter’s objectives 
for catalog searching by author, title or subject, or for distinguishing editions.  
A study conducted by the OCLC Online Data Quality Control Section in 1989 
confi rmed that librarians’ consensus about quality in their own library catalogs 
carried over to their expectations of WorldCat as a source of shared catalog  
records.
4
Carol Davis, then head of the Online Data Quality Control Section, found 
that librarians’ top three quality concerns with WorldCat at the time were duplicate 
records (more than one record describing the same edition), incorrect (unauthorized) 
forms of name headings and incorrect (unauthorized) forms of subject headings. 
Today, OCLC’s WorldCat quality program continues to center on managing these 
top three database quality priorities. Further, a glance into the contents of OCLC 
Bibliographic Formats and Standards
5
demonstrates one way in which Cutter’s 
classical principles underpin present-day best practices in standardized description, 
consistent record encoding and authorized forms of names and subject headings. 
Many writers have affi rmed that Cutter designed his objectives of the catalog with 
the convenience of the user in mind. A similar motivation (the convenience of the 
user) underlies the “Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records” (FRBR), 
a conceptual model based on the user tasks of fi nding, identifying, selecting and 
obtaining wanted information.
6
However, an examination of the literature turns up 
little evidence that Cutter, the distinguished theorists who followed him, or those 
who framed FRBR and “Resource Description and Access” (RDA)
7
rigorously tested 
their conceptual frameworks with information users. Fran Miksa, a well-known 
professor and librarian, has noted of Cutter’s and early librarians’ work to establish 
2   Online Catalogs: What Users and Librarians Want
traditions of information organization that “in the fi eld of librarianship, user studies 
of a serious kind only begin in the 1920s.”
8
Similarly, in the quote that begins this 
introduction, Janet Swan Hill enjoins librarians to clearly understand how and which 
library catalog data quality decisions help users fi nd and obtain the information they 
need.
Information-seeking Behavior
In 2003, the OCLC Environmental Scan identifi ed self-service, satisfaction and 
seamlessness as defi nitive of information seekers’ expectations.
9
That report 
documented ease of use, convenience and availability as equally important to 
information seekers as information quality and trustworthiness. In 2005, the report 
Perceptions of Libraries and Information Resources looked further into people’s 
information-seeking behaviors and preferences with respect to libraries, most 
notably revealing the trend of information seekers to begin a search for information 
with a search engine (84%) rather than on a library Web site (1%).
10
In addition to 
these examples of serious research into end-user information needs, a large body of 
research is available from the fi elds of communications, learning theory, sociology, 
psychology, consumer research, human-computer interaction and elsewhere. Social 
science researchers have investigated many paradigms in information-seeking 
research;
11
the “Principle of Least Effort,” attributed to philologist George Zipf, is 
probably the best-known in libraries. A report from Marcia Bates to the Library of 
Congress (on improving user access to catalogs and portals) also contains a helpful 
review of the information-seeking literature.
12
Donald Case, in his book on information seeking, points out that much research 
focuses on information sources (e.g., books or newspapers) and systems (e.g., 
catalogs) rather than on the needs, motivations and behavior of information users.
13
In other words, much research has emphasized information objects and systems over 
people. In contrast, usability experts have recognized the importance of designing 
systems contextually—that is, conducting “work practice” studies and using that 
information to drive information system design.
14
Librarians at the University of 
Rochester River Campus Libraries have taken the lead in applying work practice 
studies to library research questions.
15
An example is studying faculty research work 
practices to identify how scholars might use institutional repositories.  
Catalog Use, Users and Data Quality
The recent library literature contains numerous articles on the need for change in 
online catalogs to better satisfy the expectations of information seekers who are 
accustomed to Web search engines, online bookstores and seamless linking to full 
text. Increasingly it is understood that an end user’s expectations and work practices 
on the Web matter a good deal to whether he or she will use or revisit a library 
online catalog. In his August 2005 paper for the International Federation of Library 
Associations and Institutions (IFLA), John Byrum, Library of Congress, wrote of the 
need for library catalogs to provide access to more content and to offer signifi cantly 
enhanced functionality based on the features of popular search engines.
16
Speaking 
of the limited scope of the catalog and its emphasis on print, Norm Medeiros, 
Introduction
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested