asp.net mvc generate pdf : Change pdf to gif SDK application project wpf html windows UWP Harper%27s%20Illustrated%20Biochemistry%20-%20Robert%20K.%20Murray,%20Darryl%20K.%20Granner,%20Peter%20A.%20Mayes,%20Victor%20W.%20Rodwell38-part598

PROTEIN SYNTHESIS & THE GENETIC CODE / 371
Poliovirus
protease
4E
4G
4E
4G
4E
4G
4E
4G
4G
AUG
Nil
Cap
AUG
IRES
AUG
Cap
AUG
IRES
Figure 38–10.
Picornaviruses disrupt the 4F com-
plex. The 4E
-
4G complex (4F) directs the 40S ribosomal
subunit to the typical capped mRNA (see text). 4G
alone is sufficient for targeting the 40S subunit to the
internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) of viral mRNAs. To
gain selective advantage, certain viruses (eg, poliovirus)
have a protease that cleaves the 4E binding site from
the amino terminal end of 4G. This truncated 4G can di-
rect the 40S ribosomal subunit to mRNAs that have an
IRES but not to those that have a cap. The widths of the
arrows indicate the rate of translation initiation from
the AUG codon in each example.
cell processes,including those involved in protein syn-
thesis. Some viral mRNAs are translated much more ef-
ficiently than those of the host cell (eg, encephalomyo-
carditis virus). Others, such as reovirus and vesicular
stomatitis virus, replicate abundantly, and their mRNAs
have a competitive advantage over host cell mRNAs for
limited translation factors. Other viruses inhibit host
cell protein synthesis by preventing the association of
mRNA with the 40S ribosome.
Poliovirus and other picornaviruses gain a selective
advantage by disrupting the function of the 4F complex
to their advantage. The mRNAs of these viruses do not
have a cap structure to direct the binding of the 40S ri-
bosomal subunit (see above). Instead, the 40S ribosomal
subunit contacts an internal ribosomal entry site
(IRES)in a reaction that requires 4G but not 4E. The
virus gains a selective advantage by having a protease that
attacks 4G and removes the amino terminal 4E binding
site. Now the 4E-4G complex (4F) cannot form, so the
40S ribosomal subunit cannot be directed to capped
mRNAs. Host cell translation is thus abolished. The 4G
fragment can direct binding of the 40S ribosomal sub-
unit to IRES-containing mRNAs, so viral mRNA trans-
lation is very efficient (Figure 38–10). These viruses also
promote the dephosphorylation of BP1 (PHAS-1),
thereby decreasing cap (4E)-dependent translation.
POSTTRANSLATIONAL PROCESSING
AFFECTS THE ACTIVITY OF 
MANY PROTEINS
Some animal viruses, notably poliovirus and hepatitis A
virus, synthesize long polycistronic proteins from one
long mRNA molecule. These protein molecules are
subsequently cleaved at specific sites to provide the sev-
eral specific proteins required for viral function. In ani-
mal cells, many proteins are synthesized from the
mRNA template as a precursor molecule, which then
must be modified to achieve the active protein. The
prototype is insulin, which is a low-molecular-weight
protein having two polypeptide chains with interchain
and intrachain disulfide bridges. The molecule is syn-
thesized as a single chain precursor, or prohormone,
which folds to allow the disulfide bridges to form. A
specific protease then clips out the segment that con-
nects the two chains which form the functional insulin
molecule (see Figure 42–12).
Many other peptides are synthesized as proproteins
that require modifications before attaining biologic ac-
tivity. Many of the posttranslational modifications in-
volve the removal of amino terminal amino acid
residues by specific aminopeptidases. Collagen, an
abundant protein in the extracellular spaces of higher
eukaryotes, is synthesized as procollagen. Three procol-
lagen polypeptide molecules, frequently not identical in
sequence, align themselves in a particular way that is
dependent upon the existence of specific amino termi-
nal peptides. Specific enzymes then carry out hydrox-
ylations and oxidations of specific amino acid residues
within the procollagen molecules to provide cross-links
for greater stability. Amino terminal peptides are
cleaved off the molecule to form the final product—a
strong, insoluble collagen molecule. Many other post-
translational modifications of proteins occur. Covalent
modification by acetylation, phosphorylation, methyla-
tion, ubiquitinylation, and glycosylation is common,
for example.
MANY ANTIBIOTICS WORK BECAUSE
THEY SELECTIVELY INHIBIT PROTEIN
SYNTHESIS IN BACTERIA
Ribosomes in bacteria and in the mitochondria of
higher eukaryotic cells differ from the mammalian ribo-
some described in Chapter 35. The bacterial ribosome
is smaller (70S rather than 80S) and has a different,
somewhat simpler complement of RNA and protein
Error processing SSI file
372 / CHAPTER 38
N(CH
3
)
2
O
N
N
H
H
N
N
OH
NH
H
H
HOCH
2
C
O
CH
2
NH
2
OCH
3
CH
NH
2
O
N
N
H
H
N
N
OH
O
H
H
CH
2
C
O
CH
2
NH
2
OH
CH
tRNA
P
O
O
O
O
Figure 38–11.
The comparative structures of the an-
tibiotic puromycin (top) and the 3terminal portion of
tyrosinyl-tRNA (bottom).
molecules. This difference is exploited for clinical pur-
poses because many effective antibiotics interact specifi-
cally with the proteins and RNAs of prokaryotic ribo-
somes and thus inhibit protein synthesis. This results in
growth arrest or death of the bacterium. The most use-
ful members of this class of antibiotics (eg, tetracy-
clines, lincomycin, erythromycin, and chlorampheni-
col) do not interact with components of eukaryotic
ribosomal particles and thus are not toxic to eukaryotes.
Tetracycline prevents the binding of aminoacyl-tRNAs
to the A site. Chloramphenicol and the macrolide class
of antibiotics work by binding to 23S rRNA, which is
interesting in view of the newly appreciated role of
rRNA in peptide bond formation through its peptidyl-
transferase activity. It should be mentioned that the
close similarity between prokaryotic and mitochondrial
ribosomes can lead to complications in the use of some
antibiotics.
Other antibiotics inhibit protein synthesis on all ri-
bosomes (puromycin) or only on those of eukaryotic
cells (cycloheximide).Puromycin (Figure 38–11) is a
structural analog of tyrosinyl-tRNA. Puromycin is in-
corporated via the A site on the ribosome into the car-
boxyl terminal position of a peptide but causes the pre-
mature release of the polypeptide. Puromycin, as a
tyrosinyl-tRNA analog, effectively inhibits protein syn-
thesis in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Cyclohex-
imide inhibits peptidyltransferase in the 60S ribosomal
subunit in eukaryotes, presumably by binding to an
rRNA component.
Diphtheria toxin,an exotoxin of Corynebacterium
diphtheriaeinfected with a specific lysogenic phage, cat-
alyzes the ADP-ribosylation of EF-2 on the unique
amino acid diphthamide in mammalian cells. This
modification inactivates EF-2 and thereby specifically
inhibits mammalian protein synthesis. Many animals
(eg, mice) are resistant to diphtheria toxin. This resis-
tance is due to inability of diphtheria toxin to cross the
cell membrane rather than to insensitivity of mouse 
EF-2 to diphtheria toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation
by NAD.
Ricin, an extremely toxic molecule isolated from the
castor bean, inactivates eukaryotic 28S ribosomal RNA
by providing the N-glycolytic cleavage or removal of a
single adenine.
Many of these compounds—puromycin and cyclo-
heximide in particular—are not clinically useful but
have been important in elucidating the role of protein
synthesis in the regulation of metabolic processes, par-
ticularly enzyme induction by hormones.
SUMMARY
• The flow of genetic information follows the sequence
DNA →RNA → protein. 
• The genetic information in the structural region of a
gene is transcribed into an RNA molecule such that
the sequence of the latter is complementary to that in
the DNA. 
• Several different types of RNA, including ribosomal
RNA (rRNA), transfer RNA (tRNA), and messenger
RNA (mRNA), are involved in protein synthesis. 
• The information in mRNA is in a tandem array of
codons, each of which is three nucleotides long. 
• The mRNA is read continuously from a start codon
(AUG) to a termination codon (UAA, UAG, UGA). 
• The open reading frame of the mRNA is the series of
codons, each specifying a certain amino acid, that de-
termines the precise amino acid sequence of the pro-
tein.
• Protein synthesis, like DNA and RNA synthesis, fol-
lows a 5′to 3′polarity and can be divided into three
Error processing SSI file
PROTEIN SYNTHESIS & THE GENETIC CODE / 373
processes: initiation, elongation, and termination.
Mutant proteins arise when single-base substitutions
result in codons that specify a different amino acid at
a given position, when a stop codon results in a trun-
cated protein, or when base additions or deletions
alter the reading frame, so different codons are read. 
• A variety of compounds, including several antibi-
otics, inhibit protein synthesis by affecting one or
more of the steps involved in protein synthesis.
REFERENCES
Crick F et al: The genetic code. Nature 1961;192:1227.
Green R, Noller HF: Ribosomes and translation. Annu Rev
Biochem 1997;66:679.
Kozak M: Structural features in eukaryotic mRNAs that modulate
the initiation of translation. J Biol Chem 1991;266:1986.
Lawrence JC, Abraham RT: PHAS/4E-BPs as regulators of mRNA
translation and cell proliferation. Trends Biochem Sci
1997;22:345.
Sachs AB, Buratowski S: Common themes in translational and
transcriptional regulation. Trends Biochem Sci 1997;22:189. 
Sachs AB, Sarnow P, Hentze MW: Starting at the beginning, mid-
dle and end: translation initiation in eukaryotes. Cell 1997;
98:831.
Weatherall DJ et al: The hemoglobinopathies. In: The Metabolic
and Molecular Bases of Inherited Disease,8th ed. Scriver CR et
al (editors). McGraw-Hill, 2001.
Error processing SSI file
Regulation of Gene Expression
39
374
Daryl K. Granner, MD, & P. Anthony Weil, PhD
BIOMEDICAL IMPORTANCE
Organisms adapt to environmental changes by altering
gene expression. The process of alteration of gene ex-
pression has been studied in detail and often involves
modulation of gene transcription. Control of transcrip-
tion ultimately results from changes in the interaction
of specific binding regulatory proteins with various re-
gions of DNA in the controlled gene. This can have a
positive or negative effect on transcription. Transcrip-
tion control can result in tissue-specific gene expres-
sion, and gene regulation is influenced by hormones,
heavy metals, and chemicals. In addition to transcrip-
tion level controls, gene expression can also be modu-
lated by gene amplification, gene rearrangement, post-
transcriptional modifications, and RNA stabilization.
Many of the mechanisms that control gene expression
are used to respond to hormones and therapeutic
agents. Thus, a molecular understanding of these
processes will lead to development of agents that alter
pathophysiologic mechanisms or inhibit the function or
arrest the growth of pathogenic organisms.
REGULATED EXPRESSION OF GENES 
IS REQUIRED FOR DEVELOPMENT,
DIFFERENTIATION, & ADAPTATION
The genetic information present in each somatic cell of
a metazoan organism is practically identical. The excep-
tions are found in those few cells that have amplified or
rearranged genes in order to perform specialized cellular
functions. Expression of the genetic information must
be regulated during ontogeny and differentiation of the
organism and its cellular components. Furthermore, in
order for the organism to adapt to its environment and
to conserve energy and nutrients, the expression of
genetic information must be cued to extrinsic signals
and respond only when necessary. As organisms have
evolved, more sophisticated regulatory mechanisms
have appeared which provide the organism and its cells
with the responsiveness necessary for survival in a com-
plex environment. Mammalian cells possess about 1000
times more genetic information than does the bac-
terium Escherichia coli.Much of this additional genetic
information is probably involved in regulation of gene
expression during the differentiation of tissues and bio-
logic processes in the multicellular organism and in en-
suring that the organism can respond to complex envi-
ronmental challenges.
In simple terms, there are only two types of gene
regulation: positive regulation and negative regula-
tion(Table 39–1). When the expression of genetic in-
formation is quantitatively increased by the presence of
a specific regulatory element, regulation is said to be
positive; when the expression of genetic information is
diminished by the presence of a specific regulatory ele-
ment, regulation is said to be negative. The element or
molecule mediating negative regulation is said to be a
negative regulator or repressor;that mediating positive
regulation is a positive regulator or activator.However,
double negativehas the effect of acting as a positive.
Thus, an effector that inhibits the function of a nega-
tive regulator will appear to bring about a positive regu-
lation. Many regulated systems that appear to be in-
duced are in fact derepressed at the molecular level.
(See Chapter 9 for explanation of these terms.)
BIOLOGIC SYSTEMS EXHIBIT THREE
TYPES OF TEMPORAL RESPONSES 
TO A REGULATORY SIGNAL
Figure 39–1 depicts the extent or amount of gene ex-
pression in three types of temporal response to an in-
ducing signal. A type A responseis characterized by an
increased extent of gene expression that is dependent
upon the continued presence of the inducing signal.
When the inducing signal is removed, the amount of
gene expression diminishes to its basal level, but the
amount repeatedly increases in response to the reap-
pearance of the specific signal. This type of response is
commonly observed in prokaryotes in response to sud-
den changes of the intracellular concentration of a nu-
trient. It is also observed in many higher organisms
after exposure to inducers such as hormones, nutrients,
or growth factors (Chapter 43).
type B responseexhibits an increased amount of
gene expression that is transient even in the continued
presence of the regulatory signal. After the regulatory
signal has terminated and the cell has been allowed to
recover, a second transient response to a subsequent
regulatory signal may be observed. This phenomenon
of response-desensitization-recovery characterizes the
action of many pharmacologic agents, but it is also a
Error processing SSI file
REGULATION OF GENE EXPRESSION / 375
Table 39–1. Effects of positive and negative
regulation on gene expression.
Rate of Gene Expression
Negative
Positive
Regulation
Regulation
Regulator present
Decreased
Increased
Regulator absent
Increased
Decreased
feature of many naturally occurring processes. This type
of response commonly occurs during development of
an organism, when only the transient appearance of a
specific gene product is required although the signal
persists.
The type C responsepattern exhibits, in response
to the regulatory signal, an increased extent of gene ex-
pression that persists indefinitely even after termination
of the signal. The signal acts as a trigger in this pattern.
Once expression of the gene is initiated in the cell, it
cannot be terminated even in the daughter cells; it is
therefore an irreversible and inherited alteration. This
type of response typically occurs during the develop-
ment of differentiated function in a tissue or organ.
Prokaryotes Provide Models for the Study
of Gene Expression in Mammalian Cells
Analysis of the regulation of gene expression in
prokaryotic cells helped establish the principle that in-
formation flows from the gene to a messenger RNA to a
specific protein molecule. These studies were aided by
the advanced genetic analyses that could be performed
in prokaryotic and lower eukaryotic organisms. In re-
cent years, the principles established in these early stud-
ies, coupled with a variety of molecular biology tech-
niques, have led to remarkable progress in the analysis
of gene regulation in higher eukaryotic organisms, in-
cluding mammals. In this chapter, the initial discussion
will center on prokaryotic systems. The impressive ge-
netic studies will not be described, but the physiology
of gene expression will be discussed. However, nearly
all of the conclusions about this physiology have been
derived from genetic studies and confirmed by molecu-
lar genetic and biochemical studies.
Some Features of Prokaryotic Gene
Expression Are Unique
Before the physiology of gene expression can be ex-
plained, a few specialized genetic and regulatory terms
must be defined for prokaryotic systems. In prokary-
otes, the genes involved in a metabolic pathway are
often present in a linear array called an operon,eg, the
lacoperon. An operon can be regulated by a single pro-
moter or regulatory region. The cistronis the smallest
unit of genetic expression. As described in Chapter 9,
some enzymes and other protein molecules are com-
posed of two or more nonidentical subunits. Thus, the
“one gene, one enzyme” concept is not necessarily
valid. The cistron is the genetic unit coding for the
structure of the subunit of a protein molecule, acting as
it does as the smallest unit of genetic expression. Thus,
the one gene, one enzyme idea might more accurately
Time
Signal
G
e
n
e
e
x
p
r
e
s
s
i
o
n
Type A
Time
Recovery
Signal
G
e
n
e
e
x
p
r
e
s
s
i
o
n
Type B
Time
Signal
G
e
n
e
e
x
p
r
e
s
s
i
o
n
Type C
Figure 39–1.
Diagrammatic representations of the
responses of the extent of expression of a gene to spe-
cific regulatory signals such as a hormone.
Error processing SSI file
376 / CHAPTER 39
Operator
Promoter
site
lacI
lacZ
lac operon
lacY
lacA
Figure 39–2.
The positional relationships of the
structural and regulatory genes of the lacoperon. lacZ
encodes β-galactosidase, lacYencodes a permease, and
lacAencodes a thiogalactoside transacetylase. lacIen-
codes the lacoperon repressor protein.
be regarded as a one cistron, one subunitconcept. A
single mRNA that encodes more than one separately
translated protein is referred to as a polycistronic
mRNA. For example, the polycistronic lac operon
mRNA is translated into three separate proteins (see
below). Operons and polycistronic mRNAs are com-
mon in bacteria but not in eukaryotes.
An inducible geneis one whose expression increases
in response to an induceror activator,a specific posi-
tive regulatory signal. In general, inducible genes have
relatively low basal rates of transcription. By contrast,
genes with high basal rates of transcription are often
subject to down-regulation by repressors.
The expression of some genes is constitutive,mean-
ing that they are expressed at a reasonably constant rate
and not known to be subject to regulation. These are
often referred to as housekeeping genes.As a result of
mutation, some inducible gene products become con-
stitutively expressed. A mutation resulting in constitu-
tive expression of what was formerly a regulated gene is
called a constitutive mutation.
Analysis of Lactose Metabolism in E coli
Led to the Operon Hypothesis
Jacob and Monod in 1961 described their operon
model in a classic paper. Their hypothesis was to a
large extent based on observations on the regulation of
lactose metabolism by the intestinal bacterium E coli.
The molecular mechanisms responsible for the regula-
tion of the genes involved in the metabolism of lactose
are now among the best-understood in any organism.
β-Galactosidase hydrolyzes the β-galactoside lactose to
galactose and glucose. The structural gene for β-galac-
tosidase (lacZ) is clustered with the genes responsible
for the permeation of galactose into the cell (lacY)and
for thiogalactoside transacetylase (lacA).The structural
genes for these three enzymes, along with the lacpro-
moter and lacoperator (a regulatory region), are physi-
cally associated to constitute the lacoperonas depicted
in Figure 39–2. This genetic arrangement of the struc-
tural genes and their regulatory genes allows for coordi-
nate expressionof the three enzymes concerned with
lactose metabolism. Each of these linked genes is tran-
scribed into one large mRNA molecule that contains
multiple independent translation start (AUG) and stop
(UAA) codons for each cistron. Thus, each protein is
translated separately, and they are not processed from a
single large precursor protein. This type of mRNA mol-
ecule is called a polycistronic mRNA. Polycistronic
mRNAs are predominantly found in prokaryotic organ-
isms.
It is now conventional to consider that a gene in-
cludes regulatory sequences as well as the region that
encodes the primary transcript. Although there are
many historical exceptions, a gene is generally italicized
in lower case and the encoded protein, when abbrevi-
ated, is expressed in roman type with the first letter cap-
italized. For example, the gene lacIencodes the repres-
sor protein LacI. When E coliis presented with lactose
or some specific lactose analogs under appropriate non-
repressing conditions (eg, high concentrations of lac-
tose, no or very low glucose in media; see below), the
expression of the activities of β-galactosidase, galacto-
side permease, and thiogalactoside transacetylase is in-
creased 100-fold to 1000-fold. This is a type A re-
sponse, as depicted in Figure 39–1. The kinetics of
induction can be quite rapid; lac-specific mRNAs are
fully induced within 5–6 minutes after addition of lac-
tose to a culture; β-galactosidase protein is maximal
within 10 minutes. Under fully induced conditions,
there can be up to 5000 β-galactosidase molecules per
cell, an amount about 1000 times greater than the
basal, uninduced level. Upon removal of the signal, ie,
the inducer, the synthesis of these three enzymes de-
clines. 
When E coliis exposed to both lactose and glucose
as sources of carbon, the organisms first metabolize
theglucose and then temporarily stop growing until the
genes of the lacoperon become induced to provide the
ability to metabolize lactose as a usable energy source.
Although lactose is present from the beginning of the
bacterial growth phase, the cell does not induce those
enzymes necessary for catabolism of lactose until the
glucose has been exhausted. This phenomenon was first
thought to be attributable to repression of the lac
operon by some catabolite of glucose; hence, it was
termed catabolite repression. It is now known that
catabolite repression is in fact mediated by a catabolite
gene activator protein (CAP) in conjunction with
cAMP(Figure 18–5). This protein is also referred to as
the cAMP regulatory protein (CRP). The expression of
many inducible enzyme systems or operons in E coli
and other prokaryotes is sensitive to catabolite repres-
sion, as discussed below.
Error processing SSI file
REGULATION OF GENE EXPRESSION / 377
No inducer
or
With inducer
and
no glucose
Inducer
and
glucose
A
B
lacI gene
lacZ gene
lacY gene
lacA gene
lacI 
lacZ
lacY
lacA
Operator
Promoter
Repressor
subunits
Repressor
(tetramer)
↑ RNA
polymerase
RNA polymerase
cannot transcribe
operator or distal
genes (Z,Y, A)
CAP-cAMP
RNA polymerases transcribing genes
mRNA
Inducers
Inactive
repressor
β-Galacto-
sidase
protein
Permease
protein
Transacetylase
protein
Figure 39–3.
The mechanism of repression and derepression of the lacoperon. When either no inducer is
present or inducer is present with glucose (A),the lacIgene products that are synthesized constitutively form
a repressor tetramer molecule which binds at the operator locus to prevent the efficient initiation of transcrip-
tion by RNA polymerase at the promoter locus and thus to prevent the subsequent transcription of the lacZ,
lacY,and lacAstructural genes. When inducer is present (B),the constitutively expressed lacIgene forms re-
pressor molecules that are conformationally altered by the inducer and cannot efficiently bind to the operator
locus (affinity of binding reduced > 1000-fold). In the presence of cAMP and its binding protein (CAP), the RNA
polymerase can transcribe the structural genes lacZ, lacY,and lacA,and the polycistronic mRNA molecule
formed can be translated into the corresponding protein molecules β-galactosidase, permease, and
transacetylase, allowing for the catabolism of lactose.
The physiology of induction of the lac operon is
well understood at the molecular level (Figure 39–3).
Expression of the normal lacIgene of the lacoperon is
constitutive; it is expressed at a constant rate, resulting
in formation of the subunits of the lacrepressor.Four
identical subunits with molecular weights of 38,000 as-
semble into a lacrepressor molecule. The LacI repressor
protein molecule, the product of lacI, has a high affinity
(K
d
about 10−13 mol/L) for the operator locus. The op-
erator locusis a region of double-stranded DNA 27
base pairs long with a twofold rotational symmetry and
an inverted palindrome (indicated by solid lines about
the dotted axis) in a region that is 21 base pairs long, as
shown below:
The minimum effective size of an operator for LacI
repressor binding is 17 base pairs (boldface letters in the
TGTGAGC G GATAACAATT
3 TTA ACACTCG C CTATTGTTAA
:
:
5′
AAT
Error processing SSI file
378 / CHAPTER 39
above sequence). At any one time, only two subunits of
the repressors appear to bind to the operator, and within
the 17-base-pair region at least one base of each base
pair is involved in LacI recognition and binding. The
binding occurs mostly in the major groovewithout in-
terrupting the base-paired, double-helical nature of the
operator DNA. The operator locusis between the pro-
moter site,at which the DNA-dependent RNA polym-
erase attaches to commence transcription, and the tran-
scription initiation site of the lacZgene,the structural
gene for β-galactosidase (Figure 39–2). When attached
to the operator locus, the LacI repressor molecule pre-
vents transcription of the operator locus as well as of the
distal structural genes, lacZ, lacY,and lacA.Thus, the
LacI repressor molecule is a negative regulator; in its
presence (and in the absence of inducer; see below), ex-
pression from the lacZ, lacY, and lacA genes is pre-
vented. There are normally 20–40 repressor tetramer
molecules in the cell, a concentration of tetramer suffi-
cient to effect, at any given time, > 95% occupancy of
the one lacoperator element in a bacterium, thus ensur-
ing low (but not zero) basal lacoperon gene transcrip-
tion in the absence of inducing signals.
A lactose analog that is capable of inducing the lac
operon while not itself serving as a substrate for β-galac-
tosidase is an example of a gratuitous inducer.An ex-
ample is isopropylthiogalactoside (IPTG). The addition
of lactose or of a gratuitous inducer such as IPTG to
bacteria growing on a poorly utilized carbon source
(such as succinate) results in prompt induction of the
lacoperon enzymes. Small amounts of the gratuitous in-
ducer or of lactose are able to enter the cell even in the
absence of permease. The LacI repressor molecules—
both those attached to the operator loci and those free in
the cytosol—have a high affinity for the inducer. Bind-
ing of the inducer to a repressor molecule attached to
the operator locus induces a conformational change in
the structure of the repressor and causes it to dissociate
from the DNA because its affinity for the operator is
now 10
3
times lower (K
d
about 10
−9
mol/L) than that of
LacI in the absence of IPTG. If DNA-dependent RNA
polymerase has already attached to the coding strand at
the promoter site, transcription will begin. The polym-
erase generates a polycistronic mRNA whose 5′terminal
is complementary to the template strand of the operator.
In such a manner, an inducer derepresses the lac
operonand allows transcription of the structural genes
for β-galactosidase, galactoside permease, and thiogalac-
toside transacetylase. Translation of the polycistronic
mRNA can occur even before transcription is com-
pleted. Derepression of the lacoperon allows the cell to
synthesize the enzymes necessary to catabolize lactose as
an energy source. Based on the physiology just de-
scribed, IPTG-induced expression of transfected plas-
mids bearing the lacoperator-promoter ligated to appro-
priate bioengineered constructs is commonly used to ex-
press mammalian recombinant proteins in E coli.
In order for the RNA polymerase to efficiently form
a PIC at the promoter site, there must also be present
the catabolite gene activator protein (CAP)to which
cAMP is bound. By an independent mechanism, the
bacterium accumulates cAMP only when it is starved
for a source of carbon. In the presence of glucose—or
of glycerol in concentrations sufficient for growth—the
bacteria will lack sufficient cAMP to bind to CAP be-
cause the glucose inhibits adenylyl cyclase, the enzyme
that converts ATP to cAMP (see Chapter 42). Thus, in
the presence of glucose or glycerol, cAMP-saturated
CAP is lacking, so that the DNA-dependent RNA
polymerase cannot initiate transcription of the lac
operon. In the presence of the CAP-cAMP complex,
which binds to DNA just upstream of the promoter
site, transcription then occurs (Figure 39–3). Studies
indicate that a region of CAP contacts the RNA polym-
erase αsubunit and facilitates binding of this enzyme to
the promoter. Thus, the CAP-cAMP regulator is acting
as a positive regulatorbecause its presence is required
for gene expression. The lac operon is therefore con-
trolled by two distinct, ligand-modulated DNA bind-
ing trans factors; one that acts positively (cAMP-CRP
complex) and one that acts negatively (LacI repressor).
Maximal activity of the lacoperon occurs when glucose
levels are low (high cAMP with CAP activation) and
lactose is present (LacI is prevented from binding to the
operator).
When the lacI gene has been mutated so that its
product, LacI, is not capable of binding to operator
DNA, the organism will exhibit constitutive expres-
sionof the lacoperon. In a contrary manner, an organ-
ism with a lacIgene mutation that produces a LacI pro-
tein which prevents the binding of an inducer to the
repressor will remain repressed even in the presence of
the inducer molecule, because the inducer cannot bind
to the repressor on the operator locus in order to dere-
press the operon. Similarly, bacteria harboring muta-
tions in their lacoperator locus such that the operator
sequence will not bind a normal repressor molecule
constitutively express the lacoperon genes. Mechanisms
of positive and negative regulation comparable to those
described here for the lacsystem have been observed in
eukaryotic cells (see below).
The Genetic Switch of Bacteriophage
Lambda () Provides a Paradigm 
for Protein-DNA Interactions
in Eukaryotic Cells
Like some eukaryotic viruses (eg, herpes simplex, HIV),
some bacterial viruses can either reside in a dormant
state within the host chromosomes or can replicate
Error processing SSI file
REGULATION OF GENE EXPRESSION / 379
1
2
3
4
5
10
Lysogenic
pathway
Lytic
pathway
7
9
Ultraviolet
radiation
8
6
Induction
Figure 39–4.
Infection of the bacterium E coliby
phage lambda begins when a virus particle attaches it-
self to the bacterial cell (1) and injects its DNA (shaded
line) into the cell (2, 3). Infection can take either of two
courses depending on which of two sets of viral genes
is turned on. In the lysogenic pathway, the viral DNA
becomes integrated into the bacterial chromosome (4,
5), where it replicates passively as the bacterial cell di-
vides. The dormant virus is called a prophage, and the
cell that harbors it is called a lysogen. In the alternative
lytic mode of infection, the viral DNA replicates itself (6)
and directs the synthesis of viral proteins (7). About 100
new virus particles are formed. The proliferating viruses
lyse, or burst, the cell (8). A prophage can be “induced”
by a DNA damaging agent such as ultraviolet radiation
(9). The inducing agent throws a switch, so that a differ-
ent set of genes is turned on. Viral DNA loops out of the
chromosome (10) and replicates; the virus proceeds
along the lytic pathway. (Reproduced, with permission,
from Ptashne M, Johnson AD, Pabo CO: A genetic switch
in a bacterial virus. Sci Am [Nov] 1982;247:128.)
within the bacterium and eventually lead to lysis and
killing of the bacterial host. Some E coliharbor such a
“temperate” virus, bacteriophage lambda (λ). When
lambda infects an organism of that species it injects its
45,000-bp, double-stranded, linear DNA genome into
the cell (Figure 39–4). Depending upon the nutritional
state of the cell, the lambda DNA will either integrate
into the host genome (lysogenic pathway)and remain
dormant until activated (see below), or it will com-
mence replicatinguntil it has made about 100 copies
of complete, protein-packaged virus, at which point it
causes lysis of its host (lytic pathway).The newly gen-
erated virus particles can then infect other susceptible
hosts.
When integrated into the host genome in its dor-
mant state, lambda will remain in that state until acti-
vated by exposure of its lysogenic bacterial host to
DNA-damaging agents. In response to such a noxious
stimulus, the dormant bacteriophage becomes “in-
duced” and begins to transcribe and subsequently trans-
late those genes of its own genome which are necessary
for its excision from the host chromosome, its DNA
replication, and the synthesis of its protein coat and
lysis enzymes. This event acts like a trigger or type C
(Figure 39–1) response; ie, once lambda has committed
itself to induction, there is no turning back until the
cell is lysed and the replicated bacteriophage released.
This switch from a dormant or prophage state to a
lytic infection is well understood at the genetic and
molecular levels and will be described in detail here.
The switching event in lambda is centered around
an 80-bp region in its double-stranded DNA genome
referred to as the “right operator” (O
R
) (Figure 39–5A).
The right operatoris flanked on its left side by the
structural gene for the lambda repressor protein, the cI
protein,and on its right side by the structural gene en-
coding another regulatory protein called Cro. When
lambda is in its prophage state—ie, integrated into the
host genome—the cI repressor gene is the onlylambda
gene cI protein that is expressed. When the bacterio-
phage is undergoing lytic growth, the cI repressor gene
is not expressed, but the cro gene—as well as many
other genes in lambda—is expressed. That is, when the
repressor gene is on, the crogene is off, and when
the crogene is on, the repressor gene is off.As we
shall see, these two genes regulate each other’s expres-
sion and thus, ultimately, the decision between lytic
and lysogenic growth of lambda. This decision be-
tween repressor gene transcription and cro gene
transcription is a paradigmatic example of a molecu-
lar switch.
The 80-bp λright operator, O
R
, can be subdivided
into three discrete, evenly spaced, 17-bp cis-active
DNA elements that represent the binding sites for ei-
ther of two bacteriophage λregulatory proteins. Impor-
Error processing SSI file
380 / CHAPTER 39
O
R
O
R
3
O
R
2
O
R
1
Repressor RNA
Repressor promoter
cro Promoter
cro RNA
Gene for repressor (cl)
Gene for Cro
T
A
C
C
T
C
T
G
G
C
G
G
T
G
T
A
A
T
T
G
G
G
A
A
A
A
C
C
C
C
C
G
A
T
A
B
C
Figure 39–5.
Right operator (O
R
) is shown in increasing detail in this series of drawings.
The operator is a region of the viral DNA some 80 base pairs long (A).To its left lies the
gene encoding lambda repressor (cI), to its right the gene (cro)encoding the regulator pro-
tein Cro. When the operator region is enlarged (B),it is seen to include three subregions,
O
R
1, O
R
2, and O
R
3, each 17 base pairs long. They are recognition sites to which both repres-
sor and Cro can bind. The recognition sites overlap two promoters—sequences of bases to
which RNA polymerase binds in order to transcribe these genes into mRNA (wavy lines),
that are translated into protein. Site O
R
1 is enlarged (C)to show its base sequence. Note
that in this region of the λchromosome, both strands of DNA act as a template for tran-
scription (Chapter 39). (Reproduced, with permission, from Ptashne M, Johnson AD, Pabo CO:
A genetic switch in a bacterial virus. Sci Am [Nov] 1982;247:128.)
tantly, the nucleotide sequences of these three tandemly
arranged sites are similar but not identical (Figure
39–5B). The three related cis elements, termed opera-
tors O
R
1, O
R
2, and O
R
3, can be bound by either cI or
Cro proteins. However, the relative affinities of cI and
Cro for each of the sites varies, and this differential
binding affinity is central to the appropriate operation
of the λphage lytic or lysogenic “molecular switch.”
The DNA region between the croand repressor genes
also contains two promoter sequences that direct the
binding of RNA polymerase in a specified orientation,
where it commences transcribing adjacent genes. One
promoter directs RNA polymerase to transcribe in the
rightward direction and, thus, to transcribe croand
other distal genes, while the other promoter directs the
transcription of the repressorgene in the leftward di-
rection(Figure 39–5B).
The product of the repressor gene, the 236-amino-
acid, 27 kDa repressor protein, exists as a two-
domainmolecule in which the amino terminal domain
binds to operator DNA and the carboxyl terminal
domain promotes the association of one repressor
protein with another to form a dimer. A dimerof re-
pressor molecules binds to operator DNAmuch more
tightly than does the monomeric form (Figure 39–6A
to 39–6C).
The product of the cro gene, the 66-amino-acid,
9kDa Cro protein,has a single domain but also binds
the operator DNA more tightly as a dimer (Figure
39–6D). The Cro protein’s single domain mediates
both operator binding and dimerization.
In a lysogenic bacterium—ie, a bacterium containing
a lambda prophage—the lambda repressor dimer binds
preferentially to O
R
1 but in so doing, by a cooperative
interaction, enhances the binding (by a factor of 10) of
another repressor dimer to O
R
2 (Figure 39–7). The
affinity of repressor for O
R
3 is the least of the three oper-
ator subregions. The binding of repressor to O
R
1 has two
major effects. The occupation of O
R
1 by repressor
blocks the binding of RNA polymerase to the right-
ward promoterand in that way prevents expression of
cro.Second, as mentioned above, repressor dimer bound
to O
R
1 enhances the binding of repressor dimer to O
R
2.
The binding of repressor to O
R
2 has the important
added effect of enhancing the binding of RNA polym-
erase to the leftward promoterthat overlaps O
R
2 and
thereby enhances transcription and subsequent expres-
sion of the repressor gene. This enhancement of tran-
scription is apparently mediated through direct protein-
protein interactions between promoter-bound RNA
polymerase and O
R
2-bound repressor. Thus, the lambda
repressor is both a negative regulator, by preventing
transcription of cro,and a positive regulator,by enhanc-
ing transcription of its own gene, the repressor gene.
This dual effect of repressor is responsible for the stable
state of the dormant lambda bacteriophage; not only
does the repressor prevent expression of the genes neces-
sary for lysis, but it also promotes expression of itself to
Error processing SSI file
Error processing SSI file