THE EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX / 541
Heparin A
Fibrin A
Heparin B
Collagen
DNA
Cell A
Cell B
Fibrin B
RGD
Figure 48–3.
Schematic representation of fibronectin. Seven functional
domains of fibronectin are represented; two different types of domain for
heparin, cell-binding, and fibrin are shown. The domains are composed of
various combinations of three structural motifs (I, II, and III), not depicted
in the figure. Also not shown is the fact that fibronectin is a dimer joined
by disulfide bridges near the carboxyl terminals of the monomers. The ap-
proximate location of the RGD sequence of fibronectin, which interacts
with a variety of fibronectin integrin receptors on cell surfaces, is indicated
by the arrow. (Redrawn after Yamada KM: Adhesive recognition sequences.
JBiol Chem 1991;266:12809.)
α
β
α
β
Collagen
Laminin
α
β
Fibronectin
Figure 48–4.
Schematic representation of a cell in-
teracting through various integrin receptors with colla-
gen, fibronectin, and laminin present in the ECM. (Spe-
cific subunits are not indicated.) (Redrawn after Yamada
KM: Adhesive recognition sequences. J Biol Chem
1991;266:12809.)
kDa), the major plasma protein, passes through the
normal glomerulus. This is explained by two sets of
facts: (1) The pores in the glomerular membrane are
large enough to allow molecules up to about 8 nm to
pass through. (2) Albumin is smaller than this pore size,
but it is prevented from passing through easily by the
negative charges of heparan sulfate and of certain sialic
acid-containing glycoproteins present in the lamina.
These negative charges repel albumin and most plasma
proteins, which are negatively charged at the pH of
blood. The normal structure of the glomerulus may be
severely damaged in certain types of glomerulonephri-
tis(eg, caused by antibodies directed against various
components of the glomerular membrane). This alters
the pores and the amounts and dispositions of the nega-
tively charged macromolecules referred to above, and
relatively massive amounts of albumin (and of certain
S-S
S-S
Heparin
Fibronectin
OUTSIDE
INSIDE
Collagen
Plasma membrane
Talin
Vinculin
Capping protein
α-Actin
Actin
Integrin
receptor
α
β
Figure 48–5.
Schematic representation of fibro-
nectin interacting with an integrin fibronectin receptor
situated in the exterior of the plasma membrane of a
cell of the ECM and of various attachment proteins in-
teracting indirectly or directly with an actin microfila-
ment in the cytosol. For simplicity, the attachment pro-
teins are represented as a complex.
To jpeg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
change from pdf to jpg; convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg
To jpeg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
conversion pdf to jpg; pdf to jpg converter
542 / CHAPTER 48
Figure 48–6.
Dark field electron micrograph of a
proteoglycan aggregate in which the proteoglycan
subunits and filamentous backbone are particularly
well extended. (Reproduced, with permission, from
Rosenberg L, Hellman W, Kleinschmidt AK: Electron micro-
scopic studies of proteoglycan aggregates from bovine
articular cartilage. J Biol Chem 1975;250:1877.)
other plasma proteins) can pass through into the urine,
resulting in severe albuminuria.
PROTEOGLYCANS 
& GLYCOSAMINOGLYCANS
The Glycosaminoglycans Found 
in Proteoglycans Are Built Up 
of Repeating Disaccharides
Proteoglycans are proteins that contain covalently
linked glycosaminoglycans. A number of them have
been characterized and given names such as syndecan,
betaglycan, serglycin, perlecan, aggrecan, versican,
decorin, biglycan, and fibromodulin. They vary in tis-
sue distribution, nature of the core protein, attached
glycosaminoglycans, and function. The proteins bound
covalently to glycosaminoglycans are called “core pro-
teins”;they have proved difficult to isolate and charac-
terize, but the use of recombinant DNA technology is
beginning to yield important information about their
structures. The amount of carbohydrate in a proteogly-
can is usually much greater than is found in a glycopro-
tein and may comprise up to 95% of its weight. Figures
48–6 and 48–7 show the general structure of one par-
ticular proteoglycan, aggrecan,the major type found in
cartilage. It is very large (about 2 ×10
3
kDa), with its
overall structure resembling that of a bottle brush. It
contains a long strand of hyaluronic acid (one type of
GAG) to which link proteins are attached noncova-
lently. In turn, these latter interact noncovalently with
core protein molecules from which chains of other
GAGs (keratan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate in this
case) project. More details on this macromolecule are
given when cartilage is discussed below.
There are at least seven glycosaminoglycans
(GAGs): hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate, keratan
sulfates I and II, heparin, heparan sulfate, and der-
matan sulfate. A GAG is an unbranched polysaccharide
made up of repeating disaccharides, one component of
which is always an amino sugar (hence the name
GAG), either 
D
-glucosamine or 
D
-galactosamine. The
other component of the repeating disaccharide (except
in the case of keratan sulfate) is a uronic acid, either 
L
-glucuronic acid (GlcUA) or its 5′-epimer, 
L
-iduronic
acid (IdUA). With the exception of hyaluronic acid, all
the GAGs contain sulfate groups, either as O-esters or
as N-sulfate (in heparin and heparan sulfate).
Hyaluronic acid affords another exception because
there is no clear evidence that it is attached covalently
to protein, as the definition of a proteoglycan given
above specifies. Both GAGs and proteoglycans have
proved difficult to work with, partly because of their
complexity. However, they are major components of
the ground substance; they have a number of important
biologic roles; and they are involved in a number of dis-
ease processes—so that interest in them is increasing
rapidly.
Biosynthesis of Glycosaminoglycans
Involves Attachment to Core Proteins,
Chain Elongation, & Chain Termination
A. A
TTACHMENTTO
C
ORE
P
ROTEINS
The linkage between GAGs and their core proteins is
generally one of three types.
1.An O-glycosidic bond between xylose (Xyl) and
Ser, a bond that is unique to proteoglycans. This link-
age is formed by transfer of a Xyl residue to Ser from
UDP-xylose. Two residues of Gal are then added to the
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
change pdf to jpg file; convert multiple page pdf to jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
change file from pdf to jpg; convert multipage pdf to jpg
THE EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX / 543
Hyaluronic acid
Link protein
Keratan sulfate
Chondroitin sulfate
Core protein
Subunits
Figure 48–7.
Schematic representation of the pro-
teoglycan aggrecan. (Reproduced, with permission, from
Lennarz WJ:The Biochemistry of Glycoproteins and Proteo-
glycans.Plenum Press, 1980.)
Xyl residue, forming a link trisaccharide,Gal-Gal-Xyl-
Ser. Further chain growth of the GAG occurs on the
terminal Gal.
2. An O-glycosidic bond forms between GalNAc
(N-acetylgalactosamine) and Ser (Thr) (Figure 47–
1[a]), present in keratan sulfate II. This bond is formed
by donation to Ser (or Thr) of a GalNAc residue, em-
ploying UDP-GalNAc as its donor.
3. An N-glycosylamine bond between GlcNAc 
(N-acetylglucosamine) and the amide nitrogen of Asn,
as found in N-linked glycoproteins (Figure 47–1[b]).
Its synthesis is believed to involve dolichol-P-P-
oligosaccharide.
The synthesis of the core proteins occurs in the en-
doplasmic reticulum,and formation of at least some
of the above linkages also occurs there. Most of the later
steps in the biosynthesis of GAG chains and their sub-
sequent modifications occur in the Golgi apparatus.
B. C
HAIN
E
LONGATION
Appropriate nucleotide sugars and highly specific
Golgi-located glycosyltransferases are employed to syn-
thesize the oligosaccharide chains of GAGs. The “one
enzyme, one linkage” relationship appears to hold here,
as in the case of certain types of linkages found in gly-
coproteins. The enzyme systems involved in chain elon-
gation are capable of high-fidelity reproduction of com-
plex GAGs.
C. C
HAIN
T
ERMINATION
This appears to result from (1) sulfation, particularly at
certain positions of the sugars, and (2) the progression
of the growing GAG chain away from the membrane
site where catalysis occurs.
D. F
URTHER
M
ODIFICATIONS
After formation of the GAG chain, numerous chemical
modifications occur, such as the introduction of sulfate
groups onto GalNAc and other moieties and the
epimerization of GlcUA to IdUA residues. The enzymes
catalyzing sulfation are designated sulfotransferasesand
use 3′-phosphoadenosine-5′-phosphosulfate (PAPS; ac-
tive sulfate) as the sulfate donor. These Golgi-located
enzymes are highly specific, and distinct enzymes cat-
alyze sulfation at different positions (eg, carbons 2, 3, 4,
and 6) on the acceptor sugars. An epimerasecatalyzes
conversions of glucuronyl to iduronyl residues.
The Various Glycosaminoglycans Exhibit
Differences in Structure & Have
Characteristic Distributions
The seven GAGs named above differ from each other in
a number of the following properties: amino sugar com-
position, uronic acid composition, linkages between
these components, chain length of the disaccharides, the
presence or absence of sulfate groups and their positions
of attachment to the constituent sugars, the nature of
the core proteins to which they are attached, the nature
of the linkage to core protein, their tissue and subcellu-
lar distribution, and their biologic functions.
The structures (Figure 48–8) and the distributions
of each of the GAGs will now be briefly discussed. The
major features of the seven GAGs are summarized in
Table 48–6.
A. H
YALURONIC
A
CID
Hyaluronic acid consists of an unbranched chain of re-
peating disaccharide units containing GlcUA and Glc-
NAc. Hyaluronic acid is present in bacteria and is
widely distributed among various animals and tissues,
including synovial fluid, the vitreous body of the eye,
cartilage, and loose connective tissues.
B. C
HONDROITIN
S
ULFATES
(C
HONDROITIN
4-S
ULFATE
& C
HONDROITIN
6-S
ULFATE
)
Proteoglycans linked to chondroitin sulfate by the Xyl-
Ser O-glycosidic bond are prominent components of
cartilage (see below). The repeating disaccharide is
similar to that found in hyaluronic acid, containing
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Raster
Raster Images File Formats. • C#.NET RasterEdge HTML5 Viewer supports various images formats, including JPEG, GIF, BMP, PNG, etc. Loading & Viewing.
change file from pdf to jpg on; batch pdf to jpg
C# Raster - Convert Image to JPEG in C#.NET
C# Raster - Convert Image to JPEG in C#.NET. Online C# Guide for Converting Image to JPEG in .NET Application. Convert RasterImage to JPEG.
convert pdf image to jpg image; convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi
544 / CHAPTER 48
IdUA
Dermatan sulfate:
GalNAc
β1,4
α1,3
GlcUA
GalNAc
2-Sulfate
β1,4
β1,3
GlcUA
Gal
β1,4
β1,3
Gal
β1,3
Xyl
β1,4
Ser
β
4-Sulfate
Chondroitin sulfates:
GlcUA
GalNAc
β1,4
β1,3
GlcUA
Gal
β1,4
β1,3
Gal
β1,3
Xyl
β1,4
Ser
β
4- or 6-Sulfate
Hyaluronic acid:
GlcUA
GlcNAc
β1,4
β1,3
GlcUA
β1,4
GlcNAc
β1,4
β1,3
IdUA
Heparin and
heparan sulfate:
GlcN
α1,4
α1,4
GlcUA
GlcNAc
2-Sulfate
α1,4
β1,4
GlcUA
Gal
α1,4
β1,3
Gal
β1,3
Xyl
β1,4
Ser
β
SO
3
or Ac
6-Sulfate
GlcNAc
Keratan sulfates
I and II:
Gal
β1,4
β1,3
GlcNAc
Gal
6-Sulfate
6-Sulfate
β1,4
β1,3
GlcNAc
Asn (keratan sulfate I)
β
GalNAc
Gal-NeuAc
Thr (Ser) (keratan sulfate II)
α
(
G
l
c
N
A
c
,
M
a
n
)
1
,
6
Figure 48–8.
Summary of structures of glycosaminoglycans and their attachments to core proteins. (GlcUA,
D
-glucuronic acid; IdUA, 
L
-iduronic acid; GlcN, 
D
-glucosamine; GalN, 
D
-galactosamine; Ac, acetyl; Gal, 
D
-galac-
tose; Xyl, 
D
-xylose; Ser, 
L
-serine; Thr, 
L
-threonine; Asn, 
L
-asparagine; Man, 
D
-mannose; NeuAc, N-acetylneu-
raminic acid.) The summary structures are qualitative representations only and do not reflect, for example, the
uronic acid composition of hybrid glycosaminoglycans such as heparin and dermatan sulfate, which contain
both 
L
-iduronic and 
D
-glucuronic acid. Neither should it be assumed that the indicated substituents are always
present, eg, whereas most iduronic acid residues in heparin carry a 2′-sulfate group, a much smaller proportion
of these residues are sulfated in dermatan sulfate. The presence of link trisaccharides (Gal-Gal-Xyl) in the chon-
droitin sulfates, heparin, and heparan and dermatan sulfates is shown. (Slightly modified and reproduced, with
permission, from Lennarz WJ: The Biochemistry of Glycoproteins and Proteoglycans.Plenum Press, 1980.)
Table 48–6. Major properties of the glycosaminoglycans.
GAG
Sugars
Sulfate
1
Linkage of Protein
Location
HA
GIcNAc, GlcUA A Nil
No firm evidence
Synovial fluid, vitreous humor, loose connective tissue
CS
GaINAc, GlcUA A GalNAc
Xyl-Ser; associated with 
HA via link proteins
Cartilage, bone, cornea
KS I
GlcNAc, Gal
GlcNAc
GlcNAc-Asn
Cornea
KS II
GlcNAc, Gal
Same as KS I I GalNAc-Thr
Loose connective tissue
Heparin
GlcN, IdUA
GlcN
Ser
Mast cells
GlcN
IdUA
Heparan sulfate e GlcN, GlcUA
GlcN
Xyl-Ser
Skin fibroblasts, aortic wall
Dermatan
GalNAc, IdUA, , GaINAc
Xyl-Ser
Wide distribution
sulfate
(GlcUA)
IdUa
1
The sulfate is attached to various positions of the sugars indicated (see Figure 48–7).
.NET JPEG 2000 SDK | Encode & Decode JPEG 2000 Images
RasterEdge .NET Image SDK - JPEG 2000 Codec. Royalty-free JPEG 2000 Compression Technology Available for .NET Framework.
change pdf to jpg on; convert pdf to gif or jpg
C# TIFF: How to Convert TIFF to JPEG Images in C# Application
C# Demo to Convert and Render TIFF to JPEG/Png/Bmp/Gif in Visual C#.NET Project. C#.NET Image: TIFF to Raster Images Overview. C#.NET Image: TIFF to JPEG Demo.
convert pdf to jpg; changing pdf to jpg file
THE EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX / 545
GlcUA but with GalNAc replacing GlcNAc. The
GalNAc is substituted with sulfate at either its 4′or its
6′position, with approximately one sulfate being pre-
sent per disaccharide unit.
C. K
ERATAN
S
ULFATES
I & II
As shown in Figure 48–8, the keratan sulfates consist of
repeating Gal-GlcNAc disaccharide units containing
sulfate attached to the 6′position of GlcNAc or occa-
sionally of Gal. Type I is abundant in cornea,and type
II is found along with chondroitin sulfate attached to
hyaluronic acid in loose connective tissue.Types I and
II have different attachments to protein (Figure 48–8).
D. H
EPARIN
The repeating disaccharide contains glucosamine
(GlcN) and either of the two uronic acids (Figure
48–9). Most of the amino groups of the GlcN residues
are N-sulfated,but a few are acetylated. The GlcN also
carries a C
6
sulfate ester.
Approximately 90% of the uronic acid residues are
IdUA. Initially, all of the uronic acids are GlcUA, but a
5′-epimerase converts approximately 90% of the
GlcUA residues to IdUA after the polysaccharide chain
is formed. The protein molecule of the heparin proteo-
glycan is unique, consisting exclusively of serine and
glycine residues. Approximately two-thirds of the serine
residues contain GAG chains, usually of 5–15 kDa but
occasionally much larger. Heparin is found in the gran-
ules of mast cellsand also in liver, lung, and skin.
E. H
EPARAN
S
ULFATE
This molecule is present on many cell surfaces as a
proteoglycan and is extracellular. It contains GlcN with
fewer N-sulfates than heparin, and, unlike heparin, its
predominant uronic acid is GlcUA.
F. D
ERMATAN
S
ULFATE
This substance is widely distributed in animal tissues.
Its structure is similar to that of chondroitin sulfate, ex-
cept that in place of a GlcUA in β-1,3 linkage to
GalNAc it contains an IdUA in an α-1,3 linkage to
GalNAc. Formation of the IdUA occurs, as in heparin
and heparan sulfate, by 5′-epimerization of GlcUA. Be-
cause this is regulated by the degree of sulfation and be-
cause sulfation is incomplete, dermatan sulfate contains
both IdUA-GalNAc and GlcUA-GalNAc disaccha-
rides.
Deficiencies of Enzymes That Degrade
Glycosaminoglycans Result in
Mucopolysaccharidoses
Both exo- and endoglycosidases degrade GAGs. Like
most other biomolecules, GAGs are subject to
turnover, being both synthesized and degraded. In
adult tissues, GAGs generally exhibit relatively slow
turnover, their half-lives being days to weeks.
Understanding of the degradative pathways for
GAGs, as in the case of glycoproteins (Chapter 47) and
glycosphingolipids (Chapter 24), has been greatly aided
by elucidation of the specific enzyme deficiencies that
occur in certain inborn errors of metabolism.When
GAGs are involved, these inborn errors are called mu-
copolysaccharidoses(Table 48–7).
Degradation of GAGs is carried out by a battery of
lysosomal hydrolases. These include certain endogly-
cosidases, various exoglycosidases, and sulfatases, gener-
ally acting in sequence to degrade the various GAGs. A
number of them are indicated in Table 48–7.
The mucopolysaccharidoses share a common
mechanism of causation, as illustrated in Figure 48–10.
They are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner,
with Hurler and Hunter syndromes being perhaps the
most widely studied. None are common. In some cases,
a family history of a mucopolysaccharidosis is obtained.
Specific laboratory investigations of help in their diag-
nosis are urine testing for the presence of increased
O
HNSO
3
OH
GlcN
CH
2
OSO
3
O
HNSO
3
OH
CH
2
OSO
3
O
O
CO
2
OSO
3
OH
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
IdUA
O
CO
2
OH
OH
IdUA
O
CO
2
OH
OH
GlcUA
GlcNAc
GlcN
O
HNSO
3
OH
CH
2
OSO
3
GlcN
O
HNAc
OH
CH
2
OSO
3
Figure 48–9.
Structure of heparin. The polymer section illustrates structural features typical of heparin;
however, the sequence of variously substituted repeating disaccharide units has been arbitrarily selected. In
addition, non-O-sulfated or 3-O-sulfated glucosamine residues may also occur. (Modified, redrawn, and repro-
duced, with permission, from Lindahl U et al: Structure and biosynthesis of heparin-like polysaccharides. Fed Proc
1977;36:19.)
C# Word - Convert Word to JPEG in C#.NET
C# Word - Convert Word to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET Word to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Word to JPEG Conversion Overview. Convert Word to JPEG Using C#.NET
change pdf file to jpg; pdf to jpeg
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to JPEG in C#.NET
C# PowerPoint - Convert PowerPoint to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PowerPoint to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. PowerPoint to JPEG Conversion Overview.
.pdf to jpg; convert pdf image to jpg online
546 / CHAPTER 48
Table 48–7. Biochemical defects and diagnostic tests in mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) and
mucolipidoses (ML).1
Alternative
Urinary
Name
Designation
2,3
Enzymatic Defect
Metabolites
Mucopolysaccharidoses
Hurler, Scheie,
MPS I
α-
L
-Iduronidase
Dermatan sulfate, heparan sulfate
Hurler-Scheie
(MIM 252800)
Hunter (MIM 309900)
MPS II
Iduronate sulfatase
Dermatan sulfate, heparan sulfate
Sanfilippo A
MPS IIIA
Heparan sulfate N-sulfatase
Heparan sulfate
(MIM 252900)
(sulfamidase)
Sanfilippo B
MPS IIIB
α-N-Acetylglucosaminidase Heparan sulfate
(MIM 252920)
Sanfilippo C
MPS IIIC
Acetyltransferase
Heparan sulfate
(MIM 252930)
Sanfilippo D
MPS IIID
N-Acetylglucosamine 
Heparan sulfate
(MIM 252940)
6-sulfatase
Morquio A
MPS IVA
Galactosamine 6-sulfatase
Keratan sulfate, chondroitin 6-sulfate
(MIM 253000)
Morquio B
MPS IVB
β-Galactosidase
Keratan sulfate
(MIM 253010)
Maroteaux-Lamy
MPS VI
N-Acetylgalactosamine 4-
Dermatan sulfate
(MIM 253200)
sulfatase (arylsulfatase B)
Sly (MIM 253220)
MPS VII
β-Glucuronidase
Dermatan sulfate, heparan sulfate, chondroitin 
4-sulfate, chondroitin 6-sulfate
Mucolipidoses
Sialidosis
M LI
Sialidase (neuraminidase)
Glycoprotein fragments
(MIM 256550)
I-cell disease
ML II
UDP-N-acetylglucosamine: 
Glycoprotein fragments
(MIM 252500)
glycoprotein N-acetylglu-
cosamininylphosphotrans-
ferase. (Acid hydrolases 
thus lack phosphoman-
nosyl residues.)
Pseudo-Hurler
ML III
As for ML IIbut deficiency
Glycoprotein fragments
polydystrophy
is incomplete
(MIM 252600)
1Modified and reproduced, with permission, from DiNatale P, Neufeld EF: The biochemical diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidoses,
mucolipidoses and related disorders. In: Perspectives in Inherited Metabolic Diseases,vol 2. Barr B et al (editors). Editiones Ermes
(Milan), 1979.
2Fibroblasts, leukocytes, tissues, amniotic fluid cells, or serum can be used for the assay of many of the above enzymes. Patients
with these disorders exhibit a variety of clinical findings that may include cloudy corneas, mental retardation, stiff joints, cardiac ab-
normalities, hepatosplenomegaly, and short stature, depending on the specific disease and its severity.
3The term MPS V is no longer used. The existence of MPS VIII (suspected glucosamine 6-sulfatase deficiency:MIM 253230) has not
been confirmed. At least one case of hyaluronidase deficiency (MPS IX; MIM601492) has been reported.
amounts of GAGs and assays of suspected enzymes in
white cells, fibroblasts, or sometimes in serum. In cer-
tain cases, a tissue biopsy is performed and the GAG
that has accumulated can be determined by elec-
trophoresis. DNA tests are increasingly available. Pre-
natal diagnosis can be made using amniotic cells or
chorionic villus biopsy.
The term “mucolipidosis” was introduced to de-
note diseases that combined features common to both
mucopolysaccharidoses and sphingolipidoses (Chapter
24). Three mucolipidoses are listed in Table 48–7. In
sialidosis(mucolipidosis I, ML-I), various oligosaccha-
rides derived from glycoproteins and certain ganglio-
sides can accumulate in tissues. I-cell disease(ML-II)
THE EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX / 547
Mutation(s) in a gene encoding a lysosomal hydrolase
involved in the degradation of one or more GAGs
Accumulation of substrate in various tissues, including
liver, spleen, bone, skin, and central nervous system
Defective lysosomal hydrolase
Figure 48–10.
Simplified scheme of causation of a
mucopolysaccharidosis, such as Hurler syndrome (MIM
252800), in which the affected enzyme is α-
L
-iduroni-
dase. Marked accumulation of the GAGs in the tissues
mentioned in the figure could cause hepatomegaly,
splenomegaly, disturbances of growth, coarse facies,
and mental retardation, respectively.
and pseudo-Hurler polydystrophy (ML-III) are de-
scribed in Chapter 47. The term “mucolipidosis” is re-
tained because it is still in relatively widespread clinical
usage, but it is not appropriate for these two latter dis-
eases since the mechanism of their causation involves
mislocation of certain lysosomal enzymes. Genetic de-
fects of the catabolism of the oligosaccharide chains of
glycoproteins (eg, mannosidosis, fucosidosis) are also
described in Chapter 47. Most of these defects are char-
acterized by increased excretion of various fragments of
glycoproteins in the urine, which accumulate because
of the metabolic block, as in the case of the mucolipi-
doses.
Hyaluronidase is one important enzyme involved
in the catabolism of both hyaluronic acid and chondro-
itin sulfate. It is a widely distributed endoglycosidase
that cleaves hexosaminidic linkages. From hyaluronic
acid, the enzyme will generate a tetrasaccharide with
the structure (GlcUA-β-1,3-GlcNAc-β-1,4)
2
, which
can be degraded further by a β-glucuronidase and β-N-
acetylhexosaminidase. Surprisingly, only one case of an
apparent genetic deficiency of this enzyme appears to
have been reported.
Proteoglycans Have Numerous Functions
As indicated above, proteoglycans are remarkably com-
plex molecules and are found in every tissue of the
body, mainly in the ECM or “ground substance.”
There they are associated with each other and also with
the other major structural components of the matrix,
collagen and elastin, in quite specific manners. Some
proteoglycans bind to collagen and others to elastin.
These interactions are important in determining the
structural organization of the matrix. Some proteogly-
cans (eg, decorin) can also bind growth factors such as
TGF-β, modulating their effects on cells. In addition,
some of them interact with certain adhesive proteins
such as fibronectin and laminin (see above), also found
in the matrix. The GAGs present in the proteoglycans
are polyanions and hence bind polycations and cations
such as Na
+
and K
+
. This latter ability attracts water by
osmotic pressure into the extracellular matrix and con-
tributes to its turgor. GAGs also gel at relatively low
concentrations. Because of the long extended nature of
the polysaccharide chains of GAGs and their ability to
gel, the proteoglycans can act as sieves, restricting the
passage of large macromolecules into the ECM but al-
lowing relatively free diffusion of small molecules.
Again, because of their extended structures and the
huge macromolecular aggregates they often form, they
occupy a large volume of the matrix relative to proteins.
A. S
OME
F
UNCTIONSOF
S
PECIFIC
GAG
S
& P
ROTEOGLYCANS
Hyaluronic acidis especially high in concentration in
embryonic tissues and is thought to play an important
role in permitting cell migration during morphogenesis
and wound repair. Its ability to attract water into the
extracellular matrix and thereby “loosen it up” may be
important in this regard. The high concentrations of
hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfates present in car-
tilage contribute to its compressibility (see below).
Chondroitin sulfatesare located at sites of calcifica-
tion in endochondral bone and are also found in carti-
lage. They are also located inside certain neurons and
may provide an endoskeletal structure, helping to
maintain their shape.
Both keratan sulfate I and dermatan sulfate are
present in the cornea. They lie between collagen fibrils
and play a critical role in corneal transparency. Changes
in proteoglycan composition found in corneal scars dis-
appear when the cornea heals. The presence of der-
matan sulfate in the sclera may also play a role in main-
taining the overall shape of the eye. Keratan sulfate I is
also present in cartilage.
Heparin is an important anticoagulant. It binds
with factors IX and XI, but its most important interac-
tion is with plasma antithrombin III (discussed in
Chapter 51). Heparin can also bind specifically to
lipoprotein lipase present in capillary walls, causing a
release of this enzyme into the circulation.
Certain proteoglycans (eg, heparan sulfate) are as-
sociated with the plasma membrane of cells, with their
core proteins actually spanning that membrane. In it
they may act as receptors and may also participate in
the mediation of cell growth and cell-cell communica-
tion. The attachment of cells to their substratum in cul-
ture is mediated at least in part by heparan sulfate. This
proteoglycan is also found in the basement membrane
of the kidney along with type IV collagen and laminin
548 / CHAPTER 48
Table 48–9. The principal proteins found 
in bone.1
Proteins
Comments
Collagens
Collagen type I
Approximately 90% of total bone 
protein. Composed of two α1(I) 
and one α2(I) chains.
Collagen type V
Minor component.
Noncollagen proteins
Plasma proteins
Mixture of various plasma proteins.
Proteoglycans
2
CS-PG I (biglycan)
Contains two GAG chains; found in 
other tissues.
CS-PG II (decorin)
Contains one GAG chain; found in 
other tissues.
CS-PG III
Bone-specific.
Bone SPARC
3
protein
Not bone-specific.
(osteonectin)
Osteocalcin (bone Gla a Contains γ-carboxyglutamate 
protein)
residues that bind to hydroxyap-
atite. Bone-specific.
Osteopontin
Not bone-specific. Glycosylated 
and phosphorylated.
Bone sialoprotein
Bone-specific. Heavily glycosylated,
and sulfated on tyrosine.
Bone morphogenetic c A family (eight or more) of secreted 
proteins (BMPs)
proteins with a variety of actions 
on bone; many induce ectopic 
bone growth.
1
Various functions have been ascribed to the noncollagen
proteins, including roles in mineralization; however, most of
them are still speculative. It is considered unlikely that the
noncollagen proteins that are not bone-specific play a key
role in mineralization. A number of other proteins are also
present in bone, including a tyrosine-rich acidic matrix pro-
tein (TRAMP), some growth factors (eg, TGFβ), and enzymes
involved in collagen synthesis (eg, lysyl oxidase).
2
CS-PG, chondroitin sulfate–proteoglycan; these are similar to
the dermatan sulfate PGs (DS-PGs) of cartilage (Table 48–11).
3SPARC, secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine.
(see above), where it plays a major role in determining
the charge selectiveness of glomerular filtration.
Proteoglycans are also found in intracellular loca-
tions such as the nucleus; their function in this or-
ganelle has not been elucidated. They are present in
some storage or secretory granules, such as the chromaf-
fin granules of the adrenal medulla. It has been postu-
lated that they play a role in release of the contents of
such granules. The various functions of GAGs are sum-
marized in Table 48–8.
B. A
SSOCIATIONS
W
ITH
M
AJOR
D
ISEASES
& W
ITH
A
GING
Hyaluronic acid may be important in permitting
tumor cellsto migrate through the ECM. Tumor cells
can induce fibroblasts to synthesize greatly increased
amounts of this GAG, thereby perhaps facilitating their
own spread. Some tumor cells have less heparan sulfate
at their surfaces, and this may play a role in the lack of
adhesiveness that these cells display.
The intima of the arterial wallcontains hyaluronic
acid and chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and he-
paran sulfate proteoglycans. Of these proteoglycans,
dermatan sulfate binds plasma low-density lipopro-
teins. In addition, dermatan sulfate appears to be the
major GAG synthesized by arterial smooth muscle
cells. Because it is these cells that proliferate in athero-
sclerotic lesions in arteries, dermatan sulfate may play
an important role in development of the atheroscle-
rotic plaque.
In various types of arthritis,proteoglycans may act
as autoantigens, thus contributing to the pathologic
features of these conditions. The amount of chon-
droitin sulfate in cartilage diminishes with age, whereas
the amounts of keratan sulfate and hyaluronic acid in-
crease. These changes may contribute to the develop-
ment of osteoarthritis.Changes in the amounts of cer-
Table 48–8. Some functions of
glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans.
1
• Act as structural components of the ECM
• Have specific interactions with collagen, elastin, fibronectin,
laminin, and other proteins such as growth factors
• As polyanions, bind polycations and cations
• Contribute to the characteristic turgor of various tissues
• Act as sieves in the ECM
• Facilitate cell migration (HA)
• Have role in compressibility of cartilage in weight-bearing
(HA, CS)
• Play role in corneal transparency (KS I and DS)
• Have structural role in sclera (DS)
• Act as anticoagulant (heparin)
• Are components of plasma membranes, where they may
act as receptors and participate in cell adhesion and cell-cell
interactions (eg, HS)
• Determine charge-selectiveness of renal glomerulus (HS)
• Are components of synaptic and other vesicles (eg, HS)
1ECM, extracellular matrix; HA, hyaluronic acid; CS, chondroitin
sulfate; KS I, keratan sulfate I; DS, dermatan sulfate; HS, heparan
sulfate.
THE EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX / 549
tain GAGs in the skin are also observed with agingand
help to account for the characteristic changes noted in
this organ in the elderly.
An exciting new phase in proteoglycan research is
opening up with the findings that mutations that affect
individual proteoglycans or the enzymes needed for
their synthesis alter the regulation of specific signaling
pathways in drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans,thus
affecting development; it already seems likely that simi-
lar effects exist in mice and humans. 
BONE IS A MINERALIZED 
CONNECTIVE TISSUE
Bone contains both organic and inorganic material.
The organic matter is mainly protein. The principal
proteins of bone are listed in Table 48–9; type I colla-
genis the major protein, comprising 90–95% of the
organic material. Type V collagen is also present in
small amounts, as are a number of noncollagen pro-
teins, some of which are relatively specific to bone.
The inorganic or mineral component is mainly crys-
talline hydroxyapatite—Ca
10
(PO
4
)
6
(OH)
2
—along
with sodium, magnesium, carbonate, and fluoride; ap-
proximately 99% of the body’s calcium is contained in
bone (Chapter 45). Hydroxyapatite confers on bone
the strength and resilience required by its physiologic
roles.
Bone is a dynamic structure that undergoes continu-
ing cycles of remodeling, consisting of resorption fol-
lowed by deposition of new bone tissue. This remodel-
ing permits bone to adapt to both physical (eg,
increases in weight-bearing) and hormonal signals.
The major cell types involved in bone resorption
and deposition are osteoclastsand osteoblasts(Figure
48–11). The former are associated with resorption and
the latter with deposition of bone. Osteocytes are de-
scended from osteoblasts; they also appear to be in-
volved in maintenance of bone matrix but will not be
discussed further here.
Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells derived from
pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells. Osteoclasts pos-
sess an apical membrane domain, exhibiting a ruffled
border that plays a key role in bone resorption (Figure
48–12). A proton-translocating ATPase expels protons
across the ruffled border into the resorption area, which
is the microenvironment of low pH shown in the fig-
ure. This lowers the local pH to 4.0 or less, thus in-
creasing the solubility of hydroxyapatite and allowing
demineralization to occur. Lysosomal acid proteases are
released that digest the now accessible matrix proteins.
Osteoblast
Osteocyte
Bone matrix
Osteoclast
Mesenchyme
Newly formed matrix (osteoid)
Figure 48–11.
Schematic illustration of the major cells present in membranous
cytes. (Reproduced, with permission, from Junqueira LC, Carneiro J: Basic Histology: Text &
Atlas,10th ed. McGraw-Hill, 2003.)
550 / CHAPTER 48
Osteoblasts—mononuclear cells derived from pluripo-
tent mesenchymal precursors—synthesize most of the
proteins found in bone (Table 48–9) as well as various
growth factors and cytokines. They are responsible for
the deposition of new bone matrix (osteoid) and its
subsequent mineralization. Osteoblasts control miner-
alization by regulating the passage of calcium and phos-
phate ions across their surface membranes. The latter
contain alkaline phosphatase, which is used to generate
phosphate ions from organic phosphates. The mecha-
nisms involved in mineralization are not fully under-
stood, but several factors have been implicated. Alkaline
phosphatase contributes to mineralization but in itself
is not sufficient. Small vesicles (matrix vesicles) contain-
ing calcium and phosphate have been described at sites
of mineralization, but their role is not clear. Type I col-
lagen appears to be necessary, with mineralization being
first evident in the gaps between successive molecules.
Recent interest has focused on acidic phosphoproteins,
such as bone sialoprotein, acting as sites of nucleation.
These proteins contain motifs (eg, poly-Asp and poly-
Glu stretches) that bind calcium and may provide an
initial scaffold for mineralization. Some macromole-
cules, such as certain proteoglycans and glycoproteins,
can also act as inhibitors of nucleation.
It is estimated that approximately 4% of compact
bone is renewed annually in the typical healthy adult,
whereas approximately 20% of trabecular bone is re-
placed.
Many factors are involved in the regulation of bone
metabolism, only a few of which will be mentioned
here. Some stimulate osteoblasts (eg, parathyroid hor-
mone and 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol) and others
inhibit them (eg, corticosteroids). Parathyroid hormone
and 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol also stimulate osteo-
clasts, whereas calcitonin and estrogens inhibit them.
Osteoclast
Golgi
Nucleus
Nucleus
Ruffled
border
Lysosomes
Bone matrix
Microenvironment of low pH
and lysosomal enzymes
Section of 
circumferential
clear zone
Blood capillary
CO
2
+ H
2
O
H
+ HCO
3
Figure 48–12.
Schematic illustration of some aspects of the role of the osteoclast in
bone resorption. Lysosomal enzymes and hydrogen ions are released into the confined
microenvironment created by the attachment between bone matrix and the peripheral
clear zone of the osteoclast. The acidification of this confined space facilitates the dis-
solution of calcium phosphate from bone and is the optimal pH for the activity of lyso-
somal hydrolases. Bone matrix is thus removed, and the products of bone resorption
are taken up into the cytoplasm of the osteoclast, probably digested further, and trans-
ferred into capillaries. The chemical equation shown in the figure refers to the action of
carbonic anhydrase II, described in the text. (Reproduced, with permission, from Jun-
queira LC, Carneiro J: Basic Histology: Text & Atlas, 10th ed. McGraw-Hill, 2003.)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested