RNA SYNTHESIS, PROCESSING, & MODIFICATION / 351
Pol II associates with other proteins to form a
holoenzyme complex. In yeast, at least nine gene prod-
ucts—called Srb (for suppressor of RNA polymer-
aseB)—bind to the CTD. The Srb proteins—or medi-
ators, as they are also called—are essential for pol II
transcription, though their exact role in this process has
not been defined. Related proteins comprising even
more complex forms of RNA polymerase II have been
described in human cells.
The Role of Transcription Activators 
& Coactivators
TFIID was originally considered to be a single protein.
However, several pieces of evidence led to the impor-
tant discovery that TFIID is actually a complex consist-
ing of TBP and the 14 TAFs. The first evidence that
TFIID was more complex than just the TBP molecules
came from the observation that TBP binds to a 10-bp
segment of DNA, immediately over the TATA box of
the gene, whereas native holo-TFIID covers a 35 bp or
larger region (Figure 37–9). Second, TBP has a molec-
ular mass of 20–40 kDa (depending on the species),
whereas the TFIID complex has a mass of about 1000
kDa. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, TBP sup-
ports basal transcription but not the augmented tran-
scription provided by certain activators, eg, Sp1 bound
to the GC box. TFIID, on the other hand, supports
both basal and enhanced transcription by Sp1, Oct1,
AP1, CTF, ATF, etc. (Table 37–3). The TAFs are es-
sential for this activator-enhanced transcription. It is
not yet clear whether there are one or several forms of
TFIID that might differ slightly in their complement of
TAFs. It is conceivable that different combinations of
TAFs with TBP—or one of several recently discovered
TBP-like factors (TLFs)—may bind to different pro-
moters, and recent reports suggest that this may ac-
count for selective activation noted in various promot-
ers and for the different strengths of certain promoters.
TAFs, since they are required for the action of acti-
vators, are often called coactivators.There are thus
three classes of transcription factors involved in the reg-
ulation of class II genes: basal factors, coactivators, and
activator-repressors (Table 37–4). How these classes of
proteins interact to govern both the site and frequency
of transcription is a question of central importance.
Two Models Explain the Assembly 
of the Preinitiation Complex
The formation of the PIC described above is based on
the sequential addition of purified components in in
vitro experiments. An essential feature of this model is
that the assembly takes place on the DNA template.
Accordingly, transcription activators, which have au-
tonomous DNA binding and activation domains (see
Chapter 39), are thought to function by stimulating ei-
ther PIC formation or PIC function. The TAF coacti-
vators are viewed as bridging factors that communicate
between the upstream activators, the proteins associated
with pol II, or the many other components of TFIID.
This view, which assumes that there is stepwise assem-
blyof the PIC—promoted by various interactions be-
tween activators, coactivators, and PIC components—
is illustrated in panel A of Figure 37–10. This model
was supported by observations that many of these pro-
teins could indeed bind to one another in vitro.
Recent evidence suggests that there is another possi-
ble mechanism of PIC formation and transcription reg-
ulation. First, large preassembled complexes of GTFs
and pol II are found in cell extracts, and this complex
can associate with a promoter in a single step. Second,
the rate of transcription achieved when activators are
added to limiting concentrations of pol II holoenzyme
can be matched by increasing the concentration of the
pol II holoenzyme in the absence of activators. Thus,
Table 37–3. Some of the transcription control
elements, their consensus sequences, and the
factors that bind to them which are found in
mammalian genes transcribed by RNA
polymerase II. A complete list would include
dozens of examples. The asterisks mean that
there are several members of this family.
Element
Consensus Sequence
Factor
TATA box
TATAAA
TBP
CAAT box
CCAATC
C/EBP*, NF-Y*
GC box
GGGCGG
Sp1*
CAACTGAC
Myo D
T/CGGA/CN
5
GCCAA
NF1*
lg octamer
ATGCAAAT
Oct1, 2, 4, 6*
AP1
TGAG/CTC/AA
Jun, Fos, ATF*
Serum response
GATGCCCATA
SRF
Heat shock
(NGAAN)
3
HSF
Table 37–4. Three classes of transcription factors
in class II genes.
General Mechanisms
Specific Components
Basal components
TBP, TFIIA, B, E, F, and H
Coactivators
TAFs (TBP + TAFs) = TFIID; Srbs
Activators
SP1, ATF, CTF, AP1, etc
Change from pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
pdf to jpeg; change pdf file to jpg
Change from pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf to jpg; best way to convert pdf to jpg
352 / CHAPTER 37
activators are not in themselves absolutely essential for
PIC formation. These observations led to the “recruit-
ment” hypothesis,which has now been tested experi-
mentally. Simply stated, the role of activators and
coactivators may be solely to recruit a preformed
holoenzyme-GTF complex to the promoter. The re-
quirement for an activation domain is circumvented
when either a component of TFIID or the pol II
holoenzyme is artificially tethered, using recombinant
DNA techniques, to the DNA binding domain (DBD)
of an activator. This anchoring, through the DBD
component of the activator molecule, leads to a tran-
scriptionally competent structure, and there is no fur-
ther requirement for the activation domain of the acti-
vator. In this view, the role of activation domains and
TAFs is to form an assembly that directs the preformed
holoenzyme-GTF complex to the promoter; they do
not assist in PIC assembly (see panel B, Figure 37–10).
The efficiency of this recruitment process determines
the rate of transcription at a given promoter.
Hormones—and other effectors that serve to trans-
mit information related to the extracellular environ-
ment—modulate gene expression by influencing the as-
sembly and activity of the activator and coactivator
complexes and the subsequent formation of the PIC at
the promoter of target genes (see Chapter 43). The nu-
merous components involved provide for an abundance
of possible combinations and therefore a range of tran-
scriptional activity of a given gene. It is important to
note that the two models are not mutually exclusive—
stepwise versus holoenzyme-mediated PIC formation.
Indeed, one can envision various more complex models
invoking elements of both models operating on a gene.
RNA MOLECULES ARE USUALLY
PROCESSED BEFORE THEY 
BECOME FUNCTIONAL
In prokaryotic organisms, the primary transcripts of
mRNA-encoding genes begin to serve as translation
templates even before their transcription has been com-
pleted. This is because the site of transcription is not
compartmentalized into a nucleus as it is in eukaryotic
organisms. Thus, transcription and translation are cou-
pled in prokaryotic cells. Consequently, prokaryotic
mRNAs are subjected to little processing prior to carry-
ing out their intended function in protein synthesis. In-
deed, appropriate regulation of some genes (eg, the Trp
operon) relies upon this coupling of transcription and
translation. Prokaryotic rRNA and tRNA molecules are
transcribed in units considerably longer than the ulti-
mate molecule. In fact, many of the tRNA transcription
units contain more than one molecule. Thus, in
prokaryotes the processing of these rRNA and tRNA
precursor molecules is required for the generation of
the mature functional molecules.
Nearly all eukaryotic RNA primary transcripts un-
dergo extensive processing between the time they are
synthesized and the time at which they serve their ulti-
mate function, whether it be as mRNA or as a com-
ponent of the translation machinery such as rRNA,
5S RNA, or tRNA or RNA processing machinery, 
snRNAs. Processing occurs primarily within the nu-
cleus and includes nucleolytic cleavage to smaller mole-
cules and coupled nucleolytic and ligation reactions
(splicing of exons). In mammalian cells, 50–75% of
the nuclear RNA does not contribute to the cytoplas-
mic mRNA. This nuclear RNA loss is significantly
greater than can be reasonably accounted for by the loss
of intervening sequences alone (see below). Thus, the
exact function of the seemingly excessive transcripts in
the nucleus of a mammalian cell is not known.
The Coding Portions (Exons)
of Most Eukaryotic Genes 
Are Interrupted by Introns
Interspersed within the amino acid-coding portions
(exons)of many genes are long sequences of DNA that
do not contribute to the genetic information ultimately
translated into the amino acid sequence of a protein
molecule (see Chapter 36). In fact, these sequences ac-
tually interrupt the coding region of structural genes.
These intervening sequences (introns) exist within
most but not all mRNA encoding genes of higher eu-
karyotes. The primary transcripts of the structural genes
contain RNA complementary to the interspersed se-
quences. However, the intron RNA sequences are
cleaved out of the transcript, and the exons of the tran-
script are appropriately spliced together in the nucleus
before the resulting mRNA molecule appears in the cy-
toplasm for translation (Figures 37–11 and 37–12).
One speculation is that exons, which often encode an
activity domain of a protein, represent a convenient
means of shuffling genetic information, permitting or-
ganisms to quickly test the results of combining novel
protein functional domains.
Introns Are Removed & Exons 
Are Spliced Together
The mechanisms whereby introns are removed from
the primary transcript in the nucleus, exons are ligated
to form the mRNA molecule, and the mRNA molecule
is transported to the cytoplasm are being elucidated.
Four different splicing reaction mechanisms have been
described. The one most frequently used in eukaryotic
cells is described below. Although the sequences of nu-
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. Web Security. All your JPG and PDF files will be permanently erased from our servers after one hour.
convert multipage pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg
JPG to PNG Converter | Convert JPEG to PNG, Convert PNG to JPG
Allow to change converting image with adjusted width & height; Change image resolution Open JPEG to PNG Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in
change file from pdf to jpg on; bulk pdf to jpg
RNA SYNTHESIS, PROCESSING, & MODIFICATION / 353
5′
Cap
3′
Primary transcript
Exon 1
Intron
Exon 2
A
n
G   G
Cap
Nucleophilic attack 
at 5′
end of intron
Cut at 3′
end of intron
Ligation of 3′
end of exon
1 to 5′ end of exon 2 
A
n
G OH
Cap
Lariat formation
 G
A
n
G
Cap
Cap
and
A  G
A  G
G   G
G
A
n
A
n
G
A
G
Intron is digested
OH
A
G
G—G
Figure 37–11.
The processing of the primary transcript to mRNA. In this hy-
pothetical transcript, the 5(left) end of the intron is cut (↓) and a lariat forms
between the G at the 5end of the intron and an A near the 3end, in the con-
sensus sequence UACUAAC. This sequence is called the branch site, and it is the
3most A that forms the 5–2’ bond with the G. The 3(right) end of the intron is
then cut (⇓). This releases the lariat, which is digested, and exon 1 is joined to
exon 2 at G residues.
cleotides in the introns of the various eukaryotic tran-
scripts—and even those within a single transcript—are
quite heterogeneous, there are reasonably conserved se-
quences at each of the two exon-intron (splice) junc-
tions and at the branch site, which is located 20–40 nu-
cleotides upstream from the 3′splice site (see consensus
sequences in Figure 37–12). A special structure, the
spliceosome, is involved in converting the primary
transcript into mRNA. Spliceosomes consist of the pri-
mary transcript, five small nuclear RNAs (U1, U2, U5,
U4, and U6) and more than 60 proteins. Collectively,
these form a small nucleoprotein (snRNP) complex,
sometimes called a “snurp.”It is likely that this penta-
snRNP spliceosome forms prior to interaction with
mRNA precursors. Snurps are thought to position the
RNA segments for the necessary splicing reactions. The
splicing reaction starts with a cut at the junction of the
5′exon (donor or left) and intron (Figure 37–11). This
5′
3′
UAAGU
UACUAAC 28-37 nucleotides C
A
C
Consensus sequences
Intron
5′ Exon
Exon 3′
G
AG
G
AG
Figure 37–12.
Consensus sequences at splice junctions. The 5(donor or left) and 3(ac-
ceptor or right) sequences are shown. Also shown is the yeast consensus sequence
(UACUAAC) for the branch site. In mammalian cells, this consensus sequence is PyNPyPy-
PuAPy, where Py is a pyrimidine, Pu is a purine, and N is any nucleotide. The branch site is lo-
cated 20–40 nucleotides upstream from the 3site.
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Web Security. Your PDF and JPG files will be deleted from our servers an hour after the conversion.
change pdf into jpg; reader pdf to jpeg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. C:\input.tif"; String outputDirectory = @"C:\output\"; // Convert tiff to jpg and show How to change Tiff image to Bmp image in your C#
change from pdf to jpg; best way to convert pdf to jpg
354 / CHAPTER 37
is accomplished by a nucleophilic attack by an adenylyl
residue in the branch point sequence located just up-
stream from the 3′end of this intron. The free 5′termi-
nal then forms a loop or lariat structure that is linked
by an unusual 5′–2′phosphodiester bond to the reac-
tive A in the PyNPyPyPuAPy branch site sequence
(Figure 37–12). This adenylyl residue is typically lo-
cated 28–37 nucleotides upstream from the 3′end of
the intron being removed. The branch site identifies
the 3′splice site. A second cut is made at the junction
of the intron with the 3′exon (donor on right). In this
second transesterification reaction, the 3′ ′ hydroxyl of
the upstream exon attacks the 5′ ′ phosphate at the
downstream exon-intron boundary, and the lariat
structure containing the intron is released and hy-
drolyzed. The 5′and 3′exons are ligated to form a con-
tinuous sequence.
The snRNAs and associated proteins are required
for formation of the various structures and intermedi-
ates. U1 within the snRNP complex binds first by base
pairing to the 5′exon-intron boundary. U2 within the
snRNP complex then binds by base pairing to the
branch site, and this exposes the nucleophilic A residue.
U5/U4/U6 within the snRNP complex mediates an
ATP-dependent protein-mediated unwinding that re-
sults in disruption of the base-paired U4-U6 complex
with the release of U4. U6 is then able to interact first
with U2, then with U1. These interactions serve to ap-
proximate the 5′splice site, the branch point with its
reactive A, and the 3′splice site. This alignment is en-
hanced by U5. This process also results in the forma-
tion of the loop or lariat structure. The two ends are
cleaved, probably by the U2-U6 within the snRNP
complex.U6 is certainly essential, since yeasts deficient
in this snRNA are not viable. It is important to note
that RNA serves as the catalytic agent. This sequence is
then repeated in genes containing multiple introns. In
such cases, a definite pattern is followed for each gene,
and the introns are not necessarily removed in se-
quence—1, then 2, then 3, etc.
The relationship between hnRNA and the corre-
sponding mature mRNA in eukaryotic cells is now ap-
parent. The hnRNA molecules are the primary tran-
scripts plus their early processed products, which, after
the addition of caps and poly(A) tails and removal of
the portion corresponding to the introns, are trans-
ported to the cytoplasm as mature mRNA molecules.
Alternative Splicing Provides 
for Different mRNAs
The processing of hnRNA molecules is a site for reg-
ulation of gene expression. Alternative patterns of
RNA splicing result from tissue-specific adaptive and
developmental control mechanisms. As mentioned
above, the sequence of exon-intron splicing events gen-
erally follows a hierarchical order for a given gene. The
fact that very complex RNA structures are formed dur-
ing splicing—and that a number of snRNAs and pro-
teins are involved—affords numerous possibilities for a
change of this order and for the generation of different
mRNAs. Similarly, the use of alternative termination-
cleavage-polyadenylation sites also results in mRNA
heterogeneity. Some schematic examples of these
processes, all of which occur in nature, are shown in
Figure 37–13.
Faulty splicing can cause disease. At least one
form of β-thalassemia, a disease in which the β-globin
gene of hemoglobin is severely underexpressed, appears
to result from a nucleotide change at an exon-intron
junction, precluding removal of the intron and there-
fore leading to diminished or absent synthesis of the 
β-chain protein. This is a consequence of the fact that
the normal translation reading frame of the mRNA is
disrupted—a defect in this fundamental process (splic-
ing) that underscores the accuracy which the process of
RNA-RNA splicing must achieve.
Alternative Promoter Utilization 
Provides a Form of Regulation
Tissue-specific regulation of gene expression can be
provided by control elements in the promoter or by the
1
mRNA precursor
2
3
AAUAA
AAUAA
(A)
n
1
1
Selective splicing
2
3
AAUAA
AAUAA
(A)
n
1′
Alternative 5′ donor site
2
2
3
AAUAA
AAUAA
(A)
n
2′
Alternative 3′ acceptor site
3
AAUAA
AAUAA
(A)
n
1
Alternative polyadenylation site
3
AAUAA
(A)
n
Figure 37–13.
Mechanisms of alternative process-
ing of mRNA precursors. This form of RNA processing
involves the selective inclusion or exclusion of exons,
the use of alternative 5donor or 3acceptor sites, and
the use of different polyadenylation sites.
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg. C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion.
.net pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg on
JPG to JBIG2 Converter | Convert JPEG to JBIG2, Convert JBIG2 to
Users may easily change image size, rotate image angle, set image rotation in dpi Covert JPG & JBIG2 image with high-quality; Provide user-friendly interface
change pdf to jpg file; pdf to jpeg converter
RNA SYNTHESIS, PROCESSING, & MODIFICATION / 355
use of alternative promoters. The glucokinase (GK)
gene consists of ten exons interrupted by nine introns.
The sequence of exons 2–10 is identical in liver and
pancreatic B cells, the primary tissues in which GK pro-
tein is expressed. Expression of the GKgene is regulated
very differently—by two different promoters—in these
two tissues. The liver promoter and exon 1L are located
near exons 2–10; exon 1L is ligated directly to exon 2.
In contrast, the pancreatic B cell promoter is located
about 30 kbp upstream. In this case, the 3′boundary of
exon 1B is ligated to the 5′boundary of exon 2. The
liver promoter and exon 1L are excluded and removed
during the splicing reaction (see Figure 37–14). The ex-
istence of multiple distinct promoters allows for cell-
and tissue-specific expression patterns of a particular
gene (mRNA).
Both Ribosomal RNAs & Most 
Transfer RNAs Are Processed 
From Larger Precursors
In mammalian cells, the three rRNA molecules are
transcribed as part of a single large precursor molecule.
The precursor is subsequently processed in the nu-
cleolusto provide the RNA component for the ribo-
some subunits found in the cytoplasm. The rRNA
genes are located in the nucleoli of mammalian cells.
Hundreds of copies of these genes are present in every
cell. This large number of genes is required to synthe-
size sufficient copies of each type of rRNA to form the
10
7
ribosomes required for each cell replication.
Whereas a single mRNA molecule may be copied into
10
5
protein molecules, providing a large amplification,
the rRNAs are end products. This lack of amplification
requires a large number of genes. Similarly, transfer
RNAs are often synthesized as precursors, with extra se-
quences both 5′and 3′of the sequences comprising the
mature tRNA. A small fraction of tRNAs even contain
introns.
RNAS CAN BE EXTENSIVELY MODIFIED
Essentially all RNAs are covalently modified after tran-
scription. It is clear that at least some of these modifica-
tions are regulatory. 
Messenger RNA (mRNA) Is Modified 
at the 5& 3Ends
As mentioned above, mammalian mRNA molecules
contain a 7-methylguanosine cap structure at their 5′
terminal, and most have a poly(A) tail at the 3′termi-
nal. The cap structure is added to the 5′ end of the
newly transcribed mRNA precursor in the nucleus
prior to transport of the mRNA molecule to the cyto-
plasm. The 5′ ′ capof the RNA transcript is required
both for efficient translation initiation and protection
of the 5′end of mRNA from attack by 5′→3′exonu-
cleases. The secondary methylations of mRNA mole-
cules, those on the 2′-hydroxy and the N
6
of adenylyl
residues, occur after the mRNA molecule has appeared
in the cytoplasm.
Poly(A) tails are added to the 3′end of mRNA mol-
ecules in a posttranscriptional processing step. The
mRNA is first cleaved about 20 nucleotides down-
stream from an AAUAA recognition sequence. Another
enzyme, poly(A) polymerase, adds a poly(A) tail which
is subsequently extended to as many as 200 A residues.
The poly(A) tail appears to protect the 3′ end of
mRNA from 3′→5′exonuclease attack. The presence
or absence of the poly(A) tail does not determine
whether a precursor molecule in the nucleus appears in
the cytoplasm, because all poly(A)-tailed hnRNA mole-
cules do not contribute to cytoplasmic mRNA, nor do
all cytoplasmic mRNA molecules contain poly(A) tails
Liver
1B
1L
2A 2 2 3
4
56
7
8
9 10
(
˜
30 kb)
B cell/pituitary
1B
1L
2A 2 2 3
4
56
7
8
9 10
(
˜
30 kb)
Figure 37–14.
Alternative promoter use in the liver and pancreatic B cell glucokinase
genes. Differential regulation of the glucokinase (GK) gene is accomplished by the use of
tissue-specific promoters. The B cell GKgene promoter and exon 1B are located about
30kbp upstream from the liver promoter and exon 1L. Each promoter has a unique
structure and is regulated differently. Exons 2–10 are identical in the two genes, and the
GK proteins encoded by the liver and B cell mRNAs have identical kinetic properties.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET program with this demo code.
best pdf to jpg converter; change pdf to jpg
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
similar software; Support a batch conversion of JPG to PDF with amazingly high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after conversion; Support
change from pdf to jpg on; convert pdf to high quality jpg
356 / CHAPTER 37
(the histones are most notable in this regard). Cytoplas-
mic enzymes in mammalian cells can both add and re-
move adenylyl residues from the poly(A) tails; this
process has been associated with an alteration of mRNA
stability and translatability.
The size of some cytoplasmic mRNA molecules,
even after the poly(A) tail is removed, is still consider-
ably greater than the size required to code for the spe-
cific protein for which it is a template, often by a factor
of 2 or 3. The extra nucleotides occur in untrans-
lated (non-protein coding) regionsboth 5′and 3′of
the coding region; the longest untranslated sequences
are usually at the 3′end. The exact function of these se-
quences is unknown, but they have been implicated in
RNA processing, transport, degradation, and transla-
tion; each of these reactions potentially contributes ad-
ditional levels of control of gene expression.
RNA Editing Changes mRNA 
After Transcription
The central dogma states that for a given gene and gene
product there is a linear relationship between the cod-
ing sequence in DNA, the mRNA sequence, and the
protein sequence (Figure 36–7). Changes in the DNA
sequence should be reflected in a change in the mRNA
sequence and, depending on codon usage, in protein se-
quence. However, exceptions to this dogma have been
recently documented. Coding information can be
changed at the mRNA level by RNA editing.In such
cases, the coding sequence of the mRNA differs from
that in the cognate DNA. An example is the apolipo-
protein B (apoB)gene and mRNA. In liver, the single
apoBgene is transcribed into an mRNA that directs the
synthesis of a 100-kDa protein, apoB100. In the intes-
tine, the same gene directs the synthesis of the primary
transcript; however, a cytidine deaminase converts a
CAA codon in the mRNA to UAA at a single specific
site. Rather than encoding glutamine, this codon be-
comes a termination signal, and a 48-kDa protein
(apoB48) is the result. ApoB100 and apoB48 have dif-
ferent functions in the two organs. A growing number
of other examples include a glutamine to arginine
change in the glutamate receptor and several changes
in trypanosome mitochondrial mRNAs, generally in-
volving the addition or deletion of uridine. The exact
extent of RNA editing is unknown, but current esti-
mates suggest that < 0.01% of mRNAs are edited in
this fashion.
Transfer RNA (tRNA) Is Extensively
Processed & Modified
As described in Chapters 35 and 38, the tRNA mole-
cules serve as adapter molecules for the translation of
mRNA into protein sequences. The tRNAs contain
many modifications of the standard bases A, U, G, and
C, including methylation, reduction, deamination, and
rearranged glycosidic bonds. Further modification of
the tRNA molecules includes nucleotide alkylations
and the attachment of the characteristic CpCpA
OH
ter-
minal at the 3′end of the molecule by the enzyme nu-
cleotidyl transferase. The 3′OH of the A ribose is the
point of attachment for the specific amino acid that is
to enter into the polymerization reaction of protein
synthesis. The methylation of mammalian tRNA pre-
cursors probably occurs in the nucleus, whereas the
cleavage and attachment of CpCpA
OH
are cytoplasmic
functions, since the terminals turn over more rapidly
than do the tRNA molecules themselves. Enzymes
within the cytoplasm of mammalian cells are required
for the attachment of amino acids to the CpCpA
OH
residues. (See Chapter 38.)
RNA CAN ACT AS A CATALYST
In addition to the catalytic action served by the 
snRNAs in the formation of mRNA, several other
enzymatic functions have been attributed to RNA.
Ribozymesare RNA molecules with catalytic activity.
These generally involve transesterification reactions,
and most are concerned with RNA metabolism (splic-
ing and endoribonuclease). Recently, a ribosomal RNA
component was noted to hydrolyze an aminoacyl ester
and thus to play a central role in peptide bond function
(peptidyl transferases; see Chapter 38). These observa-
tions, made in organelles from plants, yeast, viruses,
and higher eukaryotic cells, show that RNA can act as
an enzyme. This has revolutionized thinking about en-
zyme action and the origin of life itself.
SUMMARY
• RNA is synthesized from a DNA template by the en-
zyme RNA polymerase.
• There are three distinct nuclear DNA-dependent
RNA polymerases in mammals: RNA polymerases I,
II, and III. These enzymes control the transcriptional
function—the transcription of rRNA, mRNA, and
small RNA (tRNA/5S rRNA, snRNA) genes, respec-
tively.
• RNA polymerases interact with unique cis-active re-
gions of genes, termed promoters, in order to form
preinitiation complexes (PICs) capable of initiation.
In eukaryotes the process of PIC formation is facili-
tated by multiple general transcription factors
(GTFs), TFIIA, B, D, E, F, and H.
• Eukaryotic PIC formation can occur either step-
wise—by the sequential, ordered interactions of
RNA SYNTHESIS, PROCESSING, & MODIFICATION / 357
GTFs and RNA polymerase with promoters—or in
one step by the recognition of the promoter by a pre-
formed GTF-RNA polymerase holoenzyme complex.
• Transcription exhibits three phases: initiation, elon-
gation, and termination. All are dependent upon dis-
tinct DNA cis-elements and can be modulated by
distinct trans-acting protein factors.
• Most eukaryotic RNAs are synthesized as precursors
that contain excess sequences which are removed
prior to the generation of mature, functional RNA.
• Eukaryotic mRNA synthesis results in a pre-mRNA
precursor that contains extensive amounts of excess
RNA (introns) that must be precisely removed by
RNA splicing to generate functional, translatable
mRNA composed of exonic coding and noncoding
sequences.
• All steps—from changes in DNA template, sequence,
and accessibility in chromatin to RNA stability—are
subject to modulation and hence are potential con-
trol sites for eukaryotic gene regulation.
REFERENCES
Busby S, Ebright RH: Promoter structure, promoter recognition,
and transcription activation in prokaryotes. Cell 1994;79:
743.
Cramer P, Bushnell DA, Kornberg R: Structural basis of transcrip-
tion: RNA polymerase II at 2.8 angstrom resolution. Science
2001;292:1863.
Fedor MJ: Ribozymes. Curr Biol 1998;8:R441.
Gott JM, Emeson RB: Functions and mechanisms of RNA editing.
Ann Rev Genet 2000;34:499.
Hirose Y, Manley JL: RNA polymerase II and the integration of
nuclear events. Genes Dev 2000;14:1415.
Keaveney M, Struhl K: Activator-mediated recruitment of the
RNA polymerase machinery is the predominant mechanism
for transcriptional activation in yeast. Mol Cell 1998;1:917.
Lemon B, Tjian R: Orchestrated response: a symphony of tran-
scription factors for gene control. Genes Dev 2000;14:2551.
Maniatis T, Reed R: An extensive network of coupling among gene
expression machines. Nature 2002;416:499.
Orphanides G, Reinberg D: A unified theory of gene expression.
Cell 2002;108:439.
Shatkin AJ, Manley JL: The ends of the affair: capping and poly-
adenylation. Nat Struct Biol 2000;7:838.
Stevens SW et al: Composition and functional characterization of
the yeast spliceosomal penta-snRNP. Mol Cell 2002;9:31.
Tucker M, Parker R: Mechanisms and control of mRNA decap-
ping in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.Ann Rev Biochem 2000;69:
571.
Woychik NA, Hampsey M: The RNA polymerase II machinery:
structure illuminates function. Cell 2002;108:453.
358
Protein Synthesis & the 
Genetic Code
38
Daryl K. Granner, MD
BIOMEDICAL IMPORTANCE
The letters A, G, T, and C correspond to the nu-
cleotides found in DNA. They are organized into three-
letter code words called codons,and the collection of
these codons makes up the genetic code.It was impos-
sible to understand protein synthesis—or to explain
mutations—before the genetic code was elucidated.
The code provides a foundation for explaining the way
in which protein defects may cause genetic disease and
for the diagnosis and perhaps the treatment of these
disorders. In addition, the pathophysiology of many
viral infections is related to the ability of these agents to
disrupt host cell protein synthesis. Many antibacterial
agents are effective because they selectively disrupt pro-
tein synthesis in the invading bacterial cell but do not
affect protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells. 
GENETIC INFORMATION FLOWS 
FROM DNA TO RNA TO PROTEIN
The genetic information within the nucleotide se-
quence of DNA is transcribed in the nucleus into the
specific nucleotide sequence of an RNA molecule. The
sequence of nucleotides in the RNA transcript is com-
plementary to the nucleotide sequence of the template
strand of its gene in accordance with the base-pairing
rules. Several different classes of RNA combine to di-
rect the synthesis of proteins.
In prokaryotes there is a linear correspondence be-
tween the gene, the messenger RNA (mRNA) tran-
scribed from the gene, and the polypeptide product.
The situation is more complicated in higher eukaryotic
cells, in which the primary transcript is much larger
than the mature mRNA. The large mRNA precursors
contain coding regions (exons)that will form the ma-
ture mRNA and long intervening sequences (introns)
that separate the exons. The hnRNA is processed
within the nucleus, and the introns, which often make
up much more of this RNA than the exons, are re-
moved. Exons are spliced together to form mature
mRNA, which is transported to the cytoplasm, where it
is translated into protein.
The cell must possess the machinery necessary to
translate information accurately and efficiently from
the nucleotide sequence of an mRNA into the sequence
of amino acids of the corresponding specific protein.
Clarification of our understanding of this process,
which is termed translation,awaited deciphering of the
genetic code. It was realized early that mRNA mole-
cules themselves have no affinity for amino acids and,
therefore, that the translation of the information in the
mRNA nucleotide sequence into the amino acid se-
quence of a protein requires an intermediate adapter
molecule. This adapter molecule must recognize a spe-
cific nucleotide sequence on the one hand as well as a
specific amino acid on the other. With such an adapter
molecule, the cell can direct a specific amino acid into
the proper sequential position of a protein during its
synthesis as dictated by the nucleotide sequence of the
specific mRNA. In fact, the functional groups of the
amino acids do not themselves actually come into con-
tact with the mRNA template.
THE NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE 
OF AN mRNA MOLECULE CONSISTS 
OF A SERIES OF CODONS THAT SPECIFY
THE AMINO ACID SEQUENCE OF THE
ENCODED PROTEIN
Twenty different amino acids are required for the syn-
thesis of the cellular complement of proteins; thus,
there must be at least 20 distinct codons that make up
the genetic code. Since there are only four different nu-
cleotides in mRNA, each codon must consist of more
than a single purine or pyrimidine nucleotide. Codons
consisting of two nucleotides each could provide for
only 16 (42) specific codons, whereas codons of three
nucleotides could provide 64 (43) specific codons.
It is now known that each codon consists of a se-
quence of three nucleotides; ie, it is a triplet code
(see Table 38–1). The deciphering of the genetic code
depended heavily on the chemical synthesis of nu-
cleotide polymers, particularly triplets in repeated se-
quence.
PROTEIN SYNTHESIS & THE GENETIC CODE / 359
Table 38–1. The genetic code (codon
assignments in mammalian messenger RNA).1
First
Second
Third
Nucleotide
Nucleotide
Nucleotide
U
C
A
G
Phe Ser r Tyr
Cys
U
Phe Ser r Tyr
Cys
C
U
Leu Ser Term m Term2
A
Leu Ser Term m Trp
G
Leu Pro o His
Arg
U
Leu Pro o His
Arg
C
C
Leu Pro o Gln
Arg
A
Leu Pro o Gln
Arg
G
Ile
Thr Asn
Ser
U
Ile
Thr Asn
Ser
C
A
IleThr Lys
Arg2
A
Met Thr Lys
Arg
2
G
Val Ala a Asp
Gly
U
Val Ala a Asp
Gly
C
G
Val Ala a Glu
Gly
A
Val Ala a Glu
Gly
G
1
The terms first, second, and third nucleotide refer to the indi-
vidual nucleotides of a triplet codon. U, uridine nucleotide;
C,cytosine nucleotide; A, adenine nucleotide; G, guanine nu-
cleotide; Term, chain terminator codon. AUG, which codes for
Met, serves as the initiator codon in mammalian cells and en-
codes for internal methionines in a protein. (Abbreviations of
amino acids are explained in Chapter 3.)
2
In mammalian mitochondria, AUA codes for Met and UGA for
Trp, and AGA and AGG serve as chain terminators.
THE GENETIC CODE IS DEGENERATE,
UNAMBIGUOUS, NONOVERLAPPING,
WITHOUT PUNCTUATION, & UNIVERSAL
Three of the 64 possible codons do not code for specific
amino acids; these have been termed nonsense codons.
These nonsense codons are utilized in the cell as termi-
nation signals;they specify where the polymerization
of amino acids into a protein molecule is to stop. The
remaining 61 codons code for 20 amino acids (Table
38–1). Thus, there must be “degeneracy” in the ge-
netic code—ie, multiple codons must decode the same
amino acid. Some amino acids are encoded by several
codons; for example, six different codons specify serine.
Other amino acids, such as methionine and trypto-
phan, have a single codon. In general, the third nu-
cleotide in a codon is less important than the first two
in determining the specific amino acid to be incorpo-
rated, and this accounts for most of the degeneracy of
the code. However, for any specific codon, only a single
amino acid is indicated; with rare exceptions, the ge-
netic code isunambiguous—ie, given a specific codon,
only a single amino acid is indicated. The distinction
between ambiguity and degeneracy is an important
concept.
The unambiguous but degenerate code can be ex-
plained in molecular terms. The recognition of specific
codons in the mRNA by the tRNA adapter molecules is
dependent upon their anticodon regionand specific
base-pairing rules. Each tRNA molecule contains a spe-
cific sequence, complementary to a codon, which is
termed its anticodon. For a given codon in the mRNA,
only a single species of tRNA molecule possesses the
proper anticodon. Since each tRNA molecule can be
charged with only one specific amino acid, each codon
therefore specifies only one amino acid. However, some
tRNA molecules can utilize the anticodon to recognize
more than one codon. With few exceptions, given a
specific codon, only a specific amino acid will be in-
corporated—although, given a specific amino acid,
more than one codon may be used.
As discussed below, the reading of the genetic code
during the process of protein synthesis does not involve
any overlap of codons. Thus, the genetic code is
nonoverlapping. Furthermore, once the reading is
commenced at a specific codon, there is no punctua-
tionbetween codons, and the message is read in a con-
tinuing sequence of nucleotide triplets until a transla-
tion stop codon is reached.
Until recently, the genetic code was thought to be
universal. It has now been shown that the set of tRNA
molecules in mitochondria (which contain their own
separate and distinct set of translation machinery) from
lower and higher eukaryotes, including humans, reads
four codons differently from the tRNA molecules in
the cytoplasm of even the same cells. As noted in Table
38–1, the codon AUA is read as Met, and UGA codes
for Trp in mammalian mitochondria. In addition, in
mitochondria, the codons AGA and AGG are read as
stop or chain terminator codons rather than as Arg. As
a result, mitochondria require only 22 tRNA molecules
to read their genetic code, whereas the cytoplasmic
translation system possesses a full complement of 31
tRNA species. These exceptions noted, the genetic
code is universal.The frequency of use of each amino
acid codon varies considerably between species and
among different tissues within a species. The specific
tRNA levels generally mirror these codon usage biases.
Thus, a particular abundantly used codon is decoded
by a similarly abundant specific tRNA which recognizes
that particular codon. Tables of codon usage are be-
coming more accurate as more genes are sequenced.
This is of considerable importance because investigators
360 / CHAPTER 38
Table 38–2. Features of the genetic code.
• Degenerate
• Unambiguous
• Nonoverlapping
• Not punctuated
• Universal
often need to deduce mRNA structure from the pri-
mary sequence of a portion of protein in order to syn-
thesize an oligonucleotide probe and initiate a recombi-
nant DNA cloning project. The main features of the
genetic code are listed in Table 38–2.
AT LEAST ONE SPECIES OF TRANSFER
RNA (tRNA) EXISTS FOR EACH OF THE 
20 AMINO ACIDS
tRNA molecules have extraordinarily similar functions
and three-dimensional structures. The adapter function
of the tRNA molecules requires the charging of each
specific tRNA with its specific amino acid. Since there
is no affinity of nucleic acids for specific functional
groups of amino acids, this recognition must be carried
out by a protein molecule capable of recognizing both a
specific tRNA molecule and a specific amino acid. At
least 20 specific enzymes are required for these specific
recognition functions and for the proper attachment of
the 20 amino acids to specific tRNA molecules. The
process of recognition and attachment (charging)
proceeds in two steps by one enzyme for each of the 20
amino acids. These enzymes are termed aminoacyl-
tRNA synthetases.They form an activated intermedi-
ate of aminoacyl-AMP-enzyme complex (Figure 38–1).
The specific aminoacyl-AMP-enzyme complex then
recognizes a specific tRNA to which it attaches the
aminoacyl moiety at the 3′-hydroxyl adenosyl terminal.
The charging reactions have an error rate of less than
10
−4
and so are extremely accurate. The amino acid re-
mains attached to its specific tRNA in an ester linkage
until it is polymerized at a specific position in the fabri-
cation of a polypeptide precursor of a protein molecule.
The regions of the tRNA molecule referred to in
Chapter 35 (and illustrated in Figure 35–11) now be-
come important. The thymidine-pseudouridine-cyti-
dine (TΨC) arm is involved in binding of the amino-
acyl-tRNA to the ribosomal surface at the site of
protein synthesis. The D arm is one of the sites impor-
tant for the proper recognition of a given tRNA species
by its proper aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. The acceptor
arm, located at the 3′-hydroxyl adenosyl terminal, is the
site of attachment of the specific amino acid.
The anticodon region consists of seven nucleotides,
and it recognizes the three-letter codon in mRNA (Fig-
ure 38–2). The sequence read from the 3′to 5′direc-
tion in that anticodon loop consists of a variable
base–modified purine–XYZ–pyrimidine–pyrimidine-
5′. Note that this direction of reading the anticodon is
3′to 5′, whereas the genetic code in Table 38–1 is read
5′to 3′, since the codon and the anticodon loop of the
mRNA and tRNA molecules, respectively, are antipar-
allelin their complementarity just like all other inter-
molecular interactions between nucleic acid strands.
The degeneracy of the genetic code resides mostly in
the last nucleotide of the codon triplet, suggesting that
the base pairing between this last nucleotide and the
corresponding nucleotide of the anticodon is not strictly
tRNA
tRNA-aa
AMP + Enz
HOOC
HC
H
2
N
R
Enzyme (Enz)
PP
i
ATP
Enz
P
R
O
O
O
O
C
NH
2
OH
Adenosine
Aminoacyl-tRNA
AMINOACYL-
tRNA SYNTHETASE
Amino acid (aa)
Enz•AMP-aa
(Activated amino acid)
Aminoacyl-AMP-enzyme
complex
CH
Figure 38–1.
Formation of aminoacyl-tRNA. A two-step reaction, involving the enzyme
aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase, results in the formation of aminoacyl-tRNA. The first reaction in-
volves the formation of an AMP-amino acid-enzyme complex. This activated amino acid is next
transferred to the corresponding tRNA molecule. The AMP and enzyme are released, and the lat-
ter can be reutilized. The charging reactions have an error rate of less than 10–4and so are ex-
tremely accurate.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested