asp.net mvc pdf viewer free : Batch pdf to jpg converter SDK Library project wpf asp.net web page UWP Harper%27s%20Illustrated%20Biochemistry%20-%20Robert%20K.%20Murray,%20Darryl%20K.%20Granner,%20Peter%20A.%20Mayes,%20Victor%20W.%20Rodwell60-part623

PLASMA PROTEINS & IMMUNOGLOBULINS / 591
and display striking green birefringence when viewed
by polarizing microscopy. Deposition of amyloid oc-
curs in patients with a variety of disorders; treatment of
the underlying disorder should be provided if possible.
PLASMA IMMUNOGLOBULINS PLAY
AMAJOR ROLE IN THE BODY’S 
DEFENSE MECHANISMS
The immune system of the body consists of two major
components: B lymphocytesand T lymphocytes.The
B lymphocytes are mainly derived from bone marrow
cells in higher animals and from the bursa of Fabricius
in birds. The T lymphocytes are of thymic origin. The
B cellsare responsible for the synthesis of circulating,
humoral antibodies, also known as immunoglobulins.
The T cellsare involved in a variety of important cell-
mediated immunologic processessuch as graft rejec-
tion, hypersensitivity reactions, and defense against ma-
lignant cells and many viruses. This section considers
only the plasma immunoglobulins, which are synthe-
sized mainly in plasma cells.These are specialized cells
of B cell lineage that synthesize and secrete immuno-
globulins into the plasma in response to exposure to a
variety of antigens.
All Immunoglobulins Contain a Minimum
of Two Light & Two Heavy Chains
Immunoglobulins contain a minimum of two iden-
ticallight (L) chains (23 kDa) and two identical heavy
(H) chains (53–75 kDa), held together as a tetramer
(L
2
H
2
) by disulfide bonds The structure of IgG is
shown in Figure 50–8; it is Y-shaped, with binding of
antigen occurring at both tips of the Y. Each chain can
be divided conceptually into specific domains, or re-
gions, that have structural and functional significance.
The half of the light (L) chain toward the carboxyl ter-
minal is referred to as the constant region (C
L
), while
the amino terminal half is the variable region of the
light chain (V
L
). Approximately one-quarter of the
heavy (H) chain at the amino terminals is referred to as
its variable region (V
H
), and the other three-quarters of
the heavy chain are referred to as the constant regions
(C
H
1, C
H
2, C
H
3) of that H chain. The portion of the
immunoglobulin molecule that binds the specific anti-
gen is formed by the amino terminal portions (variable
regions) of both the H and L chains—ie, the V
H
and
V
L
domains. The domains of the protein chains consist
of two sheets of antiparallel distinct stretches of amino
acids that bind antigen.
As depicted in Figure 50–8, digestion of an im-
munoglobulin by the enzyme papain produces two
antigen-binding fragments (Fab) and one crystallizable
fragment (Fc), which is responsible for functions of im-
munoglobulins other than direct binding of antigens.
Because there are two Fab regions, IgG molecules bind
two molecules of antigen and are termed divalent. The
site on the antigen to which an antibody binds is
termed an antigenic determinant, or epitope. The
area in which papain cleaves the immunoglobulin mol-
ecule—ie, the region between the C
H
1 and C
H
2 do-
mains—is referred to as the “hinge region.”The hinge
region confers flexibility and allows both Fab arms to
move independently, thus helping them to bind to
antigenic sites that may be variable distances apart (eg,
on bacterial surfaces). Fc and hinge regions differ in the
different classes of antibodies, but the overall model of
antibody structure for each class is similar to that
shown in Figure 50–8 for IgG.
All Light Chains Are Either Kappa 
or Lambda in Type
There are two general types of light chains, kappa (κ)
and lambda (λ), which can be distinguished on the
basis of structural differences in their C
L
regions. A
given immunoglobulin molecule always contains two κ
or two λlight chains—never a mixture of κand λ. In
humans, the κchains are more frequent than λchains
in immunoglobulin molecules.
The Five Types of Heavy Chain Determine
Immunoglobulin Class
Five classes of H chain have been found in humans
(Table 50–7), distinguished by differences in their C
H
regions. They are designated γ, α, µ µ δ, and ε. The µ
and εchains each have four C
H
domains rather than
the usual three. The type of H chain determines the
class of immunoglobulin and thus its effector function.
There are thus five immunoglobulin classes: IgG, IgA,
IgM, IgD, and IgE. The biologic functions of these
five classes are summarized in Table 50–8.
No Two Variable Regions Are Identical
The variable regions of immunoglobulin molecules
consist of the V
L
and V
H
domains and are quite hetero-
geneous. In fact, no two variable regions from different
humans have been found to have identical amino acid
sequences. However, amino acid analyses have shown
that the variable regions are comprised of relatively in-
variable regions and other hypervariable regions (Figure
50–9). L chains have three hypervariable regions (in
V
L
) and H chains have four (in V
H
). These hypervari-
able regions comprise the antigen-binding site (located
at the tips of the Y shown in Figure 50–8) and dictate
the amazing specificity of antibodies. For this reason,
hypervariable regions are also termed complementar-
Batch pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert multiple page pdf to jpg; best program to convert pdf to jpg
Batch pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
batch pdf to jpg converter; change pdf to jpg online
592 / CHAPTER 50
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
L
c
h
a
i
n
H
c
h
a
i
n
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
H
c
h
a
i
n
H
c
h
a
i
n
V
L
V
H
C
H
1
C
H
2
F
C
C
H
3
C
L
+
H
3
N
+
H
3
N
+
H
3
N
+
H
3
N
Fab
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
H
c
h
a
i
n
L
c
h
a
i
n
Hinge region
COO
COO
Pepsin
Papain
Fab
Cleavage sites
S
S
S
S
Figure 50–8.
Structure of IgG. The molecule consists of two light (L) chains and
two heavy (H) chains. Each light chain consists of a variable (V
L
) and a constant (C
L
)
region. Each heavy chain consists of a variable region (V
H
) and a constant region
that is divided into three domains (C
H
1, C
H
2, and C
H
3). The C
H
2 domain contains
the complement-binding site and the C
H
3 domain contains a site that attaches to
receptors on neutrophils and macrophages. The antigen-binding site is formed by
the hypervariable regions of both the light and heavy chains, which are located in
the variable regions of these chains (see Figure 50–9). The light and heavy chains
are linked by disulfide bonds, and the heavy chains are also linked to each other
by disulfide bonds. (Reproduced, with permission, from Parslow TG et al [editors]:
Medical Immunology,10th ed. McGraw-Hill, 2001.)
ity-determining regions (CDRs). About five to ten
amino acids in each hypervariable region (CDR) con-
tribute to the antigen-binding site. CDRs are located
on small loops of the variable domains, the surrounding
polypeptide regions between the hypervariable regions
being termed framework regions. CDRs from both
V
H
and V
L
domains, brought together by folding of the
polypeptide chains in which they are contained, form a
single hypervariable surface comprising the antigen-
binding site. Various combinations of H and L chain
CDRs can give rise to many antibodies of different
specificities, a feature that contributes to the tremen-
dous diversity of antibody molecules and is termed
combinatorial diversity. Large antigens interact with
all of the CDRs of an antibody, whereas small ligands
may interact with only one or a few CDRs that form a
pocket or groove in the antibody molecule. The essence
of antigen-antibody interactions is mutual complemen-
tarity between the surfaces of CDRs and epitopes. The
interactions between antibodies and antigens involve
noncovalent forces and bonds (electrostatic and van der
Waals forces and hydrogen and hydrophobic bonds).
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
similar software; Support a batch conversion of JPG to PDF with amazingly high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after conversion; Support
bulk pdf to jpg; batch pdf to jpg online
JPG to DICOM Converter | Convert JPEG to DICOM, Convert DICOM to
Open JPEG to DICOM Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "DICOM" in
convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi; batch pdf to jpg converter online
PLASMA PROTEINS & IMMUNOGLOBULINS / 593
Table 50–7. Properties of human immunoglobulins.1
Property
IgG
IgA
IgM
IgD
IgE
Percentage of total immunoglo-
75
15
9
0.2
0.004
bulin in serum (approximate)
Serum concentration
1000
200
120
3
0.05
(mg/dL) (approximate)
Sedimentation coefficient
7S
7S or 11S
2
19S
7S
8S
Molecular weight
150
170 or
900
180
190
(×1000)
4002
Structure
Monomer Monomer or dimer r Monomer or dimer r Monomer Monomer
H-chain symbol
γ
α
µ
δ
ε
Complement fixation
+
+
Transplacental passage
+
?
Mediation of allergic responses
+
Found in secretions
+
Opsonization
+
3
Antigen receptor on B cell
+
?
Polymeric form contains J chain
+
+
1
Reproduced, with permission, from Levinson W, Jawetz E: Medical Microbiology and Immunology,7th ed. McGraw-Hill,
2002.
2The 11S form is found in secretions (eg, saliva, milk, tears) and fluids of the respiratory, intestinal, and genital tracts.
3
IgM opsonizes indirectly by activating complement. This produces C3b, which is an opsonin.
The Constant Regions Determine
Class-Specific Effector Functions
The constant regions of the immunoglobulin molecules,
particularly the C
H
2 and C
H
3 (and C
H
4 of IgM and
IgE), which constitute the Fc fragment, are responsible
for the class-specific effector functions of the different
immunoglobulin molecules (Table 50–7, bottom part),
eg, complement fixation or transplacental passage.
Some immunoglobulins such as immune IgG exist
only in the basic tetrameric structure, while others such
as IgA and IgM can exist as higher order polymers of
two, three (IgA), or five (IgM) tetrameric units (Figure
50–10).
The L chains and H chains are synthesized as sepa-
rate molecules and are subsequently assembled within
the B cell or plasma cell into mature immunoglobulin
molecules, all of which are glycoproteins.
Both Light & Heavy Chains Are Products 
of Multiple Genes
Each immunoglobulin light chain is the product of at
least three separate structural genes: a variable region
(V
L
) gene, a joining region (J)gene (bearing no rela-
tionship to the J chain of IgA or IgM), and a constant
region (C
L
) gene. Each heavy chain is the product of at
least four different genes: a variable region (V
H
) gene, a
diversity region (D)gene, a joining region (J)gene, and
a constant region (C
H
) gene. Thus, the “one gene, one
protein” concept is not valid. The molecular mecha-
nisms responsible for the generation of the single im-
munoglobulin chains from multiple structural genes are
discussed in Chapters 36 and 39.
Antibody Diversity Depends 
on Gene Rearrangements
Each person is capable of generating antibodies directed
against perhaps 1 million different antigens. The gener-
ation of such immense antibody diversity depends
upon a number of factors including the existence of
multiple gene segments (V, C, J, and D segments),
their recombinations (see Chapters 36 and 39), the
combinations of different L and H chains, a high fre-
quency of somatic mutations in immunoglobulin genes,
and junctional diversity.The latter reflects the addi-
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
Open JPEG to GIF Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "GIF" in "Output
.pdf to .jpg converter online; advanced pdf to jpg converter
JPG to JBIG2 Converter | Convert JPEG to JBIG2, Convert JBIG2 to
Ability to preserve original images without any affecting; Ability to convert image swiftly between JPG & JBIG2 in single and batch mode;
convert pdf page to jpg; change pdf to jpg format
594 / CHAPTER 50
Light chain
hypervariable
regions
Heavy chain
hypervariable
regions
Interchain
disulfide
bonds
Intrachain
disulfide
bonds
V
L
C
L
V
H
C
H
Figure 50–9.
Schematic model of an IgG molecule
showing approximate positions of the hypervariable re-
gions in heavy and light chains. The antigen-binding
site is formed by these hypervariable regions. The hy-
pervariable regions are also called complementarity-
determining regions (CDRs). (Modified and reproduced,
with permission, from Parslow TG et al [editors]: Medical
Immunology,10th ed. McGraw-Hill, 2001.)
Table 50–8. Major functions of
immunoglobulins.1
Immunoglobulin
Major Functions
IgG
Main antibody in the secondary re-
sponse. Opsonizes bacteria, making 
them easier to phagocytose. Fixes com-
plement, which enhances bacterial 
killing. Neutralizes bacterial toxins and 
viruses. Crosses the placenta.
IgA
Secretory IgA prevents attachment of 
bacteria and viruses to mucous mem-
branes. Does not fix complement.
IgM
Produced in the primary response to an 
antigen. Fixes complement. Does not 
cross the placenta. Antigen receptor on 
the surface of B cells.
IgD
Uncertain. Found on the surface of 
many B cells as well as in serum.
IgE
Mediates immediate hypersensitivity by 
causing release of mediators from mast 
cells and basophils upon exposure to 
antigen (allergen). Defends against 
worm infections by causing release of 
enzymes from eosinophils. Does not fix 
complement. Main host defense against
helminthic infections.
1
Reproduced, with permission, from Levinson W, Jawetz E: Med-
ical Microbiology and Immunology, 7th ed. McGraw-Hill, 2002.
tion or deletion of a random number of nucleotides
when certain gene segments are joined together, and in-
troduces an additional degree of diversity. Thus, the
above factors ensure that a vast number of antibodies
can be synthesized from several hundred gene segments.
Class (Isotype) Switching Occurs 
During Immune Responses
In most humoral immune responses, antibodies with
identical specificity but of different classes are generated
in a specific chronologic order in response to the im-
munogen (immunizing antigen). For instance, antibod-
ies of the IgM class normally precede molecules of the
IgG class. The switch from one class to another is desig-
nated “class or isotype switching,”and its molecular
basis has been investigated extensively. A single type of
immunoglobulin light chain can combine with an anti-
gen-specific µchain to generate a specific IgM molecule.
Subsequently, the same antigen-specific light chain
combines with a γchain with an identical V
H
region to
generate an IgG molecule with antigen specificity iden-
tical to that of the original IgM molecule. The same
light chain can also combine with an αheavy chain,
again containing the identical V
H
region, to form an IgA
molecule with identical antigen specificity. These three
classes (IgM, IgG, and IgA) of immunoglobulin mole-
cules against the same antigen have identical variable do-
mains of both their light (V
L
) chains and heavy (V
H
)
chains and are said to share an idiotype.(Idiotypes are
the antigenic determinants formed by the specific amino
acids in the hypervariable regions.) The different classes
of these three immunoglobulins (called isotypes) are
thus determined by their different C
H
regions, which are
combined with the same antigen-specific V
H
regions.
Both Over- & Underproduction 
of Immunoglobulins May Result 
in Disease States
Disorders of immunoglobulins include increased pro-
duction of specific classes of immunoglobulins or even
JPG to Word Converter | Convert JPEG to Word, Convert Word to JPG
Open JPEG to Word Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "Word" in
change pdf file to jpg online; changing pdf file to jpg
JPG to JPEG2000 Converter | Convert JPEG to JPEG2000, Convert
Open JPEG to JPEG2000 Converter first; ad JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "JPEG2000" in
change pdf to jpg on; convert .pdf to .jpg online
PLASMA PROTEINS & IMMUNOGLOBULINS / 595
A. Serum lgA
B. Secretory lgA
(dimer)
C. lgM
(pentamer)
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
Monomer
Dimer
J chain
J chain
J chain
Secretory
component
Figure 50–10.
Schematic repre-
sentation of serum IgA, secretory
IgA, and IgM. Both IgA and IgM have
a J chain, but only secretory IgA has
a secretory component. Polypeptide
chains are represented by thick lines;
disulfide bonds linking different
polypeptide chains are represented
by thin lines. (Reproduced, with per-
mission, from Parslow TG et al [edi-
tors]: Medical Immunology,10th ed.
McGraw-Hill, 2001.)
specific immunoglobulin molecules, the latter by clonal
tumors of plasma cells called myelomas. Multiple
myelomais a neoplastic condition; electrophoresis of
serum or urine will usually reveal a large increase of one
particular immunoglobulin or one particular light chain
(the latter termed a Bence Jones protein). Decreased
production may be restricted to a single class of im-
munoglobulin molecules (eg, IgA or IgG) or may in-
volve underproduction of all classes of immunoglobu-
lins (IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM). A severe reduction
in synthesis of an immunoglobulin class due to a ge-
netic abnormality can result in a serious immunodefi-
ciency disease—eg, agammaglobulinemia, in which
production of IgG is markedly affected—because of
impairment of the body’s defense against microorgan-
isms.
Hybridomas Provide Long-Term Sources
of Highly Useful Monoclonal Antibodies
When an antigen is injected into an animal, the result-
ing antibodies are polyclonal, being synthesized by a
mixture of B cells. Polyclonal antibodies are directed
against a number of different sites (epitopes or determi-
nants) on the antigen and thus are not monospecific.
However, by means of a method developed by Kohler
and Milstein, large amounts of a single monoclonal an-
tibody specific for one epitope can be obtained.
The method involves cell fusion,and the resulting
permanent cell line is called a hybridoma.Typically, B
cells are obtained from the spleen of a mouse (or other
suitable animal) previously injected with an antigen or
mixture of antigens (eg, foreign cells). The B cells are
JPG to PNG Converter | Convert JPEG to PNG, Convert PNG to JPG
Open JPEG to PNG Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in "File" in toolbar Windows Explorer; Select "Batch Conversion" & Choose "PNG" in "Output
change pdf into jpg; convert pdf picture to jpg
VB.NET Image: PDF to Image Converter, Convert Batch PDF Pages to
and non-professional end users to convert PDF and PDF/A documents to many image formats that are used commonly in daily life (like tiff, jpg, png, bitmap, jpeg
convert multi page pdf to jpg; convert pdf file into jpg
596 / CHAPTER 50
Hybridoma cell
Fused in presence of PEG
Grown in presence of HAT medium
Hybridoma multiplies; myeloma and B cells die
B cell
Myeloma cell
Hybridoma cell
Figure 50–11.
Scheme of production of a hy-
bridoma cell. The myeloma cells are immortalized, do
not produce antibody, and are HGPRT(rendering the
salvage pathway of purine synthesis [Chapter 34] inac-
tive). The B cells are not immortalized, each produces a
specific antibody, and they are HGPRT
+
. Polyethylene
glycol (PEG) stimulates cell fusion. The resulting hy-
bridoma cells are immortalized (via the parental
myeloma cells), produce antibody, and are HGPRT
+
(both latter properties gained from the parental B cells).
The B cells will die in the medium because they are not
immortalized. In the presence of HAT, the myeloma
cells will also die, since the aminopterin in HAT sup-
presses purine synthesis by the de novo pathway by in-
hibiting reutilization of tetrahydrofolate (Chapter 34).
However, the hybridoma cells will survive, grow (be-
cause they are HGPRT
+
), and—if cloned—produce
monoclonal antibody. (HAT, hypoxanthine,
aminopterin, and thymidine; HGPRT, hypoxanthine-
guanine phosphoribosyl transferase.)
mixed with mouse myeloma cellsand exposed to poly-
ethylene glycol, which causes cell fusion. A summary of
the principles involved in generating hybridoma cells is
given in Figure 50–11. Under the conditions used, only
the hybridoma cells multiply in cell culture. This in-
volves plating the hybrid cells into hypoxanthine-
aminopterin-thymidine (HAT)-containing medium at
a concentration such that each dish contains approxi-
mately one cell. Thus, a cloneof hybridoma cells mul-
tiplies in each dish. The culture medium is harvested
and screened for antibodies that react with the original
antigen or antigens. If the immunogen is a mixture of
many antigens (eg, a cell membrane preparation), an
individual culture dish will contain a clone of hy-
bridoma cells synthesizing a monoclonal antibody to
one specific antigenic determinant of the mixture. By
harvesting the media from many culture dishes, a bat-
tery of monoclonal antibodies can be obtained, many of
which are specific for individual components of the im-
munogenic mixture. The hybridoma cells can be frozen
and stored and subsequently thawed when more of the
antibody is required; this ensures its long-term supply.
The hybridoma cells can also be grown in the abdomen
of mice, providing relatively large supplies of anti-
bodies.
Because of their specificity, monoclonal antibodies
have become useful reagents in many areas of biology
and medicine. For example, they can be used to mea-
sure the amounts of many individual proteins (eg,
plasma proteins), to determine the nature of infectious
agents (eg, types of bacteria), and to subclassify both
normal (eg, lymphocytes) and tumor cells (eg, leukemic
cells). In addition, they are being used to direct thera-
peutic agents to tumor cells and also to accelerate re-
moval of drugs from the circulation when they reach
toxic levels (eg, digoxin).
The Complement System Comprises About
20 Plasma Proteins & Is Involved in Cell
Lysis, Inflammation, & Other Processes
Plasma contains approximately 20 proteins that are
members of the complement system. This system was
discovered when it was observed that addition of fresh
serum containing antibodies directed to a bacterium
caused its lysis. Unlike antibodies, the factor was labile
when heated at 56 °C. Subsequent work has resolved
the proteins of the system and how they function; most
have been cloned and sequenced. The major protein
components are designated C1–9, with C9 associated
with the C5–8 complex (together constituting the
membrane attack complex) being involved in generat-
ing a lipid-soluble pore in the cell membrane that
causes osmotic lysis.
The details of this system are relatively complex, and
a textbook of immunology should be consulted. The
basic concept is that the normally inactive proteins of
the system, when triggered by a stimulus, become acti-
vated by proteolysis and interact in a specific sequence
with one or more of the other proteins of the system.
This results in cell lysis and generation of peptide or
polypeptide fragmentsthat are involved in various as-
pects of inflammation (chemotaxis, phagocytosis, etc).
The system has other functions, such as clearance of
antigen-antibody complexes from the circulation. Acti-
vation of the complement system is triggered by one of
two routes, called the classicand the alternative path-
ways.The first involves interaction of C1 with antigen-
antibody complexes, and the second (not involving an-
tibody) involves direct interaction of bacterial cell
surfaces or polysaccharides with a component desig-
nated C3b.
PLASMA PROTEINS & IMMUNOGLOBULINS / 597
The complement system resembles blood coagula-
tion (Chapter 51) in that it involves both conversion of
inactive precursors to active products by proteases and a
cascade with amplification.
SUMMARY
• Plasma contains many proteins with a variety of
functions. Most are synthesized in the liver and are
glycosylated. 
• Albumin, which is not glycosylated, is the major pro-
tein and is the principal determinant of intravascular
osmotic pressure; it also binds many ligands, such as
drugs and bilirubin. 
• Haptoglobin binds extracorpuscular hemoglobin,
prevents its loss into the kidney and urine, and hence
preserves its iron for reutilization. 
• Transferrin binds iron, transporting it to sites where
it is required. Ferritin provides an intracellular store
of iron. Iron deficiency anemia is a very prevalent
disorder. Hereditary hemochromatosis has been
shown to be due to mutations in HFE,a gene encod-
ing the protein HFE, which appears to play an im-
portant role in absorption of iron. 
• Ceruloplasmin contains substantial amounts of cop-
per, but albumin appears to be more important with
regard to its transport. Both Wilson disease and
Menkes disease, which reflect abnormalities of copper
metabolism, have been found to be due to mutations
in genes encoding copper-binding P-type ATPases. 
• α
1
-Antitrypsin is the major serine protease inhibitor
of plasma, in particular inhibiting the elastase of neu-
trophils. Genetic deficiency of this protein is a cause
of emphysema and can also lead to liver disease.
• α
2
-Macroglobulin is a major plasma protein that
neutralizes many proteases and targets certain cy-
tokines to specific organs. 
• Immunoglobulins play a key role in the defense
mechanisms of the body, as do proteins of the com-
plement system. Some of the principal features of
these proteins are described.
REFERENCES
Andrews NC: Disorders of iron metabolism. N Engl J Med
1999;341:1986. 
Carrell RW, Lomas DA: Alpha
1
-antitrypsin deficiency—a model
for conformational diseases. N Engl J Med 2002;346:45. 
Gabay C, Kushner I: Acute-phase proteins and other systemic re-
sponses to inflammation. New Engl J Med 1999;340:448.
Harris ED: Cellular copper transport and metabolism. Annu Rev
Nutr 2000;20:291.
Langlois MR, Delanghe JR: Biological and clinical significance of
haptoglobin polymorphism in humans. Clin Chem 1996;
2:1589.
Levinson W, Jawetz E: Medical Microbiology and Immunology,6th
ed. Appleton & Lange, 2000.
Parslow TG et al (editors): Medical Immunology,10th ed. Appleton
& Lange, 2001. 
Pepys MB, Berger A: The renaissance of C reactive protein. BMJ
2001;322:4.
Waheed A et al: Regulation of transferrin-mediated iron uptake by
HFE, the protein defective in hereditary hemochromatosis.
Proc Natl Acad U S A 2002;99:3117.
Hemostasis & Thrombosis
51
598
Margaret L. Rand, PhD, & Robert K. Murray, MD, PhD
BIOMEDICAL IMPORTANCE
Basic aspects of the proteins of the blood coagulation
system and of fibrinolysis are described in this chapter.
Some fundamental aspects of platelet biology are also
presented. Hemorrhagic and thrombotic states can
cause serious medical emergencies, and thromboses in
the coronary and cerebral arteries are major causes of
death in many parts of the world. Rational manage-
ment of these conditions requires a clear understanding
of the bases of blood clotting and fibrinolysis.
HEMOSTASIS & THROMBOSIS HAVE
THREE COMMON PHASES
Hemostasis is the cessation of bleeding from a cut or
severed vessel, whereas thrombosis occurs when the en-
dothelium lining blood vessels is damaged or removed
(eg, upon rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque). These
processes encompass blood clotting (coagulation) and
involve blood vessels, platelet aggregation, and plasma
proteins that cause formation or dissolution of platelet
aggregates.
In hemostasis, there is initial vasoconstriction of the
injured vessel, causing diminished blood flow distal to
the injury. Then hemostasis and thrombosis share three
phases:
(1) Formation of a loose and temporary platelet ag-
gregate at the site of injury. Platelets bind to col-
lagen at the site of vessel wall injury and are acti-
vated by thrombin (the mechanism of activation
of platelets is described below), formed in the co-
agulation cascade at the same site, or by ADP re-
leased from other activated platelets. Upon acti-
vation, platelets change shape and, in the
presence of fibrinogen, aggregate to form the he-
mostatic plug (in hemostasis) or thrombus (in
thrombosis).
(2) Formation of a fibrin mesh that binds to the
platelet aggregate, forming a more stable hemosta-
tic plug or thrombus.
(3) Partial or complete dissolution of the hemostatic
plug or thrombus by plasmin.
There Are Three Types of Thrombi
Three types of thrombi or clots are distinguished. All
three contain fibrinin various proportions.
(1) The whitethrombus is composed of platelets and
fibrin and is relatively poor in erythrocytes. It
forms at the site of an injury or abnormal vessel
wall, particularly in areas where blood flow is
rapid (arteries).
(2) The redthrombus consists primarily of red cells
and fibrin. It morphologically resembles the clot
formed in a test tube and may form in vivo in
areas of retarded blood flow or stasis (eg, veins)
with or without vascular injury, or it may form at
a site of injury or in an abnormal vessel in con-
junction with an initiating platelet plug.
(3) A third type is a disseminated fibrin depositin
very small blood vessels or capillaries.
We shall first describe the coagulation pathway lead-
ing to the formation of fibrin. Then we shall briefly de-
scribe some aspects of the involvement of platelets and
blood vessel walls in the overall process. This separation
of clotting factors and platelets is artificial, since both
play intimate and often mutually interdependent roles
in hemostasis and thrombosis, but it facilitates descrip-
tion of the overall processes involved.
Both Intrinsic & Extrinsic Pathways Result
in the Formation of Fibrin
Two pathways lead to fibrin clot formation: the intrin-
sic and the extrinsic pathways. These pathways are not
independent, as previously thought. However, this arti-
ficial distinction is retained in the following text to fa-
cilitate their description.
Initiation of the fibrin clot in response to tissue in-
jury is carried out by the extrinsic pathway. How the
intrinsic pathway is activated in vivo is unclear, but it
involves a negatively charged surface. The intrinsic and
extrinsic pathways converge in a final common path-
wayinvolving the activation of prothrombin to throm-
bin and the thrombin-catalyzed cleavage of fibrinogen
to form the fibrin clot. The intrinsic, extrinsic, and
final common pathways are complex and involve many
different proteins (Figure 51–1 and Table 51–1). In
HEMOSTASIS & THROMBOSIS / 599
VIII
VII
IX
Xa
X
X
IXa
XIa
XI
XII
XIIa
VIIIa
Ca
2
+
Ca
2
+
Ca
2
+
PL
Ca
2
+
PL
VIIa/Tissue factor
Va
V
HK
HK
PK
Extrinsic pathway
Thrombin
Prothrombin
Intrinsic pathway
Fibrinogen
XIIIa
XIII
Fibrin monomer
Fibrin polymer
Cross-linked
fibrin polymer
Classic coagulation
cascade
Positive feedback
(hypothesized)
Extrinsic-to-intrinsic 
activation
Figure 51–1.
The pathways of
blood coagulation. The intrinsic
and extrinsic pathways are indi-
cated. The events depicted below
factor Xa are designated the final
common pathway, culminating in
the formation of cross-linked fibrin.
New observations (dotted arrow)
include the finding that complexes
of tissue factor and factor VIIa acti-
vate not only factor X (in the classic
extrinsic pathway) but also factor
IX in the intrinsic pathway. In ad-
dition, thrombin and factor Xa
feedback-activate at the two sites
indicated (dashed arrows). (PK,
prekallikrein; HK, HMW kininogen;
PL, phospholipids.) (Reproduced,
with permission, from Roberts HR,
Lozier JN: New perspectives on the
coagulation cascade. Hosp Pract [Off
Ed] 1992 Jan;27:97.)
600 / CHAPTER 51
Table 51–1. Numerical system for nomenclature
of blood clotting factors. The numbers indicate
the order in which the factors have been
discovered and bear no relationship to the order
in which they act.
Factor
Common Name
I
Fibrinogen
These factors are usually referred 
II
Prothrombin
to by their common names.
III
Tissue factor
These factors are usually not re-
IV
Ca2
+
ferred to as coagulation factors.
V
Proaccelerin, labile factor, accelerator (Ac-) 
globulin
VII1
Proconvertin, serum prothrombin conversion 
accelerator (SPCA), cothromboplastin
VIII
Antihemophilic factor A, antihemophilic globulin 
(AHG)
IX
Antihemophilic factor B, Christmas factor, plasma 
thromboplastin component (PTC)
X
Stuart-Prower factor
XI
Plasma thromboplastin antecedent (PTA)
XII
Hageman factor
XIII
Fibrin stabilizing factor (FSF), fibrinoligase
1
There is no factor VI.
Table 51–2. The functions of the proteins
involved in blood coagulation.
Zymogens of serine proteases
Factor XII
Binds to negatively charged surface at site of 
vessel wall injury; activated by high-MW 
kininogen and kallikrein.
Factor XI
Activated by factor XIIa.
Factor IX
Activated by factor Xla in presence of Ca
2
+
.
Factor VII
Activated thrombin in presence of Ca2
+
.
Factor X
Activated on surface of activated platelets by 
tenase complex (Ca
2
+
, factors VIIIa and IXa) 
and by factor VIIa in presence of tissue fac-
tor and Ca
2
+
.
Factor II
Activated on surface of activated platelets by 
prothrombinase complex (Ca2
+
, factors Va 
and Xa).
[Factors II, VII, IX, and X are Gla-containing
zymogens.] (Gla = γ-carboxyglutamate.)
Cofactors
Factor VIII
Activated by thrombin; factor VIIIa is a co-
factor in the activation of factor X by  
factor IXa.
Factor V
Activated by thrombin; factor Va is a co-
factor in the activation of prothrombin by 
factor Xa.
Tissue factor A glycoprotein expressed on the surface of 
(factor III)
injured or stimulated endothelial cells to 
act as a cofactor for factor VIIa.
Fibrinogen
Factor I
Cleaved by thrombin to form fibrin clot.
Thiol-dependent transglutaminase
Factor XIII
Activated by thrombin in presence of Ca
2
+
stabilizes fibrin clot by covalent cross-
linking.
Regulatory and other proteins
Protein C
Activated to protein Ca by thrombin bound 
to thrombomodulin; then degrades fac-
tors VIIIa and Va.
Protein S
Acts as a cofactor of protein C; both proteins 
contain Gla (γ-carboxyglutamate) 
residues.
Thrombo-
Protein on the surface of endothelial 
modulin
cells; binds thrombin, which then acti-
vates protein C.
general, as shown in Table 51–2, these proteins can be
classified into five types: (1) zymogens of serine-depen-
dent proteases, which become activated during the
process of coagulation; (2) cofactors; (3) fibrinogen;
(4)a transglutaminase, which stabilizes the fibrin clot;
and (5) regulatory and other proteins.
The Intrinsic Pathway Leads 
to Activation of Factor X
The intrinsic pathway (Figure 51–1) involves factors
XII, XI, IX, VIII, and X as well as prekallikrein, high-
molecular-weight (HMW) kininogen, Ca
2+
, and plate-
let phospholipids. It results in the production of fac-
tor Xa (by convention, activated clotting factors are
referred to by use of the suffix a).
This pathway commences with the “contact phase”
in which prekallikrein, HMW kininogen, factor XII,
and factor XI are exposed to a negatively charged acti-
vating surface. In vivo, the proteins probably assemble
on endothelial cell membranes, whereas glass or kaolin
can be used for in vitro tests of the intrinsic pathway.
When the components of the contact phase assemble
on the activating surface, factor XII is activated to fac-
tor XIIa upon proteolysis by kallikrein. This factor
XIIa, generated by kallikrein, attacks prekallikrein to
generate more kallikrein, setting up a reciprocal activa-
tion. Factor XIIa, once formed, activates factor XI to
XIa and also releases bradykinin (a nonapeptide with
potent vasodilator action) from HMW kininogen.
Factor XIa in the presence of Ca
2+
activates factor IX
(55 kDa, a zymogen containing vitamin K-dependent
γ-carboxyglutamate [Gla] residues; see Chapter 45), to
the serine protease, factor IXa. This in turn cleaves an
Arg-Ile bond in factor X (56 kDa) to produce the two-
chain serine protease, factor Xa. This latter reaction re-
quires the assembly of components, called the tenase
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested