NUCLEIC ACID STRUCTURE & FUNCTION / 311
O
O
C
C
OH
HC
CH
H
H
OH
CH
3
HN
N
N
N
O
H
2
N
H
2
C
P
O
P
O
P
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
C
C
OCH
3
HC
CH
H
H
NH
2
N
N
N
N
CH
2
3
2
O
C
C
OH
HC
CH
H
H
N
O
O
NH
CH
2
O
P
O
O
O
O
P
O
O
3
5
5
5
CAP
mRNA
Figure 35–10.
The cap structure attached to the 5′terminal of most eukaryotic messen-
ger RNA molecules. A 7-methylguanosine triphosphate (black) is attached at the 5′terminal
of the mRNA (shown in blue), which usually contains a 2′-O-methylpurine nucleotide.
These modifications (the cap and methyl group) are added after the mRNA is transcribed
from DNA.
ribosomes and its translation. Recent studies suggest
that an rRNA component performs the peptidyl trans-
ferase activity and thus is an enzyme (a ribozyme).
D. S
MALL
S
TABLE
RNA
A large number of discrete, highly conserved, and small
stable RNA species are found in eukaryotic cells. The
majority of these molecules are complexed with pro-
teins to form ribonucleoproteins and are distributed in
the nucleus, in the cytoplasm, or in both. They range in
size from 90 to 300 nucleotides and are present in
100,000–1,000,000 copies per cell.
Small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), a subset of these
RNAs, are significantly involved in mRNA processing
and gene regulation. Of the several snRNAs, U1, U2,
U4, U5, and U6 are involved in intron removal and the
processing of hnRNA into mRNA (Chapter 37). The
U7 snRNA may be involved in production of the cor-
rect 3′ends of histone mRNA—which lacks a poly(A)
tail. The U4 and U6 snRNAs may also be required for
poly(A) processing.
Pdf to jpeg converter - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
to jpeg; change from pdf to jpg on
Pdf to jpeg converter - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf to jpg c#; convert pdf to jpg file
312 / CHAPTER 35
D arm
Anticodon arm
U
G
T
ψ
TψC arm
C
G
A
C
C
5P
3
Extra arm
Alkylated purine
aa
Acceptor
arm
Region of hydrogen
bonding between
base pairs
Figure 35–11.
Typical aminoacyl tRNA in which the
amino acid (aa) is attached to the 3′CCA terminal. The
anticodon, TΨC, and dihydrouracil (D) arms are indi-
cated, as are the positions of the intramolecular hydro-
gen bonding between these base pairs. (From Watson
JD: Molecular Biology of the Gene,3rd ed. Copyright ©
1976, 1970, 1965, by W.A. Benjamin, Inc., Menlo Park, Cali-
fornia.)
SPECIFIC NUCLEASES DIGEST 
NUCLEIC ACIDS
Enzymes capable of degrading nucleic acids have been
recognized for many years. These nucleases can be clas-
sified in several ways. Those which exhibit specificity
for deoxyribonucleic acid are referred to as deoxyri-
bonucleases. Those which specifically hydrolyze ri-
bonucleic acids are ribonucleases. Within both of
these classes are enzymes capable of cleaving internal
phosphodiester bonds to produce either 3′-hydroxyl
and 5′-phosphoryl terminals or 5′-hydroxyl and 3′-
phosphoryl terminals. These are referred to as endonu-
cleases.Some are capable of hydrolyzing both strands
of a double-stranded molecule, whereas others can
only cleave single strandsof nucleic acids. Some nucle-
ases can hydrolyze only unpaired single strands, while
others are capable of hydrolyzing single strands partici-
pating in the formation of a double-stranded molecule.
There exist classes of endonucleases that recognize spe-
cific sequences in DNA; the majority of these are the
restriction endonucleases,which have in recent years
become important tools in molecular genetics and med-
ical sciences. A list of some currently recognized restric-
tion endonucleases is presented in Table 40–2.
Some nucleases are capable of hydrolyzing a nu-
cleotide only when it is present at a terminal of a mole-
cule; these are referred to as exonucleases. Exonucle-
ases act in one direction (3′→5′or 5′→3′) only. In
bacteria, a 3′→5′exonuclease is an integral part of the
DNA replication machinery and there serves to edit—
or proofread—the most recently added deoxynucleo-
tide for base-pairing errors.
Table 35–2. Components of mammalian ribosomes.1
Mass
Protein
RNA
Component
(mw)
Number Mass s Size
Mass
Bases
40S subunit t 1.4 ×106
~35
7 ×1018S
7 ×101900
60S subunit t 2.8 ×10
6
~50
1 ×10
6
5S
35,000
120
5.8S 45,000
160
28S 1.6 ×104700
1
The ribosomal subunits are defined according to their sedimentation ve-
locity in Svedberg units (40S or 60S). This table illustrates the total mass
(MW) of each. The number of unique proteins and their total mass (MW) and
the RNA components of each subunit in size (Svedberg units), mass, and
number of bases are listed.
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert pdf image to jpg online; conversion of pdf to jpg
C#: How to Use SDK to Convert Document and Image Using XDoc.
You may use our converter SDK to easily convert PDF, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Tiff, and Dicom files to raster images like Jpeg, Png, Bmp and Gif.
changing pdf to jpg file; convert .pdf to .jpg
NUCLEIC ACID STRUCTURE & FUNCTION / 313
SUMMARY
• DNA consists of four bases—A, G, C, and T—
which are held in linear array by phosphodiester
bonds through the 3′and 5′positions of adjacent de-
oxyribose moieties. 
• DNA is organized into two strands by the pairing of
bases A to T and G to C on complementary strands.
These strands form a double helix around a central
axis. 
• The 3 ×10
9
base pairs of DNA in humans are orga-
nized into the haploid complement of 23 chromo-
somes. The exact sequence of these 3 billion nu-
cleotides defines the uniqueness of each individual.
• DNA provides a template for its own replication and
thus maintenance of the genotype and for the tran-
scription of the 30,000–50,000 genes into a variety
of RNA molecules.
• RNA exists in several different single-stranded struc-
tures, most of which are involved in protein synthe-
sis. The linear array of nucleotides in RNA consists
of A, G, C, and U, and the sugar moiety is ribose. 
• The major forms of RNA include messenger RNA
(mRNA), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and transfer
RNA (tRNA). Certain RNA molecules act as cata-
lysts (ribozymes).
REFERENCES
Green R, Noller HF: Ribosomes and translation. Annu Rev Bio-
chem 1997;66:689.
Guthrie C, Patterson B: Spliceosomal snRNAs. Ann Rev Genet
1988;22:387.
Hunt T: DNA Makes RNA Makes Protein.Elsevier, 1983.
Watson JD, Crick FHC: Molecular structure of nucleic acids. Na-
ture 1953;171:737.
Watson JD: The Double Helix.Atheneum, 1968.
Watson JD et al: Molecular Biology of the Gene,5th ed. Benjamin-
Cummings, 2000. 
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Jpeg, Png, Bmp, Gif Image to PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.Converter ›› C# Converter: Raster Image to PDF.
change file from pdf to jpg on; convert pdf pictures to jpg
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
convert pdf into jpg format; convert pdf document to jpg
314
DNA Organization,Replication,
& Repair
36
Daryl K. Granner, MD, & P. Anthony Weil, PhD
BIOMEDICAL IMPORTANCE
*
The genetic information in the DNA of a chromosome
can be transmitted by exact replication or it can be ex-
changed by a number of processes, including crossing
over, recombination, transposition, and conversion.
These provide a means of ensuring adaptability and di-
versity for the organism but, when these processes go
awry, can also result in disease. A number of enzyme
systems are involved in DNA replication, alteration,
and repair. Mutations are due to a change in the base
sequence of DNA and may result from the faulty repli-
cation, movement, or repair of DNA and occur with a
frequency of about one in every 10
6
cell divisions. Ab-
normalities in gene products (either in protein function
or amount) can be the result of mutations that occur in
coding or regulatory-region DNA. A mutation in a
germ cell will be transmitted to offspring (so-called ver-
tical transmission of hereditary disease). A number of
factors, including viruses, chemicals, ultraviolet light,
and ionizing radiation, increase the rate of mutation.
Mutations often affect somatic cells and so are passed
on to successive generations of cells, but only within an
organism. It is becoming apparent that a number of
diseases—and perhaps most cancers—are due to the
combined effects of vertical transmission of mutations
as well as horizontal transmission of induced mutations.
CHROMATIN IS THE CHROMOSOMAL
MATERIAL EXTRACTED FROM NUCLEI 
OF CELLS OF EUKARYOTIC ORGANISMS
Chromatin consists of very long double-stranded DNA
moleculesand a nearly equal mass of rather small basic
proteins termed histonesas well as a smaller amount of
nonhistone proteins (most of which are acidic and
larger than histones) and a small quantity of RNA.The
nonhistone proteins include enzymes involved in DNA
replication, such as DNA topoisomerases. Also in-
cluded are proteins involved in transcription, such as
the RNA polymerase complex. The double-stranded
DNA helix in each chromosome has a length that is
thousands of times the diameter of the cell nucleus.
One purpose of the molecules that comprise chro-
matin, particularly the histones, is to condense the
DNA. Electron microscopic studies of chromatin have
demonstrated dense spherical particles called nucleo-
somes, which are approximately 10 nm in diameter
and connected by DNA filaments (Figure 36–1). Nu-
cleosomes are composed of DNA wound around a col-
lection of histone molecules.
Histones Are the Most Abundant
Chromatin Proteins
The histones are a small family of closely related basic
proteins. H1 histonesare the ones least tightly bound
to chromatin Figure 36–1) and are, therefore, easily re-
moved with a salt solution, after which chromatin be-
comes soluble. The organizational unit of this soluble
chromatin is the nucleosome. Nucleosomes contain
four classes of histones: H2A, H2B, H3,and H4.The
structures of all four histones—H2A, H2B, H3, and
H4, the so-called core histones forming the nucleo-
some—have been highly conserved between species.
This extreme conservation implies that the function of
histones is identical in all eukaryotes and that the entire
molecule is involved quite specifically in carrying out
this function. The carboxyl terminal two-thirds of the
molecules have a typical random amino acid composi-
tion, while their amino terminal thirds are particularly
rich in basic amino acids. These four core histones are
subject to at least five types of covalent modifica-
tion:acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, ADP-
ribosylation, and covalent linkage (H2A only) to ubiq-
uitin. These histone modifications probably play an
important role in chromatin structure and function as
illustrated in Table 36–1.
The histones interact with each other in very specific
ways. H3 and H4 form a tetramercontaining two mol-
*So far as is possible, the discussion in this chapter and in Chapters
37, 38, and 39 will pertain to mammalian organisms, which are, of
course, among the higher eukaryotes. At times it will be necessary
to refer to observations in prokaryotic organisms such as bacteria
and viruses, but in such cases the information will be of a kind that
can be extrapolated to mammalian organisms.
XDoc.Converter for .NET, Support Documents and Images Conversion
This .NET file converter SDK supports various commonly used document Office (2003 and 2007) Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, Tiff, Dicom, SVG, Jpeg, Png, Bmp
changing pdf to jpg on; changing file from pdf to jpg
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
As this VB.NET PDF converter component plug-in embeds several image image converting applications, like PDF to tiff conversion, PDF to JPEG conversion and
change format from pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg converter
DNA ORGANIZATION, REPLICATION, & REPAIR / 315
Figure 36–1.
Electron micrograph of nucleosomes
attached by strands of nucleic acid. (The bar represents
2.5 µm.) (Reproduced, with permission, from Oudet P,
Gross-Bellard M, Chambon P: Electron microscopic and
biochemical evidence that chromatin structure is a re-
peating unit. Cell 1975;4:281.)
Histone octamer
DNA
Histone
H1
Figure 36–2.
Model for the structure of the nucleo-
some, in which DNA is wrapped around the surface of a
flat protein cylinder consisting of two each of histones
H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 that form the histone octamer.
The 146 base pairs of DNA, consisting of 1.75 superheli-
cal turns, are in contact with the histone octamer. This
protects the DNA from digestion by a nuclease. The po-
sition of histone H1, when it is present, is indicated by
the dashed outline at the bottom of the figure.
ecules of each (H3/H4)
2
, while H2A and H2B form
dimers (H2A-H2B). Under physiologic conditions,
these histone oligomers associate to form the histone oc-
tamerof the composition (H3/H4)
2
-(H2A-H2B)
2
.
The Nucleosome Contains Histone & DNA
When the histone octamer is mixed with purified, dou-
ble-stranded DNA, the same x-ray diffraction pattern is
formed as that observed in freshly isolated chromatin.
Electron microscopic studies confirm the existence of
reconstituted nucleosomes. Furthermore, the reconsti-
tution of nucleosomes from DNA and histones H2A,
H2B, H3, and H4 is independent of the organismal or
cellular origin of the various components. The histone
H1 and the nonhistone proteins are not necessary for
the reconstitution of the nucleosome core.
In the nucleosome, the DNA is supercoiled in a left-
handed helix over the surface of the disk-shaped histone
octamer (Figure 36–2). The majority of core histone
proteins interact with the DNA on the inside of the su-
percoil without protruding, though the amino terminal
tails of all the histones probably protrude outside of this
structure and are available for regulatory covalent mod-
ifications (see Table 36–1).
The (H3/H4)
2
tetramer itself can confer nucleo-
some-like properties on DNA and thus has a central
role in the formation of the nucleosome. The addition
of two H2A-H2B dimers stabilizes the primary particle
and firmly binds two additional half-turns of DNA pre-
viously bound only loosely to the (H3/H4)
2
. Thus,
1.75 superhelical turns of DNA are wrapped around
the surface of the histone octamer, protecting 146 base
pairs of DNA and forming the nucleosome core particle
(Figure 36–2). The core particles are separated by an
about 30-bp linker region of DNA. Most of the DNA
is in a repeating series of these structures, giving the so-
called “beads-on-a-string” appearance when examined
by electron microscopy (see Figure 36–1).
The assembly of nucleosomes is mediated by one of
several chromatin assembly factors facilitated by histone
chaperones, proteins such as the anionic nuclear protein
nucleoplasmin.As the nucleosome is assembled, his-
tones are released from the histone chaperones. Nucleo-
somes appear to exhibit preference for certain regions on
specific DNA molecules, but the basis for this nonran-
dom distribution, termed phasing, is not completely
Table 36–1. Possible roles of modified histones.
1. Acetylation of histones H3 and H4 is associated with the ac-
tivation or inactivation of gene transcription (Chapter 37).
2. Acetylation of core histones is associated with chromoso-
mal assembly during DNA replication.
3. Phosphorylation of histone H1 is associated with the con-
densation of chromosomes during the replication cycle.
4. ADP-ribosylation of histones is associated with DNA repair.
5. Methylation of histones is correlated with activation and
repression of gene transcription.
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Help to convert PDF to multiple image formats, including GIF, BMP, JPEG, PNG and so on. Remarkably, this PDF document converter control for C#.NET can
convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi; c# convert pdf to jpg
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
NET converter control for It enables you to build a PDF file with one or more images. Various image forms are supported which include Png, Jpeg, Bmp, and Gif
batch convert pdf to jpg online; batch pdf to jpg online
316 / CHAPTER 36
understood. It is probably related to the relative physical
flexibility of certain nucleotide sequences that are able to
accommodate the regions of kinking within the super-
coil as well as the presence of other DNA-bound factors
that limit the sites of nucleosome deposition.
The super-packing of nucleosomes in nuclei is seem-
ingly dependent upon the interaction of the H1 his-
tones with adjacent nucleosomes.
HIGHER-ORDER STRUCTURES PROVIDE
FOR THE COMPACTION OF CHROMATIN
Electron microscopy of chromatin reveals two higher
orders of structure—the 10-nm fibril and the 30-nm
chromatin fiber—beyond that of the nucleosome itself.
The disk-like nucleosome structure has a 10-nm diame-
ter and a height of 5 nm. The 10-nm fibrilconsists of
nucleosomes arranged with their edges separated by a
small distance (30 bp of DNA) with their flat faces par-
allel with the fibril axis (Figure 36–3). The 10-nm fibril
is probably further supercoiled with six or seven nucleo-
somes per turn to form the 30-nm chromatin fiber
(Figure 36–3). Each turn of the supercoil is relatively
flat, and the faces of the nucleosomes of successive
turns would be nearly parallel to each other. H1 his-
tones appear to stabilize the 30-nm fiber, but their posi-
tion and that of the variable length spacer DNA are not
clear. It is probable that nucleosomes can form a variety
of packed structures. In order to form a mitotic chro-
mosome, the 30-nm fiber must be compacted in length
another 100-fold (see below).
In interphase chromosomes,chromatin fibers ap-
pear to be organized into 30,000–100,000 bp loops or
domainsanchored in a scaffolding (or supporting ma-
trix) within the nucleus. Within these domains, some
DNA sequences may be located nonrandomly. It has
been suggested that each looped domain of chromatin
corresponds to one or more separate genetic functions,
containing both coding and noncoding regions of the
cognate gene or genes.
SOME REGIONS OF CHROMATIN ARE
“ACTIVE” & OTHERS ARE “INACTIVE”
Generally, every cell of an individual metazoan organism
contains the same genetic information. Thus, the differ-
ences between cell types within an organism must be ex-
plained by differential expression of the common genetic
information. Chromatin containing active genes (ie,
transcriptionally active chromatin) has been shown to
differ in several ways from that of inactive regions. The
nucleosome structure of active chromatin appears to be
altered, sometimes quite extensively, in highly active re-
gions. DNA in active chromatin contains large regions
(about 100,000 bases long) that are sensitive to diges-
tion by a nucleasesuch as DNase I. DNase I makes sin-
gle-strand cuts in any segment of DNA (no sequence
specificity). It will digest DNA not protected by protein
into its component deoxynucleotides. The sensitivity to
DNase I of chromatin regions being actively transcribed
reflects only a potential for transcription rather than
transcription itself and in several systems can be corre-
lated with a relative lack of 5-methyldeoxycytidine in the
DNA and particular histone covalent modifications
(phosphorylation, acetylation, etc; see Table 36–1).
Within the large regions of active chromatin there
exist shorter stretches of 100–300 nucleotides that ex-
hibit an even greater (another tenfold) sensitivity to
DNase I. These hypersensitive sites probably result
from a structural conformation that favors access of the
nuclease to the DNA. These regions are often located
immediately upstream from the active gene and are the
location of interrupted nucleosomal structure caused by
the binding of nonhistone regulatory transcription factor
proteins. (See Chapters 37 and 39.) In many cases, it
seems that if a gene is capable of being transcribed, it
very often has a DNase-hypersensitive site(s) in the chro-
matin immediately upstream. As noted above, nonhis-
tone regulatory proteins involved in transcription control
and those involved in maintaining access to the template
strand lead to the formation of hypersensitive sites. Hy-
persensitive sites often provide the first clue about the
presence and location of a transcription control element.
Transcriptionally inactive chromatin is densely
packed during interphase as observed by electron mi-
croscopic studies and is referred to as heterochro-
matin; transcriptionally active chromatin stains less
densely and is referred to as euchromatin. Generally,
euchromatin is replicated earlier than heterochromatin
in the mammalian cell cycle (see below).
There are two types of heterochromatin: constitutive
and facultative. Constitutive heterochromatin is al-
ways condensed and thus inactive. It is found in the
regions near the chromosomal centromere and at chro-
mosomal ends (telomeres). Facultative heterochro-
matinis at times condensed, but at other times it is ac-
tively transcribed and, thus, uncondensed and appears
as euchromatin. Of the two members of the X chromo-
some pair in mammalian females, one X chromosome is
almost completely inactive transcriptionally and is hete-
rochromatic. However, the heterochromatic X chromo-
some decondenses during gametogenesis and becomes
transcriptionally active during early embryogenesis—
thus, it is facultative heterochromatin.
Certain cells of insects, eg, Chironomus, contain
giant chromosomes that have been replicated for ten
cycles without separation of daughter chromatids.
These copies of DNA line up side by side in precise reg-
ister and produce a banded chromosome containing re-
gions of condensed chromatin and lighter bands of
1400 nm
Metaphase
chromosome
Condensed
loops
30-nm
chromatin fibril
composed of
nucleosomes
“Beads-
on-a-string”
10-nm
chromatin
fibril
H1
H1
H1
Naked
double-helical
DNA
Non-condensed
loops
Nuclear-scaffold
associated
form
Chromosome
scaffold
700 nm
300 nm
30 nm
10 nm
2 nm
Oct
Oct
Oct
Figure 36–3.
Shown is the extent of DNA packaging in metaphase chromosomes (top) to noted duplex DNA (bot-
tom). Chromosomal DNA is packaged and organized at several levels as shown (see Table 36–2). Each phase of con-
densation or compaction and organization (bottom to top) decreases overall DNA accessibility to an extent that the
DNA sequences in metaphase chromosomes are almost totally transcriptionally inert. In toto, these five levels of
DNA compaction result in nearly a 104-fold linear decrease in end-to-end DNA length. Complete condensation and
decondensation of the linear DNA in chromosomes occur in the space of hours during the normal replicative cell
cycle (see Figure 36–20).
317
318 / CHAPTER 36
A
B
5C
BR3
BR3
5C
Figure 36–4.
Illustration of the tight correlation be-
tween the presence of RNA polymerase II and RNA syn-
thesis. A number of genes are activated when Chirono-
mus tentanslarvae are subjected to heat shock (39 °C
for 30 minutes). A:Distribution of RNA polymerase II
(also called type B) in isolated chromosome IV from the
salivary gland (at arrows). The enzyme was detected by
immunofluorescence using an antibody directed
against the polymerase. The 5C and BR3 are specific
bands of chromosome IV, and the arrows indicate puffs.
B:Autoradiogram of a chromosome IV that was incu-
bated in 3H-uridine to label the RNA. Note the corre-
spondence of the immunofluorescence and presence
of the radioactive RNA (black dots). Bar = 7 µm. (Repro-
duced, with permission, from Sass H: RNA polymerase B in
polytene chromosomes. Cell 1982;28:274. Copyright ©
1982 by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.)
more extended chromatin. Transcriptionally active re-
gions of these polytene chromosomes are especially
decondensed into “puffs”that can be shown to contain
the enzymes responsible for transcription and to be the
sites of RNA synthesis (Figure 36–4).
DNA IS ORGANIZED 
INTO CHROMOSOMES
At metaphase, mammalian chromosomes possess a
twofold symmetry, with the identical duplicated sister
chromatidsconnected at a centromere,the relative po-
sition of which is characteristic for a given chromosome
(Figure 36–5). The centromere is an adenine-thymine
(A–T) rich region ranging in size from 10
2
(brewers’
yeast) to 10
6
(mammals) base pairs. It binds several pro-
teins with high affinity. This complex, called the kine-
tochore,provides the anchor for the mitotic spindle. It
thus is an essential structure for chromosomal segrega-
tion during mitosis.
The ends of each chromosome contain structures
called telomeres. Telomeres consist of short, repeat
TG-rich sequences. Human telomeres have a variable
number of repeats of the sequence 5′-TTAGGG-3′,
which can extend for several kilobases. Telomerase,a
multisubunit RNA-containing complex related to viral
RNA-dependent DNA polymerases (reverse transcrip-
tases), is the enzyme responsible for telomere synthesis
and thus for maintaining the length of the telomere.
Since telomere shortening has been associated with
both malignant transformation and aging, telomerase
has become an attractive target for cancer chemother-
apy and drug development. Each sister chromatid con-
tains one double-stranded DNA molecule. During in-
terphase, the packing of the DNA molecule is less dense
than it is in the condensed chromosome during
metaphase. Metaphase chromosomes are nearly com-
pletely transcriptionally inactive.
The human haploid genome consists of about
3×10
9
bp and about 1.7 ×10
7
nucleosomes. Thus, each
of the 23 chromatids in the human haploid genome
would contain on the average 1.3 ×10
8
nucleotides in
one double-stranded DNA molecule. The length of
each DNA molecule must be compressed about 8000-
fold to generate the structure of a condensed metaphase
chromosome! In metaphase chromosomes, the 30-nm
chromatin fibers are also folded into a series of looped
domains,the proximal portions of which are anchored
to a nonhistone proteinaceous scaffolding within the
nucleus (Figure 36–3). The packing ratios of each of
the orders of DNA structure are summarized in Table
36–2.
The packaging of nucleoproteins within chromatids
is not random, as evidenced by the characteristic pat-
terns observed when chromosomes are stained with spe-
cific dyes such as quinacrine or Giemsa’s stain (Figure
36–6).
From individual to individual within a single
species, the pattern of staining (banding) of the entire
chromosome complement is highly reproducible; none-
theless, it differs significantly from other species, even
those closely related. Thus, the packaging of the nucleo-
proteins in chromosomes of higher eukaryotes must in
some way be dependent upon species-specific character-
istics of the DNA molecules.
A combination of specialized staining techniques
and high-resolution microscopy has allowed geneticists
DNA ORGANIZATION, REPLICATION, & REPAIR / 319
Sister chromatid No. 2
Centromere
Telomeres
(TTAGG)
n
Sister chromatid No. 1
Figure 36–5.
The two sister chromatids of
human chromosome 12 (×27,850). The location
of the A+T-rich centromeric region connecting
sister chromatids is indicated, as are two of the
four telomeres residing at the very ends of the
chromatids that are attached one to the other at
the centromere.(Modified and reproduced, with
permission, from DuPraw EJ: DNAand Chromo-
somes.Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1970.)
to quite precisely map thousands of genes to specific re-
gions of mouse and human chromosomes. With the re-
cent elucidation of the human and mouse genome se-
quences, it has become clear that many of these visual
mapping methods were remarkably accurate.
Coding Regions Are Often Interrupted 
by Intervening Sequences
The protein coding regions of DNA,the transcripts
of which ultimately appear in the cytoplasm as single
mRNA molecules, are usually interrupted in the eu-
karyotic genome by large intervening sequences of
nonprotein coding DNA. Accordingly, the primary
transcripts of DNA (mRNA precursors, originally
termed hnRNA because this species of RNA was quite
heterogeneous in size [length] and mostly restricted to
the nucleus), contain noncoding intervening sequences
of RNA that must be removed in a process which also
joins together the appropriate coding segments to form
the mature mRNA. Most coding sequences for a single
mRNA are interrupted in the genome (and thus in the
primary transcript) by at least one—and in some cases
as many as 50—noncoding intervening sequences (in-
trons).In most cases, the introns are much longer than
the continuous coding regions (exons).The processing
of the primary transcript, which involves removal of in-
trons and splicing of adjacent exons, is described in de-
tail in Chapter 37.
The function of the intervening sequences, or in-
trons, is not clear. They may serve to separate func-
tional domains (exons) of coding information in a form
that permits genetic rearrangement by recombination
to occur more rapidly than if all coding regions for a
given genetic function were contiguous. Such an en-
hanced rate of genetic rearrangement of functional do-
mains might allow more rapid evolution of biologic
function. The relationships among chromosomal
DNA, gene clusters on the chromosome, the exon-
intron structure of genes, and the final mRNA product
are illustrated in Figure 36–7.
Table 36–2. The packing ratios of each of the
orders of DNA structure.
Chromatin Form
Packing Ratio
Naked double-helical DNA
~1.0
10-nm fibril of nucleosomes
7–10
25- to 30-nm chromatin fiber of superheli- - 40–60
cal nucleosomes
Condensed metaphase chromosome of 
8000
loops
320 / CHAPTER 36
6
7
8
9
11
10
12
13
14
15
17
16
18
1
2
3
4
5
19
20
21
22
XY
Figure 36–6.
A human karyotype (of a man with a normal 46,XY constitution), in
which the metaphase chromosomes have been stained by the Giemsa method and
aligned according to the Paris Convention. (Courtesy of H Lawce and F Conte.)
MUCH OF THE MAMMALIAN GENOME 
IS REDUNDANT & MUCH IS 
NOT TRANSCRIBED
The haploid genome of each human cell consists of
3×10
9
base pairs of DNA subdivided into 23 chromo-
somes. The entire haploid genome contains sufficient
DNA to code for nearly 1.5 million average-sized
genes. However, studies of mutation rates and of the
complexities of the genomes of higher organisms
strongly suggest that humans have < 100,000 proteins
encoded by the ~1.1% of the human genome that is
composed of exonic DNA. This implies that most of
the DNA is noncoding—ie, its information is never
translated into an amino acid sequence of a protein
molecule. Certainly, some of the excess DNA sequences
serve to regulate the expression of genes during devel-
opment, differentiation, and adaptation to the environ-
ment. Some excess clearly makes up the intervening se-
quences or introns (24% of the total human genome)
that split the coding regions of genes, but much of the
excess appears to be composed of many families of re-
peated sequences for which no functions have been
clearly defined. A summary of the salient features of the
human genome is presented in Chapter 40.
The DNA in a eukaryotic genome can be divided
into different “sequence classes.” These are unique-
sequence, or nonrepetitive, DNA and repetitive-
sequence DNA. In the haploid genome, unique-se-
quence DNA generally includes the single copy genes
that code for proteins. The repetitive DNA in the hap-
loid genome includes sequences that vary in copy num-
ber from two to as many as 10
7
copies per cell.
More Than Half the DNA in Eukaryotic
Organisms Is in Unique or 
Nonrepetitive Sequences
This estimation (and the distribution of repetitive-
sequence DNA) is based on a variety of DNA-RNA hy-
bridization techniques and, more recently, on direct
DNA sequencing. Similar techniques are used to esti-
mate the number of active genes in a population of
unique-sequence DNA. In brewers’ yeast (Saccha-
romyces cerevisiae,a lower eukaryote), about two thirds
of its 6200 genes are expressed. In typical tissues in a
higher eukaryote (eg, mammalian liver and kidney), be-
tween 10,000 and 15,000 genes are expressed. Differ-
ent combinations of genes are expressed in each tissue,
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested