HEMOSTASIS & THROMBOSIS / 601
complex,on the surface of activated platelets: Ca2
+
and
factor VIIIa, as well as factors IXa and X. It should be
noted that in all reactions involving the Gla-containing
zymogens (factors II, VII, IX, and X), the Gla residues
in the amino terminal regions of the molecules serve as
high-affinity binding sites for Ca2
+
. For assembly of the
tenase complex, the platelets must first be activated to
expose the acidic (anionic) phospholipids, phos-
phatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol, that are
normally on the internal side of the plasma membrane
of resting, nonactivated platelets. Factor VIII (330
kDa), a glycoprotein, is not a protease precursor but a
cofactor that serves as a receptor for factors IXa and X
on the platelet surface. Factor VIII is activated by
minute quantities of thrombin to form factor VIIIa,
which is in turn inactivated upon further cleavage by
thrombin.
The Extrinsic Pathway Also Leads 
to Activation of Factor X But 
by a Different Mechanism
Factor Xa occurs at the site where the intrinsic and ex-
trinsic pathways converge (Figure 51–1) and lead into
the final common pathway of blood coagulation. The
extrinsic pathway involves tissue factor, factors VII and
X, and Ca2
+
and results in the production of factor Xa.
It is initiated at the site of tissue injury with the expo-
sure of tissue factor(Figure 51–1) on subendothelial
cells. Tissue factor interacts with and activates factor
VII (53 kDa), a circulating Gla-containing glycoprotein
synthesized in the liver. Tissue factor acts as a cofactor
for factor VIIa, enhancing its enzymatic activity to acti-
vate factor X. The association of tissue factor and factor
VIIa is called tissue factor complex. Factor VIIa
cleaves the same Arg-Ile bond in factor X that is cleaved
by the tenase complex of the intrinsic pathway. Activa-
tion of factor X provides an important link between the
intrinsic and extrinsic pathways.
Another important interaction between the extrinsic
and intrinsic pathways is that complexes of tissue factor
and factor VIIa also activate factor IX in the intrinsic
pathway. Indeed, the formation of complexes be-
tween tissue factor and factor VIIa is now consid-
ered to be the key process involved in initiation of
blood coagulation in vivo. The physiologic signifi-
cance of the initial steps of the intrinsic pathway, in
which factor XII, prekallikrein, and HMW kininogen
are involved, has been called into question because pa-
tients with a hereditary deficiency of these components
do not exhibit bleeding problems. Similarly, patients
with a deficiency of factor XI may not have bleeding
problems. The intrinsic pathway may actually be more
important in fibrinolysis (see below) than in coagula-
tion, since kallikrein, factor XIIa, and factor XIa can
cleave plasminogen and kallikrein can activate single-
chain urokinase.
Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI)is a major
physiologic inhibitor of coagulation. It is a protein that
circulates in the blood associated with lipoproteins.
TFPI directly inhibits factor Xa by binding to the en-
zyme near its active site. This factor Xa-TFPI complex
then inhibits the factor VIIa-tissue factor complex.
The Final Common Pathway of Blood
Clotting Involves Activation of
Prothrombin to Thrombin
In the final common pathway, factor Xa, produced by
either the intrinsic or the extrinsic pathway, activates
prothrombin (factor II) to thrombin (factor IIa),
which then converts fibrinogen to fibrin (Figure 51–1).
The activation of prothrombin, like that of factor X,
occurs on the surface of activated platelets and requires
the assembly of aprothrombinase complex,consisting
of platelet anionic phospholipids, Ca
2+
, factor Va, fac-
tor Xa, and prothrombin.
Factor V (330 kDa), a glycoprotein with homology
to factor VIII and ceruloplasmin, is synthesized in the
liver, spleen, and kidney and is found in platelets as
well as in plasma. It functions as a cofactor in a manner
similar to that of factor VIII in the tenase complex.
When activated to factor Va by traces of thrombin, it
binds to specific receptors on the platelet membrane
(Figure 51–2) and forms a complex with factor Xa and
prothrombin. It is subsequently inactivated by further
action of thrombin, thereby providing a means of limit-
ing the activation of prothrombin to thrombin. Pro-
thrombin(72 kDa; Figure 51–3) is a single-chain gly-
coprotein synthesized in the liver. The amino terminal
region of prothrombin (1 in Figure 51–3) contains ten
Gla residues, and the serine-dependent active protease
site (indicated by the arrowhead) is in the carboxyl ter-
minal region of the molecule. Upon binding to the
complex of factors Va and Xa on the platelet mem-
brane, prothrombin is cleaved by factor Xa at two sites
(Figure 51–2) to generate the active, two-chain throm-
bin molecule, which is then released from the platelet
surface. The A and B chains of thrombin are held to-
gether by a disulfide bond.
Conversion of Fibrinogen to Fibrin 
Is Catalyzed by Thrombin
Fibrinogen (factor I, 340 kDa; see Figures 51–1 and
51–4 and Tables 51–1 and 51–2) is a soluble plasma
glycoprotein that consists of three nonidentical pairs of
polypeptide chains (Aα,Bβγ)
2
covalently linked by
disulfide bonds. The Bβ β and γ chains contain as-
paragine-linked complex oligosaccharides. All three
Change file from pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
change pdf file to jpg; best way to convert pdf to jpg
Change file from pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf to jpg c#; convert pdf file into jpg
602 / CHAPTER 51
Prethrombin
F-1.2
Platelet
plasma
membrane
Indicates negative charges
to which Ca2
+
binds.
S-S
V
a
NH
3
+
COO
X
a
Ca2
+
Ca2
+
Figure 51-2.
Diagrammatic representation
(not to scale) of the binding of factors Va, Xa,
Ca2
+
, and prothrombin to the plasma membrane
of the activated platelet. The sites of cleavage of
prothrombin by factor Xa are indicated by two
arrows. The part of prothrombin destined to
form thrombin is labeled prethrombin. The Ca2
+
is bound to anionic phospholipids of the plasma
membrane of the activated platelet.
chains are synthesized in the liver; the three structural
genes involved are on the same chromosome, and their
expression is coordinately regulated in humans. The
amino terminal regions of the six chains are held in
close proximity by a number of disulfide bonds, while
the carboxyl terminal regions are spread apart, giving
rise to a highly asymmetric, elongated molecule (Figure
51–4). The A and B portions of the Aαand Bβchains,
designated fibrinopeptides A (FPA) and B (FPB),re-
spectively, at the amino terminal ends of the chains,
bear excess negative charges as a result of the presence
of aspartate and glutamate residues, as well as an un-
usual tyrosine O-sulfate in FPB. These negative charges
contribute to the solubility of fibrinogen in plasma and
also serve to prevent aggregation by causing electrosta-
tic repulsion between fibrinogen molecules.
Thrombin(34 kDa), a serine protease formed by
the prothrombinase complex, hydrolyzes the four Arg-
Gly bonds between the fibrinopeptides and the αand β
portions of the Aαand Bβchains of fibrinogen (Figure
51–5A). The release of the fibrinopeptides by thrombin
generates fibrin monomer, which has the subunit struc-
ture (α, β, γ)
2
. Since FPA and FPB contain only 16 and
14 residues, respectively, the fibrin molecule retains
98% of the residues present in fibrinogen. The removal
of the fibrinopeptides exposes binding sites that allow
the molecules of fibrin monomers to aggregate sponta-
neously in a regularly staggered array, forming an insol-
uble fibrin clot. It is the formation of this insoluble fib-
rin polymer that traps platelets, red cells, and other
components to form the white or red thrombi. This
initial fibrin clot is rather weak, held together only by
the noncovalent association of fibrin monomers.
In addition to converting fibrinogen to fibrin,
thrombin also converts factor XIII to factor XIIIa. This
factor is a highly specific transglutaminasethat cova-
lently cross-links fibrin molecules by forming peptide
bonds between the amide groups of glutamine and the
ε-amino groups of lysine residues (Figure 51–5B),
yielding a more stable fibrin clot with increased resis-
tance to proteolysis.
Levels of Circulating Thrombin Must Be
Carefully Controlled or Clots May Form
Once active thrombin is formed in the course of hemo-
stasis or thrombosis, its concentration must be carefully
controlled to prevent further fibrin formation or
platelet activation. This is achieved in two ways.
Thrombin circulates as its inactive precursor, pro-
thrombin, which is activated as the result of a cascade
of enzymatic reactions, each converting an inactive zy-
mogen to an active enzyme and leading finally to the
conversion of prothrombin to thrombin (Figure 51–1).
At each point in the cascade, feedback mechanisms
produce a delicate balance of activation and inhibition.
The concentration of factor XII in plasma is approxi-
mately 30 µg/mL, while that of fibrinogen is 3 mg/mL,
with intermediate clotting factors increasing in concen-
tration as one proceeds down the cascade, showing that
the clotting cascade provides amplification. The second
means of controlling thrombin activity is the inactiva-
tion of any thrombin formed by circulating inhibi-
2
F-1
Prethrombin
(before Xa cleavage)
Thrombin (after Xa cleavage)
2
A
B
1
Gla
n
X
a
X
a
S – S
Figure 51–3.
Diagrammatic representation (not to
scale) of prothrombin. The amino terminal is to the left;
region 1 contains all ten Gla residues. The sites of cleav-
age by factor Xa are shown and the products named.
The site of the catalytically active serine residue is indi-
cated by the solid triangle. The A and B chains of active
thrombin (shaded) are held together by the disulfide
bridge.
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start immediately to sort the files, try out some settings and then create the PDF files with the
batch pdf to jpg; convert .pdf to .jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
.pdf to jpg; batch pdf to jpg online
HEMOSTASIS & THROMBOSIS / 603
FPA
FPB
Aα chain  
Bβ chain  
γ chain  
NH
3
+
COO
COO
Figure 51–4.
Diagrammatic representation
(not to scale) of fibrinogen showing pairs of Aα,
Bβ, and γchains linked by disulfide bonds. (FPA,
fibrinopeptide A; FPB, fibrinopeptide B.)
tors,the most important of which is antithrombin III
(see below).
The Activity of Antithrombin III, 
an Inhibitor of Thrombin, 
Is Increased by Heparin
Four naturally occurring thrombin inhibitors exist in
normal plasma. The most important is antithrombin
III (often called simply antithrombin), which con-
tributes approximately 75% of the antithrombin activ-
ity. Antithrombin III can also inhibit the activities of
factors IXa, Xa, XIa, XIIa, and VIIa complexed with
tissue factor. α
2
-Macroglobulin contributes most of
the remainder of the antithrombin activity, with hep-
arin cofactor IIand α
1
-antitrypsinacting as minor in-
hibitors under physiologic conditions.
The endogenous activity of antithrombin III is
greatly potentiated by the presence of acidic proteogly-
cans such as heparin (Chapter 48). These bind to a
specific cationic site of antithrombin III, inducing a
conformational change and promoting its binding to
thrombin as well as to its other substrates. This is the
basis for the use of heparin in clinical medicine to in-
hibit coagulation. The anticoagulant effects of heparin
can be antagonized by strongly cationic polypeptides
such as protamine, which bind strongly to heparin,
thus inhibiting its binding to antithrombin III. Individ-
uals with inherited deficiencies of antithrombin III are
prone to develop venous thrombosis, providing evi-
dence that antithrombin III has a physiologic function
and that the coagulation system in humans is normally
in a dynamic state.
Thrombin is involved in an additional regulatory
mechanism that operates in coagulation. It combines
with thrombomodulin,a glycoprotein present on the
surfaces of endothelial cells. The complex activates pro-
tein C.In combination with protein S,activated pro-
tein C (APC) degrades factors Va and VIIIa, limiting
their actions in coagulation. A genetic deficiency of ei-
ther protein C or protein S can cause venous thrombo-
sis. Furthermore, patients with factor V Leiden(which
has a glutamine residue in place of an arginine at posi-
tion 506) have an increased risk of venous thrombotic
Arg
Gly
COO
Fibrinopeptide
(A or B)
Fibrin chain
β
α
or )
(
Thrombin
A
B
Fibrin
CH
2
CH
2
CH
2
CH
2
NH
(Lysyl)
CH
2
CH
2
Fibrin
(Glutaminyl)
NH
4
+
Factor XIIIa (Transglutaminase)
Fibrin
CH
2
CH
2
CH
2
CH
2
NH
3
+
C
O
Fibrin
CH
2
CH
2
H
2
N
C
O
NH
3
+
Figure 51-5.
Formation of a fibrin
clot. A:Thrombin-induced cleavage
of Arg-Gly bonds of the Aαand Bβ
chains of fibrinogen to produce fi-
brinopeptides (left-hand side) and
the αand βchains of fibrin mono-
mer (right-hand side). B:Cross-
linking of fibrin molecules by acti-
vated factor XIII (factor XIIIa).
JPG to PNG Converter | Convert JPEG to PNG, Convert PNG to JPG
image with adjusted width & height; Change image resolution JPEG image from local folders in "File" in toolbar JPEG to PNG Converter first; Load JPG images from
convert pdf to jpeg; convert pdf pages to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. How to change Tiff image to Bmp image in your C# program. This demo code convert TIFF file all pages to bmp images.
convert pdf file to jpg; .net pdf to jpg
604 / CHAPTER 51
disease because factor V Leiden is resistant to inactiva-
tion by APC. This condition is termed APC resistance.
Coumarin Anticoagulants Inhibit the
Vitamin K-Dependent Carboxylation of
Factors II, VII, IX, & X
The coumarin drugs (eg, warfarin), which are used as
anticoagulants, inhibit the vitamin K-dependent car-
boxylation of Glu to Gla residues (see Chapter 45) in
the amino terminal regions of factors II, VII, IX, and X
and also proteins C and S. These proteins, all of which
are synthesized in the liver, are dependent on the Ca
2+
-
binding properties of the Gla residues for their normal
function in the coagulation pathways. The coumarins
act by inhibiting the reduction of the quinone deriva-
tives of vitamin K to the active hydroquinone forms
(Chapter 45). Thus, the administration of vitamin K
will bypass the coumarin-induced inhibition and allow
maturation of the Gla-containing factors. Reversal of
coumarin inhibition by vitamin K requires 12–24
hours, whereas reversal of the anticoagulant effects of
heparin by protamine is almost instantaneous.
Heparin and warfarin are widely used in the treat-
ment of thrombotic and thromboembolic conditions,
such as deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolus.
Heparin is administered first, because of its prompt
onset of action, whereas warfarin takes several days to
reach full effect. Their effects are closely monitored by
use of appropriate tests of coagulation (see below) be-
cause of the risk of producing hemorrhage.
Hemophilia A Is Due to a Genetically
Determined Deficiency of Factor VIII
Inherited deficiencies of the clotting system that result
in bleeding are found in humans. The most common is
deficiency of factor VIII, causing hemophilia A,an X
chromosome-linked disease that has played a major role
in the history of the royal families of Europe. Hemo-
philia Bis due to a deficiency of factor IX; its clinical
features are almost identical to those of hemophilia A,
but the conditions can be separated on the basis of spe-
cific assays that distinguish between the two factors.
The gene for human factor VIII has been cloned
and is one of the largest so far studied, measuring 186
kb in length and containing 26 exons. A variety of mu-
tations have been detected leading to diminished activ-
ity of factor VIII; these include partial gene deletions
and point mutations resulting in premature chain ter-
mination. Prenatal diagnosis by DNA analysis after
chorionic villus sampling is now possible.
In past years, treatment for patients with hemophilia
A has consisted of administration of cryoprecipitates
(enriched in factor VIII) prepared from individual
donors or lyophilized factor VIII concentrates prepared
from plasma pools of up to 5000 donors. It is now pos-
sible to prepare factor VIII by recombinant DNA
technology.Such preparations are free of contaminat-
ing viruses (eg, hepatitis A, B, C, or HIV-1) found in
human plasma but are at present expensive; their use
may increase if cost of production decreases.
Fibrin Clots Are Dissolved by Plasmin
As stated above, the coagulation system is normally in a
state of dynamic equilibrium in which fibrin clots are
constantly being laid down and dissolved. This latter
process is termed fibrinolysis.Plasmin,the serine pro-
tease mainly responsible for degrading fibrin and fi-
brinogen, circulates in the form of its inactive zymogen,
plasminogen(90 kDa), and any small amounts of plas-
min that are formed in the fluid phase under physio-
logic conditions are rapidly inactivated by the fast-
acting plasmin inhibitor, α
2
-antiplasmin. Plasminogen
binds to fibrin and thus becomes incorporated in clots
as they are produced; since plasmin that is formed
when bound to fibrin is protected from α
2
-antiplasmin,
it remains active. Activators of plasminogenof various
types are found in most body tissues, and all cleave the
same Arg-Val bond in plasminogen to produce the two-
chain serine protease, plasmin (Figure 51–6).
Tissue plasminogen activator (alteplase; t-PA)is a
serine protease that is released into the circulation from
vascular endothelium under conditions of injury or
NH
3
+
Arg–Val
S
S
Plasminogen
activators
PLASMINOGEN
NH
3
+
Val
Arg
COO
S
S
PLASMIN
COO
Figure 51–6.
Activation of plasminogen. The same
Arg-Val bond is cleaved by all plasminogen activators
to give the two-chain plasmin molecule. The solid trian-
gle indicates the serine residue of the active site. The
two chains of plasmin are held together by a disulfide
bridge.
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
convert pdf photo to jpg; .pdf to jpg converter online
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Or directly change PDF to Gif image file in VB.NET program with this demo code.
conversion pdf to jpg; changing pdf to jpg
HEMOSTASIS & THROMBOSIS / 605
stress and is catalytically inactive unless bound to fibrin.
Upon binding to fibrin, t-PA cleaves plasminogen
within the clot to generate plasmin, which in turn di-
gests the fibrin to form soluble degradation products
and thus dissolves the clot. Neither plasmin nor the
plasminogen activator can remain bound to these
degradation products, and so they are released into the
fluid phase, where they are inactivated by their natural
inhibitors. Prourokinase is the precursor of a second ac-
tivator of plasminogen, urokinase.Originally isolated
from urine, it is now known to be synthesized by cell
types such as monocytes and macrophages, fibroblasts,
and epithelial cells. Its main action is probably in the
degradation of extracellular matrix. Figure 51–7 indi-
cates the sites of action of five proteins that influence
the formation and action of plasmin.
Recombinant t-PA & Streptokinase Are
Used as Clot Busters
Alteplase(t-PA), produced by recombinant DNA tech-
nology, is used therapeutically as a fibrinolytic agent, as
is streptokinase. However, the latter is less selective
than t-PA, activating plasminogen in the fluid phase
(where it can degrade circulating fibrinogen) as well as
plasminogen that is bound to a fibrin clot. The amount
of plasmin produced by therapeutic doses of streptoki-
nase may exceed the capacity of the circulating α
2
-
antiplasmin, causing fibrinogen as well as fibrin to be
degraded and resulting in the bleeding often encoun-
tered during fibrinolytic therapy. Because of its selec-
tivityfor degrading fibrin, there is considerable thera-
peutic interest in the use of recombinant t-PA to restore
the patency of coronary arteries following thrombosis.
If administered early enough, before irreversible dam-
age of heart muscle occurs (about 6 hours after onset of
thrombosis), t-PA can significantly reduce the mortality
rate from myocardial damage following coronary
thrombosis. t-PA is more effective than streptokinase at
restoring full patency and also appears to result in a
slightly better survival rate. Table 51–3 compares some
thrombolytic features of streptokinase and t-PA.
There are a number of disorders, including cancer
and shock, in which the concentrations of plasmino-
gen activators increase.In addition, the antiplasmin
activities contributed by α
1
-antitrypsin and α
2
-antiplas-
min may be impaired in diseases such as cirrhosis. Since
certain bacterial products, such as streptokinase, are ca-
pable of activating plasminogen, they may be responsi-
ble for the diffuse hemorrhage sometimes observed in
patients with disseminated bacterial infections.
Activation of Platelets Involves
Stimulation of the 
Polyphosphoinositide Pathway
Platelets normally circulate in an unstimulated disk-
shaped form. During hemostasis or thrombosis, they
become activated and help form hemostatic plugs or
thrombi. Three major steps are involved: (1) adhesion
to exposed collagen in blood vessels, (2) release of the
contents of their granules, and (3) aggregation.
Platelets adhere to collagen via specific receptors on
the platelet surface, including the glycoprotein complex
GPIa–IIa (α
2
β
1
integrin; Chapter 52), in a reaction
that involves von Willebrand factor.This is a glyco-
protein, secreted by endothelial cells into the plasma,
which stabilizes factor VIII and binds to collagen and
the subendothelium. Platelets bind to von Willebrand
factor via a glycoprotein complex (GPIb–V–IX) on the
platelet surface; this interaction is especially important
in platelet adherence to the subendothelium under con-
ditions of high shear stress that occur in small vessels
and stenosed arteries.
Platelets adherent to collagen change shape and
spread out on the subendothelium. They release the
contents of their storage granules (the dense granules
and the alpha granules); secretion is also stimulated by
thrombin.
Streptokinase
+
Plasminogen
Plasmin
Fibrin
Fibrin degradation products
α
2
-Antiplasmin
Urokinase
t-PA
Plasminogen
activator
inhibitor
Streptokinase-plasminogen
complex
Figure 51–7.
Scheme of sites of action
of streptokinase, tissue plasminogen acti-
vator (t-PA), urokinase, plasminogen acti-
vator inhibitor, and α
2
-antiplasmin (the
last two proteins exert inhibitory actions).
Streptokinase forms a complex with plas-
minogen, which exhibits proteolytic activ-
ity; this cleaves some plasminogen to plas-
min, initiating fibrinolysis.
C# TIFF: How to Use C#.NET Code to Compress TIFF Image File
C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object. List<Bitmap> images = new List<Bitmap>(); / Step1: Load image to REImage object. foreach (string file in
.net convert pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg image
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")); images.Add 1.png")); / Build a PDF document with PDFDocument(images.ToArray()); / Save document to a file.
c# pdf to jpg; to jpeg
606 / CHAPTER 51
Thrombin,formed from the coagulation cascade, is
the most potent activator of platelets and initiates
platelet activation by interacting with its receptor on
the plasma membrane (Figure 51–8). The further
events leading to platelet activation are examples of
transmembrane signaling,in which a chemical mes-
senger outside the cell generates effector molecules in-
side the cell. In this instance, thrombin acts as the ex-
ternal chemical messenger (stimulus or agonist). The
interaction of thrombin with its receptor stimulates the
activity of an intracellular phospholipase Cβ.This en-
zyme hydrolyzes the membrane phospholipid phos-
phatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP
2
, a polyphospho-
inositide) to form the two internal effector molecules,
1,2-diacylglycerol and 1,4,5-inositol trisphosphate.
Hydrolysis of PIP
2
is also involved in the action of
many hormones and drugs. Diacylglycerol stimulates
R
1
R
3
R
4
R
5
cAMP
Arachidonic acid
TxA
2
Prostacyclin
TxA
2
Thrombin
Aggregation
Fibrinogen
ADP
GPllb-llla
PLCβ
PIP
2
DAG
IP
3
Plasma
membrane
PKC
Signaling
events
Ca
2
+
Phosphorylation
of light chain of
myosin
Actomyosin
Change of shape
Actin
Phosphorylation
of pleckstrin
Release of contents
of platelet granules
(dense and alpha),
including ADP;
signaling events
PLA
2
PL
R
2
Collagen
+
+
+
+
+
+
AC
Figure 51–8.
Diagrammatic representation of platelet activation. The external environ-
ment, the plasma membrane, and the inside of a platelet are depicted from top to bottom.
Thrombin and collagen are the two most important platelet activators. ADP is considered
a weak agonist; it causes aggregation but not granule release. (GP, glycoprotein; R1–R5,
various receptors; AC, adenylyl cyclase; PLA
2
, phospholipase A
2
; PL, phospholipids; PLCβ,
phospholipase Cβ; PIP
2
, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate; cAMP, cyclic AMP; PKC,
protein kinase C; TxA
2
, thromboxane A
2
; IP
3
, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate; DAG, 1,2-diacyl-
glycerol. The G proteins that are involved are not shown.)
Table 51–3. Comparison of some properties of
streptokinase (SK) and tissue plasminogen
activator (t-PA) with regard to their use as
thrombolytic agents.1
SK
t-PA
Selective for fibrin clot
+
Produces plasminemia
+
Reduces mortality
+
+
Causes allergic reaction
+
Causes hypotension
+
Cost per treatment 
Relatively low
Relatively high
(approximate)
1
Data from Webb J, Thompson C: Thrombolysis for acute myocar-
dial infarction. Can Fam Physician 1992;38:1415.
HEMOSTASIS & THROMBOSIS / 607
Table 51–4. Molecules synthesized by
endothelial cells that play a role in the regulation
of thrombosis and fibrinolysis.
1
Molecule
Action
ADPase (an ectoenzyme)
Degrades ADP (an aggregating 
agent of platelets) to AMP + P
i
Endothelium-derived relax- - Inhibits platelet adhesion and 
ing factor (nitric oxide)
aggregation by elevating lev-
els of cGMP
Heparan sulfate (a glycos-
Anticoagulant; combines with 
aminoglycan)
antithrombin III to inhibit 
thrombin
Prostacyclin (PGI
2
, a prosta- - Inhibits platelet aggregation by 
glandin)
increasing levels of cAMP
Thrombomodulin (a glyco- - Binds protein C, which is then 
protein)
cleaved by thrombin to yield 
activated protein C; this in 
combination with protein S 
degrades factors Va and VIIIa, 
limiting their actions
Tissue plasminogen activa- - Activates plasminogen to plas-
tor (t-PA, a protease)
min, which digests fibrin; the 
action of t-PA is opposed by 
plasminogen activator in-
hibitor-1 (PAI-1)
1
Adapted from Wu KK: Endothelial cells in hemostasis, thrombosis
and inflammation. Hosp Pract (Off Ed) 1992 Apr; 27:145.
protein kinase C, which phosphorylates the protein
pleckstrin(47 kDa). This results in aggregation and re-
lease of the contents of the storage granules. ADP re-
leased from dense granules can also activate platelets,
resulting in aggregation of additional platelets. IP
3
causes release of Ca
2+
into the cytosol mainly from the
dense tubular system (or residual smooth endoplasmic
reticulum from the megakaryocyte), which then inter-
acts with calmodulin and myosin light chain kinase,
leading to phosphorylation of the light chains of
myosin. These chains then interact with actin, causing
changes of platelet shape.
Collagen-induced activation of a platelet phospholi-
pase A
2
by increased levels of cytosolic Ca
2+
results in
liberation of arachidonic acid from platelet phospho-
lipids, leading to the formation of thromboxane A
2
(Chapter 23), which in turn, in a receptor-mediated
fashion, can further activate phospholipase C, promot-
ing platelet aggregation.
Activated platelets, besides forming a platelet aggre-
gate, are required, via newly expressed anionic phos-
pholipids on the membrane surface, for acceleration of
the activation of factors X and II in the coagulation cas-
cade (Figure 51–1).
All of the aggregating agents, including thrombin,
collagen, ADP, and others such as platelet-activating
factor, modify the platelet surface so that fibrinogen
can bind to a glycoprotein complex, GPIIb–IIIa
IIb
β
3
integrin; Chapter 52), on the activated platelet
surface. Molecules of divalent fibrinogen then link adja-
cent activated platelets to each other, forming a platelet
aggregate. Some agents, including epinephrine, sero-
tonin, and vasopressin, exert synergistic effects with
other aggregating agents.
Endothelial Cells Synthesize Prostacyclin
& Other Compounds That Affect 
Clotting & Thrombosis
The endothelial cells in the walls of blood vessels make
important contributions to the overall regulation of he-
mostasis and thrombosis. As described in Chapter 23,
these cells synthesize prostacyclin(PGI
2
), a potent in-
hibitor of platelet aggregation, opposing the action of
thromboxane A
2
. Prostacyclin acts by stimulating the
activity of adenylyl cyclase in the surface membranes of
platelets. The resulting increase of intraplatelet cAMP
opposes the increase in the level of intracellular Ca
2+
produced by IP
3
and thus inhibits platelet activation
(Figure 51–8). Endothelial cells play other roles in the
regulation of thrombosis. For instance, these cells pos-
sess an ADPase, which hydrolyzes ADP, and thus op-
poses its aggregating effect on platelets. In addition,
these cells appear to synthesize heparan sulfate, an anti-
coagulant, and they also synthesize plasminogen activa-
tors, which may help dissolve thrombi. Table 51–4 lists
some molecules produced by endothelial cells that af-
fect thrombosis and fibrinolysis. Endothelium-derived
relaxing factor (nitric oxide) is discussed in Chapter 49.
Analysis of the mechanisms of uptake of atherogenic
lipoproteins, such as LDL, by endothelial, smooth mus-
cle, and monocytic cells of arteries, along with detailed
studies of how these lipoproteins damage such cells is a
key area of study in elucidating the mechanisms of ath-
erosclerosis(Chapter 26).
Aspirin Is an Effective Antiplatelet Drug
Certain drugs (antiplatelet drugs) modify the behavior
of platelets. The most important is aspirin (acetylsali-
cylic acid), which irreversibly acetylates and thus in-
hibits the platelet cyclooxygenase system involved in
formation of thromboxane A
2
(Chapter 14), a potent
aggregator of platelets and also a vasoconstrictor.
Platelets are very sensitive to aspirin; as little as 30 mg/d
(one aspirin tablet usually contains 325 mg) effectively
eliminates the synthesis of thromboxane A
2
. Aspirin
also inhibits production of prostacyclin (PGI
2
, which
opposes platelet aggregation and is a vasodilator) by en-
608 / CHAPTER 51
dothelial cells, but unlike platelets, these cells regenerate
cyclooxygenase within a few hours. Thus, the overall
balance between thromboxane A
2
and prostacyclin can
be shifted in favor of the latter, opposing platelet aggre-
gation. Indications for treatment with aspirin thus in-
clude management of angina and evolving myocardial
infarction and also prevention of stroke and death in
patients with transient cerebral ischemic attacks.
Laboratory Tests Measure Coagulation 
& Thrombolysis
A number of laboratory tests are available to measure
the phases of hemostasis described above. The tests in-
clude platelet count, bleeding time, activated partial
thromboplastin time (aPTT or PTT), prothrombin time
(PT), thrombin time (TT), concentration of fibrin-
ogen, fibrin clot stability, and measurement of fibrin
degradation products. The platelet count quantitates
the number of platelets, and the bleeding time is an
overall test of platelet function. aPTT is a measure of
the intrinsic pathway and PT of the extrinsic pathway.
PT is used to measure the effectiveness of oral anticoag-
ulants such as warfarin, and aPTT is used to monitor
heparin therapy. The reader is referred to a textbook of
hematology for a discussion of these tests.
SUMMARY
• Hemostasis and thrombosis are complex processes
involving coagulation factors, platelets, and blood
vessels. 
• Many coagulation factors are zymogens of serine pro-
teases, becoming activated during the overall process.
• Both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of coagulation
exist, the latter initiated by tissue factor. The path-
ways converge at factor Xa, embarking on the com-
mon final pathway resulting in thrombin-catalyzed
conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin, which is strength-
ened by cross-linking, catalyzed by factor XIII. 
• Genetic disorders of coagulation factors occur, and
the two most common involve factors VIII (hemo-
philia A) and IX (hemophilia B). 
• An important natural inhibitor of coagulation is an-
tithrombin III; genetic deficiency of this protein can
result in thrombosis. 
• For activity, factors II, VII, IX, and X and proteins C
and S require vitamin K-dependent γ-carboxylation
of certain glutamate residues, a process that is inhib-
ited by the anticoagulant warfarin. 
• Fibrin is dissolved by plasmin. Plasmin exists as an
inactive precursor, plasminogen, which can be acti-
vated by tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). Both 
t-PA and streptokinase are widely used to treat early
thrombosis in the coronary arteries.
• Thrombin and other agents cause platelet aggrega-
tion, which involves a variety of biochemical and
morphologic events. Stimulation of phospholipase C
and the polyphosphoinositide pathway is a key event
in platelet activation, but other processes are also in-
volved.
• Aspirin is an important antiplatelet drug that acts by
inhibiting production of thromboxane A
2
.
REFERENCES
Bennett JS: Mechanisms of platelet adhesion and aggregation: an
update. Hosp Pract (Off Ed) 1992;27:124.
Broze GJ: Tissue factor pathway inhibitor and the revised theory of
coagulation. Annu Rev Med 1995;46:103.
Clemetson KJ: Platelet activation: signal transduction via mem-
brane receptors. Thromb Haemost 1995;74:111.
Collen D, Lijnen HR: Basic and clinical aspects of fibrinolysis and
thrombolysis. Blood 1991;78:3114.
Handin RI: Anticoagulant, fibrinolytic and antiplatelet therapy. 
In: Harrison’s Principles of Internal Medicine,15th ed. Braun-
wald E et al (editors). McGraw-Hill, 2001.
Handin RI: Disorders of coagulation and thrombosis. In: Harri-
son’s Principles of Internal Medicine,15th ed. Braunwald E et
al (editors). McGraw-Hill, 2001.
Handin RI: Disorders of the platelet and vessel wall. In: Harrison’s
Principles of Internal Medicine, 15th ed. Braunwald E et al
(editors). McGraw-Hill, 2001.
Kroll MH, Schafer AI: Biochemical mechanisms of platelet activa-
tion. Blood 1989;74:1181.
Roberts HR, Lozier JN: New perspectives on the coagulation cas-
cade. Hosp Pract (Off Ed) 1992;27:97.
Roth GJ, Calverley DC: Aspirin, platelets, and thrombosis: theory
and practice. Blood 1994;83:885.
Schmaier AH: Contact activation: a revision. Thromb Haemost
1997;78:101.
Wu KK: Endothelial cells in hemostasis, thrombosis and inflamma-
tion. Hosp Pract (Off Ed) 1992;27:145.
Red & White Blood Cells
52
609
Robert K. Murray, MD, PhD
BIOMEDICAL IMPORTANCE
Blood cells have been studied intensively because they
are obtained easily, because of their functional impor-
tance, and because of their involvement in many disease
processes. The structure and function of hemoglobin,
the porphyrias, jaundice, and aspects of iron metabo-
lism are discussed in previous chapters. Reduction of
the number of red blood cells and of their content of
hemoglobin is the cause of the anemias, a diverse and
important group of conditions, some of which are seen
very commonly in clinical practice. Certain of the
blood group systems, present on the membranes of
erythrocytes and other blood cells, are of extreme im-
portance in relation to blood transfusion and tissue
transplantation. Table 52–1 summarizes the causes of a
number of important diseases affecting red blood cells;
some are discussed in this chapter, and the remainder
are discussed elsewhere in this text. Every organ in the
body can be affected by inflammation; neutrophils play
a central role in acute inflammation, and other white
blood cells, such as lymphocytes, play important roles
in chronic inflammation. Leukemias, defined as malig-
nant neoplasms of blood-forming tissues, can affect
precursor cells of any of the major classes of white
blood cells; common types are acute and chronic my-
elocytic leukemia, affecting precursors of the neu-
trophils; and acute and chronic lymphocytic leukemias.
Combination chemotherapy, using combinations of
various chemotherapeutic agents, all of which act at one
or more biochemical loci, has been remarkably effective
in the treatment of certain of these types of leukemias.
Understanding the role of red and white cells in health
and disease requires a knowledge of certain fundamen-
tal aspects of their biochemistry.
THE RED BLOOD CELL IS SIMPLE IN
TERMS OF ITS STRUCTURE & FUNCTION
The major functions of the red blood cell are relatively
simple, consisting of delivering oxygen to the tissues
and of helping in the disposal of carbon dioxide and
protons formed by tissue metabolism. Thus, it has a
much simpler structure than most human cells, being
essentially composed of a membrane surrounding a so-
lution of hemoglobin (this protein forms about 95% of
the intracellular protein of the red cell). There are no
intracellular organelles, such as mitochondria, lyso-
somes, or Golgi apparatus. Human red blood cells, like
most red cells of animals, are nonnucleated. However,
the red cell is not metabolically inert. ATP is synthe-
sized from glycolysis and is important in processes that
help the red blood cell maintain its biconcave shape
and also in the regulation of the transport of ions (eg,
by the Na
+
-K
+
ATPase and the anion exchange protein
[see below]) and of water in and out of the cell. The bi-
concave shape increases the surface-to-volume ratio of
the red blood cell, thus facilitating gas exchange. The
red cell contains cytoskeletal components (see below)
that play an important role in determining its shape.
About Two Million Red Blood Cells Enter
the Circulation per Second
The life span of the normal red blood cell is 120 days;
this means that slightly less than 1% of the population
of red cells (200 billion cells, or 2 million per second) is
replaced daily. The new red cells that appear in the cir-
culation still contain ribosomes and elements of the en-
doplasmic reticulum. The RNA of the ribosomes can be
detected by suitable stains (such as cresyl blue), and cells
containing it are termed reticulocytes; they normally
number about 1% of the total red blood cell count. The
life span of the red blood cell can be dramatically short-
ened in a variety of hemolytic anemias.The number of
reticulocytes is markedly increased in these conditions,
as the bone marrow attempts to compensate for rapid
breakdown of red blood cells by increasing the amount
of new, young red cells in the circulation.
Erythropoietin Regulates Production 
of Red Blood Cells
Human erythropoietin is a glycoprotein of 166 amino
acids (molecular mass about 34 kDa). Its amount in
plasma can be measured by radioimmunoassay. It is the
major regulator of human erythropoiesis. Erythropoietin
is synthesized mainly by the kidney and is released in re-
sponse to hypoxia into the bloodstream, in which it
travels to the bone marrow. There it interacts with pro-
genitors of red blood cells via a specific receptor. The re-
ceptor is a transmembrane protein consisting of two dif-
ferent subunits and a number of domains. It is not a
tyrosine kinase, but it stimulates the activities of specific
610 / CHAPTER 52
Table 52–1. Summary of the causes of some
important disorders affecting red blood cells.
Disorder
Sole or Major Cause
Iron deficiency anemia a Inadequate intake or excessive loss 
of iron
Methemoglobinemia
Intake of excess oxidants (various 
chemicals and drugs)
Genetic deficiency in the NADH-
dependent methemoglobin re-
ductase system (MIM 250800)
Inheritance of HbM (MIM 141800)
Sickle cell anemia
Sequence of codon 6 of the βchain 
(MIM 141900)
changed from GAG in the normal 
gene to GTG in the sickle cell 
gene, resulting in substitution of 
valine for glutamic acid
α-Thalassemias
Mutations in the α-globin genes, 
(MIM 141800)
mainly unequal crossing-over and 
large deletions and less com-
monly nonsense and frameshift 
mutations
β-Thalassemia
A very wide variety of mutations in 
(MIM 141900)
the β-globin gene, including dele-
tions, nonsense and frameshift 
mutations, and others affecting 
every aspect of its structure (eg, 
splice sites, promoter mutants)
Megaloblastic anemias s Decreased absorption of B
12
, often 
Deficiency of 
due to a deficiency of intrinsic fac-
vitamin B
12
tor, normally secreted by gastric 
parietal cells
Deficiency of folic 
Decreased intake, defective absorp-
acid
tion, or increased demand (eg, in 
pregnancy) for folate
Hereditary 
Deficiencies in the amount or in the 
spherocytosis
1
structure of αor βspectrin, 
ankyrin, band 3 or band 4.1
Glucose-6-phosphate
A variety of mutations in the gene 
dehydrogenase
(X-linked) for G6PD, mostly single 
(G6PD) deficiency
1
point mutations
(MIM 305900)
Pyruvate kinase (PK)
Presumably a variety of mutations 
deficiency1
in the gene for the R (red cell) iso-
(MIM 255200)
zyme of PK
Paroxysmal nocturnal l Mutations in the PIG-A gene, affect-
hemoglobinemia
1
ing synthesis of GPI-anchored 
(MIM 311770)
proteins
1
The last four disorders cause hemolytic anemias, as do a number
of the other disorders listed. Most of the above conditions are dis-
cussed in other chapters of this text. MIMnumbers apply only to
disorders with a genetic basis.
members of this class of enzymes involved in down-
stream signal transduction. Erythropoietin interacts
with a red cell progenitor, known as the burst-forming
unit-erythroid (BFU-E), causing it to proliferate and
differentiate. In addition, it interacts with a later pro-
genitor of the red blood cell, called the colony-forming
unit-erythroid (CFU-E), also causing it to proliferate
and further differentiate. For these effects, erythropoi-
etin requires the cooperation of other factors (eg, inter-
leukin-3 and insulin-like growth factor; Figure 52–1).
The availability of a cDNA for erythropoietin has
made it possible to produce substantial amounts of this
hormone for analysis and for therapeutic purposes; pre-
viously the isolation of erythropoietin from human
urine yielded very small amounts of the protein. The
major use of recombinant erythropoietinhas been in
the treatment of a small number of anemic states,such
as that due to renal failure.
MANY GROWTH FACTORS REGULATE
PRODUCTION OF WHITE BLOOD CELLS
A large number of hematopoietic growth factorshave
been identified in recent years in addition to erythro-
poietin. This area of study adds to knowledge about the
differentiation of blood cells, provides factors that may
be useful in treatment, and also has implications for un-
derstanding of the abnormal growth of blood cells (eg,
the leukemias). Like erythropoietin, most of the growth
factors isolated have been glycoproteins, are very active
in vivo and in vitro, interact with their target cells via
specific cell surface receptors, and ultimately (via intra-
cellular signals) affect gene expression, thereby promot-
ing differentiation. Many have been cloned, permitting
their production in relatively large amounts. Two of
particular interest are granulocyte- and granulocyte-
macrophage colony-stimulating factors(G-CSF and
GM-CSF, respectively). G-CSF is relatively specific, in-
ducing mainly granulocytes. GM-CSF affects a variety
of progenitor cells and induces granulocytes, macro-
phages, and eosinophils. When the production of neu-
trophils is severely depressed, this condition is referred
to as neutropenia.It is particularly likely to occur in
patients treated with certain chemotherapeutic regi-
mens and after bone marrow transplantation. These pa-
tients are liable to develop overwhelming infections. 
G-CSF has been administered to such patients to boost
production of neutrophils. 
THE RED BLOOD CELL HAS A UNIQUE &
RELATIVELY SIMPLE METABOLISM
Various aspects of the metabolism of the red cell, many
of which are discussed in other chapters of this text, are
summarized in Table 52–2.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested