PROTEINS: MYOGLOBIN & HEMOGLOBIN
/ 41
N
N
N
N
Fe
2
+
O
O
O
O
Figure 6–1.
Heme. The pyrrole rings and methylene
bridge carbons are coplanar, and the iron atom (Fe
2
+
)
resides in almost the same plane. The fifth and sixth co-
ordination positions of Fe
2
+are directed perpendicular
to—and directly above and below—the plane of the
heme ring. Observe the nature of the substituent
groups on the βcarbons of the pyrrole rings, the cen-
tral iron atom, and the location of the polar side of the
heme ring (at about 7 o’clock) that faces the surface of
the myoglobin molecule.
Apomyoglobin Provides a Hindered
Environment for Heme Iron
When O
2
binds to myoglobin, the bond between the first
oxygen atom and the Fe
2
+
is perpendicular to the plane of
the heme ring. The bond linking the first and second
oxygen atoms lies at an angle of 121 degrees to the plane
of the heme, orienting the second oxygen away from the
distal histidine (Figure 6–3, left). Isolated heme binds
carbon monoxide (CO) 25,000 times more strongly than
oxygen. Since CO is present in small quantities in the at-
mosphere and arises in cells from the catabolism of heme,
why is it that CO does not completely displace O
2
from
heme iron? The accepted explanation is that the apopro-
teins of myoglobin and hemoglobin create a hindered
environment.While CO can bind to isolated heme in its
preferred orientation, ie, with all three atoms (Fe, C, and
O) perpendicular to the plane of the heme, in myoglobin
and hemoglobin the distal histidine sterically precludes
this orientation. Binding at a less favored angle reduces
the strength of the heme-CO bond to about 200 times
that of the heme-O
2
bond (Figure 6–3, right) at which
level the great excess of O
2
over CO normally present
dominates. Nevertheless, about 1% of myoglobin typi-
cally is present combined with carbon monoxide.
THE OXYGEN DISSOCIATION CURVES
FOR MYOGLOBIN & HEMOGLOBIN SUIT
THEIR PHYSIOLOGIC ROLES
Why is myoglobin unsuitable as an O
2
transport pro-
tein but well suited for O
2
storage? The relationship
between the concentration, or partial pressure, of O
2
(P
O
2
) and the quantity of O
2
bound is expressed as an
O
2
saturation isotherm (Figure 6–4). The oxygen-
H24
O
C
HC5
H16
EF3
EF1
E20
H5
H1
GH4
G19
G15
A16
AB1
B1
B5
NA1
A1
O
F6
FG2
F9
F8
F1
C3
C7
C5
E7
B14
B16
E5
E1
CD1
C1
G1
G5
D1
D7
CD7
CD2
+
H
3
N
Figure 6–2.
A model of myoglobin at low resolution.
Only the α-carbon atoms are shown. The α-helical re-
gions are named A through H. (Based on Dickerson RE in:
The Proteins, 2nd ed. Vol 2. Neurath H [editor]. Academic
Press, 1964. Reproduced with permission.)
Fe
O
O
O
Fe
C
N
F8
N
N
F8
N
N
E7
N
N
E7
N
Figure 6–3.
Angles for bonding of oxygen and car-
bon monoxide to the heme iron of myoglobin. The dis-
tal E7 histidine hinders bonding of CO at the preferred
(180 degree) angle to the plane of the heme ring.
Convert pdf pages to jpg online - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
batch pdf to jpg converter; best way to convert pdf to jpg
Convert pdf pages to jpg online - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert multiple pdf to jpg; change pdf file to jpg
42 / CHAPTER 6
100
140
0
20
40
60
Gaseous pressure of oxygen (mm Hg)
80
100
120
80
60
40
20
P
e
r
c
e
n
t
s
a
t
u
r
a
t
i
o
n
Oxygenated blood
leaving the lungs
Myoglobin
Reduced blood
returning from tissues
Hemoglobin
Figure 6–4.
Oxygen-binding curves of both hemo-
globin and myoglobin. Arterial oxygen tension is about
100 mm Hg; mixed venous oxygen tension is about 40
mm Hg; capillary (active muscle) oxygen tension is
about 20 mm Hg; and the minimum oxygen tension re-
quired for cytochrome oxidase is about 5 mm Hg. Asso-
ciation of chains into a tetrameric structure (hemoglo-
bin) results in much greater oxygen delivery than
would be possible with single chains. (Modified, with
permission, from Scriver CR et al [editors]: The Molecular
and Metabolic Bases of Inherited Disease, 7th ed.
McGraw-Hill, 1995.)
binding curve for myoglobin is hyperbolic. Myoglobin
therefore loads O
2
readily at the P
O
2
of the lung capil-
lary bed (100 mm Hg). However, since myoglobin re-
leases only a small fraction of its bound O
2
at the P
O
2
values typically encountered in active muscle (20 mm
Hg) or other tissues (40 mm Hg), it represents an inef-
fective vehicle for delivery of O
2
. However, when
strenuous exercise lowers the P
O
2
of muscle tissue to
about 5 mm Hg, myoglobin releases O
2
for mitochon-
drial synthesis of ATP, permitting continued muscular
activity.
THE ALLOSTERIC PROPERTIES OF
HEMOGLOBINS RESULT FROM THEIR
QUATERNARY STRUCTURES
The properties of individual hemoglobins are conse-
quences of their quaternary as well as of their secondary
and tertiary structures. The quaternary structure of he-
moglobin confers striking additional properties, absent
from monomeric myoglobin, which adapts it to its
unique biologic roles. The allosteric(Gk allos“other,”
steros“space”) properties of hemoglobin provide, in ad-
dition, a model for understanding other allosteric pro-
teins (see Chapter 11).
Hemoglobin Is Tetrameric
Hemoglobins are tetramers comprised of pairs of two
different polypeptide subunits. Greek letters are used to
designate each subunit type. The subunit composition
of the principal hemoglobins are α
2
β
2
(HbA; normal
adult hemoglobin), α
2
γ
2
(HbF; fetal hemoglobin), α
2
S
2
(HbS; sickle cell hemoglobin), and α
2
δ
2
(HbA
2
; a
minor adult hemoglobin). The primary structures of
the β, γ, and δchains of human hemoglobin are highly
conserved. 
Myoglobin & the βSubunits 
of Hemoglobin Share Almost Identical
Secondary and Tertiary Structures
Despite differences in the kind and number of amino
acids present, myoglobin and the βpolypeptide of he-
moglobin A have almost identical secondary and ter-
tiary structures. Similarities include the location of the
heme and the eight helical regions and the presence of
amino acids with similar properties at comparable loca-
tions. Although it possesses seven rather than eight heli-
cal regions, the α α polypeptide of hemoglobin also
closely resembles myoglobin.
Oxygenation of Hemoglobin 
Triggers Conformational Changes 
in the Apoprotein
Hemoglobins bind four molecules of O
2
per tetramer,
one per heme. A molecule of O
2
binds to a hemoglobin
tetramer more readily if other O
2
molecules are already
bound (Figure 6–4). Termed cooperative binding,
this phenomenon permits hemoglobin to maximize
both the quantity of O
2
loaded at the P
O
2
of the lungs
and the quantity of O
2
released at the P
O
2
of the pe-
ripheral tissues. Cooperative interactions, an exclusive
property of multimeric proteins, are critically impor-
tant to aerobic life.
P
50
Expresses the Relative Affinities 
of Different Hemoglobins for Oxygen
The quantity P
50
, a measure of O
2
concentration, is the
partial pressure of O
2
that half-saturates a given hemo-
globin. Depending on the organism, P
50
can vary
widely, but in all instances it will exceed the P
O
2
of the
peripheral tissues. For example, values of P
50
for HbA
and fetal HbF are 26 and 20 mm Hg, respectively. In
the placenta, this difference enables HbF to extract oxy-
gen from the HbA in the mother’s blood. However,
HbF is suboptimal postpartum since its high affinity
for O
2
dictates that it can deliver less O
2
to the tissues. 
The subunit composition of hemoglobin tetramers
undergoes complex changes during development. The
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
convert pdf image to jpg online; convert pdf into jpg online
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code convert TIFF file all pages to jpg images.
convert pdf image to jpg image; changing file from pdf to jpg
PROTEINS: MYOGLOBIN & HEMOGLOBIN
/ 43
50
40
30
20
10
0
3
6
3
6
Birth
α chain
δ chain
β chain (adult)
and ζ chains
(embryonic)
γ chain
(fetal)
Gestation (months)
Age (months)
G
l
o
b
i
n
c
h
a
i
n
s
y
n
t
h
e
s
i
s
(
%
o
f
t
o
t
a
l
)
Figure 6–5.
Developmental pattern of the quater-
nary structure of fetal and newborn hemoglobins. (Re-
produced, with permission, from Ganong WF: Review of
Medical Physiology,20th ed. McGraw-Hill, 2001.)
human fetus initially synthesizes a ζ
2
ε
2
tetramer. By the
end of the first trimester, ζand γsubunits have been re-
placed by αand εsubunits, forming HbF (α
2
γ
2
), the
hemoglobin of late fetal life. While synthesis of βsub-
units begins in the third trimester, βsubunits do not
completely replace γsubunits to yield adult HbA (α
2
β
2
)
until some weeks postpartum (Figure 6–5).
Oxygenation of Hemoglobin Is
Accompanied by Large 
Conformational Changes
The binding of the first O
2
molecule to deoxyHb shifts
the heme iron towards the plane of the heme ring from
a position about 0.6 nm beyond it (Figure 6–6). This
motion is transmitted to the proximal (F8) histidine
and to the residues attached thereto, which in turn
causes the rupture of salt bridges between the carboxyl
terminal residues of all four subunits. As a consequence,
one pair of α/βsubunits rotates 15 degrees with respect
to the other, compacting the tetramer (Figure 6–7).
Profound changes in secondary, tertiary, and quater-
nary structure accompany the high-affinity O
2
-induced
transition of hemoglobin from the low-affinity T (taut)
stateto the R (relaxed) state.These changes signifi-
cantly increase the affinity of the remaining unoxy-
genated hemes for O
2
, as subsequent binding events re-
quire the rupture of fewer salt bridges (Figure 6–8).
The terms T and R also are used to refer to the low-
affinity and high-affinity conformations of allosteric en-
zymes, respectively.
Fe
C
F helix
Histidine F8
N
N
HC
CH
Fe
C
F helix
N
N
HC
CH
Fe
Steric
repulsion
Porphyrin
plane
+O
2
O
O
Figure 6–6.
The iron atom moves into the plane of
the heme on oxygenation. Histidine F8 and its associ-
ated residues are pulled along with the iron atom.
(Slightly modified and reproduced, with permission,
from Stryer L: Biochemistry,4th ed. Freeman, 1995.)
T form
R form
15°
Axis
α
1
α
1
β
2
α
2
β
1
α
2
β
2
β
1
Figure 6–7.
During transition of the T form to the R
form of hemoglobin, one pair of subunits (α
2
2
) ro-
tates through 15 degrees relative to the other pair
1
1
). The axis of rotation is eccentric, and the α
2
2
pair also shifts toward the axis somewhat. In the dia-
gram, the unshaded α
1
1
pair is shown fixed while the
colored α
2
2
pair both shifts and rotates.
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
bulk pdf to jpg converter; convert pdf file into jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
convert pdf image to jpg; .pdf to .jpg online
44 / CHAPTER 6
After Releasing O
2
at the Tissues,
Hemoglobin Transports CO
2
& Protons 
to the Lungs
In addition to transporting O
2
from the lungs to pe-
ripheral tissues, hemoglobin transports CO
2
, the by-
product of respiration, and protons from peripheral tis-
sues to the lungs. Hemoglobin carries CO
2
as
carbamates formed with the amino terminal nitrogens
of the polypeptide chains. 
Carbamates change the charge on amino terminals
from positive to negative, favoring salt bond formation
between the αand βchains.
Hemoglobin carbamates account for about 15% of
the CO
2
in venous blood. Much of the remaining CO
2
is carried as bicarbonate, which is formed in erythro-
cytes by the hydration of CO
2
to carbonic acid
(H
2
CO
3
), a process catalyzed by carbonic anhydrase. At
the pH of venous blood, H
2
CO
3
dissociates into bicar-
bonate and a proton.
CO
Hb
Hb
H
N
O
C
O
2
+
+
+
NH   2H
3
+
=
 
||
R structure
T structure
α
1
α
2
β
2
β
1
O
2
O
2
O
2
O
2
O
2
O
2
O
2
O
2
O
2
O
2
O
2
O
2
O
2
O
2
O
2
O
2
Figure 6–8.
Transition from the T structure to the R structure. In this model, salt
they are unstable. (Modified and redrawn, with permission, from Perutz MF: Hemoglobin
structure and respiratory transport. Sci Am [Dec] 1978;239:92.)
Deoxyhemoglobin binds one proton for every two
O
2
molecules released, contributing significantly to the
buffering capacity of blood. The somewhat lower pH of
peripheral tissues, aided by carbamation, stabilizes the
T state and thus enhances the delivery of O
2
. In the
lungs, the process reverses. As O
2
binds to deoxyhemo-
globin, protons are released and combine with bicar-
bonate to form carbonic acid. Dehydration of H
2
CO
3
,
catalyzed by carbonic anhydrase, forms CO
2
, which is
exhaled. Binding of oxygen thus drives the exhalation
of CO
2
(Figure 6–9).This reciprocal coupling of proton
and O
2
binding is termed the Bohr effect.The Bohr
effect is dependent upon cooperative interactions be-
tween the hemes of the hemoglobin tetramer.Myo-
globin, a monomer, exhibits no Bohr effect. 
Protons Arise From Rupture of Salt Bonds
When O
2
Binds
Protons responsible for the Bohr effect arise from rup-
ture of salt bridges during the binding of O
2
to T state
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Create multiple pages Tiff file from PDF document. Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF.
convert pdf into jpg format; convert pdf to jpg for online
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Components to batch convert PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class. Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif
change pdf to jpg on; change pdf to jpg format
PROTEINS: MYOGLOBIN & HEMOGLOBIN
/ 45
hemoglobin. Conversion to the oxygenated R state
breaks salt bridges involving β-chain residue His 146.
The subsequent dissociation of protons from His 146
drives the conversion of bicarbonate to carbonic acid
(Figure 6–9). Upon the release of O
2
, the T structure
and its salt bridges re-form. This conformational
change increases the pK
a
of the β-chain His 146
residues, which bind protons. By facilitating the re-for-
mation of salt bridges, an increase in proton concentra-
tion enhances the release of O
2
from oxygenated (R
state) hemoglobin. Conversely, an increase in P
O
2
pro-
motes proton release.
2,3-Bisphosphoglycerate (BPG) Stabilizes
the T Structure of Hemoglobin
A low P
O
2
in peripheral tissues promotes the synthesis
in erythrocytes of 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (BPG) from
the glycolytic intermediate 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate.
The hemoglobin tetramer binds one molecule of
BPG in the central cavity formed by its four subunits.
However, the space between the H helices of the β
chains lining the cavity is sufficiently wide to accom-
modate BPG only when hemoglobin is in the T state.
BPG forms salt bridges with the terminal amino groups
of both βchains via Val NA1 and with Lys EF6 and
His H21 (Figure 6–10). BPG therefore stabilizes de-
oxygenated (T state) hemoglobin by forming additional
salt bridges that must be broken prior to conversion to
the R state.
Residue H21 of the γsubunit of fetal hemoglobin
(HbF) is Ser rather than His. Since Ser cannot form a
salt bridge, BPG binds more weakly to HbF than to
HbA. The lower stabilization afforded to the T state by
BPG accounts for HbF having a higher affinity for O
2
than HbA.
CARBONIC
ANHYDRASE
Hb • 4O
2
Hb • 2H
+
(buffer)
4O
2
4O
2
2H
+
+ 2HCO
3
2HCO
3
+ 2H
+
2H
2
CO
3
2CO
2
+ 2H
2
O
Exhaled
LUNGS
CARBONIC
ANHYDRASE
2H
2
CO
3
2CO
2
+ 2H
2
O
Generated by
the Krebs cycle
PERIPHERAL
TISSUES
Figure 6–9.
The Bohr effect. Carbon dioxide gener-
ated in peripheral tissues combines with water to form
carbonic acid, which dissociates into protons and bicar-
bonate ions. Deoxyhemoglobin acts as a buffer by
binding protons and delivering them to the lungs. In
the lungs, the uptake of oxygen by hemoglobin re-
leases protons that combine with bicarbonate ion,
forming carbonic acid, which when dehydrated by car-
bonic anhydrase becomes carbon dioxide, which then
is exhaled.
Val NA1
BPG
Lys EF6
His H21
Val NA1
α-NH
3
+
Lys EF6
His H21
Figure 6–10.
Mode of binding of 2,3-bisphospho-
glycerate to human deoxyhemoglobin. BPG interacts
with three positively charged groups on each βchain.
(Based on Arnone A: X-ray diffraction study of binding of
2,3-diphosphoglycerate to human deoxyhemoglobin. Na-
ture 1972;237:146. Reproduced with permission.)
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Supports for changing image size. Also supports convert PDF files to jpg, jpeg images. C# class source codes and online demos are provided for .NET.
changing pdf file to jpg; change pdf to jpg online
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff. string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object.
convert pdf to gif or jpg; convert pdf photo to jpg
46 / CHAPTER 6
Adaptation to High Altitude
Physiologic changes that accompany prolonged expo-
sure to high altitude include an increase in the number
of erythrocytes and in their concentrations of hemoglo-
bin and of BPG. Elevated BPG lowers the affinity of
HbA for O
2
(decreases P
50
), which enhances release of
O
2
at the tissues.
NUMEROUS MUTANT HUMAN
HEMOGLOBINS HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED
Mutations in the genes that encode the αor βsubunits
of hemoglobin potentially can affect its biologic func-
tion. However, almost all of the over 800 known mu-
tant human hemoglobins are both extremely rare and
benign, presenting no clinical abnormalities. When a
mutation does compromise biologic function, the con-
dition is termed a hemoglobinopathy. The URL
http://globin.cse.psu.edu/ (Globin Gene Server) pro-
vides information about—and links for—normal and
mutant hemoglobins.
Methemoglobin & Hemoglobin M
In methemoglobinemia, the heme iron is ferric rather
than ferrous. Methemoglobin thus can neither bind nor
transport O
2
. Normally, the enzyme methemoglobin
reductase reduces the Fe
3
+
of methemoglobin to Fe
2
+
.
Methemoglobin can arise by oxidation of Fe
2
+
to Fe
3
+
as a side effect of agents such as sulfonamides, from
hereditary hemoglobin M, or consequent to reduced
activity of the enzyme methemoglobin reductase.
In hemoglobin M, histidine F8 (His F8) has been
replaced by tyrosine. The iron of HbM forms a tight
ionic complex with the phenolate anion of tyrosine that
stabilizes the Fe
3
+
form. In α-chain hemoglobin M vari-
ants, the R-T equilibrium favors the T state. Oxygen
affinity is reduced, and the Bohr effect is absent. 
β-Chain hemoglobin M variants exhibit R-T switching,
and the Bohr effect is therefore present.
Mutations (eg, hemoglobin Chesapeake) that favor
the R state increase O
2
affinity. These hemoglobins
therefore fail to deliver adequate O
2
to peripheral tis-
sues. The resulting tissue hypoxia leads to poly-
cythemia,an increased concentration of erythrocytes.
Hemoglobin S
In HbS, the nonpolar amino acid valine has replaced
the polar surface residue Glu6 of the βsubunit, gener-
ating a hydrophobic “sticky patch”on the surface of
the β β subunit of both oxyHbS and deoxyHbS. Both
HbA and HbS contain a complementary sticky patch
on their surfaces that is exposed only in the deoxy-
genated, R state. Thus, at low P
O
2
, deoxyHbS can poly-
merize to form long, insoluble fibers. Binding of deoxy-
HbA terminates fiber polymerization, since HbA lacks
the second sticky patch necessary to bind another Hb
molecule (Figure 6–11). These twisted helical fibers
distort the erythrocyte into a characteristic sickle shape,
rendering it vulnerable to lysis in the interstices of the
splenic sinusoids. They also cause multiple secondary
clinical effects. A low P
O
2
such as that at high altitudes
exacerbates the tendency to polymerize. 
Deoxy A
Oxy A
β
Deoxy A
Oxy S
Deoxy S
Deoxy S
α
β
α
Figure 6–11.
Representation of the sticky patch () on hemoglobin S and its “receptor” ()
on deoxyhemoglobin A and deoxyhemoglobin S. The complementary surfaces allow deoxyhe-
moglobin S to polymerize into a fibrous structure, but the presence of deoxyhemoglobin A will
terminate the polymerization by failing to provide sticky patches. (Modified and reproduced, with
permission, from Stryer L: Biochemistry,4th ed. Freeman, 1995.)
PROTEINS: MYOGLOBIN & HEMOGLOBIN
/ 47
BIOMEDICAL IMPLICATIONS
Myoglobinuria
Following massive crush injury, myoglobin released
from damaged muscle fibers colors the urine dark red.
Myoglobin can be detected in plasma following a my-
ocardial infarction, but assay of serum enzymes (see
Chapter 7) provides a more sensitive index of myocar-
dial injury.
Anemias
Anemias, reductions in the number of red blood cells or
of hemoglobin in the blood, can reflect impaired syn-
thesis of hemoglobin (eg, in iron deficiency; Chapter
51) or impaired production of erythrocytes (eg, in folic
acid or vitamin B
12
deficiency; Chapter 45). Diagnosis
of anemias begins with spectroscopic measurement of
blood hemoglobin levels.
Thalassemias
The genetic defects known as thalassemias result from
the partial or total absence of one or more αor βchains
of hemoglobin. Over 750 different mutations have
been identified, but only three are common. Either the
α chain (alpha thalassemias) or β β chain (beta thal-
assemias) can be affected. A superscript indicates
whether a subunit is completely absent (α
0
or β
0
) or
whether its synthesis is reduced (α
+
or β
+
). Apart from
marrow transplantation, treatment is symptomatic.
Certain mutant hemoglobins are common in many
populations, and a patient may inherit more than one
type. Hemoglobin disorders thus present a complex
pattern of clinical phenotypes. The use of DNA probes
for their diagnosis is considered in Chapter 40. 
Glycosylated Hemoglobin (HbA
1c
)
When blood glucose enters the erythrocytes it glycosy-
lates the ε-amino group of lysine residues and the
amino terminals of hemoglobin. The fraction of hemo-
globin glycosylated, normally about 5%, is proportion-
ate to blood glucose concentration. Since the half-life of
an erythrocyte is typically 60 days, the level of glycosy-
lated hemoglobin (HbA
1c
) reflects the mean blood glu-
cose concentration over the preceding 6–8 weeks.
Measurement of HbA
1c
therefore provides valuable in-
formation for management of diabetes mellitus.
SUMMARY
• Myoglobin is monomeric; hemoglobin is a tetramer
of two subunit types (α
2
β
2
in HbA). Despite having
different primary structures, myoglobin and the sub-
units of hemoglobin have nearly identical secondary
and tertiary structures.
• Heme, an essentially planar, slightly puckered, cyclic
tetrapyrrole, has a central Fe
2
+
linked to all four ni-
trogen atoms of the heme, to histidine F8, and, in
oxyMb and oxyHb, also to O
2
.
• The O
2
-binding curve for myoglobin is hyperbolic,
but for hemoglobin it is sigmoidal, a consequence of
cooperative interactions in the tetramer. Cooperativ-
ity maximizes the ability of hemoglobin both to load
O
2
at the P
O
2
of the lungs and to deliver O
2
at the
P
O
2
of the tissues.
• Relative affinities of different hemoglobins for oxy-
gen are expressed as P
50
, the P
O
2
that half-saturates
them with O
2
. Hemoglobins saturate at the partial
pressures of their respective respiratory organ, eg, the
lung or placenta.
• On oxygenation of hemoglobin, the iron, histidine
F8, and linked residues move toward the heme ring.
Conformational changes that accompany oxygena-
tion include rupture of salt bonds and loosening of
quaternary structure, facilitating binding of addi-
tional O
2
.
• 2,3-Bisphosphoglycerate (BPG) in the central cavity
of deoxyHb forms salt bonds with the β subunits
that stabilize deoxyHb. On oxygenation, the central
cavity contracts, BPG is extruded, and the quaternary
structure loosens.
• Hemoglobin also functions in CO
2
and proton
transport from tissues to lungs. Release of O
2
from
oxyHb at the tissues is accompanied by uptake of
protons due to lowering of the pK
a
of histidine
residues.
• In sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS), Val replaces the β6
Glu of HbA, creating a “sticky patch” that has a
complement on deoxyHb (but not on oxyHb). De-
oxyHbS polymerizes at low O
2
concentrations,
forming fibers that distort erythrocytes into sickle
shapes.
• Alpha and beta thalassemias are anemias that result
from reduced production of α and β β subunits of
HbA, respectively.
REFERENCES
Bettati S et al: Allosteric mechanism of haemoglobin: Rupture of
salt-bridges raises the oxygen affinity of the T-structure. J
Mol Biol 1998;281:581. 
Bunn HF: Pathogenesis and treatment of sickle cell disease. N Engl
J Med 1997;337:762. 
Faustino P et al: Dominantly transmitted beta-thalassemia arising
from the production of several aberrant mRNA species and
one abnormal peptide. Blood 1998;91:685. 
48 / CHAPTER 6
Manning JM et al: Normal and abnormal protein subunit interac-
tions in hemoglobins. J Biol Chem 1998;273:19359. 
Mario N, Baudin B, Giboudeau J: Qualitative and quantitative
analysis of hemoglobin variants by capillary isoelectric focus-
ing. J Chromatogr B Biomed Sci Appl 1998;706:123. 
Reed W, Vichinsky EP: New considerations in the treatment of
sickle cell disease. Annu Rev Med 1998;49:461. 
Unzai S et al: Rate constants for O
2
and CO binding to the alpha
and beta subunits within the R and T states of human hemo-
globin. J Biol Chem 1998;273:23150. 
Weatherall DJ et al: The hemoglobinopathies. Chapter 181 in The
Metabolic and Molecular Bases of Inherited Disease, 8th ed.
Scriver CR et al (editors). McGraw-Hill, 2000. 
Enzymes:Mechanism of Action
7
49
Victor W. Rodwell, PhD, & Peter J. Kennelly, PhD
BIOMEDICAL IMPORTANCE
Enzymes are biologic polymers that catalyze the chemi-
cal reactions which make life as we know it possible.
The presence and maintenance of a complete and bal-
anced set of enzymes is essential for the breakdown of
nutrients to supply energy and chemical building
blocks; the assembly of those building blocks into pro-
teins, DNA, membranes, cells, and tissues; and the har-
nessing of energy to power cell motility and muscle
contraction. With the exception of a few catalytic RNA
molecules, or ribozymes, the vast majority of enzymes
are proteins. Deficiencies in the quantity or catalytic ac-
tivity of key enzymes can result from genetic defects,
nutritional deficits, or toxins. Defective enzymes can re-
sult from genetic mutations or infection by viral or bac-
terial pathogens (eg, Vibrio cholerae). Medical scientists
address imbalances in enzyme activity by using pharma-
cologic agents to inhibit specific enzymes and are inves-
tigating gene therapy as a means to remedy deficits in
enzyme level or function.
ENZYMES ARE EFFECTIVE & HIGHLY
SPECIFIC CATALYSTS
The enzymes that catalyze the conversion of one or
more compounds (substrates)into one or more differ-
ent compounds (products) enhance the rates of the
corresponding noncatalyzed reaction by factors of at
least 10
6
. Like all catalysts, enzymes are neither con-
sumed nor permanently altered as a consequence of
their participation in a reaction.
In addition to being highly efficient, enzymes are
also extremely selective catalysts. Unlike most catalysts
used in synthetic chemistry, enzymes are specific both
for the type of reaction catalyzed and for a single sub-
strate or a small set of closely related substrates. En-
zymes are also stereospecific catalysts and typically cat-
alyze reactions only of specific stereoisomers of a given
compound—for example, 
D
- but not 
L
-sugars, 
L
- but
not 
D
-amino acids. Since they bind substrates through
at least “three points of attachment,” enzymes can even
convert nonchiral substrates to chiral products. Figure
7–1 illustrates why the enzyme-catalyzed reduction of
the nonchiral substrate pyruvate produces 
L
-lactate
rather a racemic mixture of 
D
- and 
L
-lactate. The ex-
quisite specificity of enzyme catalysts imbues living cells
with the ability to simultaneously conduct and inde-
pendently control a broad spectrum of chemical
processes.
ENZYMES ARE CLASSIFIED BY REACTION
TYPE & MECHANISM
A system of enzyme nomenclature that is comprehen-
sive, consistent, and at the same time easy to use has
proved elusive. The common names for most enzymes
derive from their most distinctive characteristic: their
ability to catalyze a specific chemical reaction. In gen-
eral, an enzyme’s name consists of a term that identifies
the type of reaction catalyzed followed by the suffix 
-ase. For example, dehydrogenases remove hydrogen
atoms, proteaseshydrolyze proteins, and isomerasescat-
alyze rearrangements in configuration. One or more
modifiers usually precede this name. Unfortunately,
while many modifiers name the specific substrate in-
volved (xanthine oxidase), others identify the source of
the enzyme (pancreatic ribonuclease), specify its mode
of regulation (hormone-sensitive lipase), or name a dis-
tinguishing characteristic of its mechanism (a cysteine
protease). When it was discovered that multiple forms
of some enzymes existed, alphanumeric designators
were added to distinguish between them (eg, RNA
polymerase III; protein kinase Cβ). To address the am-
biguity and confusion arising from these inconsistencies
in nomenclature and the continuing discovery of new
enzymes, the International Union of Biochemists (IUB)
developed a complex but unambiguous system of en-
zyme nomenclature. In the IUB system, each enzyme
has a unique name and code number that reflect the
type of reaction catalyzed and the substrates involved.
Enzymes are grouped into six classes, each with several
subclasses. For example, the enzyme commonly called
“hexokinase” is designated “ATP:
D
-hexose-6-phospho-
transferase E.C. 2.7.1.1.” This identifies hexokinase as a
member of class 2 (transferases), subclass 7 (transfer of a
phosphoryl group), sub-subclass 1 (alcohol is the phos-
phoryl acceptor). Finally, the term “hexose-6” indicates
that the alcohol phosphorylated is that of carbon six of
a hexose. Listed below are the six IUB classes of en-
zymes and the reactions they catalyze.
1. Oxidoreductasescatalyze oxidations and reduc-
tions.
50 / CHAPTER 7
Enzyme site
Substrate
1
1
3
2
2
4
3
Figure 7–1.
Planar representation of the “three-
point attachment” of a substrate to the active site of an
enzyme. Although atoms 1 and 4 are identical, once
atoms 2 and 3 are bound to their complementary sites
on the enzyme, only atom 1 can bind. Once bound to
an enzyme, apparently identical atoms thus may be dis-
tinguishable, permitting a stereospecific chemical
change.
2. Transferasescatalyze transfer of groups such as
methyl or glycosyl groups from a donor molecule
to an acceptor molecule.
3. Hydrolases catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of
CC, CO, CN, PO, and certain other
bonds, including acid anhydride bonds.
4. Lyasescatalyze cleavage of CC, CO, CN,
and other bonds by elimination, leaving double
bonds, and also add groups to double bonds.
5. Isomerases catalyze geometric or structural
changes within a single molecule.
6. Ligasescatalyze the joining together of two mole-
cules, coupled to the hydrolysis of a pyrophospho-
ryl group in ATP or a similar nucleoside triphos-
phate.
Despite the many advantages of the IUB system,
texts tend to refer to most enzymes by their older and
shorter, albeit sometimes ambiguous names.
PROSTHETIC GROUPS, COFACTORS, 
& COENZYMES PLAY IMPORTANT 
ROLES IN CATALYSIS
Many enzymes contain small nonprotein molecules and
metal ions that participate directly in substrate binding
or catalysis. Termed prosthetic groups, cofactors,and
coenzymes,these extend the repertoire of catalytic ca-
pabilities beyond those afforded by the limited number
of functional groups present on the aminoacyl side
chains of peptides.
Prosthetic Groups Are Tightly Integrated
Into an Enzyme’s Structure
Prosthetic groups are distinguished by their tight, stable
incorporation into a protein’s structure by covalent or
noncovalent forces. Examples include pyridoxal phos-
phate, flavin mononucleotide (FMN), flavin dinu-
cleotide (FAD), thiamin pyrophosphate, biotin, and
the metal ions of Co, Cu, Mg, Mn, Se, and Zn. Metals
are the most common prosthetic groups. The roughly
one-third of all enzymes that contain tightly bound
metal ions are termed metalloenzymes.Metal ions that
participate in redox reactions generally are complexed
to prosthetic groups such as heme (Chapter 6) or iron-
sulfur clusters (Chapter 12). Metals also may facilitate
the binding and orientation of substrates, the formation
of covalent bonds with reaction intermediates (Co2
+
in
coenzyme B
12
), or interaction with substrates to render
them more electrophilic (electron-poor) or nucleo-
philic(electron-rich).
Cofactors Associate Reversibly With
Enzymes or Substrates
Cofactorsserve functions similar to those of prosthetic
groups but bind in a transient, dissociable manner ei-
ther to the enzyme or to a substrate such as ATP. Un-
like the stably associated prosthetic groups, cofactors
therefore must be present in the medium surrounding
the enzyme for catalysis to occur. The most common
cofactors also are metal ions. Enzymes that require a
metal ion cofactor are termed metal-activated enzymes
to distinguish them from the metalloenzymes for
which metal ions serve as prosthetic groups.
Coenzymes Serve as Substrate Shuttles
Coenzymes serve as recyclable shuttles—or group
transfer reagents—that transport many substrates from
their point of generation to their point of utilization.
Association with the coenzyme also stabilizes substrates
such as hydrogen atoms or hydride ions that are unsta-
ble in the aqueous environment of the cell. Other
chemical moieties transported by coenzymes include
methyl groups (folates), acyl groups (coenzyme A), and
oligosaccharides (dolichol).
Many Coenzymes, Cofactors, & Prosthetic
Groups Are Derivatives of B Vitamins
The water-soluble B vitamins supply important compo-
nents of numerous coenzymes. Many coenzymes con-
tain, in addition, the adenine, ribose, and phosphoryl
moieties of AMP or ADP (Figure 7–2). Nicotinamide
and riboflavinare components of the redox coenzymes
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested