REGULATION OF GENE EXPRESSION / 391
22
15
8
1
L
L
L
L
N
V
L
F
T
R
S
R
5
4
7
6
3
2
D
S
E
D
R
K
R
G
R
Q
T
Q
D
R
E
I
COOH
COOH
NH
2
NH
2
B
A
Figure 39–15.
The leucine zipper motif. Ashows a helical wheel analysis of a carboxyl terminal portion of the
DNA binding protein C/EBP. The amino acid sequence is displayed end-to-end down the axis of a schematic 
α-helix. The helical wheel consists of seven spokes that correspond to the seven amino acids that comprise every
two turns of the α-helix. Note that leucine residues (L) occur at every seventh position. Other proteins with
“leucine zippers” have a similar helical wheel pattern. Bis a schematic model of the DNA binding domain of C/EBP.
Two identical C/EBP polypeptide chains are held in dimer formation by the leucine zipper domain of each
polypeptide (denoted by the rectangles and attached ovals). This association is apparently required to hold the
DNA binding domains of each polypeptide (the shaded rectangles) in the proper conformation for DNA binding.
(Courtesy of S McKnight.)
apparatus. A given protein may thus have several sur-
faces or domains that serve different functions (see Fig-
ure 39–17). As described in Chapter 37, the primary
purpose of these complex assemblies is to facilitate the
assembly of the basal transcription apparatus on the cis-
linked promoter.
GENE REGULATION IN PROKARYOTES 
& EUKARYOTES DIFFERS IN 
IMPORTANT RESPECTS
In addition to transcription, eukaryotic cells employ a
variety of mechanisms to regulate gene expression
(Table 39–4). The nuclear membrane of eukaryotic
cells physically segregates gene transcription from trans-
lation, since ribosomes exist only in the cytoplasm.
Many more steps, especially in RNA processing, are in-
volved in the expression of eukaryotic genes than of
prokaryotic genes, and these steps provide additional
sites for regulatory influences that cannot exist in
prokaryotes. These RNA processing steps in eukaryotes,
described in detail in Chapter 37, include capping of
the 5′ ends of the primary transcripts, addition of a
polyadenylate tail to the 3′ends of transcripts, and exci-
sion of intron regions to generate spliced exons in the
mature mRNA molecule. To date, analyses of eukary-
otic gene expression provide evidence that regulation
occurs at the level of transcription, nuclear RNA pro-
cessing,and mRNA stability.In addition, gene ampli-
fication and rearrangement influence gene expression.
Owing to the advent of recombinant DNA technol-
ogy, much progress has been made in recent years in
the understanding of eukaryotic gene expression. How-
ever, because most eukaryotic organisms contain so
much more genetic information than do prokaryotes
and because manipulation of their genes is so much
more limited, molecular aspects of eukaryotic gene reg-
ulation are less well understood than the examples
discussed earlier in this chapter. This section briefly de-
scribes a few different types of eukaryotic gene regula-
tion.
Convert pdf file to jpg file - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf to jpg c#; batch pdf to jpg online
Convert pdf file to jpg file - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert .pdf to .jpg online; changing pdf to jpg
392 / CHAPTER 39
1
2
3
4
Activation
domains
1–4
Ligand-binding domain
DNA-binding domain
Figure 39–17.
Proteins that regulate transcription
have several domains. This hypothetical transcription
factor has a DNA-binding domain (DBD) that is distinct
from a ligand-binding domain (LBD) and several activa-
tion domains (ADs) (1–4). Other proteins may lack the
DBD or LBD and all may have variable numbers of
domains that contact other proteins, including 
co-regulators and those of the basal transcription
complex (see also Chapters 42 and 43).
Eukaryotic Genes Can Be Amplified
or Rearranged During Development 
or in Response to Drugs
During early development of metazoans, there is an
abrupt increase in the need for specific molecules such
as ribosomal RNA and messenger RNA molecules for
proteins that make up such organs as the eggshell. One
way to increase the rate at which such molecules can be
formed is to increase the number of genes available for
transcription of these specific molecules. Among the
repetitive DNA sequences are hundreds of copies of ri-
bosomal RNA genes and tRNA genes. These genes pre-
exist repetitively in the genomic material of the gametes
Table 39–4. Gene expression is regulated by
transcription and in numerous other ways in
eukaryotic cells.
• Gene amplification
• Gene rearrangement
• RNA processing
• Alternate mRNA splicing
• Transport of mRNA from nucleus to cytoplasm
• Regulation of mRNA stability
GAL4
+1
UAS
LexA–GAL4
G
A
L
1
gene
Active
A
+1
UAS
G
A
L
1
gene
Inactive
B
LexA–GAL4
+1
l
e
x
A
operator
G
A
L
1
gene
Active
C
Figure 39–16.
Domain-swap experiments demonstrate the independent nature of DNA binding and transcrip-
tion activation domains. The GAL1gene promoter contains an upstream activating sequence (UAS) or enhancer that
binds the regulatory protein GAL4 (A).This interaction results in a stimulation of GAL1gene transcription. A chimeric
protein, in which the amino terminal DNA binding domain of GAL4 is removed and replaced with the DNA binding
region of the E coliprotein LexA, fails to stimulate GAL1transcription because the LexA domain cannot bind to the
UAS (B).The LexA–GAL4 fusion protein does increase GAL1transcription when the lexAoperator (its natural target)
is inserted into the GAL1promoter region (C).
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start immediately to sort the files, try out some settings and then create the
pdf to jpg converter; change pdf to jpg on
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert pdf to jpg for; changing pdf to jpg file
REGULATION OF GENE EXPRESSION / 393
Amplified
Unamplified
s36
s38
s36
s38
Figure 39–18.
Schematic representation of the am-
plification of chorion protein genes s36and s38.(Repro-
duced, with permission, from Chisholm R: Gene amplifica-
tion during development. Trends Biochem Sci 1982;7:161.)
and thus are transmitted in high copy numbers from
generation to generation. In some specific organisms
such as the fruit fly (drosophila),there occurs during
oogenesis an amplification of a few preexisting genes
such as those for the chorion (eggshell) proteins. Subse-
quently, these amplified genes, presumably generated
by a process of repeated initiations during DNA syn-
thesis, provide multiple sites for gene transcription
(Figures 36–16 and 39–18).
As noted in Chapter 37, the coding sequences re-
sponsible for the generation of specific protein mole-
cules are frequently not contiguous in the mammalian
genome. In the case of antibody encoding genes, this is
particularly true. As described in detail in Chapter 50,
immunoglobulins are composed of two polypeptides,
the so-called heavy (about 50 kDa) and light (about 25
kDa) chains. The mRNAs encoding these two protein
subunits are encoded by gene sequences that are sub-
jected to extensive DNA sequence-coding changes.
These DNA coding changes are integral to generating
the requisite recognition diversity central to appropriate
immune function.
IgG heavy and light chain mRNAs are encoded by
several different segments that are tandemly repeated in
the germline. Thus, for example, the IgG light chain is
composed of variable (V
L
), joining (J
L
), and constant
(C
L
) domains or segments. For particular subsets of
IgG light chains, there are roughly 300 tandemly re-
peated V
L
gene coding segments, five tandemly
arranged J
L
coding sequences, and roughly ten C
L
gene
coding segments. All of these multiple, distinct coding
regions are located in the same region of the same chro-
mosome, and each type of coding segment (V
L
, J
L
, and
C
L
) is tandemly repeated in head-to-tail fashion within
the segment repeat region. By having multiple V
L
, J
L
,
and C
L
segments to choose from, an immune cell has a
greater repertoire of sequences to work with to develop
both immunologic flexibility and specificity. However,
a given functional IgG light chain transcription unit—
like all other “normal” mammalian transcription
units—contains only the coding sequences for a single
protein. Thus, before a particular IgG light chain can
be expressed, single V
L
, J
L
, and C
L
coding sequences
must be recombined to generate a single, contiguous
transcription unit excluding the multiple nonutilized
segments (ie, the other approximately 300 unused V
L
segments, the other four unused J
L
segments, and the
other nine unused C
L
segments). This deletion of un-
used genetic information is accomplished by selective
DNA recombination that removes the unwanted cod-
ing DNA while retaining the required coding se-
quences: one V
L
, one J
L
, and one C
L
sequence. (V
L
se-
quences are subjected to additional point mutagenesis
to generate even more variability—hence the name.)
The newly recombined sequences thus form a single
transcription unit that is competent for RNA polym-
erase II-mediated transcription. Although the IgG
genes represent one of the best-studied instances of di-
rected DNA rearrangement modulating gene expres-
sion, other cases of gene regulatory DNA rearrange-
ment have been described in the literature. Indeed, as
detailed below, drug-induced gene amplification is an
important complication of cancer chemotherapy.
In recent years, it has been possible to promote the
amplification of specific genetic regions in cultured
mammalian cells. In some cases, a several thousand-fold
increase in the copy number of specific genes can be
achieved over a period of time involving increasing doses
of selective drugs. In fact, it has been demonstrated in
patients receiving methotrexate for cancer that malig-
nant cells can develop drug resistanceby increasing the
number of genes for dihydrofolate reductase, the target
of methotrexate. Gene amplification events such as these
occur spontaneously in vivo—ie, in the absence of ex-
ogenously supplied selective agents—and these unsched-
uled extra rounds of replication can become “frozen” in
the genome under appropriate selective pressures.
Alternative RNA Processing 
Is Another Control Mechanism
In addition to affecting the efficiency of promoter uti-
lization, eukaryotic cells employ alternative RNA pro-
cessing to control gene expression. This can result when
alternative promoters, intron-exon splice sites, or
polyadenylation sites are used. Occasionally, hetero-
geneity within a cell results, but more commonly the
same primary transcript is processed differently in dif-
ferent tissues. A few examples of each of these types of
regulation are presented below.
The use of alternative transcription start sitesre-
sults in a different 5′exon on mRNAs corresponding to
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
VB.NET Components to combine various scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif, bmp, etc. Append one PDF file to the end of another one in VB.NET.
convert pdf picture to jpg; change format from pdf to jpg
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif, bmp, etc. Merge Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF form. Append one PDF file to the end
convert online pdf to jpg; .pdf to .jpg converter online
394 / CHAPTER 39
mouse amylase and myosin light chain, rat glucokinase,
and drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase and actin. Alter-
native polyadenylation sitesin the µimmunoglobulin
heavy chain primary transcript result in mRNAs that
are either 2700 bases long (µ
m
) or 2400 bases long (µ
s
).
This results in a different carboxyl terminal region of
the encoded proteins such that the µ
m
protein remains
attached to the membrane of the B lymphocyte and the
µ
s
immunoglobulin is secreted. Alternative splicing
and processing results in the formation of seven
unique α-tropomyosin mRNAs in seven different tis-
sues. It is not clear how these processing-splicing deci-
sions are made or whether these steps can be regulated.
Regulation of Messenger RNA Stability
Provides Another Control Mechanism
Although most mRNAs in mammalian cells are very
stable (half-lives measured in hours), some turn over
very rapidly (half-lives of 10–30 minutes). In certain in-
stances, mRNA stability is subject to regulation. This
has important implications since there is usually a di-
rect relationship between mRNA amount and the
translation of that mRNA into its cognate protein.
Changes in the stability of a specific mRNA can there-
fore have major effects on biologic processes.
Messenger RNAs exist in the cytoplasm as ribonu-
cleoprotein particles (RNPs). Some of these proteins
protect the mRNA from digestion by nucleases, while
others may under certain conditions promote nuclease
attack. It is thought that mRNAs are stabilized or desta-
bilized by the interaction of proteins with these various
structures or sequences. Certain effectors, such as hor-
mones, may regulate mRNA stability by increasing or
decreasing the amount of these proteins.
It appears that the ends of mRNA molecules are
involved in mRNA stability (Figure 39–19). The 5′
cap structure in eukaryotic mRNA prevents attack by 5′
exonucleases, and the poly(A) tail prohibits the action
of 3′ exonucleases. In mRNA molecules with those
structures, it is presumed that a single endonucleolytic
cut allows exonucleases to attack and digest the entire
molecule. Other structures (sequences) in the 5′non-
coding sequence (5′NCS), the coding region, and the
3′NCS are thought to promote or prevent this initial
endonucleolytic action (Figure 39–19). A few illustra-
tive examples will be cited.
Deletion of the 5′NCS results in a threefold to five-
fold prolongation of the half-life of c-mycmRNA. Short-
ening the coding region of histone mRNA results in a
prolonged half-life. A form of autoregulation of mRNA
stability indirectly involves the coding region. Free tubu-
lin binds to the first four amino acids of a nascent chain
of tubulin as it emerges from the ribosome. This appears
to activate an RNase associated with the ribosome (RNP)
which then digests the tubulin mRNA.
Structures at the 3′end, including the poly(A) tail,
enhance or diminish the stability of specific mRNAs.
The absence of a poly(A) tail is associated with rapid
degradation of mRNA, and the removal of poly(A)
from some RNAs results in their destabilization. His-
tone mRNAs lack a poly(A) tail but have a sequence
near the 3′ ′ terminal that can form a stem-loop struc-
ture, and this appears to provide resistance to exonucle-
olytic attack. Histone H4 mRNA, for example, is de-
graded in the 3′to 5′direction but only after a single
endonucleolytic cut occurs about nine nucleotides from
the 3′end in the region of the putative stem-loop struc-
ture. Stem-loop structures in the 3′ noncoding se-
quence are also critical for the regulation, by iron, of
the mRNA encoding the transferrin receptor. Stem-
loop structures are also associated with mRNA stability
in bacteria, suggesting that this mechanism may be
commonly employed.
5′ NCS
Cap
Coding
3′ NCS
AUUUA
A–A–A–A–A
n
Figure 39–19.
Structure of a typical eukaryotic mRNA showing
elements that are involved in regulating mRNA stability. The typical
eukaryotic mRNA has a 5noncoding sequence (5NCS), a coding
region, and a 3NCS. All are capped at the 5end, and most have a
polyadenylate sequence at the 3end. The 5cap and 3poly(A) tail
protect the mRNA against exonuclease attack. Stem-loop structures
in the 5and 3NCS, features in the coding sequence, and the AU-
rich region in the 3NCS are thought to play roles in mRNA stability.
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
C# Create PDF from Raster Images, .NET Graphics and REImage File with XDoc Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp
convert pdf image to jpg online; .pdf to jpg converter online
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
convert multi page pdf to jpg; convert pdf into jpg online
REGULATION OF GENE EXPRESSION / 395
Other sequences in the 3′ends of certain eukaryotic
mRNAs appear to be involved in the destabilization of
these molecules. Of particular interest are AU-rich re-
gions, many of which contain the sequence AUUUA.
This sequence appears in mRNAs that have a very short
half-life, including some encoding oncogene proteins
and cytokines. The importance of this region is under-
scored by an experiment in which a sequence corre-
sponding to the 3′noncoding region of the short-half-
life colony-stimulating factor (CSF) mRNA, which
contains the AUUUA motif, was added to the 3′end of
the β-globin mRNA. Instead of becoming very stable,
this hybrid β-globin mRNA now had the short-half-life
characteristic of CSF mRNA.
From the few examples cited, it is clear that a num-
ber of mechanisms are used to regulate mRNA stabil-
ity—just as several mechanisms are used to regulate the
synthesis of mRNA. Coordinate regulation of these two
processes confers on the cell remarkable adaptability.
SUMMARY
• The genetic constitutions of nearly all metazoan so-
matic cells are identical.
• Phenotype (tissue or cell specificity) is dictated by
differences in gene expression of this complement of
genes.
• Alterations in gene expression allow a cell to adapt to
environmental changes.
• Gene expression can be controlled at multiple levels
by changes in transcription, RNA processing, local-
ization, and stability or utilization. Gene amplifica-
tion and rearrangements also influence gene expres-
sion.
• Transcription controls operate at the level of protein-
DNA and protein-protein interactions. These inter-
actions display protein domain modularity and high
specificity.
• Several different classes of DNA-binding domains
have been identified in transcription factors.
• Chromatin modifications are important in eukary-
otic transcription control.
REFERENCES
Albright SR, Tjian R: TAFs revisited: more data reveal new twists
and confirm old ideas. Gene 2000;242:1.
Bird AP, Wolffe AP: Methylation-induced repression—belts, braces
and chromatin. Cell 1999;99:451.
Berger SL, Felsenfeld G: Chromatin goes global. Mol Cell 2001;
8:263.
Busby S, Ebright RH: Promoter structure, promoter recognition,
and transcription activation in prokaryotes. Cell 1994;79:
743.
Busby S, Ebright RH: Transcription activation by catabolite activa-
tor protein (CAP). J Mol Biol 1999;293:199.
Cowell IG: Repression versus activation in the control of gene tran-
scription. Trends Biochem Sci 1994;1:38.
Ebright RH: RNA polymerase: structural similarities between bac-
terial RNA polymerase and eukaryotic RNA polymerase II.
JMol Biol 2000;304:687.
Fugman SD: RAG1 and RAG2 in V(D)J recombination and trans-
position. Immunol Res 2001;23:23.
Jacob F, Monod J: Genetic regulatory mechanisms in protein syn-
thesis. J Mol Biol 1961;3:318.
Lemon B, Tjian R: Orchestrated response: a symphony of tran-
scription factors for gene control. Genes Dev 2000;14:2551.
Letchman DS: Transcription factor mutations and disease. N Engl
J Med 1996;334:28.
Merika M, Thanos D: Enhanceosomes. Curr Opin Genet Dev
2001;11:205.
Naar AM, Lemon BD, Tjian R: Transcriptional coactivator com-
plexes. Annu Rev Biochem 2001;70:475.
Narlikar GJ, Fan HY, Kingston RE: Cooperation between com-
plexes that regulate chromatin structure and transcription.
Cell 2002;108:475.
Oltz EM: Regulation of antigen receptor gene assembly in lympho-
cytes. Immunol Res 2001;23:121.
Ptashne M: Control of gene transcription: an outline. Nat Med
1997;3:1069.
Ptashne M: A Genetic Switch,2nd ed. Cell Press and Blackwell Sci-
entific Publications, 1992.
Sterner DE, Berger SL: Acetylation of histones and transcription-
related factors. Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 2000;64:435.
Wu R, Bahl CP, Narang SA: Lactose operator-repressor interac-
tion. Curr Top Cell Regul 1978;13:137. 
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Dicom Image File to Raster Images
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code convert dicom file all pages to jpg images.
convert pdf to jpg batch; conversion pdf to jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF documents to multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage. Turn multipage PDF file into image
convert pdf image to jpg online; reader pdf to jpeg
396
Molecular Genetics,Recombinant
DNA,& Genomic Technology
Daryl K. Granner, MD, & P. Anthony Weil, PhD
BIOMEDICAL IMPORTANCE*
The development of recombinant DNA, high-density,
high-throughput screening, and other molecular ge-
netic methodologies has revolutionized biology and is
having an increasing impact on clinical medicine.
Much has been learned about human genetic disease
from pedigree analysis and study of affected proteins,
but in many cases where the specific genetic defect is
unknown, these approaches cannot be used. The new
technologies circumvent these limitations by going di-
rectly to the DNA molecule for information. Manipu-
lation of a DNA sequence and the construction of
chimeric molecules—so-called genetic engineering—
provides a means of studying how a specific segment of
DNA works. Novel molecular genetic tools allow inves-
tigators to query and manipulate genomic sequences as
well as to examine both cellular mRNA and protein
profiles at the molecular level.
Understanding this technology is important for sev-
eral reasons: (1) It offers a rational approach to under-
standing the molecular basis of a number of diseases
(eg, familial hypercholesterolemia, sickle cell disease,
the thalassemias, cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy).
(2) Human proteins can be produced in abundance for
therapy (eg, insulin, growth hormone, tissue plasmino-
gen activator). (3) Proteins for vaccines (eg, hepatitis B)
and for diagnostic testing (eg, AIDS tests) can be ob-
tained. (4) This technology is used to diagnose existing
diseases and predict the risk of developing a given dis-
ease. (5) Special techniques have led to remarkable ad-
vances in forensic medicine. (6) Gene therapy for sickle
cell disease, the thalassemias, adenosine deaminase defi-
ciency, and other diseases may be devised.
40
* See glossary of terms at the end of this chapter. 
ELUCIDATION OF THE BASIC FEATURES
OF DNA LED TO RECOMBINANT 
DNA TECHNOLOGY
DNA Is a Complex Biopolymer 
Organized as a Double Helix
The fundamental organizational element is the se-
quence of purine (adenine [A] or guanine [G]) and
pyrimidine (cytosine [C] or thymine [T]) bases. These
bases are attached to the C-1′position of the sugar de-
oxyribose, and the bases are linked together through
joining of the sugar moieties at their 3′and 5′positions
via a phosphodiester bond (Figure 35–1). The alternat-
ing deoxyribose and phosphate groups form the back-
bone of the double helix (Figure 35–2). These 3′–5′
linkages also define the orientation of a given strand of
the DNA molecule, and, since the two strands run in
opposite directions, they are said to be antiparallel.
Base Pairing Is a Fundamental Concept 
of DNA Structure & Function
Adenine and thymine always pair, by hydrogen bonding,
as do guanine and cytosine (Figure 35–3). These base
pairs are said to be complementary,and the guanine
content of a fragment of double-stranded DNA will al-
ways equal its cytosine content; likewise, the thymine
and adenine contents are equal. Base pairing and hy-
drophobic base-stacking interactions hold the two DNA
strands together. These interactions can be reduced by
heating the DNA to denature it. The laws of base pairing
predict that two complementary DNA strands will rean-
neal exactly in register upon renaturation, as happens
when the temperature of the solution is slowly reduced to
normal. Indeed, the degree of base-pair matching (or
mismatching) can be estimated from the temperature re-
MOLECULAR GENETICS, RECOMBINANT DNA, & GENOMIC TECHNOLOGY / 397
quired for denaturation-renaturation. Segments of DNA
with high degrees of base-pair matching require more en-
ergy input (heat) to accomplish denaturation—or, to put
it another way, a closely matched segment will withstand
more heat before the strands separate. This reaction is
used to determine whether there are significant differ-
ences between two DNA sequences, and it underlies the
concept of hybridization,which is fundamental to the
processes described below.
There are about 3 10
9
base pairs (bp) in each
human haploid genome.If an average gene length is
3×10
3
bp (3 kilobases [kb]), the genome could consist
of 10
6
genes, assuming that there is no overlap and that
transcription proceeds in only one direction. It is
thought that there are < 10
5
genes in the human and
that only 1–2% of the DNA codes for proteins. The
exact function of the remaining ~98% of the human
genome has not yet been defined.
The double-helical DNA is packaged into a more
compact structure by a number of proteins, most
notably the basic proteins called histones.This con-
densation may serve a regulatory role and certainly has
a practical purpose. The DNA present within the nu-
cleus of a cell, if simply extended, would be about
1meter long. The chromosomal proteins compact this
long strand of DNA so that it can be packaged into a
nucleus with a volume of a few cubic micrometers.
DNA Is Organized Into Genes
In general, prokaryotic genes consist of a small regula-
tory region (100–500 bp) and a large protein-coding
segment (500–10,000 bp). Several genes are often con-
trolled by a single regulatory unit. Most mammalian
genes are more complicated in that the coding regions
are interrupted by noncoding regions that are elimi-
nated when the primary RNA transcript is processed
into mature messenger RNA (mRNA).The coding re-
gions(those regions that appear in the mature RNA
species) are called exons, and the noncoding regions,
which interpose or intervene between the exons, are
called introns (Figure 40–1). Introns are always re-
moved from precursor RNA before transport into the
cytoplasm occurs. The process by which introns are re-
moved from precursor RNA and by which exons are
ligated together is called RNA splicing.Incorrect pro-
cessing of the primary transcript into the mature
mRNA can result in disease in humans (see below); this
underscores the importance of these posttranscriptional
processing steps. The variation in size and complexity
of some human genes is illustrated in Table 40–1. Al-
though there is a 300-fold difference in the sizes of the
genes illustrated, the mRNA sizes vary only about 20-
fold. This is because most of the DNA in genes is pres-
ent as introns, and introns tend to be much larger than
exons. Regulatory regions for specific eukaryotic genes
are usually located in the DNA that flanks the tran-
scription initiation site at its 5′ ′ end (5′ flanking-
sequence DNA). Occasionally, such sequences are
found within the gene itself or in the region that flanks
the 3′end of the gene. In mammalian cells, each gene
has its own regulatory region. Many eukaryotic genes
(and some viruses that replicate in mammalian cells)
have special regions, called enhancers,that increase the
rate of transcription. Some genes also have DNA se-
quences, known as silencers,that repress transcription.
Mammalian genes are obviously complicated, multi-
component structures.
Genes Are Transcribed Into RNA
Information generally flows from DNA to mRNA to
protein, as illustrated in Figure 40–1 and discussed in
more detail in Chapter 39. This is a rigidly controlled
process involving a number of complex steps, each of
which no doubt is regulated by one or more enzymes or
factors; faulty function at any of these steps can cause
disease.
RECOMBINANT DNA TECHNOLOGY
INVOLVES ISOLATION & MANIPULATION
OF DNA TO MAKE CHIMERIC MOLECULES
Isolation and manipulation of DNA, including end-to-
end joining of sequences from very different sources to
make chimeric molecules (eg, molecules containing
both human and bacterial DNA sequences in a se-
quence-independent fashion), is the essence of recom-
binant DNA research. This involves several unique
techniques and reagents.
Restriction Enzymes Cut DNA 
Chains at Specific Locations
Certain endonucleases—enzymes that cut DNA at spe-
cific DNA sequences within the molecule (as opposed
to exonucleases, which digest from the ends of DNA
molecules)—are a key tool in recombinant DNA re-
search. These enzymes were called restriction enzymes
because their presence in a given bacterium restricted
the growth of certain bacterial viruses called bacterio-
phages. Restriction enzymes cut DNA of any source
into short pieces in a sequence-specific manner—in
contrast to most other enzymatic, chemical, or physical
methods, which break DNA randomly. These defensive
enzymes (hundreds have been discovered) protect the
host bacterial DNA from DNA from foreign organisms
(primarily infective phages). However, they are present
only in cells that also have a companion enzyme which
methylates the host DNA, rendering it an unsuitable
substrate for digestion by the restriction enzyme. Thus,
398 / CHAPTER 40
CAAT
TATA
AATAAA
DNA        5
NUCLEUS
CYTOPLASM
3
5′
Noncoding
region
Intron
3′
Noncoding
region
Exon
Exon
Transcription
Translation
Modification of
5′ and 3′ ends
Removal of introns
and splicing of exons
Transmembrane
transport
PPP
Cap
AAA---A
Poly(A) tail
AAA---A
AAA---A
NH
2
COOH
Primary RNA transcript
Modified transcript
Processed nuclear mRNA
mRNA
Protein
Regulatory
region
Basal
promoter
region
Transcription
start site
Poly(A)
addition
site
Figure 40–1.
Organization of a eukaryotic transcription unit and the pathway of eukaryotic gene expres-
sion. Eukaryotic genes have structural and regulatory regions. The structural region consists of the coding
DNA and 5and 3noncoding DNA sequences. The coding regions are divided into two parts: (1) exons, which
eventually are ligated together to become mature RNA, and (2) introns, which are processed out of the pri-
mary transcript. The structural region is bounded at its 5end by the transcription initiation site and at its
3end by the polyadenylate addition or termination site. The promoter region, which contains specific DNA
sequences that interact with various protein factors to regulate transcription, is discussed in detail in Chap-
ters37 and 39. The primary transcript has a special structure, a cap, at the 5end and a stretch of As at the 3
end. This transcript is processed to remove the introns; and the mature mRNA is then transported to the cyto-
plasm, where it is translated into protein.
site-specific DNA methylasesand restriction enzymes
always exist in pairs in a bacterium.
Restriction enzymes are named after the bac-
terium from which they are isolated. For example,
EcoRIis from Escherichia coli,and BamHIis from Bacil-
lus amyloliquefaciens(Table 40–2). The first three letters
in the restriction enzyme name consist of the first letter
of the genus (E) and the first two letters of the species
(co). These may be followed by a strain designation (R)
and a roman numeral (I) to indicate the order of discov-
ery (eg, EcoRI, EcoRII). Each enzyme recognizes and
cleaves a specific double-stranded DNA sequence that is
4–7 bp long. These DNA cuts result in blunt ends(eg,
HpaI)or overlapping (sticky) ends(eg,BamHI)(Figure
40–2), depending on the mechanism used by the en-
zyme. Sticky ends are particularly useful in constructing
hybrid or chimeric DNA molecules (see below). If the
four nucleotides are distributed randomly in a given
DNA molecule, one can calculate how frequently a
given enzyme will cut a length of DNA. For each posi-
tion in the DNA molecule, there are four possibilities
(A, C, G, and T); therefore, a restriction enzyme that
recognizes a 4-bp sequence cuts, on average, once every
256 bp (4
4
), whereas another enzyme that recognizes a
6-bp sequence cuts once every 4096 bp (4
6
). A given
piece of DNA has a characteristic linear array of sites for
MOLECULAR GENETICS, RECOMBINANT DNA, & GENOMIC TECHNOLOGY / 399
Table 40–1. Variations in the size and complexity
of some human genes and mRNAs.1
mRNA
Gene Size
Number
Size
Gene
(kb)
of Introns
(kb)
β-Globin
1.5
2
0.6
Insulin
1.7
2
0.4
β-Adrenergic receptor
3
0
2.2
Albumin
25
14
2.1
LDL receptor
45
17
5.5
Factor VIII
186
25
9.0
Thyroglobulin
300
36
8.7
1The sizes are given in kilobases (kb). The sizes of the genes in-
clude some proximal promoter and regulatory region sequences;
these are generally about the same size for all genes. Genes vary
in size from about 1500 base pairs (bp) to over 2 ×106bp. There is
also great variation in the number of introns and exons. The 
β-adrenergic receptor gene is intronless, and the thyroglobulin
gene has 36 introns. As noted by the smaller difference in mRNA
sizes, introns comprise most of the gene sequence.
Table 40–2. Selected restriction endonucleases
and their sequence specificities.1
Sequence Recognized
Bacterial 
Endonuclease Cleavage Sites Shown
Source
BamHI
GGATCC
Bacillus amylo-
CCTAGG
liquefaciensH
BgIII
AGATCT
Bacillus glolbigii
TCTAGA
EcoRI
GAATTC
Escherichia coli
CTTAAG
RY13
EcoRII
CCTGG
Escherichia coli
GGACC
R245
HindIII
AAGCTT
Haemophilus
TTCGAA
influenzaeR
d
Hhal
GCGC
Haemophilus
CGCG
haemolyticus
Hpal
GTTAAC
Haemophilus 
CAATTG
parainfluenzae
MstII
CCT
N
AGG
Microcoleus 
GGA
N
TCC
strain
PstI
CTGCAG
Providencia 
GACGTC
stuartii 164
Taql
TCGA
Thermus 
AGCT
aquaticus YTI
1A, adenine; C, cytosine; G, guanine, T, thymine. Arrows show the site
of cleavage; depending on the site, sticky ends (BamHI)or blunt ends
(Hpal)may result. The length of the recognition sequence can be 4 bp
(Taql), 5 bp (EcoRII), 6 bp (EcoRI), or 7 bp (MstII)or longer. By conven-
tion, these are written in the 5′or 3′direction for the upper strand of
each recognition sequence, and the lower strand is shown with the
opposite (ie, 3′or 5′) polarity. Note that most recognition sequences
are palindromes (ie, the sequence reads the same in opposite direc-
tions on the two strands). A residue designated 
N
means that any nu-
cleotide is permitted.
the various enzymes dictated by the linear sequence of
its bases; hence, a restriction mapcan be constructed.
When DNA is digested with a given enzyme, the ends
of all the fragments have the same DNA sequence. The
fragments produced can be isolated by electrophoresis
on agarose or polyacrylamide gels (see the discussion of
blot transfer, below); this is an essential step in cloning
and a major use of these enzymes.
A number of other enzymes that act on DNA and
RNA are an important part of recombinant DNA tech-
nology. Many of these are referred to in this and subse-
quent chapters (Table 40–3).
Restriction Enzymes & DNA Ligase Are
Used to Prepare Chimeric DNA Molecules
Sticky-end ligation is technically easy, but some special
techniques are often required to overcome problems in-
herent in this approach. Sticky ends of a vector may re-
connect with themselves, with no net gain of DNA.
Sticky ends of fragments can also anneal, so that tandem
heterogeneous inserts form. Also, sticky-end sites may
not be available or in a convenient position. To circum-
vent these problems, an enzyme that generates blunt
ends is used, and new ends are added using the enzyme
terminal transferase. If poly d(G) is added to the 3′ends
of the vector and poly d(C) is added to the 3′ends of
the foreign DNA, the two molecules can only anneal to
each other, thus circumventing the problems listed
above. This procedure is called homopolymer tailing.
Sometimes, synthetic blunt-ended duplex oligonu-
cleotide linkers with a convenient restriction enzyme se-
400 / CHAPTER 40
G
C
G
C
G
C
T
A
A
T
T
A
T
A
A
T
C
G
A
T
C
G
C
G
5’
3’
3’
5’
5’
3’
3’
5’
             
C
G
C
C
T
A
T
T
A
T
A
T
C
A
T
A
A
G
+
  
+
C
G
C
G
A. Sticky or staggered ends
B. Blunt ends
BamHI
HpaI
Figure 40–2.
Results of restriction en-
donuclease digestion. Digestion with a re-
striction endonuclease can result in the for-
mation of DNA fragments with sticky, or
cohesive, ends (A)or blunt ends (B).This is
an important consideration in devising
cloning strategies.
quence are ligated to the blunt-ended DNA. Direct
blunt-end ligation is accomplished using the enzyme
bacteriophage T4 DNA ligase. This technique, though
less efficient than sticky-end ligation, has the advantage
of joining together any pairs of ends. The disadvantages
are that there is no control over the orientation of inser-
tion or the number of molecules annealed together, and
there is no easy way to retrieve the insert.
Cloning Amplifies DNA
cloneis a large population of identical molecules, bac-
teria, or cells that arise from a common ancestor. Molec-
ular cloning allows for the production of a large number
of identical DNA molecules, which can then be charac-
terized or used for other purposes. This technique is
based on the fact that chimeric or hybrid DNA molecules
can be constructed in cloning vectors—typically bacter-
ial plasmids, phages, or cosmids—which then continue
to replicate in a host cell under their own control systems.
In this way, the chimeric DNA is amplified. The general
procedure is illustrated in Figure 40–3.
Bacterial plasmidsare small, circular, duplex DNA
molecules whose natural function is to confer antibiotic
resistance to the host cell. Plasmids have several proper-
ties that make them extremely useful as cloning vectors.
They exist as single or multiple copies within the bac-
terium and replicate independently from the bacterial
DNA. The complete DNA sequence of many plasmids is
known; hence, the precise location of restriction enzyme
Table 40–3. Some of the enzymes used in recombinant DNA research.
1
Enzyme
Reaction
Primary Use
Alkaline phosphatase e Dephosphorylates 5′ends of RNA and DNA. . Removal of 5′-PO
4
groups prior to kinase labeling to prevent
self-ligation.
BAL 31 nuclease
Degrades both the 3′and 5′ends of DNA.
Progressive shortening of DNA molecules.
DNA ligase
Catalyzes bonds between DNA molecules. . Joining of DNA molecules.
DNA polymerase I
Synthesizes double-stranded DNA from 
Synthesis of double-stranded cDNA; nick translation; gener-
single-stranded DNA.
ation of blunt ends from sticky ends.
DNase I
Under appropriate conditions, produces 
Nick translation; mapping of hypersensitive sites; mapping 
single-stranded nicks in DNA.
protein-DNA interactions.
Exonuclease III
Removes nucleotides from 3′ends of DNA. . DNA sequencing; mapping of DNA-protein interactions.
λexonuclease
Removes nucleotides from 5′ends of DNA. . DNA sequencing.
Polynucleotide kinase e Transfers terminal phosphate (γposition) 
32
P labeling of DNA or RNA.
from ATP to 5′-OH groups of DNA or RNA.
Reverse transcriptase e Synthesizes DNA from RNA template.
Synthesis of cDNA from mRNA; RNA (5′ end) mapping 
studies.
S1 nuclease
Degrades single-stranded DNA.
Removal of “hairpin” in synthesis of cDNA; RNA mapping 
studies (both 5′and 3′ends).
Terminal transferase
Adds nucleotides to the 3′ends of DNA.
Homopolymer tailing.
1Adapted and reproduced, with permission, from Emery AEH:Page 41 in: An Introduction to Recombinant DNA.Wiley, 1984.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested