asp.net mvc pdf viewer free : Change pdf into jpg SDK application service wpf windows web page dnn Harper%27s%20Illustrated%20Biochemistry%20-%20Robert%20K.%20Murray,%20Darryl%20K.%20Granner,%20Peter%20A.%20Mayes,%20Victor%20W.%20Rodwell64-part627

METABOLISM OF XENOBIOTICS / 631
Certain xenobiotics are very toxic even at low levels
(eg, cyanide). On the other hand, there are few xenobi-
otics, including drugs, that do not exert some toxic ef-
fects if sufficient amounts are administered. The toxic
effects of xenobioticscover a wide spectrum, but the
major effects can be considered under three general
headings (Figure 53–1). 
The first is cell injury(cytotoxicity), which can be
severe enough to result in cell death. There are many
mechanisms by which xenobiotics injure cells. The one
considered here is covalent binding to cell macromol-
eculesof reactive species of xenobiotics produced by
metabolism. These macromolecular targets include
DNA, RNA, and protein. If the macromolecule to
which the reactive xenobiotic binds is essential for
short-term cell survival, eg, a protein or enzyme in-
volved in some critical cellular function such as oxida-
tive phosphorylation or regulation of the permeability
of the plasma membrane, then severe effects on cellular
function could become evident quite rapidly.
Second, the reactive species of a xenobiotic may
bind to a protein, altering its antigenicity.The xenobi-
otic is said to act as a hapten,ie, a small molecule that
by itself does not stimulate antibody synthesis but will
combine with antibody once formed. The resulting an-
tibodiescan then damage the cell by several immuno-
logic mechanisms that grossly perturb normal cellular
biochemical processes.
Third, reactions of activated species of chemical car-
cinogens with DNAare thought to be of great impor-
tance in chemical carcinogenesis.Some chemicals (eg,
benzo[α]pyrene) require activation by monooxygenases
in the endoplasmic reticulum to become carcinogenic
(they are thus called indirect carcinogens). The activi-
ties of the monooxygenases and of other xenobiotic-
metabolizing enzymes present in the endoplasmic retic-
ulum thus help to determine whether such compounds
become carcinogenic or are “detoxified.” Other chemi-
cals (eg, various alkylating agents) can react directly (di-
rect carcinogens) with DNA without undergoing intra-
cellular chemical activation.
The enzyme epoxide hydrolase is of interest be-
cause it can exert a protective effect against certain car-
cinogens. The products of the action of certain
monooxygenases on some procarcinogen substrates are
epoxides.Epoxides are highly reactive and mutagenic
or carcinogenic or both. Epoxide hydrolase—like cy-
tochrome P450, also present in the membranes of the
endoplasmic reticulum—acts on these compounds,
converting them into much less reactive dihydrodiols.
The reaction catalyzed by epoxide hydrolase can be rep-
resented as follows:
PHARMACOGENOMICS WILL DRIVE THE
DEVELOPMENT OF NEW & SAFER DRUGS
As indicated above, pharmacogeneticsis the study of
the roles of genetic variations in the responses to drugs.
As a result of the progress made in sequencing the
C
C
H
2
O
+
C
C
HO
Dihydrodiol
O
Epoxide
OH
Reactive metabolite
Nontoxic metabolite
Xenobiotic
Hapten
Cell injury
Mutation
Cancer
Antibody production
Cell injury
Covalent binding to
macromolecules
GSH S-transferase or
epoxide hydrolase
Cytochrome P450
Figure 53–1.
Simplified scheme showing how metabolism of a xenobiotic can result in cell injury, immuno-
logic damage, or cancer. In this instance, the conversion of the xenobiotic to a reactive metabolite is catalyzed
by a cytochrome P450, and the conversion of the reactive metabolite (eg, an epoxide) to a nontoxic metabolite
is catalyzed either by a GSH S-transferase or by epoxide hydrolase.
To jpeg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert multi page pdf to jpg; change pdf into jpg
To jpeg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf to jpg converter; change from pdf to jpg on
632 / CHAPTER 53
human genome, a new field of study—pharmacoge-
nomics—has developed recently. It includes pharmaco-
genetics but covers a much wider sphere of activity. In-
formation from genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics,
and other disciplines such as biochemistry and toxicol-
ogy will be integrated to make possible the synthesis of
newer and safer drugs. As the sequences of all our genes
and their encoded proteins are determined, this will re-
veal many new targets for drug actions. It will also re-
veal polymorphisms (this term is briefly discussed in
Chapter 50) of enzymes and proteins related to drug
metabolism, action, and toxicity. DNA probes capable
of detecting them will be synthesized, permitting
screening of individuals for potentially harmful poly-
morphisms prior to the start of drug therapy. As the
structures of relevant proteins and their polymorphisms
are revealed, model building and other techniques will
permit the design of drugs that take into account both
normal protein targets and their polymorphisms. At
least to some extent, drugs will be tailor-made for indi-
viduals based on their genetic profiles. A new era of ra-
tional drug design built on information derived from
genomics and proteomics has already commenced.
SUMMARY
• Xenobiotics are chemical compounds foreign to the
body, such as drugs, food additives, and environmen-
tal pollutants; more than 200,000 have been identi-
fied. 
• Xenobiotics are metabolized in two phases. The
major reaction of phase 1 is hydroxylation catalyzed
by a variety of monooxygenases, also known as the
cytochrome P450s. In phase 2, the hydroxylated
species are conjugated with a variety of hydrophilic
compounds such as glucuronic acid, sulfate, or glu-
tathione. The combined operation of these two
phases renders lipophilic compounds into water-
soluble compounds that can be eliminated from the
body.
• Cytochrome P450s catalyze reactions that introduce
one atom of oxygen derived from molecular oxygen
into the substrate, yielding a hydroxylated product.
NADPH and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase
are involved in the complex reaction mechanism. 
• All cytochrome P450s are hemoproteins and gener-
ally have a wide substrate specificity, acting on many
exogenous and endogenous substrates. They repre-
sent the most versatile biocatalyst known. 
• Members of at least 11 families of cytochrome P450
are found in human tissue. 
• Cytochrome P450s are generally located in the endo-
plasmic reticulum of cells and are particularly en-
riched in liver.
• Many cytochrome P450s are inducible. This has im-
portant implications in phenomena such as drug in-
teraction.
• Mitochondrial cytochrome P450s also exist and are
involved in cholesterol and steroid biosynthesis.
They use a nonheme iron-containing sulfur protein,
adrenodoxin, not required by microsomal isoforms. 
• Cytochrome P450s, because of their catalytic activi-
ties, play major roles in the reactions of cells to
chemical compounds and in chemical carcinogenesis.
• Phase 2 reactions are catalyzed by enzymes such as
glucuronosyltransferases, sulfotransferases, and glu-
tathione S-transferases, using UDP-glucuronic acid,
PAPS (active sulfate), and glutathione, respectively,
as donors. 
• Glutathione not only plays an important role in
phase 2 reactions but is also an intracellular reducing
agent and is involved in the transport of certain
amino acids into cells.
• Xenobiotics can produce a variety of biologic effects,
including pharmacologic responses, toxicity, immuno-
logic reactions, and cancer.
• Catalyzed by the progress made in sequencing the
human genome, the new field of pharmacogenomics
offers the promise of being able to make available a
host of new rationally designed, safer drugs. 
REFERENCES
Evans WE, Johnson JA: Pharmacogenomics: the inherited basis for
interindividual differences in drug response. Annu Rev Ge-
nomics Hum Genet 2001;2:9.
Guengerich FP: Common and uncommon cytochrome P450 reac-
tions related to metabolism and chemical toxicity. Chem Res
Toxicol 2001;14:611.
Honkakakoski P, Negishi M: Regulation of cytochrome P450
(CYP) genes by nuclear receptors. Biochem J 2000;347:321.
Kalow W, Grant DM: Pharmacogenetics. In: The Metabolic and
Molecular Bases of Inherited Disease,8th ed. Scriver CR et al
(editors). McGraw-Hill, 2001.
Katzung BG (editor): Basic & Clinical Pharmacology,8th ed. Mc-
Graw-Hill, 2001.
McLeod HL, Evans WE: Pharmacogenomics: unlocking the
human genome for better drug therapy. Annu Rev Pharmacol
Toxicol 2001;41:101.
Nelson DR et al: P450 superfamily: update on new sequences, gene
mapping, accession numbers and nomenclature. Pharmacoge-
netics 1996;6:1.
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
convert pdf to gif or jpg; pdf to jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
bulk pdf to jpg converter online; .pdf to .jpg converter online
The Human Genome Project
54
633
Robert K. Murray, MD, PhD
BIOMEDICAL SIGNIFICANCE
The information deriving from determination of the se-
quences of the human genome and those of other or-
ganisms will change biology and medicine for all time.
For example, with reference to the human genome, new
information on our origins, on disease genes, on diag-
nosis, and possible approaches to therapy are already
flooding in. Progress in fields such as genomics, pro-
teomics, bioinformatics, biotechnology, and pharma-
cogenomics is accelerating rapidly.
The aims of this chapter are to briefly summarize
the major findings of the Human Genome Project
(HGP) and indicate their implications for biology and
medicine.
THE HUMAN GENOME PROJECT 
HAS A VARIETY OF GOALS
The HGP, which started in 1990, is an international
effort whose principal goals were to sequence the entire
human genome and the genomes of several other model
organisms that have been basic to the study of genetics
(eg, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae [a yeast],
Drosophila melanogaster [the fruit fly], Caenorhabditis
elegans[the roundworm], and Mus musculus[the com-
mon house mouse]). Most of these goals have been ac-
complished. In the United States, the National Center
for Human Genome Research (NCHGR) was estab-
lished in 1989, initially directed by James D. Watson
and subsequently by Francis Collins. The NCHGR
played a leading role in directing the United States ef-
fort in the HGP. In 1997, it became the National
Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). The in-
ternational collaboration—involving groups from the
USA, UK, Japan, France, Germany, and China—came
to be known as the International Human Genome Se-
quencing Consortium (IHGSC). Initially, a number of
short-term goals were established for the United States
effort—eg, producing a human genetic map with mark-
ers 2–5 centimorgans (cM) apart and constructing a
physical map of all 24 human chromosomes (22 auto-
somal plus X andY) with markers spaced at approxi-
mately 100,000 base pairs (bp). Figure 54–1 summa-
rizes the differences between a genetic map, a cytoge-
netic map, and a physical map of a chromosome. These
and other initial goals were achieved and surpassed by
the mid-nineties. In 1998, new goals for the United
States wing of the HGP were announced. These in-
cluded the aim of completing the entire sequence by
the end of 2003 or sooner. Other specific objectives
concerned sequencing technology, comparative ge-
nomics, bioinformatics, ethical considerations, and
other issues. By the fall of 1998, about 6% of the
human genome sequence had been completed and the
foundations for future work laid. Further progress was
catalyzed by the announcement that a second group,
the private company Celera Genomics, led by Craig
Venter, had undertaken the objective of sequencing the
human genome. Venter and colleagues had published
in 1995 the entire genome sequences of Haemophilus
influenzaeand Mycoplasma genitalium,the first of many
species to have their genomic sequences determined. An
important factor in the success of these workers was the
use of a shotgun approach, ie, sonicating the DNA, se-
quencing the fragments, and reassembling the se-
quence, based on overlaps. For comparison, a variety of
approaches that have been used at different times to
study normal and disease genes are listed in Table 54–1. 
A Draft Sequence of the Human Genome
Was Announced in June 2000
In June 2000, leaders of the IHGSC and the personnel
at Celera Genomics announced completion of working
drafts of the sequence of the human genome, covering
more than 90% of it. The principal findings of the two
groups were published separately in February 2001 in
special issues of Nature (the IHGSC) and Science (Cel-
era). The draft published by the Consortium was the
product of at least 10 years of work involving 20 se-
quencing centers located in six countries. That pub-
lished by Celera and associates was the product of some
3 years or less of work; it relied in part on data obtained
by the IHGSC. The combined achievement has been
hailed, among other descriptions, as providing a Library
of Life, supplying a Periodic Table of Life, and finding
the Holy Grail of Human Genetics. 
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Raster
Raster Images File Formats. • C#.NET RasterEdge HTML5 Viewer supports various images formats, including JPEG, GIF, BMP, PNG, etc. Loading & Viewing.
batch convert pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg
C# Raster - Convert Image to JPEG in C#.NET
C# Raster - Convert Image to JPEG in C#.NET. Online C# Guide for Converting Image to JPEG in .NET Application. Convert RasterImage to JPEG.
convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg; changing pdf to jpg on
634 / CHAPTER 54
EcoRI Hind III I NotI
Restriction map
Contig map
STS map
Genetic map
Cytogenetic
map
Physical map
20
20
25
25
50
75
100
125
150Mb
cM
30
30
Figure 54–1.
Principal methods used to identify and isolate normal
and disease genes. For the genetic map, the positions of several hypo-
thetical genetic markers are shown, along with the genetic distances in
centimorgans between them. The circle shows the position of the cen-
tromere. For the cytogenetic map, the classic banding pattern of a hypo-
thetical chromosome is shown. For the physical map, the approximate
physical positions of the above genetic markers are shown, along with
the relative physical distances in megabase pairs. Examples of a restric-
tion map, a contig mark, and an STS map are also shown. (Reproduced,
with permission, from Green ED, Waterston RH: The Human Genome
Project: Prospects and implications for clinical medicine. JAMA 1991;266:
1966. Copyright © 1991 by the American Medical Association.)
Different Approaches Were Used 
by the Two Groups 
We shall summarize the major findings reported in the
two drafts and comment on their implications. While
there are differences between the drafts, they will not be
dwelt on here, as the areas of general agreement are
much more extensive. It is worthwhile, however, to
summarize the different approaches used by the two
groups. Basically, the IHGSC employed a map first,
sequence later approach.In part, this was because se-
quencing was a slow process when the public project
started, and the strategy of the Consortium evolved
over time as advances were made in sequencing and
other techniques. The overall approach, referred to as
hierarchical shotgun sequencing, consisted of frag-
menting the entire genome into pieces of approxi-
mately 100–200 kb and inserting them into bacterial
artificial chromosomes (BACs). The BACs were then
positioned on individual chromosomes by looking for
marker sequences known as sequence-tagged sites
(STSs), whose locations had been already determined.
STSs are short (usually < 500 bp), unique genomic loci
for which a PCR assay is available. Clones of the BACs
were then broken into small fragments (shotgunning).
Each fragment was then sequenced, and computer algo-
rithms were used that recognized matching sequence
information from overlapping fragments to piece to-
gether the complete sequence.
Celera used the whole genome shotgun approach,
in effect bypassing the mapping step. Shotgun frag-
ments were assembled by algorithms onto large scaf-
folds, and the correct position of these scaffolds in the
genome was determined using STSs. A scaffold is a se-
ries of “contigs” that are in the right order but not nec-
essarily connected in one continuous sequence. Contigs
are contiguous sequences of DNA made by assembling
overlapping sequenced fragments of a natural chromo-
some or a BAC. The availability of high-throughput
sequenators, powerful computer programs, the ele-
ment of competition, and other factors accounted for the
rapid progress made by both groups from 1998 onward. 
.NET JPEG 2000 SDK | Encode & Decode JPEG 2000 Images
RasterEdge .NET Image SDK - JPEG 2000 Codec. Royalty-free JPEG 2000 Compression Technology Available for .NET Framework.
changing file from pdf to jpg; best pdf to jpg converter
C# TIFF: How to Convert TIFF to JPEG Images in C# Application
C# Demo to Convert and Render TIFF to JPEG/Png/Bmp/Gif in Visual C#.NET Project. C#.NET Image: TIFF to Raster Images Overview. C#.NET Image: TIFF to JPEG Demo.
convert pdf file to jpg online; convert pdf page to jpg
THE HUMAN GENOME PROJECT / 635
Table 54–1. Principal methods used to identify and isolate normal and disease genes.
Procedure
Comments
Detection of specific cytogenetic c For instance, a small deletion of band Xp21.2 was important in cloning the gene involved in 
abnormalities
Duchenne muscular dystrophy.
Extensive linkage studies
Large families with defined pedigrees are desirable. Dominant genes are easier to recognize
than recessives.
Use of probes to define marker 
Probes identify STSs, RFLPs, SNPs,1etc; thousands, covering all the chromosomes, are now 
loci
available. It is desirable to flank the gene on both sides, clearly delineating it.
Radiation hybrid mapping
2
Now the most rapid method of localizing a gene or DNA fragment to a subregion of a human
chromosome and constructing a physical map.
Use of rodent or human somatic Permits assignment of a gene to one specific chromosome but not to a subregion.
cell hybrids
Fluorescence in situ hybridization n Permits localization of a gene to one chromosomal band.
Use of pulsed-field gel 
Permits isolation of large DNA fragments obtained by use of restriction endonucleases (rare 
electrophoresis (PFGE) to 
cutters) that result in very limited cutting of DNA.
separate large DNA fragments
Chromosome walking
Involves repeated cloning of overlapping DNA segments; the procedure is laborious and can
usually cover only 100–200 kb.
Chromosome jumping
By cutting DNA into relatively large fragments and circularizing it, one can move more quickly
and cover greater lengths of DNA than with chromosomal walking.
Cloning via YACs, BACs, cosmids, Permits isolation of fragments of varying lengths.
phages, and plasmids
Detection of expression of 
The mRNA should be expressed in affected tissues.
mRNAs in tissues by Northern 
blotting using one or more 
fragments of the gene as a 
probe
PCR
Can be used to amplify fragments of the gene; also many other applications.
DNA sequencing
Establishes the highest resolution physical map. Identifies open reading frame. Facilities with
many high throughput instruments could sequence millions of base pairs per day.
Databases
Comparison of DNA and protein sequences obtained from unknown gene with known se-
quences in databases can facilitate gene identification.
Abbreviations: STS, sequence tagged site; RFLP, restriction fragment linked polymorphism; SNP, single nucleotide polymorphism; YAC,
yeast artificial chromosome; BAC, bacterial artificial chromosome; PCR, polymerase chain reaction.
1
Many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are being detected and catalogued. These are stable and frequent, and their detection
can be automated. It is anticipated that they will be particularly useful for mapping complex traits such as diabetes mellitus.
2Radiation hybrid mapping (consult http://compgen.rutgers.edu/rhmap/ for a detailed bibliography of this technique) makes use of a
panel of somatic cell hybrids, with each cell line containing a random set of irradiated human genomic DNA in a hamster background.
Briefly, the radiation fragments the DNA into small pieces of variable length; if a gene is located close to another known gene, it is likely
that the two will remain linked (compare genetic linkage) on the same fragment. An STS marker is typed against a radiation hybrid panel
by using its two oligonucleotide primers to perform a PCR assay against the DNA from each hybrid cell line of the panel. If enough mark-
ers are typed on one panel, continuous linkage can be established along each arm of a chromosome, and the markers can be assembled
into the map as a single linkage group.
C# Word - Convert Word to JPEG in C#.NET
C# Word - Convert Word to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET Word to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Word to JPEG Conversion Overview. Convert Word to JPEG Using C#.NET
convert pdf to jpg for online; convert from pdf to jpg
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to JPEG in C#.NET
C# PowerPoint - Convert PowerPoint to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PowerPoint to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. PowerPoint to JPEG Conversion Overview.
convert pdf to jpeg on; change pdf file to jpg file
636 / CHAPTER 54
DETERMINATION OF THE SEQUENCE OF
THE HUMAN GENOME HAS PRODUCED A
WEALTH OF NEW FINDINGS
Only a small fraction of the findings can be covered
here. The interested reader is referred to the original ar-
ticles. Table 54–2 summarizes a number of the high-
lights, which can now be described.
Most of the Human Genome 
Has Been Sequenced
Over 90% of the human genome had been sequenced
by July 2000. This is by far the largest genome se-
quenced, with an estimated size of approximately 3.2
gigabases (Gb). Prior to the human genome, that of the
fruit fly had been the largest (~180 Mb) sequenced.
Gaps still exist, small and large, and the quality of some
of the sequencing data will be refined since some of the
findings are probably not exactly right. 
The Human Genome Is Estimated to
Encode About 30,000–40,000 Proteins
The greatest surprise provided by the results to date has
been the apparently low number of genes encoding pro-
teins, estimated to lie between 30,000 and 40,000. The
higher number could increase as new data are obtained.
This number is approximately twice that found in the
roundworm (19,099) and three times that of the fruit
fly (13,061). The figures suggest that the complexity of
humans compared with that of the two simpler organ-
isms must have explanations other than strictly gene
number. 
Only 1.1–1.5% of the Human 
Genome Encodes Proteins 
Analyses of the available data reveal that 1.1–1.5% of
the genome consists of exons. About 24% consists of
introns, and 75% of sequences lying between genes (in-
tergenic). Comparisons with the data on the round-
worm and fruit fly have shown that exon size across the
three species is relatively constant (mean size of 145 bp
in humans). However, intron size in humans is much
more variable (mean size of over 3300 bp), resulting in
great variation in gene size. 
The Landscape of Human Chromosomes
Varies Widely 
There are marked differences among individual chro-
mosomes in many features, such as gene number per
megabase, density of single nucleotide polymorphisms
(SNPs), GC content, number of transposable elements
and CpG islands, and recombination rate. To take one
example, chromosome 19 has the richest gene content
(23 genes per megabase), whereas chromosome 13 and
the Y chromosome have the sparsest content (5 genes
per megabase). Explanations for these variations are not
apparent at this time. 
Human Genes Do More Work Than 
Those of Simpler Organisms
Alternative splicing appears to be more prevalent in hu-
mans, involving at least 35% of their genes. Data indi-
cate that the average number of distinct transcripts per
gene for chromosomes 22 and 19 were 2.6 and 3.2, re-
spectively. These figures are higher than for the round-
worm, where only 12.2% of genes appear to be alterna-
tively spliced and only 1.34 splice variants per gene
were noted.
The Human Proteome Is More Complex
Than That of Invertebrates
Relatively few new protein domains appear to have
emerged among vertebrates. However, the number of
distinct domain architectures (~1800) in human pro-
teins is 1.8 times that of the roundworm or fruit fly.
About 90 vertebrate-specific families of proteins have
been identified, and these have been found to be en-
riched in proteins of the immune and nervous systems. 
Table 54–2. Major findings reported in the rough
drafts of the human genome.
• More than 90% of the genome has been sequenced; gaps,
large and small, remain to be filled in.
• Estimated number of protein-coding genes ranges from
30,000 to 40,000.
• Only 1.1–1.5% of the genome codes for proteins.
• There are wide variations in features of individual chromo-
somes (eg, in gene number per Mb, SNP density, GC con-
tent, numbers of transposable elements and CpG islands,
recombination rate).
• Human genes do more work than those of the roundworm
or fruit fly (eg, alternative splicing is used more frequently).
• The human proteome is more complex than that found in
invertebrates.
• Repeat sequences probably constitute more than 50% of
the genome.
• Approximately 100 coding regions have been copied and
moved by RNA-based transposons.
• Approximately 200 genes may be derived from bacteria by
lateral transfer.
• More than 3 million SNPs have been identified.
THE HUMAN GENOME PROJECT / 637
Table 54–3. Major classes of proteins encoded by
human genes.1
Class of Protein
Number (%)
2
Unknown
12,809 (41%)
Nucleic acid enzymes
2,308 (7.5%)
Transcription factors
1,850 (6%)
Receptors
1,543 (5%)
Hydrolases
1,227 (4.0%)
Select regulatory molecules (eg, 
988 (3.2%)
G proteins, cell cycle regulators)
Protooncogenes
902 (2.9%)
Cytoskeletal structural proteins
876 (2.8%)
Kinases
868 (2.8%)
1
Data from Venter JC et al: The sequence of the human genome.
Science 2001;291:1304.
2The percentages are derived from a total of 26,383 genes re-
ported in the rough draft by Celera Genomics. Classes containing
more than 2.5% of the total proteins encoded by the genes iden-
tified when this rough draft was written are arbitrarily listed as
major.
The results of the two drafts are rich in information
about protein families and classes. One example is
shown in Table 54–3, in which the major classes of
proteins encoded by human genes are listed. As can be
seen, the largest class is “unknown.” Identification of
these unknown proteins will be a major focus of activity
for many laboratories. 
Repeat Sequences Probably Constitute
More Than 50% of the Human Genome 
Repeat sequences probably account for at least half of
the genome. They fall into five classes: (1) transposon-
derived repeats (interspersed repeats); (2) processed
pseudogenes; (3) simple sequence repeats; (4) segmental
duplications, made up of 10–300 kb that have been
copied from one region of the genome into another;
and (5) blocks of tandemly repeated sequences, found
at centromeres, telomeres, and other areas. Consider-
able information on most of the above classes of repeat
sequences—of great value in understanding the archi-
tecture and development of the human genome—is re-
ported in the drafts. Only two points of interest will be
mentioned here. It is speculated that Alu elements, the
most prominent members (about 10% of the total
genome) of the short interspersed elements (SINEs),
may be present in GC-rich areas because of positive se-
lection, implying that they are of benefit to the host.
Segmental duplications have been found to be much
more common than in the roundworm or fruit fly. It is
possible that these structures may be involved in exon
shuffling and the increased diversity of proteins found
in humans.
Other Findings of Interest
The last three major points of interest listed in Table
54–2 will be briefly described together. 
Approximately 100 coding regions are estimated to
have been copied and moved by RNA-based trans-
posons (retrotransposons). It is possible that some of
these genes may adopt new roles in the course of time.
A surprising finding is that over 200 genes may be de-
rived from bacteria by lateral transfer. None of these
genes are present in nonvertebrate eukaryotes. More
than 3 million SNPs have been identified. It is likely
that they will prove invaluable for certain aspects of
gene mapping. 
It is stressed that the findings listed here are only a
few of those reported in the drafts, and the reader is
urged to consult the original reports (see References,
below).
FURTHER WORK IS PLANNED ON THE
HUMAN & OTHER GENOMES
The IHGSC has indicated that it will determine the
complete sequence, it is hoped, by 2003. The task in-
volves filling in the gaps and identifying new genes,
their locations, and functions. Regulatory regions will
be identified, and the sequences of other large genomes
(eg, of the house mouse; of Rattus norvegicus,the Nor-
way rat; of Danio rerio,the zebra fish; of Fugu rubripes,
the tiger puffer fish; and of one or more primates) will
be obtained; indeed, a draft version of the genome of
the tiger puffer fish was published in 2002. Additional
SNPs will be identified; a complete catalog of these
variants is expected to be of great value in mapping
genes associated with complex traits and for other uses
as well. Along with the above, existing databases will be
added to as new information flows in, and new data-
bases will probably be established to serve specific pur-
poses. A variety of studies in functional genomics (ie,
the study of genomes to determine the functions of all
their genes and their products) will also be undertaken. 
IMPLICATIONS FOR PROTEOMICS,
BIOTECHNOLOGY, & BIOINFORMATICS
Many fields will be influenced by knowledge of the
human genome. Only a few are briefly discussed here. 
Proteomics(see Chapter 4) in its broadest sense is
the study of all the proteins encoded in an organism (ie,
638 / CHAPTER 54
the proteome), including their structures, modifica-
tions, functions, and interactions. In a narrower sense,
it involves the identification and study of multiple pro-
teins linked through cellular actions—but not necessar-
ily the entire proteome. With regard to humans, many
individual proteins will be identified and characterized;
their interactions and levels will be determined in phys-
iologic and pathologic states, and the resulting informa-
tion will be entered into appropriate databases. Tech-
niques such as two-dimensional electrophoresis, a
variety of modes of mass spectrometry, and antibody
arrays will be central to expansion of this rapidly grow-
ing field. Overall, proteomics will greatly advance our
knowledge of proteins at the basic level and will also
nourish biotechnologyas new proteins that are likely
to have diagnostic, therapeutic, and other uses are dis-
covered and methods for their economic production are
developed. Specialists in bioinformaticswill be in de-
mand, as this field rapidly gears up to manage, analyze,
and utilize the flood of data from genomic and pro-
teomic studies. 
IMPLICATIONS FOR MEDICINE
Practically every area of medicine will be affected by the
new information accruing from knowledge of the
human genome. The tracking of disease geneswill be
enormously facilitated. As mentioned above, SNP maps
should greatly assist determination of genes involved in
complex diseases. Probes for any gene will be available
if needed, leading to improved diagnostic testingfor
disease susceptibility genes and for genes directly in-
volved in the causation of specific diseases. The field of
pharmacogenomics (see Chapter 53) is already ex-
panding greatly, and it is possible that in the future
drugs will be tailored to accommodate the variations in
enzymes and other proteins involved in drug action and
metabolism found among individuals. Studies of genes
involved in behaviormay lead to new insights into the
causation and possible treatment of psychiatric disor-
ders. Many ethical issues—eg, privacy concerns and
the use of genomic information for commercial pur-
poses—will have to be addressed. It will also be impor-
tant that medical and economic benefits accrue to indi-
viduals in Third World countriesfrom the anticipated
effects on health services and the diagnosis and treat-
ment of disease.
SUMMARY 
• Determination of the complete sequence of the
human genome, now almost completed, is one of the
most significant scientific achievements of all time. 
• Many important findings have already emerged. The
one to date that has generated the most discussion is
that the number of human genes may be only two to
three times that estimated for the roundworm and
the fruit fly. 
• Information flowing from the Human Genome Proj-
ect is having major influences in fields such as pro-
teomics, bioinformatics, biotechnology, and phar-
macogenomics as well as all areas of biology and
medicine. 
• It is hoped that the knowledge derived will be used
wisely and fairly and that the benefits that will ensue
regarding health, disease, and other matters will be
made available to all people everywhere.
REFERENCES
Collins FS, McKusick VA: Implications of the Human Genome
Project for medical science. JAMA 2001;285:540. (The Feb-
ruary 7, 2001, issue describes opportunities for medical re-
search in the 21st century. Many articles of interest.)
Hedges SB, Kumar S: Vertebrate genomes compared. Science
2002;297:1283. (The same issue—No. 5585, August 23—
contains a draft version of the genome of the tiger puffer
fish.)
McKusick VA: The anatomy of the human genome: a neo-Vesalian
basis for medicine in the 21st century. JAMA 2001;286:
2289. (The November 14, 2001, issue contains a number of
other excellent articles—eg, on clinical proteomics, pharma-
cogenomics—relating to the Human Genome Project and its
impact on medicine.)
Nature 2001;409(6822) (February 15), and Science 2001;291
(5507) (February 16). (These two issues present the rough
drafts prepared by the IHGSC and Celera, respectively, along
with many other articles analyzing the meaning and signifi-
cance of the findings.)
Science 2001;294(5540) (October 5). (This issue contains a num-
ber of articles under the title Genome: Unlocking Biology’s
Storehouse. They describe new ideas, approaches, and re-
search related to genome information.)
APPENDIX
639
SELECTED WORLD WIDE WEB SITES
The following is a list of Web sites that readers may
find useful. The sites have been visited at various times
by one of the authors (RKM). Most are located in the
USA, but many provide extensive links to international
sites and to databases (eg, for protein and nucleic acid
sequences) and online journals. RKM would be grateful
if readers who find other useful sites would notify him
of their URLs by e-mail (rmurray6745@rogers. com) so
that they may be considered for inclusion in future edi-
tions of this text. 
Readers should note that URLs may change or cease
to exist.
ACCESS TO THE BIOMEDICAL
LITERATURE
HighWire Press: http://highwire.stanford.edu  
(Extensive lists of various classes of journals—biology, medicine,
etc—and offers also the most extensive list of journals with
free online access.)
National Library of Medicine: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/
(Free access to Medline via PubMed.)
GENERAL RESOURCE SITES
The Biology Project (from the University of Arizona): http://
www.biology.arizona.edu/default.html
Harvard Department of Molecular & Cellular Biology Links:
http://mcb.harvard.edu/BioLinks.html
SITES ON SPECIFIC TOPICS
American Heart Association: http://www.americanheart.org 
(Useful information on nutrition, on the role of various biomole-
cules—eg, cholesterol, lipoproteins—in heart disease, and on
the major cardiovascular diseases.) 
Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP): http://www.ncbi.nlm.
nih.gov/ncicgap 
(An interdisciplinary program to generate the information and
technical tools needed to decipher the molecular anatomy of
the cancer cell.) 
European Bioinformatics Institute: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ebi_
home.html 
(Maintains the EMBL Nucleotide and SWISS-PROT databases as
well as other databases.) 
GeneCards: http://bioinformatics.weizmann.ac.il/cards/ 
(A database of human genes, their products, and their involvements
in diseases. From the Weizmann Institute of Science.) 
GeneTestsGeneClinics: http://www.geneclinics.org/ 
(A medical genetics information resource with comprehensive arti-
cles on many genetic diseases.) 
Genes and Disease: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/disease/ 
(Coverage of the genetic basis of many different types of diseases.) 
The Glycoscience Network (TGN): http://www.vei.co.uk/TGN/
tgn_side.htm 
(TGN is an informal worldwide grouping of scientists who share an
interest in carbohydrates. The site contains considerable in-
formation on carbohydrates and an extensive list of links to
other sites dealing with sugar-containing molecules).
Howard Hughes Medical Institute: http://www.hhmi.org/ 
(An excellent site for following current biomedical research. Con-
tains a comprehensive Research News Archive.) 
The Human Gene Mutation Database: http://archive.uwcm.ac.uk/
uwcm/mg/hgmd0.html 
(An extensive tabulation of mutations in human genes from the In-
stitute of Medical Genetics in Cardiff, Wales.)
Human Genome Project Information: http://www.ornl.gov/hgmis/ 
(From the Human Genome Program of the United States Depart-
ment of Energy.) 
The Institute for Genetic Research: http://www.tigr.org/ 
(Sequences of various bacterial genomes and other information.)
Karolinska Institute Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases: http://
www.mic.ki.se/Diseases/c18.html 
(Access to information on many nutritional and metabolic disor-
ders.)
MITOMAP: http://www.mitomap.org/ 
(A human mitochondrial genome database.) 
National Center for Biotechnology Information: http://ncbi.nlm.
nih.gov/ 
(Information on molecular biology and how molecular processes af-
fect human health and disease.) 
National Human Genome Research Institute: http://www.genome.
gov/
(Extensive information about the Human Genome Project.) 
National Institutes of Health (NIH): http://www.nih.gov/ 
(Includes links to the separate Institutes and Centers that constitute
NIH, covering a wide range of biomedical research.) 
Neuroscience (Biosciences): http://neuro.med.cornell.edu/VL/ 
(A comprehensive list of neuroscience resources; part of the World-
Wide Web Virtual Library.)
640 / APPENDIX
Office of Rare Diseases: http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/index_
main.html 
(Access to information on more than 7000 rare diseases, including
current research.)
OMIM Home Page—Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim/ 
(An extensive catalog of human genetic disorders, updated daily.
Lists access to various allied resources.)
Protein Data Bank (PDB): http://www.rcsb.org/pdb/ 
(A worldwide repository for the processing and distribution of
three-dimensional biologic macromolecular structure data.)
The Protein Kinase Resource: http://pkr.sdsc.edu/html/index.
shtml 
(Information on the protein kinase family of enzymes.)
The Protein Society: http://www.faseb.org/protein/index.html 
(An extensive list of Web resources for protein scientists.)
Signaling Update: http://www.signaling-update.org/ 
(A one-stop overview for the specialist or nonspecialist of what is
happening in cell signaling.)
Society for Endocrinology: http://www.endocrinology.org 
(Aims to promote advancement of public education in endocrinol-
ogy. Contains a number of articles on endocrinology and a
list of links to other relevant sites.)
tbase—the Transgenic/Targeted Mutation Database at the Jackson
Laboratory, Bar Harbor, Maine: http://tbase.jax.org/ 
(An attempt to organize information on transgenic animals and tar-
geted mutations generated and analyzed worldwide.)
The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute: http://www.sanger.ac.uk  
(A genome research center whose purpose it is to increase knowl-
edge of genomes, particularly through large-scale sequencing
and analysis,) 
Whitehead Institute/MIT Center for Genome Research: http://
www.genome.wi.mit.edu/ 
(Access to various databases and articles entitled “What’s New in
Genome Research.”) 
Chapter 2
http://www.geocities.com/bioelectrochemistry/sorensen.htm 
Chapter 3
http: //www.bio.cmu.edu/Courses/03231 
http: //www.bcbp.gu.se/~orjan/bmstruct/ 
Chapter 4
http://www.lundberg.bcbp.gu.se/~orjan/bmstruct/ 
Chapter 5
http://www.umass.edu/microbio/chime/explorer/
http://molvis.sdsc.edu/protexpl/index.htm
http://www.umass.edu/microbio/rasmol/
http://www.cryst.bbk.ac.uk/PPS2/course/section10/membrane.html
http://molbio.info.nih.gov/cgi-bin/pdb/
http://www.mc.vanderbilt.edu/peds/pidl/genetic/ehlers.htm
Chapter 6
http://sickle.bwh.harvard.edu/ 
http://globin.cse.psu.edu/
Chapter 7
http://s02.middlebury.edu/CH441A/EnzymeTutorials.html
http://www.i-a-s.de/IAS/botanik/e18/18.htm
Chapter 8
http://www.indstate.edu/thcme/mwking/enzyme-kinetics.html
http://ntri.tamuk.edu/cell/kinetics.html
Chapter 9
http://users.wmin.ac.uk/~mellerj/physiology/bernard.htm
http://www.cm.utexas.edu/academic/courses/Fall2001/CH369/
LEC06/Lec6.htm
http://www.cellularsignaling.org
http://arethusa.unh.edu/bchm752/ppthtml/Jan27/sld015.htm
Chapter 22
http://www.auhs.edu/netbiochem/NetWelco.htm
Chapter 28
http://www.people.virginia.edu/~rjh9u/scurvy.html
http://www.mc.vanderbilt.edu/biolib/hc/journeys/scurvy.html
http://opbs.okstate.edu/~melcher/MG/MGW2/MG2411.html
Chapter 29
http://www.nucdf.org/whatis.htm
Chapter 30
http://www.pkunetwork.org/
http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html
http://www.msud-support.org/overv.htm
Chapter 34
http://www.rarediseases.org/search/rdblist.html
http://www.rheumatology.org/patients/factsheet/gout.html
http://www.merck.com/pubs/mmanual/section5/chapter55/55a.htm
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/goutandpseudogout.html
http://www.amg.gda.pl/~essppmm/ppd/ppd_py_umps.html
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested