DNA ORGANIZATION, REPLICATION, & REPAIR / 331
3
DNA template
5
5
3
10 bp
10 bp
Okazaki fragments
100 bp
RNA
primer
Newly synthesized
DNA strand
Figure 36–16.
The discontinuous polymerization of deoxyribonucleotides on the lagging
strand; formation of Okazaki fragments during lagging strand DNA synthesis is illustrated.
Okazaki fragments are 100–250 nt long in eukaryotes, 1000–2000 bp in prokaryotes.
nucleotides in short spurts of 150–250 nucleotides,
again in the 5′to 3′direction, but at the same time it
faces toward the back end of the preceding RNA
primer rather than toward the unreplicated portion.
This process of semidiscontinuous DNA synthesisis
shown diagrammatically in Figures 36–13 and 36–16.
In the mammalian nuclear genome, most of the
RNA primers are eventually removed as part of the
replication process, whereas after replication of the mi-
tochondrial genome the small piece of RNA remains as
an integral part of the closed circular DNA structure.
Formation of Replication Bubbles
Replication proceeds from a single ori in the circular
bacterial chromosome, composed of roughly 6 ×10
6
bp
of DNA. This process is completed in about 30 min-
utes, a replication rate of 3 ×10
5
bp/min. The entire
mammalian genome replicates in approximately 9
hours, the average period required for formation of a
tetraploid genome from a diploid genome in a replicat-
ing cell. If a mammalian genome (3 ×10
9
bp) repli-
cated at the same rate as bacteria (ie, 3 ×10
5
bp/min)
from but a single ori, replication would take over 150
hours! Metazoan organisms get around this problem
using two strategies. First, replication is bidirectional.
Second, replication proceeds from multiple origins in
each chromosome (a total of as many as 100 in hu-
mans). Thus, replication occurs in both directions
along all of the chromosomes, and both strands are
replicated simultaneously. This replication process gen-
erates “replication bubbles”(Figure 36–17).
The multiple sites that serve as origins for DNA
replication in eukaryotes are poorly defined except in a
few animal viruses and in yeast. However, it is clear that
initiation is regulated both spatially and temporally,
since clusters of adjacent sites initiate replication syn-
chronously. There are suggestions that functional do-
mains of chromatin replicate as intact units, implying
that the origins of replication are specifically located
with respect to transcription units.
During the replication of DNA, there must be a sep-
aration of the two strands to allow each to serve as a
template by hydrogen bonding its nucleotide bases to
the incoming deoxynucleoside triphosphate. The separa-
tion of the DNA double helix is promoted by SSBs, spe-
cific protein molecules that stabilize the single-stranded
structure as the replication fork progresses. These stabi-
3
5
5
Origin of replication
3
D
i
r
e
c
t
i
o
n
s
o
f
r
e
p
l
i
c
a
t
i
o
n
“Replication bubble”
Unwinding proteins
at replication forks
Figure 36–17.
The generation of “replication bubbles” during the process of DNA synthesis. The bidirectional
replication and the proposed positions of unwinding proteins at the replication forks are depicted.
Batch convert pdf to jpg online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf file to jpg on; change pdf file to jpg online
Batch convert pdf to jpg online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
bulk pdf to jpg converter; conversion pdf to jpg
332 / CHAPTER 36
lizing proteins bind cooperatively and stoichiometrically
to the single strands without interfering with the abili-
ties of the nucleotides to serve as templates (Figure
36–13). In addition to separating the two strands of the
double helix, there must be an unwinding of the mole-
cule (once every 10 nucleotide pairs) to allow strand sep-
aration. This must happen in segments, given the time
during which DNA replication occurs. There are multi-
ple “swivels” interspersed in the DNA molecules of all
organisms. The swivel function is provided by specific
enzymes that introduce “nicks” in one strand of the
unwinding double helix,thereby allowing the unwind-
ing process to proceed. The nicks are quickly resealed
without requiring energy input, because of the forma-
tion of a high-energy covalent bond between the nicked
phosphodiester backbone and the nicking-sealing en-
zyme. The nicking-resealing enzymes are called DNA
topoisomerases.This process is depicted diagrammati-
cally in Figure 36–18 and there compared with the
ATP-dependent resealing carried out by the DNA li-
gases. Topoisomerases are also capable of unwinding su-
percoiled DNA. Supercoiled DNA is a higher-ordered
structure occurring in circular DNA molecules wrapped
around a core, as depicted in Figure 36–19.
There exists in one species of animal viruses (retro-
viruses) a class of enzymes capable of synthesizing a sin-
Step 1
Step 2
Step 3
E + ATP
E
P
R
A
(AMP-Enzyme)
P
3
P
R
A
P
R
A
P
R
A
DNA ligase = E
Single-strand nick
present
E
E
P
3
5
5
H
Nick repaired
(AMP)
O
O
DNA topoisomerase I = E
5
P -E
Enzyme (E) -generated
single-strand nick
3
5
P
Formation of high-
energy bond
E
O
O
3
Nick repaired
H
H
H
5
5
-E
Figure 36–18.
Comparison of two types of nick-sealing reactions on DNA. The
series of reactions at left is catalyzed by DNA topoisomerase I, that at right by
DNA ligase; P = phosphate, R = ribose, A = ademine. (Slightly modified and repro-
duced, with permission, from Lehninger AL: Biochemistry,2nd ed. Worth, 1975.)
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
convert pdf to jpeg on; convert pdf page to jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
VB.NET components for batch convert high resolution images from PDF. Convert PDF documents to multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap
change from pdf to jpg; bulk pdf to jpg converter online
DNA ORGANIZATION, REPLICATION, & REPAIR / 333
gle-stranded and then a double-stranded DNA mole-
cule from a single-stranded RNA template. This poly-
merase, RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, or “reverse
transcriptase,” first synthesizes a DNA-RNA hybrid
molecule utilizing the RNA genome as a template. A
specific nuclease, RNase H, degrades the RNA strand,
and the remaining DNA strand in turn serves as a tem-
plate to form a double-stranded DNA molecule con-
taining the information originally present in the RNA
genome of the animal virus.
Reconstitution of Chromatin Structure
There is evidence that nuclear organization and chro-
matin structure are involved in determining the regu-
lation and initiation of DNA synthesis. As noted
above, the rate of polymerization in eukaryotic cells,
which have chromatin and nucleosomes, is tenfold
slower than that in prokaryotic cells, which have
naked DNA. It is also clear that chromatin structure
must be re-formed after replication. Newly replicated
DNA is rapidly assembled into nucleosomes, and the
preexisting and newly assembled histone octamers are
randomly distributed to each arm of the replication
fork.
DNA Synthesis Occurs During 
the S Phase of the Cell Cycle
In animal cells, including human cells, the replication
of the DNA genome occurs only at a specified time
during the life span of the cell. This period is referred to
as the synthetic or S phase. This is usually temporally
separated from the mitotic phase by nonsynthetic peri-
ods referred to as gap 1 (G1) and gap 2 (G2), occurring
before and after the S phase, respectively (Figure
36–20). Among other things, the cell prepares for DNA
synthesis in G1 and for mitosis in G2. The cell regu-
lates its DNA synthesis grossly by allowing it to occur
only at specific times and mostly in cells preparing to
divide by a mitotic process.
It appears that all eukaryotic cells have gene prod-
ucts that govern the transition from one phase of the
cell cycle to another. The cyclinsare a family of pro-
teins whose concentration increases and decreases
throughout the cell cycle—thus their name. The cyclins
turn on, at the appropriate time, different cyclin-
dependent protein kinases (CDKs) that phosphory-
late substrates essential for progression through the cell
cycle (Figure 36–21). For example, cyclin D levels rise
in late G1 phase and allow progression beyond the start
(yeast)or restriction point (mammals), the point be-
yond which cells irrevocably proceed into the S or
DNA synthesis phase.
The D cyclins activate CDK4 and CDK6. These
two kinases are also synthesized during G1 in cells un-
dergoing active division. The D cyclins and CDK4 and
CDK6 are nuclear proteins that assemble as a complex
in late G1 phase. The complex is an active serine-
threonine protein kinase. One substrate for this kinase
is the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein. Rb is a cell cycle
regulator because it binds to and inactivates a transcrip-
tion factor (E2F) necessary for the transcription of cer-
tain genes (histone genes, DNA replication proteins,
etc) needed for progression from G1 to S phase. The
phosphorylation of Rb by CDK4 or CDK6 results in
the release of E2F from Rb-mediated transcription re-
pression—thus, gene activation ensues and cell cycle
progression takes place.
Other cyclins and CDKs are involved in different
aspects of cell cycle progression (Table 36–7). Cyclin E
and CDK2 form a complex in late G1. Cyclin E is
rapidly degraded, and the released CDK2 then forms a
complex with cyclin A. This sequence is necessary for
the initiation of DNA synthesis in S phase. A complex
between cyclin B and CDK1 is rate-limiting for the
G2/M transition in eukaryotic cells.
Figure 36–19.
Supercoiling of DNA. A left-handed
toroidal (solenoidal) supercoil, at left, will convert to a
right-handed interwound supercoil, at right, when the
cylindric core is removed. Such a transition is analogous
to that which occurs when nucleosomes are disrupted
by the high salt extraction of histones from chromatin.
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Components to batch convert PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class. Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
changing pdf to jpg; reader pdf to jpeg
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Powerful .NET control to batch convert PDF documents to tiff format in Visual C# .NET program. Also supports convert PDF files to jpg, jpeg images.
.net convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf image to jpg image
334 / CHAPTER 36
duced by several DNA viruses target the Rb transcrip-
tion repressor for inactivation, inducing cell division in-
appropriately.
During the S phase, mammalian cells contain
greater quantities of DNA polymerase than during the
nonsynthetic phases of the cell cycle. Furthermore,
those enzymes responsible for formation of the sub-
strates for DNA synthesis—ie, deoxyribonucleoside
triphosphates—are also increased in activity, and their
activity will diminish following the synthetic phase
until the reappearance of the signal for renewed DNA
Cdk1-cyclin B
Cdk1-cyclin A
Cdk4-cyclin D
Cdk6-cyclin D
Cdk2-cyclin E
Cdk2-cyclin A
Restriction
point
G
2
G
1
M
S
Figure 36–21.
Schematic illustration of the
points during the mammalian cell cycle during
which the indicated cyclins and cyclin-dependent
kinases are activated. The thickness of the various
colored lines is indicative of the extent of activity.
Improper spindle
detected
Damaged DNA
detected
Damaged DNA
detected
Incomplete
replication
detected
G
2
Gl
M
S
Figure 36–20.
Mammalian cell cycle and cell
cycle checkpoints. DNA, chromosome, and chro-
mosome segregation integrity is continuously
monitored throughout the cell cycle. If DNA dam-
age is detected in either the G1 or the G2 phase of
the cell cycle, if the genome is incompletely repli-
cated, or if normal chromosome segregation ma-
chinery is incomplete (ie, a defective spindle), cells
will not progress through the phase of the cycle in
which defects are detected. In some cases, if the
damage cannot be repaired, such cells undergo
programmed cell death (apoptosis).
Many of the cancer-causing viruses (oncoviruses)
and cancer-inducing genes (oncogenes) are capable of
alleviating or disrupting the apparent restriction that
normally controls the entry of mammalian cells from
G1 into the S phase. From the foregoing, one might
have surmised that excessive production of a cyclin—or
production at an inappropriate time—might result in
abnormal or unrestrained cell division. In this context it
is noteworthy that the bcloncogene associated with B
cell lymphoma appears to be the cyclin D1 gene. Simi-
larly, the oncoproteins (or transforming proteins) pro-
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
and Benefits. Powerful image converter to convert images of Support a batch conversion of JPG to PDF with amazingly high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after
change file from pdf to jpg; change pdf file to jpg file
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
speed JPEG to GIF Converter, faster than other JPG Converters; Automatically sort the file name when you convert the files in batch; Storing conversion
convert pdf to jpg for online; change pdf to jpg on
DNA ORGANIZATION, REPLICATION, & REPAIR / 335
synthesis. During the S phase, the nuclear DNA is
completely replicated once and only once.It seems
that once chromatin has been replicated, it is marked so
as to prevent its further replication until it again passes
through mitosis. The molecular mechanisms for this
phenomenon have yet to be elucidated.
In general, a given pair of chromosomes will repli-
cate simultaneously and within a fixed portion of the S
phase upon every replication. On a chromosome, clus-
ters of replication units replicate coordinately. The na-
ture of the signals that regulate DNA synthesis at these
levels is unknown, but the regulation does appear to be
an intrinsic property of each individual chromosome.
Enzymes Repair Damaged DNA
The maintenance of the integrity of the information in
DNA molecules is of utmost importance to the survival
of a particular organism as well as to survival of the
species. Thus, it can be concluded that surviving species
have evolved mechanisms for repairing DNA damage
occurring as a result of either replication errors or envi-
ronmental insults.
As described in Chapter 35, the major responsibility
for the fidelity of replication resides in the specific pair-
ing of nucleotide bases. Proper pairing is dependent
upon the presence of the favored tautomers of the
purine and pyrimidine nucleotides, but the equilibrium
whereby one tautomer is more stable than another is
only about 10or 10in favor of that with the greater
stability. Although this is not favorable enough to en-
sure the high fidelity that is necessary, favoring of the
preferred tautomers—and thus of the proper base pair-
ing—could be ensured by monitoring the base pairing
twice. Such double monitoring does appear to occur in
both bacterial and mammalian systems: once at the
time of insertion of the deoxyribonucleoside triphos-
phates, and later by a follow-up energy-requiring mech-
anism that removes all improper bases which may occur
in the newly formed strand. This “proofreading” pre-
vents tautomer-induced misincorporation from occur-
ring more frequently than once every 10
8
–10
10
base
pairs of DNA synthesized. The mechanisms responsible
for this monitoring mechanism in E coliinclude the 3′
to 5′exonuclease activities of one of the subunits of the
pol III complex and of the pol I molecule. The analo-
gous mammalian enzymes (δ δ and α) do not seem to
possess such a nuclease proofreading function. Other
enzymes provide this repair function.
Replication errors, even with a very efficient repair
system, lead to the accumulation of mutations. A
human has 10
14
nucleated cells each with 3 ×10
9
base
pairs of DNA. If about 10
16
cell divisions occur in a
lifetime and 10
−10
mutations per base pair per cell gen-
eration escape repair, there may eventually be as many
as one mutation per 10
6
bp in the genome. Fortunately,
most of these will probably occur in DNA that does not
encode proteins or will not affect the function of en-
coded proteins and so are of no consequence. In addi-
tion, spontaneous and chemically induced damage to
DNA must be repaired.
Damage to DNA by environmental, physical, and
chemical agents may be classified into four types
(Table 36–8). Abnormal regions of DNA, either from
copying errors or DNA damage, are replaced by four
mechanisms: (1) mismatch repair, (2) base excision-
repair, (3) nucleotide excision-repair, and (4) double-
strand break repair (Table 36–9). These mechanisms
exploit the redundancy of information inherent in the
double helical DNA structure. The defective region in
one strand can be returned to its original form by rely-
ing on the complementary information stored in the
unaffected strand.
Table 36–7. Cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases
involved in cell cycle progression.
Cyclin
Kinase
Function
D
CDK4, CDK6 6 Progression past restriction point at 
G1/S boundary
E, A
CDK2
Initiation of DNA synthesis in early S 
phase
B
CDK1
Transition from G2 to M
Table 36–8. Types of damage to DNA.
I. Single-base alteration
A. Depurination
B. Deamination of cytosine to uracil
C. Deamination of adenine to hypoxanthine
D. Alkylation of base
E. Insertion or deletion of nucleotide
F. Base-analog incorporation
II. Two-base alteration
A. UV light–induced thymine-thymine (pyrimidine) dimer
B. Bifunctional alkylating agent cross-linkage
III. Chain breaks
A. Ionizing radiation
B. Radioactive disintegration of backbone element
C. Oxidative free radical formation
IV. Cross-linkage
A. Between bases in same or opposite strands
B. Between DNA and protein molecules (eg, histones)
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
An advanced .NET control able to batch convert PDF documents to image formats in C# Support exporting PDF to multiple image forms, including Jpg, Png, Bmp
.pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg online
JPG to DICOM Converter | Convert JPEG to DICOM, Convert DICOM to
Select "Convert to DICOM"; Select "Start" to start conversion How to Start Batch JPEG Conversion to DICOM. JPEG to DICOM Converter first; Load JPG images from
convert pdf pages to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg file
336 / CHAPTER 36
3
CH
3
5
5
3
SINGLE-SITE STRAND CUT
BY GATC ENDONUCLEASE
3
5
5
3
DEFECT REMOVED
BY EXONUCLEASE
3
5
5
3
DEFECT REPAIRED
BY POLYMERASE
3
5
RELIGATED
BY LIGASE
3
5
5
3
CH
3
CH
3
CH
3
CH
3
CH
3
CH
3
CH
3
CH
3
CH
3
Figure 36–22.
Mismatch repair of DNA. This mecha-
nism corrects a single mismatch base pair (eg, C to A
rather than T to A) or a short region of unpaired DNA.
The defective region is recognized by an endonuclease
that makes a single-strand cut at an adjacent methy-
lated GATC sequence. The DNA strand is removed
through the mutation, replaced, and religated.
Mismatch Repair
Mismatch repair corrects errors made when DNA is
copied. For example, a C could be inserted opposite an
A, or the polymerase could slip or stutter and insert two
to five extra unpaired bases. Specific proteins scan the
newly synthesized DNA, using adenine methylation
within a GATC sequence as the point of reference (Fig-
ure 36–22). The template strand is methylated, and the
newly synthesized strand is not. This difference allows
the repair enzymes to identify the strand that contains
the errant nucleotide which requires replacement. If a
mismatch or small loop is found, a GATC endonucle-
ase cuts the strand bearing the mutation at a site corre-
sponding to the GATC. An exonuclease then digests
this strand from the GATC through the mutation, thus
removing the faulty DNA. This can occur from either
end if the defect is bracketed by two GATC sites. This
defect is then filled in by normal cellular enzymes ac-
cording to base pairing rules. In E coli,three proteins
(Mut S, Mut C, and Mut H) are required for recogni-
tion of the mutation and nicking of the strand. Other
cellular enzymes, including ligase, polymerase, and
SSBs, remove and replace the strand. The process is
somewhat more complicated in mammalian cells, as
about six proteins are involved in the first steps.
Faulty mismatch repair has been linked to heredi-
tary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC), one of the
most common inherited cancers. Genetic studies linked
HNPCC in some families to a region of chromosome
2. The gene located, designated hMSH2, was sub-
sequently shown to encode the human analog of the
EcoliMutS protein that is involved in mismatch repair
(see above). Mutations of hMSH2account for 50–60%
of HNPCC cases. Another gene, hMLH1,is associated
with most of the other cases. hMLH1is the human ana-
log of the bacterial mismatch repair gene MutL.How
does faulty mismatch repair result in colon cancer? The
human genes were localized because microsatellite in-
stability was detected. That is, the cancer cells had a mi-
crosatellite of a length different from that found in the
normal cells of the individual. It appears that the af-
fected cells, which harbor a mutated hMSH2 or
hMLH1mismatch repair enzyme, are unable to remove
small loops of unpaired DNA, and the microsatellite
thus increases in size. Ultimately, microsatellite DNA
expansion must affect either the expression or the func-
tion of a protein critical in surveillance of the cell cycle
in these colon cells.
Table 36–9. Mechanism of DNA repair
Mechanism
Problem
Solution
Mismatch
Copying errors (single e Methyl-directed
repair
base or two- to five-
strand cutting, exo-
base unpaired loops)
nuclease digestion,
and replacement
Base
Spontaneous, chem-
Base removal by N-
excision-
ical, or radiation dam- - glycosylase, abasic
repair
age to a single base
sugar removal, re-
placement
Nucleotide
Spontaneous, chem-
Removal of an ap-
excision-
ical, or radiation dam- - proximately 30-
repair
age to a DNA segment t nucleotide oligomer
and replacement
Double-
Ionizing radiation,
Synapsis, unwind-
strand
chemotherapy,
ing, alignment,
break repair r oxidative free
ligation
radicals
DNA ORGANIZATION, REPLICATION, & REPAIR / 337
A
T
T
A
C
G
G
C
G
C
C
G
T
A
C
G
A
T
T
A
C
G
C
G
G
C
A
T
T
A
Heat energy
A
T
T
A
C
G
G
C
G
C
C
G
T
A
U
U
G
A
T
T
A
C
G
C
G
G
C
A
T
T
A
URACIL DNA GLYCOSYLASE
A
T
T
A
C
G
G
C
G
C
C
G
T
A
*
G
A
T
T
A
C
G
C
G
G
C
A
T
T
A
NUCLEASES
A
T
T
A
C
G
G
C
G
C
C
G
A G T
T
A
C
G
C
G
G
C
A
T
T
A
DNA POLYMERASE + DNA LIGASE
A
T
T
A
C
G
G
C
G
C
C
G
T
A
C
G
A
T
T
A
C
G
C
G
G
C
A
T
T
A
3
5
5
3
Figure 36–23.
Base excision-repair of DNA. The en-
zyme uracil DNA glycosylase removes the uracil created
by spontaneous deamination of cytosine in the DNA. An
endonuclease cuts the backbone near the defect; then,
after an endonuclease removes a few bases, the defect
is filled in by the action of a repair polymerase and the
strand is rejoined by a ligase. (Courtesy of B Alberts.)
Base Excision-Repair
The depurination of DNA, which happens sponta-
neously owing to the thermal lability of the purine N-
glycosidic bond, occurs at a rate of 5000–10,000/cell/d
at 37 °C. Specific enzymes recognize a depurinated site
and replace the appropriate purine directly, without in-
terruption of the phosphodiester backbone.
Cytosine, adenine, and guanine bases in DNA spon-
taneously form uracil, hypoxanthine, or xanthine, re-
spectively. Since none of these normally exist in DNA,
it is not surprising that specific N-glycosylasescan rec-
ognize these abnormal bases and remove the base itself
from the DNA. This removal marks the site of the de-
fect and allows an apurinic or apyrimidinic endonu-
clease to excise the abasic sugar. The proper base is
then replaced by a repair DNA polymerase, and a ligase
returns the DNA to its original state (Figure 36–23).
This series of events is called base excision-repair.By a
similar series of steps involving initially the recognition
of the defect, alkylated bases and base analogs can be re-
moved from DNA and the DNA returned to its origi-
nal informational content. This mechanism is suitable
for replacement of a single base but is not effective at
replacing regions of damaged DNA.
Nucleotide Excision-Repair
This mechanism is used to replace regions of damaged
DNA up to 30 bases in length. Common examples of
DNA damage include ultraviolet (UV) light, which in-
duces the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine-pyrimi-
dine dimers, and smoking, which causes formation of
benzo[a]pyrene-guanine adducts. Ionizing radiation,
cancer chemotherapeutic agents, and a variety of chemi-
cals found in the environment cause base modification,
strand breaks, cross-linkage between bases on opposite
strands or between DNA and protein, and numerous
other defects. These are repaired by a process called nu-
cleotide excision-repair (Figure 36–24). This complex
process, which involves more gene products than the two
other types of repair, essentially involves the hydrolysis of
two phosphodiester bonds on the strand containing the
defect. A special excision nuclease (exinuclease), consist-
ing of at least three subunits in E coliand 16 polypep-
tides in humans, accomplishes this task. In eukaryotic
cells the enzymes cut between the third to fifth phospho-
diester bond 3′from the lesion, and on the 5′side the cut
is somewhere between the twenty-first and twenty-fifth
bonds. Thus, a fragment of DNA 27–29 nucleotides
long is excised. After the strand is removed it is replaced,
again by exact base pairing, through the action of yet an-
other polymerase (δ/ε in humans), and the ends are
joined to the existing strands by DNA ligase.
Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)is an autosomal re-
cessive genetic disease. The clinical syndrome includes
marked sensitivity to sunlight (ultraviolet) with subse-
quent formation of multiple skin cancers and prema-
ture death. The risk of developing skin cancer is in-
creased 1000- to 2000-fold. The inherited defect seems
to involve the repair of damaged DNA, particularly
thymine dimers. Cells cultured from patients with xero-
derma pigmentosum exhibit low activity for the nu-
cleotide excision-repair process. Seven complementa-
tion groups have been identified using hybrid cell
analyses, so at least seven gene products (XPA–XPG)
are involved. Two of these (XPA and XPC) are in-
volved in recognition and excision. XPB and XPD are
helicases and, interestingly, are subunits of the tran-
scription factor TFIIH (see Chapter 37).
Double-Strand Break Repair
The repair of double-strand breaks is part of the physio-
logic process of immunoglobulin gene rearrangement. It
338 / CHAPTER 36
3
5
5
3
3
5
5
3
3
5
5
3
3
5
5
3
RECOGNITION AND UNWINDING
OLIGONUCLEOTIDE EXCISION
BY CUTTING AT TWO SITES
RESYNTHESIS AND RELIGATION
DEGRADATION OF MUTATED DNA
Figure 36–24.
Nucleotide excision-repair. This
mechanism is employed to correct larger defects in
DNA and generally involves more proteins than either
mismatch or base excision-repair. After defect recogni-
tion (indicated by XXXX) and unwinding of the DNA en-
compassing the defect, an excision nuclease (exinucle-
ase) cuts the DNA upstream and downstream of the
defective region. This gap is then filled in by a poly-
merase (δ/εin humans) and religated.
is also an important mechanism for repairing damaged
DNA, such as occurs as a result of ionizing radiation or
oxidative free radical generation. Some chemotherapeu-
tic agents destroy cells by causing ds breaks or prevent-
ing their repair.
Two proteins are initially involved in the nonho-
mologous rejoining of a ds break. Ku, a heterodimer of
70 kDa and 86 kDa subunits, binds to free DNA ends
and has latent ATP-dependent helicase activity. The
DNA-bound Ku heterodimer recruits a unique protein
kinase, DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK).
DNA-PK has a binding site for DNA free ends and an-
other for dsDNA just inside these ends. It therefore al-
lows for the approximation of the two separated ends.
The free end DNA-Ku-DNA-PK complex activates the
kinase activity in the latter. DNA-PK reciprocally phos-
phorylates Ku and the other DNA-PK molecule, on the
opposing strand, in trans. DNA-PK then dissociates
from the DNA and Ku, resulting in activation of the
Ku helicase. This results in unwinding of the two ends.
The unwound, approximated DNA forms base pairs;
the extra nucleotide tails are removed by an exonucle-
ase; and the gaps are filled and closed by DNA ligase.
This repair mechanism is illustrated in Figure 36–25.
Some Repair Enzymes Are Multifunctional
Somewhat surprising is the recent observation that
DNA repair proteins can serve other purposes. For ex-
ample, some repair enzymes are also found as compo-
nents of the large TFIIH complex that plays a central
role in gene transcription (Chapter 37). Another com-
ponent of TFIIH is involved in cell cycle regulation.
Thus, three critical cellular processes may be linked
through use of common proteins. There is also good
evidence that some repair enzymes are involved in gene
rearrangements that occur normally.
In patients with ataxia-telangiectasia,an autosomal
recessive disease in humans resulting in the development
of cerebellar ataxia and lymphoreticular neoplasms,
there appears to exist an increased sensitivity to damage
by x-ray. Patients with Fanconi’s anemia,an autosomal
recessive anemia characterized also by an increased fre-
quency of cancer and by chromosomal instability, prob-
ably have defective repair of cross-linking damage.
P
P
Ku and DNA-PK bind
Approximation
Unwinding
Alignment and base pairing
Ligation
Figure 36–25.
Double-strand break repair of DNA.
The proteins Ku and DNA-dependent protein kinase
combine to approximate the two strands and unwind
them. The aligned fragments form base pairs; the extra
ends are removed, probably by a DNA-PK-associated
endo- or exonuclease, and the gaps are filled in; and
continuity is restored by ligation.
DNA ORGANIZATION, REPLICATION, & REPAIR / 339
All three of these clinical syndromes are associated
with an increased frequency of cancer. It is likely that
other human diseases resulting from disordered DNA
repair capabilities will be found in the future.
DNA & Chromosome Integrity Is
Monitored Throughout the Cell Cycle
Given the importance of normal DNA and chromosome
function to survival, it is not surprising that eukaryotic
cells have developed elaborate mechanisms to monitor
the integrity of the genetic material. As detailed above, a
number of complex multi-subunit enzyme systems have
evolved to repair damaged DNA at the nucleotide se-
quence level. Similarly, DNA mishaps at the chromo-
some level are also monitored and repaired. As shown in
Figure 36–20, DNA integrity and chromosomal in-
tegrity are continuously monitored throughout the cell
cycle. The four specific steps at which this monitoring
occurs have been termed checkpoint controls.If prob-
lems are detected at any of these checkpoints, progression
through the cycle is interrupted and transit through the
cell cycle is halted until the damage is repaired. The mol-
ecular mechanisms underlying detection of DNA dam-
age during the G1 and G2 phases of the cycle are under-
stood better than those operative during S and M phases.
The tumor suppressorp53, a protein of MW 53
kDa, plays a key role in both G1 and G2 checkpoint con-
trol. Normally a very unstable protein, p53 is a DNA
binding transcription factor, one of a family of related
proteins, that is somehow stabilized in response to DNA
damage, perhaps by direct p53-DNA interactions. In-
creased levels of p53 activate transcription of an ensemble
of genes that collectively serve to delay transit through the
cycle. One of these induced proteins, p21CIP, is a potent
CDK-cyclin inhibitor (CKI) that is capable of efficiently
inhibiting the action of all CDKs. Clearly, inhibition of
CDKs will halt progression through the cell cycle (see
Figures 36–19 and 36–20). If DNA damage is too exten-
sive to repair, the affected cells undergo apoptosis(pro-
grammed cell death) in a p53-dependent fashion. In this
case, p53 induces the activation of a collection of genes
that induce apoptosis. Cells lacking functional p53 fail to
undergo apoptosis in response to high levels of radiation
or DNA-active chemotherapeutic agents. It may come as
no surprise, then, that p53is one of the most frequently
mutated genes in human cancers. Additional research into
the mechanisms of checkpoint control will prove invalu-
able for the development of effective anticancer therapeu-
tic options.
SUMMARY
• DNA in eukaryotic cells is associated with a variety
of proteins, resulting in a structure called chromatin. 
• Much of the DNA is associated with histone proteins
to form a structure called the nucleosome. Nucleo-
somes are composed of an octamer of histones and
150 bp of DNA. 
• Nucleosomes and higher-order structures formed
from them serve to compact the DNA. 
• As much as 90% of DNA may be transcriptionally
inactive as a result of being nuclease-resistant, highly
compacted, and nucleosome-associated. 
• DNA in transcriptionally active regions is sensitive to
nuclease attack; some regions are exceptionally sensi-
tive and are often found to contain transcription
control sites. 
• Transcriptionally active DNA (the genes) is often
clustered in regions of each chromosome. Within
these regions, genes may be separated by inactive
DNA in nucleosomal structures. The transcription
unit—that portion of a gene that is copied by RNA
polymerase—consists of coding regions of DNA
(exons) interrupted by intervening sequences of non-
coding DNA (introns). 
• After transcription, during RNA processing, introns
are removed and the exons are ligated together to
form the mature mRNA that appears in the cyto-
plasm.
• DNA in each chromosome is exactly replicated ac-
cording to the rules of base pairing during the S
phase of the cell cycle. 
• Each strand of the double helix is replicated simulta-
neously but by somewhat different mechanisms. A
complex of proteins, including DNA polymerase,
replicates the leading strand continuously in the 5′to
3′direction. The lagging strand is replicated discon-
tinuously, in short pieces of 150–250 nucleotides, in
the 3′to 5′direction. 
• DNA replication occurs at several sites—called repli-
cation bubbles—in each chromosome. The entire
process takes about 9 hours in a typical cell. 
• A variety of mechanisms employing different en-
zymes repair damaged DNA, as after exposure to
chemical mutagens or ultraviolet radiation.
REFERENCES
DePamphilis ML: Origins of DNA replication in metazoan chro-
mosomes. J Biol Chem 1993;268:1.
Hartwell LH, Kastan MB: Cell cycle control and cancer. Science
1994;266:1821.
Jenuwein T, Allis CD: Translating the histone code. Science 2001;
293:1074.
Lander ES et al: Initial sequencing and analysis of the human
genome. Nature 2001;409:860.
Luger L et al: Crystal structure of the nucleosome core particle at
2.8 Å resolution. Nature 1997;398:251.
340 / CHAPTER 36
Marians KJ: Prokaryotic DNA replication. Annu Rev Biochem
1992;61:673.
Michelson RJ, Weinart T: Closing the gaps among a web of DNA
repair disorders. Bioessays J 2002;22:966.
Moll UM, Erster S, Zaika A: p53, p63 and p73—solos, alliances
and feuds among family members. Biochim Biophys Acta
2001;1552:47.
Mouse Genome Sequencing Consortium: Initial sequencing and
comparative analysis of the mouse genome. Nature 2002;
420:520.
Narlikar GJ et al: Cooperation between complexes that regulate
chromatin structure and transcription. Cell 2002;108:475.
Sullivan et al: Determining centromere identity: cyclical stories and
forking paths. Nat Rev Genet 2001;2:584.
van Holde K, Zlatanova J: Chromatin higher order: chasing a mi-
rage? J Biol Chem 1995;270:8373.
Venter JC et al: The sequence of the human genome. Science
2002;291:1304.
Wallace DC: Mitochondrial DNA in aging and disease. Sci Am
1997 Aug;277:40.
Wood RD: Nucleotide excision repair in mammalian cells. J Biol
Chem 1997;272:23465. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested