asp.net mvc generate pdf : C# convert pdf to image application Library tool html asp.net wpf online Harper%27s%20Illustrated%20Biochemistry%20-%20Robert%20K.%20Murray,%20Darryl%20K.%20Granner,%20Peter%20A.%20Mayes,%20Victor%20W.%20Rodwell46-part607

THE DIVERSITY OF THE ENDOCRINE SYSTEM
/ 451
Met
Met
Ser
Ala
Lys
Asp
Met
Val
Lys
Val
Met
Ile
Val
Met
Leu
Ala
Ile
Cys
Phe
Leu
Ala
Arg
Ser
Asp
Gly
Arg
Leu
Trp
Glu
Val
Arg
Glu
Met
Ser
Ser
Leu
His
Lys
Gly
Leu
Asn
His
Met
Phe
Gln
Lys
Ser
Val
Lys
Lys
Arg
Ala
Val
Ser
Glu
Ile
–31
–20
–10
–6
–1
1
Lys
Lys
Leu
Gln
Asp
Val
His
Asn
Phe
Val
Ala
Leu
Gly
Ala
Ser
Ile
Ala
Tyr
Arg
Asp
Gly
Ser
Ser
Gln
Arg
Pro
Arg
Lys
Lys
Glu
Asp
Gln
Pro
Lys
Ala
Lys
Ile
Leu
Val
Asp
Val
Asp
Ala
Lys
Asp
Ala
Glu
Gly
Pro
sequence
10
20
30
40
50
Asn
Val
Leu
Val
Glu
Ser
His
Gln
Lys
Ser
Leu
60
70
80
C
O
OH
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
NH
2
C-fragment sequence
Leader (pre) sequence
Full biologic activity sequence
Figure 42–13.
Structure of bovine preproparathyroid hormone. Arrows indicate sites cleaved by pro-
cessing enzymes in the parathyroid gland (1–5) and in the liver after secretion of the hormone (4–5). The
biologically active region of the molecule is flanked by sequence not required for activity on target re-
ceptors. (Slightly modified and reproduced, with permission, from Habener JF: Recent advances in parathy-
roid hormone research. Clin Biochem 1981;14:223.)
Angiotensin II Is Also Synthesized 
From a Large Precursor
The renin-angiotensin system is involved in the regula-
tion of blood pressure and electrolyte metabolism
(through production of aldosterone). The primary hor-
mone involved in these processes is angiotensin II, an
octapeptide made from angiotensinogen (Figure 
42–14). Angiotensinogen, a large α
2
-globulin made in
liver, is the substrate for renin, an enzyme produced in
the juxtaglomerular cells of the renal afferent arteriole.
The position of these cells makes them particularly sen-
sitive to blood pressure changes, and many of the physi-
ologic regulators of renin release act through renal
baroreceptors. The juxtaglomerular cells are also sensi-
tive to changes of Na
+
and Cl− concentration in the
renal tubular fluid; therefore, any combination of fac-
tors that decreases fluid volume (dehydration, decreased
blood pressure, fluid or blood loss) or decreases NaCl
concentration stimulates renin release. Renal sympa-
thetic nerves that terminate in the juxtaglomerular cells
mediate the central nervous system and postural effects
on renin release independently of the baroreceptor and
salt effects, a mechanism that involves the β-adrenergic
receptor. Renin acts upon the substrate angiotensino-
gen to produce the decapeptide angiotensin I.
Angiotensin-converting enzyme, a glycoprotein
found in lung, endothelial cells, and plasma, removes
two carboxyl terminal amino acids from the decapep-
tide angiotensin I to form angiotensin II in a step that
is not thought to be rate-limiting. Various nonapeptide
analogs of angiotensin I and other compounds act as
competitive inhibitors of converting enzyme and are
used to treat renin-dependent hypertension. These are
Batch pdf to jpg converter online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
changing pdf to jpg file; change from pdf to jpg
Batch pdf to jpg converter online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
best pdf to jpg converter online; convert pdf to gif or jpg
452 / CHAPTER 42
Angiotensinogen
Angiotensin I
ANGIOTENSIN II
Angiotensin III
Degradation products
RENIN
AMINOPEPTIDASE
CONVERTING ENZYME
ANGIOTENSINASES
Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-
I
le-His-Pro-Phe-His-Leu-Leu (
~
400 more amino acids)
Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-
I
le-His-Pro-Phe-His-Leu
Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-
I
le-His-Pro-Phe
Arg-Val-Tyr-
I
le-His-Pro-Phe
Figure 42–14.
Formation and metabolism of angiotensins. Small arrows in-
dicate cleavage sites.
referred to as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)
inhibitors. Angiotensin II increases blood pressure by
causing vasoconstriction of the arteriole and is a very
potent vasoactive substance. It inhibits renin release
from the juxtaglomerular cells and is a potent stimula-
tor of aldosterone production. This results in Na
+
re-
tention, volume expansion, and increased blood pres-
sure.
In some species, angiotensin II is converted to the
heptapeptide angiotensin III (Figure 42–14), an equally
potent stimulator of aldosterone production. In hu-
mans, the plasma level of angiotensin II is four times
greater than that of angiotensin III, so most effects are
exerted by the octapeptide. Angiotensins II and III are
rapidly inactivated by angiotensinases.
Angiotensin II binds to specific adrenal cortex
glomerulosa cell receptors. The hormone-receptor in-
teraction does not activate adenylyl cyclase, and cAMP
does not appear to mediate the action of this hormone.
The actions of angiotensin II, which are to stimulate
the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone and of
corticosterone to 18-hydroxycorticosterone and aldos-
terone, may involve changes in the concentration of in-
tracellular calcium and of phospholipid metabolites by
mechanisms similar to those described in Chapter 43. 
Complex Processing Generates 
the Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) 
Peptide Family
The POMC family consists of peptides that act as hor-
mones (ACTH, LPH, MSH) and others that may serve
as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators (endorphins)
(see Figure 42–15). POMC is synthesized as a precur-
sor molecule of 285 amino acids and is processed differ-
ently in various regions of the pituitary.
The POMC gene is expressed in the anterior and in-
termediate lobes of the pituitary. The most conserved
sequences between species are within the amino termi-
nal fragment, the ACTH region, and the β-endorphin
region. POMC or related products are found in several
other vertebrate tissues, including the brain, placenta,
gastrointestinal tract, reproductive tract, lung, and lym-
phocytes. 
The POMC protein is processed differently in the an-
terior lobe than in the intermediate lobe. The intermedi-
ate lobe of the pituitary is rudimentary in adult humans,
but it is active in human fetuses and in pregnant women
during late gestation and is also active in many animal
species. Processing of the POMC protein in the periph-
eral tissues (gut, placenta, male reproductive tract) resem-
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
software; Support a batch conversion of JPG to PDF with amazingly high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after conversion; Support
convert pdf photo to jpg; best convert pdf to jpg
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
Features and Benefits. High speed JPEG to GIF Converter, faster than other JPG Converters; file name when you convert the files in batch; Storing conversion
convert pdf to jpeg on; bulk pdf to jpg converter online
THE DIVERSITY OF THE ENDOCRINE SYSTEM
/ 453
bles that in the intermediate lobe. There are three basic
peptide groups: (1) ACTH, which can give rise to 
α-MSH and corticotropin-like intermediate lobe peptide
(CLIP); (2) β-lipotropin (β-LPH), which can yield 
γ-LPH, β-MSH, and β-endorphin (and thus α- and 
γ-endorphins); and (3) a large amino terminal peptide,
which generates γ-MSH. The diversity of these products
is due to the many dibasic amino acid clusters that are
potential cleavage sites for trypsin-like enzymes. Each of
the peptides mentioned is preceded by Lys-Arg, Arg-Lys,
Arg-Arg, or Lys-Lys residues. After the prehormone seg-
ment is cleaved, the next cleavage, in both anterior and
intermediate lobes, is between ACTH and β-LPH, re-
sulting in an amino terminal peptide with ACTH and a
β-LPH segment (Figure 42–15). ACTH
1–39
is subse-
quently cleaved from the amino terminal peptide, and in
the anterior lobe essentially no further cleavages occur. In
the intermediate lobe, ACTH
1–39
is cleaved into α-MSH
(residues 1–13) and CLIP (18–39); β-LPH (42–134) is
converted to γ-LPH (42–101) and β-endorphin (104–
134). β-MSH (84–101) is derived from γ-LPH.
There are extensive additional tissue-specific modifi-
cations of these peptides that affect activity. These
modifications include phosphorylation, acetylation,
glycosylation, and amidation.
THERE IS VARIATION IN THE STORAGE 
& SECRETION OF HORMONES
As mentioned above, the steroid hormones and
1,25(OH)
2
-D
3
are synthesized in their final active
form. They are also secreted as they are made, and thus
there is no intracellular reservoir of these hormones.
The catecholamines, also synthesized in active form, are
stored in granules in the chromaffin cells in the adrenal
medulla. In response to appropriate neural stimulation,
these granules are released from the cell through exocy-
tosis, and the catecholamines are released into the circu-
lation. A several-hour reserve supply of catecholamines
exists in the chromaffin cells.
Parathyroid hormone also exists in storage vesicles.
As much as 80–90% of the proPTH synthesized is de-
graded before it enters this final storage compartment,
especially when Ca
2+
levels are high in the parathyroid
cell (see above). PTH is secreted when Ca
2+
is low in
the parathyroid cells, which contain a several-hour sup-
ply of the hormone.
The human pancreas secretes about 40–50 units of in-
sulin daily, which represents about 15–20% of the hor-
mone stored in the B cells. Insulin and the C-peptide (see
Figure 42–12) are normally secreted in equimolar
amounts. Stimuli such as glucose, which provokes insulin
secretion, therefore trigger the processing of proinsulin to
insulin as an essential part of the secretory response.
A several-week supply of T
3
and T
4
exists in the thy-
roglobulin that is stored in colloid in the lumen of the
thyroid follicles. These hormones can be released upon
stimulation by TSH. This is the most exaggerated ex-
ample of a prohormone, as a molecule containing ap-
proximately 5000 amino acids must be first synthe-
sized, then degraded, to supply a few molecules of the
active hormones T
4
and T
3
.
The diversity in storage and secretion of hormones
is illustrated in Table 42–5.
β-LPH (42–134)
POMC (1–134)
γ-LPH 
(42–101)
β-MSH 
(84–101)
β-Endorphin 
(104–134)
γ-Endorphin 
(104–118)
α-Endorphin 
(104–117)
ACTH (1–39)
α-MSH
(1–13)
CLIP
(18–39)
Figure 42–15.
Products of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) cleavage.
(MSH, melanocyte-stimulating hormone; CLIP, corticotropin-like inter-
mediate lobe peptide; LPH, lipotropin.)
JPG to DICOM Converter | Convert JPEG to DICOM, Convert DICOM to
Open JPEG to DICOM Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "DICOM" in
pdf to jpeg converter; convert pdf to jpg file
JPG to JBIG2 Converter | Convert JPEG to JBIG2, Convert JBIG2 to
Open JPEG to JBIG2 Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "JBIG2" in
batch pdf to jpg converter; batch convert pdf to jpg online
Table 42–7. Comparison of T
4
and T
3
in plasma.
Total
Free Hormone
t
1
2
Hormone Percent
in Blood
(µg/dL)
of Total l ng/dL
Molarity
(days)
T
4
8
0.03
~2.24
3.0 ×10
−11
6.5
T
3
0.15
0.3
~0.4
~0.6 ×10−11
1.5
454 / CHAPTER 42
Table 42–5. Diversity in the storage of hormones.
Hormone
Supply Stored in Cell
Steroids and 1,25(OH)
2
-D
3
None
Catecholamines and PTH
Hours
Insulin
Days
T
3
and T
4
Weeks
Table 42–6. Comparison of receptors with
transport proteins.
Feature
Receptors
Transport Proteins
Concentration
Very low
Very high
(thousands/cell) (billions/µL)
Binding affinity
High (pmol/L to o Low (µmol/L range)
nmol/L range)
Binding specificity
Very high
Low
Saturability
Yes
No
Reversibility
Yes
Yes
Signal transduction n Yes
No
SOME HORMONES HAVE PLASMA
TRANSPORT PROTEINS
The class I hormones are hydrophobic in chemical na-
ture and thus are not very soluble in plasma. These hor-
mones, principally the steroids and thyroid hormones,
have specialized plasma transport proteins that serve sev-
eral purposes. First, these proteins circumvent the solu-
bility problem and thereby deliver the hormone to the
target cell. They also provide a circulating reservoir of
thehormone that can be substantial, as in the case of the
thyroid hormones. Hormones, when bound to the trans-
port proteins, cannot be metabolized, thereby prolonging
their plasma half-life (t
1/2
). The binding affinity of a
given hormone to its transporter determines the bound
versus free ratio of the hormone. This is important be-
cause only the free form of a hormone is biologically ac-
tive. In general, the concentration of free hormone in
plasma is very low, in the range of 10–15to 10–9mol/L. It
is important to distinguish between plasma transport
proteins and hormone receptors. Both bind hormones
but with very different characteristics (Table 42–6).
The hydrophilic hormones—generally class II and
of peptide structure—are freely soluble in plasma and
do not require transport proteins. Hormones such as
insulin, growth hormone, ACTH, and TSH circulate
in the free, active form and have very short plasma half-
lives. A notable exception is IGF-I, which is transported
bound to members of a family of binding proteins.
Thyroid Hormones Are Transported
by Thyroid-Binding Globulin
Many of the principles discussed above are illustrated in
a discussion of thyroid-binding proteins. One-half to
two-thirds of T
4
and T
3
in the body is in an extrathy-
roidal reservoir. Most of this circulates in bound form,
ie, bound to a specific binding protein, thyroxine-
binding globulin (TBG).TBG, a glycoprotein with a
molecular mass of 50 kDa, binds T
4
and T
3
and has the
capacity to bind 20 µg/dL of plasma. Under normal
circumstances, TBG binds—noncovalently—nearly all
of the T
4
and T
3
in plasma, and it binds T
4
with greater
affinity than T
3
(Table 42–7). The plasma half-life of
T
4
is correspondingly four to five times that of T
3
. The
small, unbound (free) fraction is responsible for the bi-
ologic activity. Thus, in spite of the great difference in
total amount, the free fraction of T
3
approximates that
of T
4
, and given that T
3
is intrinsically more active than
T
4
, most biologic activity is attributed to T
3
. TBG does
not bind any other hormones.
Glucocorticoids Are Transported 
by Corticosteroid-Binding Globulin
Hydrocortisone (cortisol) also circulates in plasma in
protein-bound and free forms. The main plasma bind-
ing protein is an α-globulin called transcortin,or cor-
ticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG). CBG is pro-
duced in the liver, and its synthesis, like that of TBG, is
increased by estrogens. CBG binds most of the hor-
mone when plasma cortisol levels are within the normal
range; much smaller amounts of cortisol are bound to
albumin. The avidity of binding helps determine the
biologic half-lives of various glucocorticoids. Cortisol
binds tightly to CBG and has a t
1/2
of 1.5–2 hours,
while corticosterone, which binds less tightly, has a t
1/2
of less than 1 hour (Table 42–8). The unbound (free)
cortisol constitutes about 8% of the total and represents
the biologically active fraction. Binding to CBG is not
restricted to glucocorticoids. Deoxycorticosterone and
JPG to JPEG2000 Converter | Convert JPEG to JPEG2000, Convert
Open JPEG to JPEG2000 Converter first; ad JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "JPEG2000" in
change pdf to jpg online; best program to convert pdf to jpg
JPG to Word Converter | Convert JPEG to Word, Convert Word to JPG
Open JPEG to Word Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "Word" in
convert pdf page to jpg; conversion pdf to jpg
THE DIVERSITY OF THE ENDOCRINE SYSTEM
/ 455
progesterone interact with CBG with sufficient affinity
to compete for cortisol binding. Aldosterone, the most
potent natural mineralocorticoid, does not have a spe-
cific plasma transport protein. Gonadal steroids bind
very weakly to CBG (Table 42–8).
Gonadal Steroids Are Transported 
by Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin
Most mammals, humans included, have a plasma β-
globulin that binds testosterone with specificity, rela-
tively high affinity, and limited capacity (Table 42–8).
This protein, usually called sex hormone-binding
globulin (SHBG) or testosterone-estrogen-binding
globulin (TEBG), is produced in the liver. Its produc-
tion is increased by estrogens (women have twice the
serum concentration of SHBG as men), certain types of
liver disease, and hyperthyroidism; it is decreased by
androgens, advancing age, and hypothyroidism. Many
of these conditions also affect the production of CBG
and TBG. Since SHBG and albumin bind 97–99% of
circulating testosterone, only a small fraction of the
hormone in circulation is in the free (biologically ac-
tive) form. The primary function of SHBG may be to
restrict the free concentration of testosterone in the
serum. Testosterone binds to SHBG with higher affin-
ity than does estradiol (Table 42–8). Therefore, a
change in the level of SHBG causes a greater change in
the free testosterone level than in the free estradiol level.
Estrogens are bound to SHBG and progestins to
CBG. SHBG binds estradiol about five times less avidly
than it binds testosterone or DHT, while progesterone
and cortisol have little affinity for this protein (Table
42–8). In contrast, progesterone and cortisol bind with
nearly equal affinity to CBG, which in turn has little
avidity for estradiol and even less for testosterone,
DHT, or estrone.
These binding proteins also provide a circulating
reservoir of hormone, and because of the relatively large
binding capacity they probably buffer against sudden
changes in the plasma level. Because the metabolic
clearance rates of these steroids are inversely related to
the affinity of their binding to SHBG, estrone is cleared
more rapidly than estradiol, which in turn is cleared
more rapidly than testosterone or DHT.
SUMMARY
• The presence of a specific receptor defines the target
cells for a given hormone.
• Receptors are proteins that bind specific hormones
and generate an intracellular signal (receptor-effector
coupling).
• Some hormones have intracellular receptors; others
bind to receptors on the plasma membrane.
• Hormones are synthesized from a number of precur-
sor molecules, including cholesterol, tyrosine per se,
and all the constituent amino acids of peptides and
proteins.
• A number of modification processes alter the activity
of hormones. For example, many hormones are syn-
thesized from larger precursor molecules.
• The complement of enzymes in a particular cell type
allows for the production of a specific class of steroid
hormone.
• Most of the lipid-soluble hormones are bound to
rather specific plasma transport proteins.
REFERENCES
Bartalina L: Thyroid hormone-binding proteins: update 1994. En-
docr Rev 1994;13:140.
Beato M et al: Steroid hormone receptors: many actors in search of
a plot. Cell 1995;83:851.
Dai G, Carrasco L, Carrasco N: Cloning and characterization of
the thyroid iodide transporter. Nature 1996;379:458.
DeLuca HR: The vitamin D story: a collaborative effort of basic
science and clinical medicine. FASEB J 1988;2:224.
Douglass J, Civelli O, Herbert E: Polyprotein gene expression:
Generation of diversity of neuroendocrine peptides. Annu
Rev Biochem 1984;53:665.
Miller WL: Molecular biology of steroid hormone biosynthesis.
Endocr Rev 1988;9:295.
Nagatsu T: Genes for human catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes.
Neurosci Res 1991;12:315.
Russell DW, Wilson JD: Steroid 5 alpha-reductase: two genes/two
enzymes. Annu Rev Biochem 1994;63:25.
Russell J et al: Interaction between calcium and 1,25-dihydroxy-
vitamin D
3
in the regulation of preproparathyroid hormone
and vitamin D receptor mRNA in avian parathyroids. En-
docrinology 1993;132:2639.
Steiner DF et al: The new enzymology of precursor processing en-
doproteases. J Biol Chem 1992;267:23435.
Table 42–8. Approximate affinities of steroids for
serum-binding proteins.
SHBGCBG1
Dihydrotestosterone
1
> 100
Testosterone
2
> 100
Estradiol
5
>10
Estrone
> 10
> 100
Progesterone
> 100
~ 2
Cortisol
> 100
~ 3
Corticosterone
> 100
~ 5
1
Affinity expressed as K
d
(nmol/L).
JPG to PNG Converter | Convert JPEG to PNG, Convert PNG to JPG
Open JPEG to PNG Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "PNG" in "Output
c# pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg on
VB.NET Image: PDF to Image Converter, Convert Batch PDF Pages to
RasterEdge .NET Imaging PDF Converter makes it non-professional end users to convert PDF and PDF/A documents commonly in daily life (like tiff, jpg, png, bitmap
convert pdf to jpg for online; convert pdf document to jpg
456
Hormone Action & 
Signal Transduction
43
Daryl K. Granner, MD
BIOMEDICAL IMPORTANCE
The homeostatic adaptations an organism makes to a
constantly changing environment are in large part ac-
complished through alterations of the activity and
amount of proteins. Hormones provide a major means
of facilitating these changes. A hormone-receptor inter-
action results in generation of an intracellular signal
that can either regulate the activity of a select set of
genes, thereby altering the amount of certain proteins
in the target cell, or affect the activity of specific pro-
teins, including enzymes and transporter or channel
proteins. The signal can influence the location of pro-
teins in the cell and can affect general processes such as
protein synthesis, cell growth, and replication, perhaps
through effects on gene expression. Other signaling
molecules—including cytokines, interleukins, growth
factors, and metabolites—use some of the same general
mechanisms and signal transduction pathways. Exces-
sive, deficient, or inappropriate production and release
of hormones and of these other regulatory molecules
are major causes of disease. Many pharmacotherapeutic
agents are aimed at correcting or otherwise influencing
the pathways discussed in this chapter.
HORMONES TRANSDUCE SIGNALS TO
AFFECT HOMEOSTATIC MECHANISMS
The general steps involved in producing a coordinated
response to a particular stimulus are illustrated in
Figure 43–1. The stimulus can be a challenge or a
threat to the organism, to an organ, or to the integrity
of a single cell within that organism. Recognition of the
stimulus is the first step in the adaptive response. At the
organismic level, this generally involves the nervous sys-
tem and the special senses (sight, hearing, pain, smell,
touch). At the organismic or cellular level, recognition
involves physicochemical factors such as pH, O
2
ten-
sion, temperature, nutrient supply, noxious metabo-
lites, and osmolarity. Appropriate recognition results in
the release of one or more hormones that will govern
generation of the necessary adaptive response. For pur-
poses of this discussion, the hormones are categorized
as described in Chapter 42, ie, based on the location of
their specific cellular receptors and the type of signals
generated. Group I hormones interact with an intracel-
lular receptor and group II hormones with receptor
recognition sites located on the extracellular surface of
the plasma membrane of target cells. The cytokines, in-
terleukins, and growth factors should also be considered
in this latter category. These molecules, of critical im-
portance in homeostatic adaptation, are hormones in
the sense that they are produced in specific cells, have
the equivalent of autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine
actions, bind to cell surface receptors, and activate
many of the same signal transduction pathways em-
ployed by the more traditional group II hormones. 
SIGNAL GENERATION
The Ligand-Receptor Complex Is the
Signal for Group I Hormones
The lipophilic group I hormones diffuse through the
plasma membrane of all cells but only encounter their
specific, high-affinity intracellular receptors in target
cells. These receptors can be located in the cytoplasm or
in the nucleus of target cells. The hormone-receptor
complex first undergoes an activation reaction. As
shown in Figure 43–2, receptor activation occurs by at
least two mechanisms. For example, glucocorticoids
diffuse across the plasma membrane and encounter
their cognate receptor in the cytoplasm of target cells.
Ligand-receptor binding results in the dissociation of
heat shock protein 90 (hsp90) from the receptor. This
step appears to be necessary for subsequent nuclear lo-
calization of the glucocorticoid receptor. This receptor
also contains nuclear localization sequences that assist
in the translocation from cytoplasm to nucleus. The
now activated receptor moves into the nucleus (Figure
43–2) and binds with high affinity to a specific DNA
sequence called the hormone response element
(HRE).In the case illustrated, this is a glucocorticoid
response element, or GRE. Consensus sequences for
HREs are shown in Table 43–1. The DNA-bound, lig-
anded receptor serves as a high-affinity binding site for
HORMONE ACTION & SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION / 457
Many different signals
Hormone•receptor complex
Group I hormones
STIMULUS
Group II hormones
Recognition
Hormone release
Signal generation
Effects
COORDINATED RESPONSE TO STIMULUS
Gene
transcription
Transporters
Channels
Protein
translocation
Protein
modification
Figure 43–1.
Hormonal involvement in responses to a stimulus. A challenge to the in-
tegrity of the organism elicits a response that includes the release of one or more hormones.
These hormones generate signals at or within target cells, and these signals regulate a vari-
ety of biologic processes which provide for a coordinated response to the stimulus or chal-
lenge. See Figure 43–8 for a specific example.
one or more coactivator proteins, and accelerated gene
transcription typically ensues when this occurs. By con-
trast, certain hormones such as the thyroid hormones
and retinoids diffuse from the extracellular fluid across
the plasma membrane and go directly into the nucleus.
In this case, the cognate receptor is already bound to
the HRE (the thyroid hormone response element
[TRE], in this example). However, this DNA-bound
receptor fails to activate transcription because it is com-
plexed with a corepressor. Indeed, this receptor-
corepressor complex serves as an active repressor of gene
transcription. The association of ligand with these re-
ceptors results in dissociation of the corepressor. The
liganded receptor is now capable of binding one or
more coactivators with high affinity, resulting in the ac-
tivation of gene transcription. The relationship of hor-
mone receptors to other nuclear receptors and to coreg-
ulators is discussed in more detail below.
By selectively affecting gene transcription and the
consequent production of appropriate target mRNAs,
the amounts of specific proteins are changed and meta-
bolic processes are influenced. The influence of each of
these hormones is quite specific; generally, the hor-
mone affects less than 1% of the genes, mRNA, or pro-
teins in a target cell; sometimes only a few are affected.
The nuclear actions of steroid, thyroid, and retinoid
hormones are quite well defined. Most evidence sug-
gests that these hormones exert their dominant effect
on modulating gene transcription, but they—and many
of the hormones in the other classes discussed below—
can act at any step of the “information pathway” illus-
trated in Figure 43–3. Direct actions of steroids in the
cytoplasm and on various organelles and membranes
have also been described.
GROUP II (PEPTIDE &
CATECHOLAMINE) HORMONES 
HAVE MEMBRANE RECEPTORS 
& USE INTRACELLULAR MESSENGERS
Many hormones are water-soluble, have no transport
proteins (and therefore have a short plasma half-life),
and initiate a response by binding to a receptor located
in the plasma membrane (see Tables 42–3 and 42–4).
The mechanism of action of this group of hormones
can best be discussed in terms of the intracellular sig-
nalsthey generate. These signals include cAMP (cyclic
AMP; 3′,5′-adenylic acid; see Figure 18–5), a nu-
cleotide derived from ATP through the action of
adenylyl cyclase; cGMP, a nucleotide formed by gua-
nylyl cyclase; Ca2
+
; and phosphatidylinositides. Many
of these second messengers affect gene transcription, as
described in the previous paragraph; but they also influ-
458 / CHAPTER 43
TRE
GRE
TRE
TRE
+
+
+
+
GRE
GRE
hsp
hsp
Cytoplasm
Nucleus
Figure 43–2.
Regulation of gene expression by class I hormones.
Steroid hormones readily gain access to the cytoplasmic compartment
of target cells. Glucocorticoid hormones (solid triangles) encounter
their cognate receptor in the cytoplasm, where it exists in a complex
with heat shock protein 90 (hsp). Ligand binding causes dissociation of
hsp and a conformational change of the receptor. The receptor•ligand
complex then traverses the nuclear membrane and binds to DNA with
specificity and high affinity at a glucocorticoid response element (GRE).
This event triggers the assembly of a number of transcription coregula-
tors (
+
), and enhanced transcription ensues. By contrast, thyroid hor-
mones and retinoic acid (
) directly enter the nucleus, where their
cognate receptors are already bound to the appropriate response ele-
ments with an associated transcription repressor complex (−). This
complex, which consists of molecules such as N-CoR or SMRT (see
Table 43–6) in the absence of ligand, actively inhibits transcription. Lig-
and binding results in dissociation of the repressor complex from the
receptor, allowing an activator complex to assemble. The gene is then
actively transcribed.
ence a variety of other biologic processes, as shown in
Figure 43–1.
G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCR)
Many of the group II hormones bind to receptors that
couple to effectors through a GTP-binding protein in-
termediary. These receptors typically have seven hy-
drophobic plasma membrane-spanning domains. This
is illustrated by the seven interconnected cylinders ex-
tending through the lipid bilayer in Figure 43–4. Re-
ceptors of this class, which signal through guanine nu-
cleotide-bound protein intermediates, are known as
G protein-coupled receptors, or GPCRs. To date,
over 130 G protein-linked receptor genes have been
cloned from various mammalian species. A wide variety
of responses are mediated by the GPCRs.
cAMP Is the Intracellular Signal 
for Many Responses
Cyclic AMP was the first intracellular signal identified
in mammalian cells. Several components comprise a
system for the generation, degradation, and action of
cAMP.
A. A
DENYLYL
C
YCLASE
Different peptide hormones can either stimulate (s) or
inhibit (i) the production of cAMP from adenylyl cy-
HORMONE ACTION & SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION / 459
Table 43–1. The DNA sequences of several
hormone response elements (HREs).1
Hormone or Effector r HRE
DNA Sequence
Glucocorticoids
GRE
Progestins
PRE
GGTACA 
NNN
TGTTCT
Mineralocorticoids
MRE
Androgens
ARE
Estrogens
ERE
AGGTCA ––– TGA/TCCT
Thyroid hormone
TRE
Retinoic acid
RARE AGGTCA 
N
3,4,5, AGGTCA
Vitamin D
VDRE
cAMP
CRE
TGACGTCA
1Letters indicate nucleotide; 
N
means any one of the four can be
used in that position. The arrows pointing in opposite directions
illustrate the slightly imperfect inverted palindromes present in
many HREs; in some cases these are called “half binding sites” be-
cause each binds one monomer of the receptor. The GRE, PRE,
MRE, and ARE consist of the same DNA sequence. Specificity may
be conferred by the intracellular concentration of the ligand or
hormone receptor, by flanking DNA sequences not included in
the consensus, or by other accessory elements. A second group of
HREs includes those for thyroid hormones, estrogens, retinoic
acid, and vitamin D. These HREs are similar except for the orienta-
tion and spacing between the half palindromes. Spacing deter-
mines the hormone specificity. VDRE (
N
=3), TRE (
N
=4), and RARE
(
N
=5) bind to direct repeats rather than to inverted repeats. An-
other member of the steroid receptor superfamily, the retinoid X
receptor (RXR), forms heterodimers with VDR, TR, and RARE, and
these constitute the trans-acting factors. cAMP affects gene tran-
scription through the CRE.
NUCLEUS
CYTOPLASM
Gene
Primary transcript
MODIFICATION/PROCESSING
A
c
t
i
v
e
T
r
a
n
s
p
o
r
t
D
e
g
r
a
d
a
t
i
o
n
D
e
g
r
a
d
a
t
i
o
n
M
o
d
i
f
i
c
a
t
i
o
n
d
e
g
r
a
d
a
t
i
o
n
d
e
g
r
a
d
a
t
i
o
n
i
n
a
c
t
i
v
e
mRNA
mRNA
Protein
TRANSCRIPTION
TRANSLATION
Figure 43–3.
The “information pathway.” Informa-
tion flows from the gene to the primary transcript to
mRNA to protein. Hormones can affect any of the steps
involved and can affect the rates of processing, degra-
dation, or modification of the various products.
clase, which is encoded by at least nine different genes
(Table 43–2). Two parallel systems, a stimulatory (s)
one and an inhibitory (i) one, converge upon a single
catalytic molecule (C). Each consists of a receptor, R
s
or
R
i
, and a regulatory complex, G
s
and G
i
. G
s
and G
i
are
each trimers composed of α, β, and γsubunits. Because
the αsubunit in G
s
differs from that in G
i
, the pro-
teins, which are distinct gene products, are designated
α
s
and α
i
. The α α subunits bind guanine nucleotides.
The βand γsubunits are always associated (βγ) and ap-
pear to function as a heterodimer. The binding of a hor-
mone to R
s
or R
i
results in a receptor-mediated activa-
tion of G, which entails the exchange of GDP by GTP
on αand the concomitant dissociation of βγfrom α.
The α
s
protein has intrinsic GTPase activity. The
active form, α
s
•GTP, is inactivated upon hydrolysis of
the GTP to GDP; the trimeric G
s
complex (αβγ) is
then re-formed and is ready for another cycle of activa-
tion. Cholera and pertussis toxins catalyze the ADP-
ribosylation of α
s
and α
i-2
(see Table 43–3), respec-
tively. In the case of α
s
, this modification disrupts the
intrinsic GTP-ase activity; thus, α
s
cannot reassociate
with βγ γ and is therefore irreversibly activated. ADP-
ribosylation of α
i-2
prevents the dissociation of α
i-2
from βγ, and free α
i-2
thus cannot be formed. α
s
activ-
ity in such cells is therefore unopposed. 
There is a large family of G proteins, and these are
part of the superfamily of GTPases. The G protein
family is classified according to sequence homology
into four subfamilies, as illustrated in Table 43–3.
There are 21 α, 5 β, and 8 γsubunit genes. Various
combinations of these subunits provide a large number
of possible αβγand cyclase complexes. 
The αsubunits and the βγcomplex have actions in-
dependent of those on adenylyl cyclase (see Figure
43–4 and Table 43–3). Some forms of α
i
stimulate K
+
channels and inhibit Ca2
+
channels, and some α
s
mole-
cules have the opposite effects. Members of the G
q
fam-
ily activate the phospholipase C group of enzymes. The
βγ complexes have been associated with K
+
channel
stimulation and phospholipase C activation. G proteins
are involved in many important biologic processes in
addition to hormone action. Notable examples include
olfaction (α
OLF
) and vision (α
t
). Some examples are
listed in Table 43–3. GPCRs are implicated in a num-
ber of diseases and are major targets for pharmaceutical
agents.
460 / CHAPTER 43
γ
β
α
s
C
No hormone: inactive effector
Bound hormone (H): active effector
N
N
E
G
D
P
β
E
γ
C
G
T
P
α
s
H
Figure 43–4.
Components of the hormone receptor–G protein effector system. Receptors that
couple to effectors through G proteins (GPCR) typically have seven membrane-spanning domains. In
the absence of hormone (left), the heterotrimeric G-protein complex (α, β, γ) is in an inactive guano-
sine diphosphate (GDP)-bound form and is probably not associated with the receptor. This complex is
anchored to the plasma membrane through prenylated groups on the βγsubunits (wavy lines) and
perhaps by myristoylated groups on αsubunits (not shown). On binding of hormone (
H
) to the re-
ceptor, there is a presumed conformational change of the receptor—as indicated by the tilted mem-
brane spanning domains—and activation of the G-protein complex. This results from the exchange of
GDP with guanosine triphosphate (GTP) on the αsubunit, after which αand βγdissociate. The αsub-
unit binds to and activates the effector (E). E can be adenylyl cyclase, Ca2
+
, Na
+
, or Clchannels (α
s
), or
it could be a K
+
channel (α
i
), phospholipase Cβ(α
q
), or cGMP phosphodiesterase (α
t
). The βγsubunit
can also have direct actions on E. (Modified and reproduced, with permission, from Granner DK in: Princi-
ples and Practice of Endocrinology and Metabolism,3rd ed. Becker KL [editor]. Lippincott, 2000.)
B. P
ROTEIN
K
INASE
In prokaryotic cells, cAMP binds to a specific protein
called catabolite regulatory protein (CRP) that binds
directly to DNA and influences gene expression. In eu-
karyotic cells, cAMP binds to a protein kinase called
protein kinase A (PKA)that is a heterotetrameric mol-
ecule consisting of two regulatory subunits (R) and two
catalytic subunits (C). cAMP binding results in the fol-
lowing reaction:
The R
2
C
2
complex has no enzymatic activity, but
the binding of cAMP by R dissociates R from C,
thereby activating the latter (Figure 43–5). The active
C subunit catalyzes the transfer of the γphosphate of
ATP to a serine or threonine residue in a variety of pro-
teins. The consensus phosphorylation sites are -Arg-
Arg/Lys-X-Ser/Thr- and -Arg-Lys-X-X-Ser-, where X
can be any amino acid.
Protein kinase activities were originally described as
being “cAMP-dependent” or “cAMP-independent.” This
4
4
2
cAMP+R
R
cAMP)+2C
2
2
C a
(
Table 43–2. Subclassification of group II.A
hormones.
Hormones That Stimulate
Hormones That Inhibit
Adenylyl Cyclase
Adenylyl Cyclase
(H
s
)
(H
l
)
ACTH
Acetylcholine
ADH
α
2
-Adrenergics
β-Adrenergics
Angiotensin II
Calcitonin
Somatostatin
CRH
FSH
Glucagon
hCG
LH
LPH
MSH
PTH
TSH
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested