MUSCLE & THE CYTOSKELETON / 571
The calmodulin-4Ca2
+
-activated light chain kinase
phosphorylates the light chains, which then ceases to in-
hibit the myosin–F-actin interaction. The contraction
cycle then begins.
Smooth Muscle Relaxes When 
the Concentration of Ca
2+
Falls 
Below 10
7
Molar
Relaxation of smooth muscle occurs when sarcoplasmic
Ca
2+
falls below 10
−7
mol/L. The Ca
2+
dissociates from
calmodulin, which in turn dissociates from the myosin
light chain kinase, inactivating the kinase. No new
phosphates are attached to the p-light chain, and light
chain protein phosphatase, which is continually active
and calcium-independent, removes the existing phos-
phates from the light chains. Dephosphorylated myosin
p-light chain then inhibits the binding of myosin heads
to F-actin and the ATPase activity. The myosin head
detaches from the F-actin in the presence of ATP, but
it cannot reattach because of the presence of dephos-
phorylated p-light chain; hence, relaxation occurs.
Table 49–7 summarizes and compares the regula-
tion of actin-myosin interactions (activation of myosin
ATPase) in striated and smooth muscles.
The myosin light chain kinase is not directly af-
fected or activated by cAMP. However, cAMP-acti-
vated protein kinase can phosphorylate the myosin
light chain kinase (not the light chains themselves). The
phosphorylated myosin light chain kinase exhibits a sig-
nificantly lower affinity for calmodulin-Ca
2+
and thus is
less sensitive to activation. Accordingly, an increase in
cAMP dampens the contraction response of smooth
muscle to a given elevation of sarcoplasmic Ca
2+
. This
molecular mechanism can explain the relaxing effect of
β-adrenergic stimulation on smooth muscle.
Another protein that appears to play a Ca
2+
-depen-
dent role in the regulation of smooth muscle contrac-
tion is caldesmon(87 kDa). This protein is ubiquitous
in smooth muscle and is also found in nonmuscle tis-
sue. At low concentrations of Ca
2+
, it binds to tro-
pomyosin and actin. This prevents interaction of actin
with myosin, keeping muscle in a relaxed state. At
higher concentrations of Ca
2+
, Ca
2+
-calmodulin binds
caldesmon, releasing it from actin. The latter is then
free to bind to myosin, and contraction can occur.
Caldesmon is also subject to phosphorylation-dephos-
phorylation; when phosphorylated, it cannot bind
actin, again freeing the latter to interact with myosin.
Caldesmon may also participate in organizing the struc-
ture of the contractile apparatus in smooth muscle.
Many of its effects have been demonstrated in vitro,
and its physiologic significance is still under investiga-
tion.
As noted in Table 49–3, slow cycling of the cross-
bridges permits slow prolonged contraction of smooth
muscle (eg, in viscera and blood vessels) with less uti-
lization of ATP compared with striated muscle. The
ability of smooth muscle to maintain force at reduced
velocities of contraction is referred to as the latch state;
this is an important feature of smooth muscle, and its
precise molecular bases are under study.
Nitric Oxide Relaxes the Smooth Muscle 
of Blood Vessels & Also Has Many Other
Important Biologic Functions
Acetylcholine is a vasodilator that acts by causing relax-
ation of the smooth muscle of blood vessels. However,
it does not act directly on smooth muscle. A key obser-
vation was that if endothelial cells were stripped away
from underlying smooth muscle cells, acetylcholine no
longer exerted its vasodilator effect. This finding indi-
cated that vasodilators such as acetylcholine initially in-
teract with the endothelial cells of small blood vessels
via receptors. The receptors are coupled to the phos-
phoinositide cycle, leading to the intracellular release of
Calmodulin
Ca
2
+
• calmodulin
Ca2
+ • 
CALMODULIN–MYOSIN
KINASE (ACTIVE)
10
–5
mol/L Ca
2
+
10
–7
mol/L Ca
2
+
ATP
ADP
H
2
PO
4
pL-myosin (does not
inhibit myosin-actin interaction)
L-myosin (inhibits
myosin-actin interaction)
Myosin kinase
(inactive)
PHOSPHATASE
Figure 49–14.
Regulation of smooth muscle con-
traction by Ca2+. pL-myosin is the phosphorylated light
chain of myosin; L-myosin is the dephosphorylated
light chain. (Adapted from Adelstein RS, Eisenberg R: Reg-
ulation and kinetics of actin-myosin ATP interaction. Annu
Rev Biochem 1980;49:921.)
Pdf to jpeg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf into jpg; convert pdf file into jpg
Pdf to jpeg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf to jpg batch; convert pdf to jpg
572 / CHAPTER 49
Table 49–7. Actin-myosin interactions in striated and smooth muscle.
Smooth Muscle
Striated Muscle
(and Nonmuscle Cells)
Proteins of muscle filaments
Actin
Actin
Myosin
Myosin
1
Tropomyosin
Tropomyosin
Troponin (Tpl, TpT, TpC)
Spontaneous interaction of F-actin and
Yes
No
myosin alone (spontaneous activation
of myosin ATPase by F-actin
Inhibitor of F-actin–myosin interaction (in- - Troponin system (Tpl)
Unphosphorylated myosin light chain
hibitor of F-actin–dependent activation
of ATPase)
Contraction activated by
Ca
2+
Ca
2+
Direct effect of Ca
2+
4Ca
2+
bind to TpC
4Ca
2+
bind to calmodulin
Effect of protein-bound Ca
2+
TpC ⋅4Ca
2+
antagonizes Tpl inhibition n Calmodulin ⋅4Ca
2+
activates myosin light 
of F-actin–myosin interaction (allows s chain kinase that phosphorylates myosin 
F-actin activation of ATPase)
p-light chain. The phosphorylated p-light 
chain no longer inhibits F-actin–myosin 
interaction (allows F-actin activation of 
ATPase).
1Light chains of myosin are different in striated and smooth muscles.
Ca2
+
through the action of inositol trisphosphate. In
turn, the elevation of Ca2
+
leads to the liberation of en-
dothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF), which
diffuses into the adjacent smooth muscle. There, it re-
acts with the heme moiety of a soluble guanylyl cyclase,
resulting in activation of the latter, with a consequent
elevation of intracellular levels of cGMP (Figure
49–15). This in turn stimulates the activities of certain
cGMP-dependent protein kinases, which probably
phosphorylate specific muscle proteins, causing relax-
ation; however, the details are still being clarified. The
important coronary artery vasodilator nitroglycerin,
widely used to relieve angina pectoris, acts to increase
intracellular release of EDRF and thus of cGMP.
Quite unexpectedly, EDRF was found to be the gas
nitric oxide (NO).NO is formed by the action of the
enzyme NO synthase, which is cytosolic. The endothe-
lial and neuronal forms of NO synthase are activated by
Ca2
+
(Table 49–8). The substrate is arginine, and the
products are citrulline and NO: 
NO synthase catalyzes a five-electron oxidation of
an amidine nitrogen of arginine. 
L
-Hydroxyarginine is
an intermediate that remains tightly bound to the en-
NO SYNTHASE
Arginine
Citrulline + NO
zyme. NO synthase is a very complex enzyme, employ-
ing five redox cofactors: NADPH, FAD, FMN, heme,
and tetrahydrobiopterin. NO can also be formed from
nitrite,derived from vasodilators such as glyceryl trini-
trate during their metabolism. NO has a very short
half-life (approximately 3–4 seconds) in tissues because
it reacts with oxygen and superoxide. The product of
the reaction with superoxide is peroxynitrite (ONOO
),
which decomposes to form the highly reactive OH
radical. NO is inhibited by hemoglobin and other
heme proteins, which bind it tightly. Chemical in-
hibitors of NO synthase are now available that can
markedly decrease formation of NO. Administration of
such inhibitors to animals and humans leads to vaso-
constriction and a marked elevation of blood pressure,
indicating that NO is of major importance in the main-
tenance of blood pressure in vivo. Another important
cardiovascular effect is that by increasing synthesis of
cGMP, it acts as an inhibitor of platelet aggregation
(Chapter 51).
Since the discovery of the role of NO as a vasodila-
tor, there has been intense experimental interest in this
substance. It has turned out to have a variety of physio-
logic roles, involving virtually every tissue of the body
(Table 49–9). Three major isoforms of NO synthase
have been identified, each of which has been cloned,
and the chromosomal locations of their genes in hu-
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
pdf to jpeg; convert pdf image to jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
changing file from pdf to jpg; change from pdf to jpg
MUSCLE & THE CYTOSKELETON / 573
Glyceryl
trinitrate
Acetylcholine
ENDOTHELIAL
CELL
NO + Citrulline
Arginine
Nitrate
Nitrite
NO
GTP
cGMP
cGMP
protein
kinases
↑Ca
2
+
NO synthase 
Guanylyl
cyclase
+
+
+
R
Relaxation
SMOOTH MUSCLE CELL
Figure 49–15.
Diagram showing formation in an en-
dothelial cell of nitric oxide (NO) from arginine in a re-
action catalyzed by NO synthase. Interaction of an ago-
nist (eg, acetylcholine) with a receptor (R) probably
leads to intracellular release of Ca2
+
via inositol trisphos-
phate generated by the phosphoinositide pathway, re-
sulting in activation of NO synthase. The NO subse-
quently diffuses into adjacent smooth muscle, where it
leads to activation of guanylyl cyclase, formation of
cGMP, stimulation of cGMP-protein kinases, and subse-
quent relaxation. The vasodilator nitroglycerin is shown
entering the smooth muscle cell, where its metabolism
also leads to formation of NO.
mans have been determined. Gene knockout experi-
ments have been performed on each of the three iso-
forms and have helped establish some of the postulated
functions of NO.
To summarize, research in the past decade has
shown that NO plays an important role in many physi-
ologic and pathologic processes.
SEVERAL MECHANISMS REPLENISH
STORES OF ATP IN MUSCLE
The ATP required as the constant energy source for the
contraction-relaxation cycle of muscle can be generated
(1) by glycolysis, using blood glucose or muscle glyco-
gen, (2) by oxidative phosphorylation, (3) from creatine
phosphate, and (4) from two molecules of ADP in a re-
action catalyzed by adenylyl kinase (Figure 49–16). The
amount of ATP in skeletal muscle is only sufficient to
provide energy for contraction for a few seconds, so
that ATP must be constantly renewed from one or
more of the above sources, depending upon metabolic
conditions. As discussed below, there are at least two
distinct types of fibers in skeletal muscle, one predomi-
nantly active in aerobic conditions and the other in
anaerobic conditions; not unexpectedly, they use each
of the above sources of energy to different extents.
Skeletal Muscle Contains Large 
Supplies of Glycogen
The sarcoplasm of skeletal muscle contains large stores
of glycogen, located in granules close to the I bands.
The release of glucose from glycogen is dependent on a
specific muscle glycogen phosphorylase (Chapter 18),
which can be activated by Ca2
+
, epinephrine, and AMP.
To generate glucose 6-phosphate for glycolysis in skele-
tal muscle, glycogen phosphorylase b must be activated
to phosphorylase a via phosphorylation by phosphory-
lase b kinase (Chapter 18). Ca2
+
promotes the activa-
tion of phosphorylase b kinase, also by phosphoryla-
tion. Thus, Ca2
+
both initiates muscle contraction and
activates a pathway to provide necessary energy. The
hormone epinephrine also activates glycogenolysis in
muscle. AMP, produced by breakdown of ADP during
muscular exercise, can also activate phosphorylase b
without causing phosphorylation. Muscle glycogen
phosphorylase b is inactive in McArdle disease,one of
the glycogen storage diseases (Chapter 18).
Under Aerobic Conditions, Muscle
Generates ATP Mainly by Oxidative
Phosphorylation
Synthesis of ATP via oxidative phosphorylation re-
quires a supply of oxygen. Muscles that have a high de-
mand for oxygen as a result of sustained contraction
(eg, to maintain posture) store it attached to the heme
moiety of myoglobin. Because of the heme moiety,
muscles containing myoglobin are red, whereas muscles
with little or no myoglobin are white. Glucose, derived
from the blood glucose or from endogenous glycogen,
and fatty acids derived from the triacylglycerols of adi-
pose tissue are the principal substrates used for aerobic
metabolism in muscle.
Creatine Phosphate Constitutes a 
Major Energy Reserve in Muscle
Creatine phosphate prevents the rapid depletion of
ATP by providing a readily available high-energy phos-
phate that can be used to regenerate ATP from ADP.
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
This example shows how to build a PDF document with three image files (BMP, JPEG and PNG). // Load 3 image files (BMP, JPEG and PNG).
convert pdf to high quality jpg; convert pdf to jpg for
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Raster
from stream or byte array, print images to tiff or pdf, annotate images C#.NET RasterEdge HTML5 Viewer supports various images formats, including JPEG, GIF, BMP
change format from pdf to jpg; convert pdf document to jpg
574 / CHAPTER 49
Table 49–8. Summary of the nomenclature of the NOsynthases and of the effects of knockout of their
genes in mice.1
Result of Gene
Subtype Name
2
Comments
Knockout in Mice
3
1
nNOS
Activity depends on elevated Ca
2+
.First
Pyloric stenosis, resistant to vascular stroke, aggressive 
identified in neurons. Calmodulin-activated. . sexual behavior (males).
2
iNOS
4
Independent of elevated Ca
2+
.
More susceptible to certain types of infection.
Prominent in macrophages.
3
eNOS
Activity depends on elevated Ca2+.
Elevated mean blood pressure.
First identified in endothelial cells.
1Adapted from Snyder SH:No endothelial NO. Nature 1995;377:196.
2
n, neuronal; i, inducible; e, endothelial.
3Gene knockouts were performed by homologous recombination in mice. The enzymes are characterized as neuronal, inducible
(macrophage), and endothelial because these were the sites in which they were first identified. However, all three enzymes have been
found in other sites, and the neuronal enzyme is also inducible. Each gene has been cloned, and its chromosomal location in humans has
been determined.
4iNOS is Ca2+-independent but binds calmodulin very tightly.
Creatine phosphate is formed from ATP and creatine
(Figure 49–16) at times when the muscle is relaxed and
demands for ATP are not so great. The enzyme catalyz-
ing the phosphorylation of creatine is creatine kinase
(CK), a muscle-specific enzyme with clinical utility in
the detection of acute or chronic diseases of muscle.
SKELETAL MUSCLE CONTAINS SLOW
(RED) & FAST (WHITE) TWITCH FIBERS
Different types of fibers have been detected in skeletal
muscle. One classification subdivides them into type I
(slow twitch), type IIA (fast twitch-oxidative), and type
IIB (fast twitch-glycolytic). For the sake of simplicity,
we shall consider only two types: type I (slow twitch, ox-
idative) and type II (fast twitch, glycolytic) (Table
49–10). The type I fibers are red because they contain
myoglobin and mitochondria; their metabolism is aero-
bic, and they maintain relatively sustained contractions.
The type II fibers, lacking myoglobin and containing
few mitochondria, are white: they derive their energy
from anaerobic glycolysis and exhibit relatively short du-
rations of contraction. The proportion of these two
types of fibers varies among the muscles of the body, de-
pending on function (eg, whether or not a muscle is in-
volved in sustained contraction, such as maintaining
posture). The proportion also varies with training; for
example, the number of type I fibers in certain leg mus-
cles increases in athletes training for marathons, whereas
the number of type II fibers increases in sprinters.
A Sprinter Uses Creatine Phosphate 
& Anaerobic Glycolysis to Make ATP,
Whereas a Marathon Runner Uses
Oxidative Phosphorylation
In view of the two types of fibers in skeletal muscle and
of the various energy sources described above, it is of
interest to compare their involvement in a sprint (eg,
100 meters) and in the marathon (42.2 km; just over
26 miles) (Table 49–11).
The major sources of energy in the 100-m sprint
are creatine phosphate (first 4–5 seconds) and then
anaerobic glycolysis, using muscle glycogen as the
source of glucose. The two main sites of metabolic con-
trol are at glycogen phosphorylase and at PFK-1. The
former is activated by Ca2+ (released from the sarcoplas-
mic reticulum during contraction), epinephrine, and
Table 49–9. Some physiologic functions and
pathologic involvements of nitric oxide (NO).
• Vasodilator, important in regulation of blood pressure
• Involved in penile erection; sildenafil citrate (Viagra) affects
this process by inhibiting a cGMP phosphodiesterase
• Neurotransmitter in the brain and peripheral autonomic
nervous system
• Role in long-term potentiation
• Role in neurotoxicity
• Low level of NOinvolved in causation of pylorospasm in in-
fantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis
• May have role in relaxation of skeletal muscle
• May constitute part of a primitive immune system
• Inhibits adhesion, activation, and aggregation of platelets
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Jpeg, Png, Bmp, Gif Image to PDF. Jpeg to PDF Conversion in C#. In the following C# programming demo, we will firstly take Jpeg to PDF conversion as an example.
change file from pdf to jpg on; c# convert pdf to jpg
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Our XDoc.PDF allows C# developers to perform high performance conversions from PDF document to multiple image forms. Besides raster image Jpeg, images forms
changing pdf to jpg file; convert pdf to jpg file
MUSCLE & THE CYTOSKELETON / 575
MUSCLE
PHOSPHORYLASE
CREATINE
PHOSPHOKINASE
GLYCOLYSIS
OXIDATIVE
PHOSPHORYLATION
ADENYLYL
KINASE
ADP + P
i
ATP
Muscle 
contraction
Glucose 6-P
Creatine
Creatine phosphate
ADP
AMP
ADP
Muscle glycogen
MYOSIN
ATPase
Figure 49–16.
The multiple sources of ATP in muscle.
AMP. PFK-1 is activated by AMP, P
i
, and NH
3
. Attest-
ing to the efficiency of these processes, the flux through
glycolysis can increase as much as 1000-fold during a
sprint.
In contrast, in the marathon,aerobic metabolism is
the principal source of ATP. The major fuel sources are
blood glucose and free fatty acids, largely derived from
the breakdown of triacylglycerols in adipose tissue,
stimulated by epinephrine. Hepatic glycogen is de-
graded to maintain the level of blood glucose. Muscle
glycogen is also a fuel source, but it is degraded much
more gradually than in a sprint. It has been calculated
that the amounts of glucose in the blood, of glycogen in
the liver, of glycogen in muscle, and of triacylglycerol in
adipose tissue are sufficient to supply muscle with en-
ergy during a marathon for 4 minutes, 18 minutes, 70
minutes, and approximately 4000 minutes, respec-
tively. However, the rate of oxidation of fatty acids by
muscle is slower than that of glucose, so that oxidation
of glucose and of fatty acids are both major sources of
energy in the marathon.
A number of procedures have been used by athletes
to counteract muscle fatigue and inadequate strength.
These include carbohydrate loading, soda (sodium bi-
Table 49–10. Characteristics of type I and type II
fibers of skeletal muscle.
Type I
Type II
Slow Twitch h Fast Twitch
Myosin ATPase
Low
High
Energy utilization
Low
High
Mitochondria
Many
Few
Color
Red
White
Myoglobin
Yes
No
Contraction rate
Slow
Fast
Duration
Prolonged
Short
Table 49–11. Types of muscle fibers and major
fuel sources used by a sprinter and by a marathon
runner.
Sprinter (100 m)
Marathon Runner
Type II (glycolytic) fibers are
Type I (oxidative) fibers are
used predominantly.
used predominantly.
Creatine phosphate is the
ATP is the major energy
major energy source dur-
source throughout.
ing the first 4–5 seconds.
Glucose derived from muscle e Blood glucose and free fatty
glycogen and metabolized
acids are the major fuel
by anaerobic glycolysis is
sources.
the major fuel source.
Muscle glycogen is rapidly
Muscle glycogen is slowly
depleted.
depleted.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Sometimes, to convert PDF document into BMP, GIF, JPEG and PNG raster images in Visual Basic .NET applications, you may need a third party tool and have some
c# pdf to jpg; conversion of pdf to jpg
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
This VB. NET example shows how to build a PDF document with three image files (BMP, JPEG and PNG). ' Load 3 image files (BMP, JPEG and PNG).
batch pdf to jpg; convert pdf into jpg
576 / CHAPTER 49
Table 49–12. Summary of major features of 
the biochemistry of skeletal muscle related to 
its metabolism.1
• Skeletal muscle functions under both aerobic (resting) and
anaerobic (eg, sprinting) conditions, so both aerobic and
anaerobic glycolysis operate, depending on conditions.
• Skeletal muscle contains myoglobin as a reservoir of oxy-
gen.
• Skeletal muscle contains different types of fibers primarily
suited to anaerobic (fast twitch fibers) or aerobic (slow
twitch fibers) conditions.
• Actin, myosin, tropomyosin, troponin complex (TpT, Tpl,
and TpC), ATP, and Ca2+are key constituents in relation to
contraction.
• The Ca
2+
ATPase, the Ca
2+
release channel, and calse-
questrin are proteins involved in various aspects of Ca2+me-
tabolism in muscle.
• Insulin acts on skeletal muscle to increase uptake of glu-
cose.
• In the fed state, most glucose is used to synthesize glyco-
gen, which acts as a store of glucose for use in exercise;
“preloading” with glucose is used by some long-distance
athletes to build up stores of glycogen.
• Epinephrine stimulates glycogenolysis in skeletal muscle,
whereas glucagon does not because of absence of its re-
ceptors.
• Skeletal muscle cannot contribute directly to blood glucose
because it does not contain glucose-6-phosphatase.
• Lactate produced by anaerobic metabolism in skeletal mus-
cle passes to liver, which uses it to synthesize glucose,
which can then return to muscle (the Cori cycle).
• Skeletal muscle contains phosphocreatine, which acts as an
energy store for short-term (seconds) demands.
• Free fatty acids in plasma are a major source of energy, par-
ticularly under marathon conditions and in prolonged star-
vation.
• Skeletal muscle can utilize ketone bodies during starvation.
• Skeletal muscle is the principal site of metabolism of
branched-chain amino acids, which are used as an energy
source.
• Proteolysis of muscle during starvation supplies amino
acids for gluconeogenesis.
• Major amino acids emanating from muscle are alanine (des-
tined mainly for gluconeogenesis in liver and forming part
of the glucose-alanine cycle) and glutamine (destined
mainly for the gut and kidneys).
1
This table brings together material from various chapters in this
book.
carbonate) loading, blood doping (administration of
red blood cells), and ingestion of creatine and an-
drostenedione. Their rationales and efficacies will not
be discussed here. 
SKELETAL MUSCLE CONSTITUTES 
THE MAJOR RESERVE OF 
PROTEIN IN THE BODY
In humans, skeletal muscle protein is the major nonfat
source of stored energy. This explains the very large
losses of muscle mass, particularly in adults, resulting
from prolonged caloric undernutrition.
The study of tissue protein breakdown in vivo is dif-
ficult, because amino acids released during intracellular
breakdown of proteins can be extensively reutilized for
protein synthesis within the cell, or the amino acids
may be transported to other organs where they enter
anabolic pathways. However, actin and myosin are
methylated by a posttranslational reaction, forming 
3-methylhistidine.During intracellular breakdown of
actin and myosin, 3-methylhistidine is released and ex-
creted into the urine. The urinary output of the methy-
lated amino acid provides a reliable index of the rate of
myofibrillar protein breakdown in the musculature of
human subjects.
Various features of muscle metabolism, most of
which are dealt with in other chapters of this text, are
summarized in Table 49–12.
THE CYTOSKELETON PERFORMS
MULTIPLE CELLULAR FUNCTIONS
Nonmuscle cells perform mechanical work, including
self-propulsion, morphogenesis, cleavage, endocytosis,
exocytosis, intracellular transport, and changing cell
shape. These cellular functions are carried out by an ex-
tensive intracellular network of filamentous structures
constituting the cytoskeleton. The cell cytoplasm is
not a sac of fluid, as once thought. Essentially all eu-
karyotic cells contain three types of filamentous struc-
tures: actin filaments (7–9.5 nm in diameter; also
known as microfilaments), microtubules (25 nm), and
intermediate filaments (10–12 nm). Each type of fila-
ment can be distinguished biochemically and by the
electron microscope.
Nonmuscle Cells Contain Actin 
That Forms Microfilaments
G-actin is present in most if not all cells of the body.
With appropriate concentrations of magnesium and
potassium chloride, it spontaneously polymerizes to
form double helical F-actin filaments like those seen in
muscle. There are at least two types of actin in nonmus-
MUSCLE & THE CYTOSKELETON / 577
cle cells: β-actin and γ-actin. Both types can coexist in
the same cell and probably even copolymerize in the
same filament. In the cytoplasm, F-actin forms micro-
filaments of 7–9.5 nm that frequently exist as bundles
of a tangled-appearing meshwork. These bundles are
prominent just underlying the plasma membrane of
many cells and are there referred to as stress fibers. The
stress fibers disappear as cell motility increases or upon
malignant transformation of cells by chemicals or onco-
genic viruses.
Although not organized as in muscle, actin filaments
in nonmuscle cells interact with myosin to cause cellu-
lar movements.
Microtubules Contain α- & β-Tubulins
Microtubules, an integral component of the cellular cy-
toskeleton, consist of cytoplasmic tubes 25 nm in diam-
eter and often of extreme length. Microtubules are nec-
essary for the formation and function of the mitotic
spindle and thus are present in all eukaryotic cells.
They are also involved in the intracellular movement of
endocytic and exocytic vesicles and form the major
structural components of cilia and flagella. Micro-
tubules are a major component of axons and dendrites,
in which they maintain structure and participate in the
axoplasmic flow of material along these neuronal
processes.
Microtubules are cylinders of 13 longitudinally
arranged protofilaments, each consisting of dimers of
α-tubulin and β-tubulin, closely related proteins of ap-
proximately 50 kDa molecular mass. The tubulin
dimers assemble into protofilaments and subsequently
into sheets and then cylinders. A microtubule-organiz-
ing center, located around a pair of centrioles, nucleates
the growth of new microtubules. A third species of
tubulin, γ-tubulin,appears to play an important role in
this assembly. GTP is required for assembly. A variety
of proteins are associated with microtubules (micro-
tubule-associated proteins [MAPs], one of which is tau)
and play important roles in microtubule assembly and
stabilization. Microtubules are in a state of dynamic
instability, constantly assembling and disassembling.
They exhibit polarity (plus and minus ends); this is im-
portant in their growth from centrioles and in their
ability to direct intracellular movement. For instance,
in axonal transport, the protein kinesin, with a
myosin-like ATPase activity, uses hydrolysis of ATP to
move vesicles down the axon toward the positive end of
the microtubular formation. Flow of materials in the
opposite direction, toward the negative end, is powered
by cytosolic dynein,another protein with ATPase ac-
tivity. Similarly, axonemal dyneinspower ciliary and
flagellar movement. Another protein, dynamin, uses
GTP and is involved in endocytosis. Kinesins, dyneins,
dynamin, and myosins are referred to as molecular
motors.
An absence of dynein in cilia and flagella results in
immotile cilia and flagella, leading to male sterility and
chronic respiratory infection, a condition known as
Kartagener syndrome.
Certain drugs bind to microtubules and thus inter-
fere with their assembly or disassembly. These include
colchicine (used for treatment of acute gouty arthritis),
vinblastine (a vinca alkaloid used for treating certain
types of cancer), paclitaxel (Taxol) (effective against
ovarian cancer), and griseofulvin (an antifungal agent).
Intermediate Filaments Differ From
Microfilaments & Microtubules
An intracellular fibrous system exists of filaments with
an axial periodicity of 21 nm and a diameter of 8–10
nm that is intermediate between that of microfilaments
(6 nm) and microtubules (23 nm). Four classes of inter-
mediate filaments are found, as indicated in Table
49–13. They are all elongated, fibrous molecules, with
a central rod domain, an amino terminal head, and a
carboxyl terminal tail. They form a structure like a
rope, and the mature filaments are composed of
tetramers packed together in a helical manner. They are
important structural components of cells, and most are
relatively stable components of the cytoskeleton, not
undergoing rapid assembly and disassembly and not
Table 49–13. Classes of intermediate filaments of
eukaryotic cells and their distributions.
Molecular
Proteins
Mass
Distributions
Keratins
Type I (acidic)
40–60 kDa a Epithelial cells, hair, 
Type II (basic)
50–70 kDa a nails
Vimentin-like
Vimentin
54 kDa
Various mesenchymal 
cells
Desmin
53 kDa
Muscle
Glial fibrillary acid 
50 kDa
Glial cells
protein
Peripherin
66 kDa
Neurons
Neurofilaments
Low (L), medium (M), 60–130 kDa a Neurons
and high (H)
1
Lamins
A, B, and C
65–75 kDa a Nuclear lamina
1Refers to their molecular masses.
578 / CHAPTER 49
disappearing during mitosis, as do actin and many mi-
crotubular filaments. An important exception to this is
provided by the lamins, which, subsequent to phosphor-
ylation, disassemble at mitosis and reappear when it ter-
minates.
Keratinsform a large family, with about 30 mem-
bers being distinguished. As indicated in Table 49–13,
two major types of keratins are found; all individual
keratins are heterodimers made up of one member of
each class.
Vimentins are widely distributed in mesodermal
cells, and desmin, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and pe-
ripherin are related to them. All members of the vi-
mentin-like family can copolymerize with each other.
Intermediate filaments are very prominent in nerve
cells; neurofilaments are classified as low, medium, and
high on the basis of their molecular masses. Lamins
form a meshwork in apposition to the inner nuclear
membrane. The distribution of intermediate filaments
in normal and abnormal (eg, cancer) cells can be stud-
ied by the use of immunofluorescent techniques, using
antibodies of appropriate specificities. These antibodies
to specific intermediate filaments can also be of use to
pathologists in helping to decide the origin of certain
dedifferentiated malignant tumors. These tumors may
still retain the type of intermediate filaments found in
their cell of origin.
A number of skin diseases,mainly characterized by
blistering, have been found to be due to mutations in
genes encoding various keratins. Three of these disor-
ders are epidermolysis bullosa simplex, epidermolytic
hyperkeratosis, and epidermolytic palmoplantar kerato-
derma. The blistering probably reflects a diminished ca-
pacity of various layers of the skin to resist mechanical
stresses due to abnormalities in microfilament structure.
SUMMARY
• The myofibrils of skeletal muscle contain thick and
thin filaments. The thick filaments contain myosin.
The thin filaments contain actin, tropomyosin, and
the troponin complex (troponins T, I, and C). 
• The sliding filament cross-bridge model is the foun-
dation of current thinking about muscle contraction.
The basis of this model is that the interdigitating fila-
ments slide past one another during contraction and
cross-bridges between myosin and actin generate and
sustain the tension. 
• The hydrolysis of ATP is used to drive movement of
the filaments. ATP binds to myosin heads and is hy-
drolyzed to ADP and P
i
by the ATPase activity of the
actomyosin complex. 
• Ca2+ plays a key role in the initiation of muscle con-
traction by binding to troponin C. In skeletal mus-
cle, the sarcoplasmic reticulum regulates distribution
of Ca
2+
to the sarcomeres, whereas inflow of Ca
2+
via
Ca
2+
channels in the sarcolemma is of major impor-
tance in cardiac and smooth muscle. 
• Many cases of malignant hyperthermia in humans
are due to mutations in the gene encoding the Ca2+
release channel. 
• A number of differences exist between skeletal and
cardiac muscle; in particular, the latter contains a va-
riety of receptors on its surface. 
• Some cases of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
are due to missense mutations in the gene coding for
β-myosin heavy chain. 
• Smooth muscle, unlike skeletal and cardiac muscle,
does not contain the troponin system; instead, phos-
phorylation of myosin light chains initiates contrac-
tion. 
• Nitric oxide is a regulator of vascular smooth muscle;
blockage of its formation from arginine causes an
acute elevation of blood pressure, indicating that reg-
ulation of blood pressure is one of its many func-
tions. 
• Duchenne-type muscular dystrophy is due to muta-
tions in the gene, located on the X chromosome, en-
coding the protein dystrophin. 
• Two major types of muscle fibers are found in hu-
mans: white (anaerobic) and red (aerobic). The for-
mer are particularly used in sprints and the latter in
prolonged aerobic exercise. During a sprint, muscle
uses creatine phosphate and glycolysis as energy
sources; in the marathon, oxidation of fatty acids is
of major importance during the later phases.
• Nonmuscle cells perform various types of mechanical
work carried out by the structures constituting the
cytoskeleton. These structures include actin filaments
(microfilaments), microtubules (composed primarily
of α- tubulin and β-tubulin), and intermediate fila-
ments. The latter include keratins, vimentin-like pro-
teins, neurofilaments, and lamins.
REFERENCES
Ackerman MJ, Clapham DE: Ion channels—basic science and clin-
ical disease. N Engl J Med 1997;336:1575.
Andreoli TE: Ion transport disorders: introductory comments. Am
J Med 1998;104:85. (First of a series of articles on ion trans-
port disorders published between January and August, 1998.
Topics covered were structure and function of ion channels,
arrhythmias and antiarrhythmic drugs, Liddle syndrome,
cholera, malignant hyperthermia, cystic fibrosis, the periodic
paralyses and Bartter syndrome, and Gittelman syndrome.)
Fuller GM, Shields D: Molecular Basis of Medical Cell Biology.Ap-
pleton & Lange, 1998.
MUSCLE & THE CYTOSKELETON / 579
Geeves MA, Holmes KC: Structural mechanism of muscle contrac-
tion. Annu Rev Biochem 1999;68:728.
Hille B: Ion Channels of Excitable Membranes.Sinauer, 2001.
Howard J: Mechanics of Motor Proteins and the Cytoskeleton.Sin-
auer, 2001.
Lodish H et al (editors): Molecular Cell Biology,4th ed. Freeman,
2000. (Chapters 18 and 19 of this text contain comprehen-
sive descriptions of cell motility and cell shape.)
Loke J, MacLennan DH: Malignant hyperthermia and central core
disease: disorders of Ca2+ release channels. Am J Med
1998;104:470.
Mayer B, Hemmens B: Biosynthesis and action of nitric oxide in
mammalian cells. Trends Biochem Sci 1998;22:477.
Scriver CR et al (editors): The Metabolic and Molecular Bases of In-
herited Disease,8th ed. McGraw-Hill, 2001. (This compre-
hensive four-volume text contains coverage of malignant hy-
perthermia [Chapter 9], channelopathies [Chapter 204],
hypertrophic cardiomyopathy [Chapter 213], the muscular
dystrophies [Chapter 216], and disorders of intermediate fila-
ments and their associated proteins [Chapter 221].) 
Plasma Proteins & Immunoglobulins
50
580
Robert K. Murray, MD, PhD
BIOMEDICAL IMPORTANCE
The fundamental role of blood in the maintenance of
homeostasisand the ease with which blood can be ob-
tained have meant that the study of its constituents has
been of central importance in the development of bio-
chemistry and clinical biochemistry. The basic proper-
ties of a number of plasma proteins, including the
immunoglobulins (antibodies), are described in this
chapter. Changes in the amounts of various plasma pro-
teins and immunoglobulins occur in many diseases and
can be monitored by electrophoresis or other suitable
procedures. As indicated in an earlier chapter, alterations
of the activities of certain enzymesfound in plasma are
of diagnostic use in a number of pathologic conditions. 
THE BLOOD HAS MANY FUNCTIONS
The functions of blood—except for specific cellular
ones such as oxygen transport and cell-mediated im-
munologic defense—are carried out by plasma and its
constituents (Table 50–1).
Plasmaconsists of water, electrolytes, metabolites,
nutrients, proteins, and hormones. The water and elec-
trolyte composition of plasma is practically the same as
that of all extracellular fluids. Laboratory determina-
tions of levels of Na
+
, K
+
, Ca
2+
, Cl
, HCO
3
, PaCO
2
,
and of blood pH are important in the management of
many patients.
PLASMA CONTAINS A COMPLEX
MIXTURE OF PROTEINS
The concentration of total protein in human plasma is
approximately 7.0–7.5 g/dL and comprises the major
part of the solids of the plasma. The proteins of the
plasma are actually a complex mixture that includes not
only simple proteins but also conjugated proteins such
as glycoproteins and various types of lipoproteins.
Thousands of antibodiesare present in human plasma,
though the amount of any one antibody is usually quite
low under normal circumstances. The relative dimen-
sions and molecular masses of some of the most impor-
tant plasma proteins are shown in Figure 50–1.
The separationof individual proteins from a com-
plex mixture is frequently accomplished by the use of
solvents or electrolytes (or both) to remove different
protein fractions in accordance with their solubility
characteristics. This is the basis of the so-called salting-
out methods, which find some usage in the determina-
tion of protein fractions in the clinical laboratory.
Thus, one can separate the proteins of the plasma into
three major groups—fibrinogen, albumin,and globu-
lins—by the use of varying concentrations of sodium
or ammonium sulfate.
The most common method of analyzing plasma
proteins is by electrophoresis.There are many types of
electrophoresis, each using a different supporting
medium. In clinical laboratories, cellulose acetate is
widely used as a supporting medium. Its use permits
resolution, after staining, of plasma proteins into five
bands, designated albumin, α
1
, α
2
, β, and γfractions,
respectively (Figure 50–2). The stained strip of cellu-
lose acetate (or other supporting medium) is called an
electrophoretogram. The amounts of these five bands
can be conveniently quantified by use of densitomet-
ric scanning machines. Characteristic changes in the
amounts of one or more of these five bands are found
in many diseases.
The Concentration of Protein in Plasma Is
Important in Determining the Distribution
of Fluid Between Blood & Tissues
In arterioles, the hydrostatic pressureis about 37 mm
Hg, with an interstitial (tissue) pressure of 1 mm Hg
opposing it. The osmotic pressure(oncotic pressure)
exerted by the plasma proteins is approximately 25 mm
Hg. Thus, a net outward force of about 11 mm Hg
drives fluid out into the interstitial spaces. In venules,
the hydrostatic pressure is about 17 mm Hg, with the
oncotic and interstitial pressures as described above;
thus, a net force of about 9 mm Hg attracts water back
into the circulation. The above pressures are often re-
ferred to as the Starling forces.If the concentration of
plasma proteins is markedly diminished (eg, due to se-
vere protein malnutrition), fluid is not attracted back
into the intravascular compartment and accumulates in
the extravascular tissue spaces, a condition known as
edema.Edema has many causes; protein deficiency is
one of them.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested