asp.net mvc generate pdf : Convert image pdf to text pdf control SDK system azure wpf winforms console Harper%27s%20Illustrated%20Biochemistry%20-%20Robert%20K.%20Murray,%20Darryl%20K.%20Granner,%20Peter%20A.%20Mayes,%20Victor%20W.%20Rodwell35-part595

RNA Synthesis,Processing,
& Modification
37
341
Daryl K. Granner, MD, & P. Anthony Weil, PhD
BIOMEDICAL IMPORTANCE
The synthesis of an RNA molecule from DNA is a
complex process involving one of the group of RNA
polymerase enzymes and a number of associated pro-
teins. The general steps required to synthesize the pri-
mary transcript are initiation, elongation, and termina-
tion. Most is known about initiation. A number of
DNA regions (generally located upstream from the ini-
tiation site) and protein factors that bind to these se-
quences to regulate the initiation of transcription have
been identified. Certain RNAs—mRNAs in particu-
lar—have very different life spans in a cell. It is impor-
tant to understand the basic principles of messenger
RNA synthesis and metabolism, for modulation of this
process results in altered rates of protein synthesis and
thus a variety of metabolic changes. This is how all or-
ganisms adapt to changes of environment. It is also how
differentiated cell structures and functions are estab-
lished and maintained. The RNA molecules synthe-
sized in mammalian cells are made as precursor mole-
cules that have to be processed into mature, active
RNA. Errors or changes in synthesis, processing, and
splicing of mRNA transcripts are a cause of disease.
RNA EXISTS IN FOUR MAJOR CLASSES
All eukaryotic cells have four major classes of RNA: ri-
bosomal RNA (rRNA), messenger RNA (mRNA), trans-
fer RNA (tRNA), and small nuclear RNA (snRNA).
The first three are involved in protein synthesis, and
snRNA is involved in mRNA splicing. As shown in
Table 37–1, these various classes of RNA are different
in their diversity, stability, and abundance in cells.
RNA IS SYNTHESIZED FROM A DNA
TEMPLATE BY AN RNA POLYMERASE
The processes of DNA and RNA synthesis are similar
in that they involve (1) the general steps of initiation,
elongation, and termination with 5′to 3′polarity; (2)
large, multicomponent initiation complexes; and (3)
adherence to Watson-Crick base-pairing rules. These
processes differ in several important ways, including the
following: (1) ribonucleotides are used in RNA synthe-
sis rather than deoxyribonucleotides; (2) U replaces T
as the complementary base pair for A in RNA; (3) a
primer is not involved in RNA synthesis; (4) only a very
small portion of the genome is transcribed or copied
into RNA, whereas the entire genome must be copied
during DNA replication; and (5) there is no proofread-
ing function during RNA transcription.
The process of synthesizing RNA from a DNA tem-
plate has been characterized best in prokaryotes. Al-
though in mammalian cells the regulation of RNA syn-
thesis and the processing of the RNA transcripts are
different from those in prokaryotes, the process of RNA
synthesis per se is quite similar in these two classes of
organisms. Therefore, the description of RNA synthesis
in prokaryotes, where it is better understood, is applica-
ble to eukaryotes even though the enzymes involved
and the regulatory signals are different.
The Template Strand of DNA 
Is Transcribed
The sequence of ribonucleotides in an RNA molecule is
complementary to the sequence of deoxyribonu-
cleotides in one strand of the double-stranded DNA
molecule (Figure 35–8). The strand that is transcribed
or copied into an RNA molecule is referred to as the
template strandof the DNA. The other DNA strand is
frequently referred to as the coding strandof that gene.
It is called this because, with the exception of T for U
changes, it corresponds exactly to the sequence of the
primary transcript, which encodes the protein product
of the gene. In the case of a double-stranded DNA mol-
ecule containing many genes, the template strand for
each gene will not necessarily be the same strand of the
DNA double helix (Figure 37–1). Thus, a given strand
of a double-stranded DNA molecule will serve as the
template strand for some genes and the coding strand
of other genes. Note that the nucleotide sequence of an
RNA transcript will be the same (except for U replacing
T) as that of the coding strand. The information in the
template strand is read out in the 3′to 5′direction.
Best convert pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
change pdf into jpg; best pdf to jpg converter for
Best convert pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi; changing pdf file to jpg
342 / CHAPTER 37
Table 37–1. Classes of eukaryotic RNA.
RNA
Types
Abundance
Stability
Ribosomal 
28S, 18S, 5.8S, 5S S 80% of total l Very stable
(rRNA)
Messenger 
~10
5
different 
2–5% of total l Unstable to 
(mRNA)
species
very 
stable
Transfer 
~60 different 
~15% of total l Very stable
(tRNA)
species
Small nuclear ~30 different 
≤1% of total l Very stable
(snRNA)
species
5′
3′
3′
5′
5′ P-P-P
RNA transcript
Transcription
RNAP complex
β′
β
α
α
σ
3′
OH
Figure 37–2.
RNA polymerase (RNAP) catalyzes the
polymerization of ribonucleotides into an RNA se-
quence that is complementary to the template strand
of the gene. The RNA transcript has the same polarity
(5to 3) as the coding strand but contains U rather
than T. E coliRNAP consists of a core complex of two
αsubunits and two βsubunits (βand β). The holoen-
zyme contains the σsubunit bound to the α
2
ββcore
assembly. The ωsubunit is not shown. The transcription
“bubble” is an approximately 20-bp area of melted
DNA, and the entire complex covers 30–75 bp, depend-
ing on the conformation of RNAP.
DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase 
Initiates Transcription at a Distinct 
Site, the Promoter
DNA-dependent RNA polymerase is the enzyme re-
sponsible for the polymerization of ribonucleotides into
a sequence complementary to the template strand of
the gene (see Figures 37–2 and 37–3). The enzyme at-
taches at a specific site—the promoter—on the tem-
plate strand. This is followed by initiation of RNA syn-
thesis at the starting point, and the process continues
until a termination sequence is reached (Figure 37–3).
transcription unitis defined as that region of DNA
that includes the signals for transcription initiation,
elongation, and termination. The RNA product, which
is synthesized in the 5′to 3′direction, is the primary
transcript.In prokaryotes, this can represent the prod-
uct of several contiguous genes; in mammalian cells, it
usually represents the product of a single gene. The 5′
terminals of the primary RNA transcript and the ma-
ture cytoplasmic RNA are identical. Thus, the starting
point of transcription corresponds to the 5′ nu-
cleotide of the mRNA.This is designated position +1,
as is the corresponding nucleotide in the DNA. The
5′
3′
3′
5′
Gene A
Gene B
Gene C
Template strands
Gene D
Figure 37–1.
This figure illustrates that genes can be
transcribed off both strands of DNA. The arrowheads in-
dicate the direction of transcription (polarity). Note that
the template strand is always read in the 3to 5direc-
tion. The opposite strand is called the coding strand be-
cause it is identical (except for T for U changes) to the
mRNA transcript (the primary transcript in eukaryotic
cells) that encodes the protein product of the gene.
(1) Template binding
RNAP
pppApN
(5) Chain termination
and RNAP release
ATP + NTP
(2) Chain initiation
pppApN
pppApN
(3) Promoter
clearance
NTPs
NTPs
(4) Chain elongation
pppApN
p
p
Figure 37–3.
The transcription cycle in bacteria. Bac-
terial RNA transcription is described in four steps:
(1)Template binding:RNA polymerase (RNAP) binds
to DNA and locates a promoter (P) melts the two DNA
strands to form a preinitiation complex (PIC). (2) Chain
initiation:RNAP holoenzyme (core + one of multiple
sigma factors) catalyzes the coupling of the first base
(usually ATP or GTP) to a second ribonucleoside
triphosphate to form a dinucleotide. (3) Chain elonga-
tion:Successive residues are added to the 3-OH termi-
nus of the nascent RNA molecule. (4) Chain termina-
tion and release:The completed RNA chain and RNAP
are released from the template. The RNAP holoenzyme
re-forms, finds a promoter, and the cycle is repeated.
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
batch pdf to jpg; .pdf to .jpg converter online
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Easy converting! We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your PDF files to JPG.
convert pdf to high quality jpg; convert pdf file to jpg
RNA SYNTHESIS, PROCESSING, & MODIFICATION / 343
Table 37–2. Nomenclature and properties of
mammalian nuclear DNA-dependent RNA
polymerases.
Form of RNA
Sensitivity to 
Polymerase
α-Amanitin
Major Products
I (A)
Insensitive
rRNA
II (B)
High sensitivity
mRNA
III (C)
Intermediate sensitivity y tRNA/5S rRNA
numbers increase as the sequence proceeds downstream.
This convention makes it easy to locate particular re-
gions, such as intron and exon boundaries. The nu-
cleotide in the promoter adjacent to the transcription
initiation site is designated −1, and these negative num-
bers increase as the sequence proceeds upstream,away
from the initiation site. This provides a conventional
way of defining the location of regulatory elements in
the promoter.
The primary transcripts generated by RNA polym-
erase II—one of three distinct nuclear DNA-depen-
dent RNA polymerases in eukaryotes—are promptly
capped by 7-methylguanosine triphosphate caps (Fig-
ure 35–10) that persist and eventually appear on the 5′
end of mature cytoplasmic mRNA. These caps are nec-
essary for the subsequent processing of the primary
transcript to mRNA, for the translation of the mRNA,
and for protection of the mRNA against exonucleolytic
attack.
Bacterial DNA-Dependent RNA
Polymerase Is a Multisubunit Enzyme
The DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) of the
bacterium Escherichia coli exists as an approximately
400 kDa core complex consisting of two identical α
subunits, similar but not identical β β and β′ ′ subunits,
and an ωsubunit. Beta is thought to be the catalytic
subunit (Figure 37–2). RNAP, a metalloenzyme, also
contains two zinc molecules. The core RNA polymerase
associates with a specific protein factor (the sigma [σ]
factor) that helps the core enzyme recognize and bind
to the specific deoxynucleotide sequence of the pro-
moter region (Figure 37–5) to form the preinitiation
complex (PIC). Sigma factors have a dual role in the
process of promoter recognition; σ association with
core RNA polymerase decreases its affinity for nonpro-
moter DNA while simultaneously increasing holoen-
zyme affinity for promoter DNA. Bacteria contain mul-
tiple σ σ factors, each of which acts as a regulatory
protein that modifies the promoter recognition speci-
ficityof the RNA polymerase. The appearance of dif-
ferent σfactors can be correlated temporally with vari-
ous programs of gene expression in prokaryotic systems
such as bacteriophage development, sporulation, and
the response to heat shock.
Mammalian Cells Possess Three 
Distinct Nuclear DNA-Dependent 
RNA Polymerases
The properties of mammalian polymerases are de-
scribed in Table 37–2. Each of these DNA-dependent
RNA polymerases is responsible for transcription of dif-
ferent sets of genes. The sizes of the RNA polymerases
range from MW 500,000 to MW 600,000. These en-
zymes are much more complex than prokaryotic RNA
polymerases. They all have two large subunits and a
number of smaller subunits—as many as 14 in the case
of RNA pol III. The eukaryotic RNA polymerases have
extensive amino acid homologies with prokaryotic
RNA polymerases. This homology has been shown re-
cently to extend to the level of three-dimensional struc-
tures. The functions of each of the subunits are not yet
fully understood. Many could have regulatory func-
tions, such as serving to assist the polymerase in the
recognition of specific sequences like promoters and
termination signals.
One peptide toxin from the mushroom Amanita
phalloides, α-amanitin, is a specific differential inhibitor
of the eukaryotic nuclear DNA-dependent RNA polym-
erases and as such has proved to be a powerful research
tool (Table 37–2). α-Amanitin blocks the translocation
of RNA polymerase during transcription.
RNA SYNTHESIS IS A CYCLICAL PROCESS
& INVOLVES INITIATION, ELONGATION,
& TERMINATION
The process of RNA synthesis in bacteria—depicted in
Figure 37–3—involves first the binding of the RNA
holopolymerase molecule to the template at the pro-
moter site to form a PIC. Binding is followed by a con-
formational change of the RNAP, and the first nu-
cleotide (almost always a purine) then associates with
the initiation site on the βsubunit of the enzyme. In
the presence of the appropriate nucleotide, the RNAP
catalyzes the formation of a phosphodiester bond, and
the nascent chain is now attached to the polymerization
site on the βsubunit of RNAP. (The analogy to the A
and P sites on the ribosome should be noted; see Figure
38–9.)
Initiationof formation of the RNA molecule at its
5′end then follows, while elongation of the RNA mole-
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Best and professional C# image to PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
convert from pdf to jpg; pdf to jpg converter
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Best adobe PDF to image converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Convert PDF documents to multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap
convert pdf image to jpg; convert pdf pages to jpg online
344 / CHAPTER 37
Figure 37–4.
Electron photomicrograph of multiple
copies of amphibian ribosomal RNA genes in the
process of being transcribed. The magnification is
about 6000 ×. Note that the length of the transcripts in-
creases as the RNA polymerase molecules progress
along the individual ribosomal RNA genes; transcrip-
tion start sites (filled circles) to transcription termina-
tion sites (open circles). RNA polymerase I (not visual-
ized here) is at the base of the nascent rRNA transcripts.
Thus, the proximal end of the transcribed gene has
short transcripts attached to it, while much longer tran-
scripts are attached to the distal end of the gene. The
arrows indicate the direction (5to 3) of transcription.
(Reproduced with permission, from Miller OL Jr, Beatty BR:
Portrait of a gene. J Cell Physiol 1969;74[Suppl 1]:225.)
cule from the 5′to its 3′end continues cyclically, an-
tiparallel to its template. The enzyme polymerizes the
ribonucleotides in a specific sequence dictated by the
template strand and interpreted by Watson-Crick base-
pairing rules. Pyrophosphate is released in the polymer-
ization reaction. This pyrophosphate (PP
i
) is rapidly
degraded to 2 mol of inorganic phosphate (P
i
) by ubiq-
uitous pyrophosphatases, thereby providing irreversibil-
ity on the overall synthetic reaction. In both prokary-
otes and eukaryotes, a purine ribonucleotide is usually
the first to be polymerized into the RNA molecule. As
with eukaryotes, 5′triphosphate of this first nucleotide
is maintained in prokaryotic mRNA. 
As the elongation complex containing the core
RNA polymerase progresses along the DNA molecule,
DNA unwindingmust occur in order to provide access
for the appropriate base pairing to the nucleotides of
the coding strand. The extent of this transcription bub-
ble (ie, DNA unwinding) is constant throughout tran-
scription and has been estimated to be about 20 base
pairs per polymerase molecule. Thus, it appears that the
size of the unwound DNA region is dictated by the
polymerase and is independent of the DNA sequence in
the complex. This suggests that RNA polymerase has
associated with it an “unwindase” activity that opens
the DNA helix. The fact that the DNA double helix
must unwind and the strands part at least transiently
for transcription implies some disruption of the nucleo-
some structure of eukaryotic cells. Topoisomerase both
precedes and follows the progressing RNAP to prevent
the formation of superhelical complexes.
Terminationof the synthesis of the RNA molecule
in bacteria is signaled by a sequence in the template
strand of the DNA molecule—a signal that is recog-
nized by a termination protein, the rho (ρ) factor. Rho
is an ATP-dependent RNA-stimulated helicase that
disrupts the nascent RNA-DNA complex. After termi-
nation of synthesis of the RNA molecule, the enzyme
separates from the DNA template and probably disso-
ciates to free core enzyme and free σfactor. With the
assistance of another σfactor, the core enzyme then
recognizes a promoter at which the synthesis of a new
RNA molecule commences. In eukaryotic cells, termi-
nation is less well defined. It appears to be somehow
linked both to initiation and to addition of the 3′
polyA tail of mRNA and could involve destabilization
of the RNA-DNA complex at a region of A–U base
pairs. More than one RNA polymerase molecule may
transcribe the same template strand of a gene simulta-
neously, but the process is phased and spaced in such a
way that at any one moment each is transcribing a dif-
ferent portion of the DNA sequence. An electron mi-
crograph of extremely active RNA synthesis is shown
in Figure 37–4.
THE FIDELITY & FREQUENCY OF
TRANSCRIPTION IS CONTROLLED 
BY PROTEINS BOUND TO CERTAIN 
DNA SEQUENCES
The DNA sequence analysis of specific genes has al-
lowed the recognition of a number of sequences impor-
tant in gene transcription. From the large number of
bacterial genes studied it is possible to construct con-
sensus models of transcription initiation and termina-
tion signals.
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Best WPF PDF Viewer control as well as a powerful PDF converter. Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG
convert pdf file to jpg format; change pdf to jpg file
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Best and professional image to PDF converter SDK Components to batch convert PDF documents in Visual Basic Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB
change pdf to jpg format; best pdf to jpg converter
RNA SYNTHESIS, PROCESSING, & MODIFICATION / 345
The question, “How does RNAP find the correct
site to initiate transcription?” is not trivial when the
complexity of the genome is considered. E coli has
4 ×10
3
transcription initiation sites in 4 ×10
6
base
pairs (bp) of DNA. The situation is even more complex
in humans, where perhaps 10
5
transcription initiation
sites are distributed throughout in 3 ×10
9
bp of DNA.
RNAP can bind to many regions of DNA, but it scans
the DNA sequence—at a rate of ≥10
3
bp/s—until it
recognizes certain specific regions of DNA to which it
binds with higher affinity. This region is called the pro-
moter, and it is the association of RNAP with the pro-
moter that ensures accurate initiation of transcription.
The promoter recognition-utilization process is the tar-
get for regulation in both bacteria and humans.
Bacterial Promoters Are Relatively Simple
Bacterial promoters are approximately 40 nucleotides
(40 bp or four turns of the DNA double helix) in
length, a region small enough to be covered by an
EcoliRNA holopolymerase molecule. In this consensus
promoter region are two short, conserved sequence ele-
ments. Approximately 35 bp upstream of the transcrip-
tion start site there is a consensus sequence of eight nu-
cleotide pairs (5′-TGTTGACA-3′) to which the RNAP
binds to form the so-called closed complex. More
proximal to the transcription start site—about ten nu-
cleotides upstream—is a six-nucleotide-pair A+T-rich
sequence (5′-TATAAT-3′). These conserved sequence
elements comprising the promoter are shown schemati-
cally in Figure 37–5. The latter sequence has a low
melting temperature because of its deficiency of GC
nucleotide pairs. Thus, the TATA boxis thought to
ease the dissociation between the two DNA strands so
that RNA polymerase bound to the promoter region
can have access to the nucleotide sequence of its imme-
diately downstream template strand. Once this process
occurs, the combination of RNA polymerase plus pro-
moter is called the open complex.Other bacteria have
slightly different consensus sequences in their promot-
ers, but all generally have two components to the pro-
moter; these tend to be in the same position relative to
the transcription start site, and in all cases the sequences
between the boxes have no similarity but still provide
critical spacing functions facilitating recognition of −35
and −10 sequence by RNA polymerase holoenzyme.
Within a bacterial cell, different sets of genes are often
Transcription
start site
+1
Promoter
Transcribed region
TRANSCRIPTION UNIT
Coding strand 5′
Template strand 3′
TGTTGACA
TATAAT
−35
region
−10
region
PPP
5′
Termination
signals
3′
5′
DNA
5′ Flanking
sequences
3′ Flanking
sequences
RNA
OH
3′
Figure 37–5.
Bacterial promoters, such as that from E colishown here,
share two regions of highly conserved nucleotide sequence. These regions
are located 35 and 10 bp upstream (in the 5direction of the coding strand)
from the start site of transcription, which is indicated as +1. By convention,
all nucleotides upstream of the transcription initiation site (at +1) are num-
bered in a negative sense and are referred to as 5-flanking sequences. Also
by convention, the DNA regulatory sequence elements (TATA box, etc) are
described in the 5to 3direction and as being on the coding strand. These
elements function only in double-stranded DNA, however. Note that the
transcript produced from this transcription unit has the same polarity or
“sense” (ie, 5to 3orientation) as the coding strand. Termination cis-
elements reside at the end of the transcription unit (see Figure 37–6 for
more detail). By convention the sequences downstream of the site at which
transcription termination occurs are termed 3-flanking sequences.
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Best PDF Viewer control as well as a powerful .NET WinForms application Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG
reader convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg batch
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Best C#.NET PDF converter SDK for converting PDF to Tiff in Visual Studio .NET project. Also supports convert PDF files to jpg, jpeg images.
batch pdf to jpg converter; convert pdf file into jpg
346 / CHAPTER 37
coordinately regulated. One important way that this is
accomplished is through the fact that these co-regulated
genes share unique −35 and −10 promoter sequences.
These unique promoters are recognized by different σ
factors bound to core RNA polymerase.
Rho-dependent transcription termination signals
in E colialso appear to have a distinct consensus se-
quence, as shown in Figure 37–6. The conserved con-
sensus sequence, which is about 40 nucleotide pairs in
length, can be seen to contain a hyphenated or inter-
rupted inverted repeat followed by a series of AT base
pairs. As transcription proceeds through the hyphen-
ated, inverted repeat, the generated transcript can form
the intramolecular hairpin structure, also depicted in
Figure 37–6. 
Transcription continues into the AT region, and
with the aid of the ρ termination protein the RNA
polymerase stops, dissociates from the DNA template,
and releases the nascent transcript.
Eukaryotic Promoters Are More Complex
It is clear that the signals in DNA which control tran-
scription in eukaryotic cells are of several types. Two
types of sequence elements are promoter-proximal. One
of these defines where transcription is to commence
along the DNA, and the other contributes to the mecha-
nisms that control how frequentlythis event is to occur.
For example, in the thymidine kinase gene of the herpes
simplex virus, which utilizes transcription factors of its
mammalian host for gene expression, there is a single
unique transcription start site, and accurate transcription
from this start site depends upon a nucleotide sequence
located 32 nucleotides upstream from the start site (ie, at
−32) (Figure 37–7). This region has the sequence of
TATAAAAG and bears remarkable similarity to the
functionally related TATA box that is located about 10
bp upstream from the prokaryotic mRNA start site (Fig-
ure 37–5). Mutation or inactivation of the TATA box
markedly reduces transcription of this and many other
genes that contain this consensus ciselement (see Figures
37–7, 37–8). Most mammalian genes have a TATA box
that is usually located 25–30 bp upstream from the tran-
scription start site. The consensus sequence for a TATA
box is TATAAA, though numerous variations have been
characterized. The TATA box is bound by 34 kDa
TATA binding protein (TBP),which in turn binds sev-
eral other proteins called TBP-associated factors
(TAFs).This complex of TBP and TAFs is referred to as
TFIID. Binding of TFIID to the TATA box sequence is
thought to represent the first step in the formation of the
transcription complex on the promoter.
A small number of genes lack a TATA box. In such
instances, two additional ciselements, an initiator se-
quence (Inr)and the so-called downstream promoter
element (DPE),direct RNA polymerase II to the pro-
moter and in so doing provide basal transcription start-
ing from the correct site. The Inr element spans the start
AGCCCGC
TCGGGCG
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
GCGGGCT
CGCCCGA
TTTTTTTT
AAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAA
A
G
C
C
C
G
G
G
G
G
C
C
C
U
U
U
UUUUUU-3′
5′
RNA transcript
Coding strand   5′
Template strand   3′
Coding strand   5′
Template strand   3′
Direction of transcription
5′
3′
DNA
5′
3′
DNA
Figure 37–6.
The predominant bacterial transcription termination signal contains an inverted, hyphenated re-
peat (the two boxed areas) followed by a stretch of AT base pairs (top figure). The inverted repeat, when tran-
scribed into RNA, can generate the secondary structure in the RNA transcript shown at the bottom of the figure.
Formation of this RNA hairpin causes RNA polymerase to pause and subsequently the ρtermination factor inter-
acts with the paused polymerase and somehow induces chain termination.
RNA SYNTHESIS, PROCESSING, & MODIFICATION / 347
Promoter proximal
upstream elements
GC
CAAT
GC
TATA box
tk coding region
+1
−25
Promoter
Sp1
CTF
Sp1
TFIID
Figure 37–7.
Transcription elements and binding factors in the herpes simplex virus thymidine ki-
nase (tk)gene. DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II binds to the region of the TATA box (which is bound
by transcription factor TFIID) to form a multicomponent preinitiation complex capable of initiating
transcription at a single nucleotide (+1). The frequency of this event is increased by the presence of up-
stream cis-acting elements (the GC and CAAT boxes). These elements bind trans-acting transcription
factors, in this example Sp1 and CTF (also called C/EBP, NF1, NFY). Theseciselements can function inde-
pendently of orientation (arrows).
Regulated expression
“Basal” expression
Distal
regulatory
elements
Promoter
proximal
elements
Promoter
Enhancer (+)
and
repressor (−)
elements
Promoter
proximal
elements
(GC/CAAT, etc)
Other
regulatory
elements
TATA
Inr
DPE
Coding region
+1
Figure 37–8.
Schematic diagram showing the transcription control regions in a hypothetical class II
(mRNA-producing) eukaryotic gene. Such a gene can be divided into its coding and regulatory regions,
as defined by the transcription start site (arrow; +1).The coding region contains the DNA sequence that
is transcribed into mRNA, which is ultimately translated into protein. The regulatory region consists of
two classes of elements. One class is responsible for ensuring basal expression. These elements gener-
ally have two components. The proximal component, generally the TATA box, or Inr or DPE elements di-
rect RNA polymerase II to the correct site (fidelity). In TATA-less promoters, an initiator (Inr) element that
spans the initiation site (+1) may direct the polymerase to this site. Another component, the upstream
elements, specifies the frequency of initiation. Among the best studied of these is the CAAT box, but
several other elements (Sp1, NF1, AP1, etc) may be used in various genes. A second class of regulatory
cis-acting elements is responsible for regulated expression. This class consists of elements that enhance
or repress expression and of others that mediate the response to various signals, including hormones,
heat shock, heavy metals, and chemicals. Tissue-specific expression also involves specific sequences of
this sort. The orientation dependence of all the elements is indicated by the arrows within the boxes. For
example, the proximal element (the TATA box) must be in the 5to 3orientation. The upstream ele-
ments work best in the 5to 3orientation, but some of them can be reversed. The locations of some el-
ements are not fixed with respect to the transcription start site. Indeed, some elements responsible for
regulated expression can be located either interspersed with the upstream elements, or they can be lo-
cated downstream from the start site.
348 / CHAPTER 37
site (from −3 to +5) and consists of the general consen-
sus sequence TCA
+
1
G/T T T/C which is similar to the
initiation site sequence per se. (A+1 indicates the first
nucleotide transcribed.) The proteins that bind to Inr in
order to direct pol II binding include TFIID. Promoters
that have both a TATA box and an Inr may be stronger
than those that have just one of these elements. The
DPE has the consensus sequence A/GGA/T CGTG and
is localized about 25 bp downstream of the +1 start site.
Like the Inr, DPE sequences are also bound by the TAF
subunits of TFIID. In a survey of over 200 eukaryotic
genes, roughly 30% contained a TATA box and Inr,
25% contained Inr and DPE, 15% contained all three
elements, while ~30% contained just the Inr.
Sequences farther upstream from the start site deter-
mine how frequently the transcription event occurs.
Mutations in these regions reduce the frequency of
transcriptional starts tenfold to twentyfold. Typical of
these DNA elements are the GC and CAAT boxes, so
named because of the DNA sequences involved. As il-
lustrated in Figure 37–7, each of these boxes binds a
protein, Sp1 in the case of the GC box and CTF (or
C/EPB,NF1,NFY) by the CAAT box; both bind
through their distinct DNA binding domains (DBDs).
The frequency of transcription initiation is a conse-
quence of these protein-DNA interactions and complex
interactions between particular domains of the tran-
scription factors (distinct from the DBD domains—so-
called activation domains; ADs) of these proteins and
the rest of the transcription machinery (RNA polym-
erase II and the basal factors TFIIA, B, D, E, F). (See
below and Figures 37–9 and 37–10). The protein-
DNA interaction at the TATA box involving RNA
polymerase II and other components of the basal tran-
scription machinery ensures the fidelity of initiation.
Together, then, the promoter and promoter-proxi-
mal cis-active upstream elements confer fidelity and fre-
quency of initiation upon a gene. The TATA box has a
particularly rigid requirement for both position and ori-
entation. Single-base changes in any of these cis ele-
ments have dramatic effects on function by reducing
the binding affinity of the cognate transfactors (either
TFIID/TBP or Sp1, CTF, and similar factors). The
spacing of these elements with respect to the transcrip-
tion start site can also be critical. This is particularly
true for the TATA box Inr and DPE.
A third class of sequence elements can either increase
or decrease the rate of transcription initiation of eukary-
otic genes. These elements are called either enhancersor
repressors (or silencers), depending on which effect
they have. They have been found in a variety of locations
both upstream and downstream of the transcription start
site and even within the transcribed portions of some
genes. In contrast to proximal and upstream promoter el-
ements, enhancers and silencers can exert their effects
when located hundreds or even thousands of bases away
from transcription units located on the same chromo-
some. Surprisingly, enhancers and silencers can function
in an orientation-independent fashion. Literally hun-
dreds of these elements have been described. In some
cases, the sequence requirements for binding are rigidly
constrained; in others, considerable sequence variation is
E
H
B
pol II
F
D
A
+10
+30
–30
–50
–10
+50
TATA
Figure 37–9.
The eukaryotic basal transcription complex. Formation of the basal transcription complex begins
when TFIID binds to the TATA box. It directs the assembly of several other components by protein-DNA and
protein-protein interactions. The entire complex spans DNA from position −30 to +30 relative to the initiation site
(+1, marked by bent arrow). The atomic level, x-ray-derived structures of RNA polymerase II alone and of TBP
bound to TATA promoter DNA in the presence of either TFIIB or TFIIA have all been solved at 3 Å resolution. The
structure of TFIID complexes have been determined by electron microscopy at 30 Å resolution. Thus, the molecu-
lar structures of the transcription machinery are beginning to be elucidated. Much of this structural information is
consistent with the models presented here.
RNA SYNTHESIS, PROCESSING, & MODIFICATION / 349
Basal
complex
TAF
Basal complex
Basal complex
CCAAT
Rate of
transcription
CAAT
TATA
nil
Rate of
transcription
TAF
TAF
TAF
CTF
C
T
F
CTF
CTF
+
C
C
A
A
T
A
B
Basal
complex
TATA
nil
Basal
complex
TBP
TAF
CTF
TAF
TBP
TAF
TBP
TATA
C
A
A
T
TBP
T
A
F
CAAT
TBP
Figure 37–10.
Two models for assembly of the active transcription complex and for how activators and coacti-
vators might enhance transcription. Shown here as a small oval is TBP, which contains TFIID, a large oval that con-
tains all the components of the basal transcription complex illustrated in Figure 37–9 (ie, RNAP II and TFIIA, TFIIB,
TFIIE, TFIIF, and TFIIH). Panel A:The basal transcription complex is assembled on the promoter after the TBP sub-
unit of TFIID is bound to the TATA box. Several TAFs (coactivators) are associated with TBP. In this example, a tran-
scription activator, CTF, is shown bound to the CAAT box, forming a loop complex by interacting with a TAF
bound to TBP. Panel B:The recruitment model. The transcription activator CTF binds to the CAAT box and inter-
acts with a coactivator (TAF in this case). This allows for an interaction with the preformed TBP-basal transcription
complex. TBP can now bind to the TATA box, and the assembled complex is fully active.
allowed. Some sequences bind only a single protein, but
the majority bind several different proteins. Similarly, a
single protein can bind to more than one element.
Hormone response elements(for steroids, T
3
, reti-
noic acid, peptides, etc) act as—or in conjunction with—
enhancers or silencers (Chapter 43). Other processes
that enhance or silence gene expression—such as the re-
sponse to heat shock, heavy metals (Cd
2+
and Zn
2+
),
and some toxic chemicals (eg, dioxin)—are mediated
through specific regulatory elements. Tissue-specific ex-
pression of genes (eg, the albumin gene in liver, the he-
moglobin gene in reticulocytes) is also mediated by spe-
cific DNA sequences.
Specific Signals Regulate 
Transcription Termination
The signals for the termination of transcriptionby
eukaryotic RNA polymerase II are very poorly under-
stood. However, it appears that the termination signals
exist far downstream of the coding sequence of eukary-
otic genes. For example, the transcription termination
signal for mouse β-globin occurs at several positions
1000–2000 bases beyond the site at which the poly(A)
tail will eventually be added. Little is known about the
termination process or whether specific termination
factors similar to the bacterial ρ factor are involved.
However, it is known that the mRNA 3′ ′ terminal is
generated posttranscriptionally, is somehow coupled to
events or structures formed at the time and site of initi-
ation, depends on a special structure in one of the sub-
units of RNA polymerase II (the CTD; see below), and
appears to involve at least two steps. After RNA polym-
erase II has traversed the region of the transcription
unit encoding the 3′end of the transcript, an RNA en-
donuclease cleaves the primary transcript at a position
about 15 bases 3′of the consensus sequence AAUAAA
that serves in eukaryotic transcripts as a cleavage signal.
350 / CHAPTER 37
Finally, this newly formed 3′terminal is polyadenylated
in the nucleoplasm, as described below.
THE EUKARYOTIC 
TRANSCRIPTION COMPLEX
A complex apparatus consisting of as many as 50
unique proteins provides accurate and regulatable tran-
scription of eukaryotic genes. The RNA polymerase en-
zymes (pol I, pol II, and pol III for class I, II, and III
genes, respectively) transcribe information contained in
the template strand of DNA into RNA. These polym-
erases must recognize a specific site in the promoter in
order to initiate transcription at the proper nucleotide.
In contrast to the situation in prokaryotes, eukaryotic
RNA polymerases alone are not able to discriminate be-
tween promoter sequences and other regions of DNA;
thus, other proteins known as general transcription fac-
tors or GTFs facilitate promoter-specific binding of
these enzymes and formation of the preinitiation com-
plex (PIC). This combination of components can cat-
alyze basal or (non)-unregulated transcription in vitro.
Another set of proteins—coactivators—help regulate
the rate of transcription initiation by interacting with
transcription activators that bind to upstream DNA el-
ements (see below).
Formation of the Basal 
Transcription Complex
In bacteria, a σfactor–polymerase complex selectively
binds to DNA in the promoter forming the PIC. The
situation is more complex in eukaryotic genes. Class II
genes—those transcribed by pol II to make mRNA—
are described as an example. In class II genes, the func-
tion of σfactors is assumed by a number of proteins.
Basal transcription requires, in addition to pol II, a
number of GTFs called TFIIA, TFIIB, TFIID,
TFIIE, TFIIF, and TFIIH.These GTFs serve to pro-
mote RNA polymerase II transcription on essentially all
genes. Some of these GTFs are composed of multiple
subunits. TFIID, which binds to the TATA box pro-
moter element, is the only one of these factors capa-
ble of binding to specific sequences of DNA.As de-
scribed above, TFIID consists of TATA binding
protein (TBP) and 14 TBP-associated factors (TAFs).
TBP binds to the TATA box in the minor groove of
DNA (most transcription factors bind in the major
groove) and causes an approximately 100-degree bend
or kink of the DNA helix. This bending is thought to
facilitate the interaction of TBP-associated factors with
other components of the transcription initiation com-
plex and possibly with factors bound to upstream ele-
ments. Although defined as a component of class II
gene promoters, TBP, by virtue of its association with
distinct, polymerase-specific sets of TAFs, is also an im-
portant component of class I and class III initiation
complexes even if they do not contain TATA boxes. 
The binding of TBP marks a specific promoter for
transcription and is the only step in the assembly process
that is entirely dependent on specific, high-affinity pro-
tein-DNA interaction. Of several subsequent in vitro
steps, the first is the binding of TFIIB to the TFIID-
promoter complex. This results in a stable ternary com-
plex which is then more precisely located and more
tightly bound at the transcription initiation site. This
complex then attracts and tethers the pol II-TFIIF com-
plex to the promoter. TFIIF is structurally and func-
tionally similar to the bacterial σfactor and is required
for the delivery of pol II to the promoter. TFIIA binds
to this assembly and may allow the complex to respond
to activators, perhaps by the displacement of repressors.
Addition of TFIIE and TFIIH is the final step in the as-
sembly of the PIC. TFIIE appears to join the complex
with pol II-TFIIF, and TFIIH is then recruited. Each of
these binding events extends the size of the complex so
that finally about 60 bp (from −30 to +30 relative to +1,
the nucleotide from which transcription commences)
are covered (Figure 37–9). The PIC is now complete
and capable of basal transcription initiated from the cor-
rect nucleotide. In genes that lack a TATA box, the
same factors, including TBP, are required. In such cases,
an Inr or the DPEs (see Figure 37–8) position the com-
plex for accurate initiation of transcription. 
Phosphorylation Activates Pol II
Eukaryotic pol II consists of 12 subunits. The two
largest subunits, both about 200 kDa, are homologous
to the bacterial βand β′subunits. In addition to the in-
creased number of subunits, eukaryotic pol II differs
from its prokaryotic counterpart in that it has a series of
heptad repeats with consensus sequence Tyr-Ser-Pro-
Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser at the carboxyl terminal of the largest
pol II subunit. This carboxyl terminal repeat domain
(CTD)has 26 repeated units in brewers’ yeast and 52
units in mammalian cells. The CTD is both a substrate
for several kinases, including the kinase component of
TFIIH, and a binding site for a wide array of proteins.
The CTD has been shown to interact with RNA pro-
cessing enzymes; such binding may be involved with
RNA polyadenylation. The association of the factors
with the CTD of RNA polymerase II (and other com-
ponents of the basal machinery) somehow serves to
couple initiation with mRNA 3′ end formation. Pol II
is activated when phosphorylated on the Ser and Thr
residues and displays reduced activity when the CTD is
dephosphorylated. Pol II lacking the CTD tail is inca-
pable of activating transcription, which underscores the
importance of this domain.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested