asp.net mvc pdf viewer free : .Net pdf to image application software tool html azure .net online Harper%27s%20Illustrated%20Biochemistry%20-%20Robert%20K.%20Murray,%20Darryl%20K.%20Granner,%20Peter%20A.%20Mayes,%20Victor%20W.%20Rodwell9-part635

BIOENERGETICS: THE ROLE OF ATP / 81
system is stable, with little or no tendency for a reaction
to occur. If ∆G is zero, the system is at equilibrium and
no net change takes place.
When the reactants are present in concentrations of
1.0 mol/L, ∆G
0
is the standard free energy change. For
biochemical reactions, a standard state is defined as
having a pH of 7.0. The standard free energy change at
this standard state is denoted by ∆G
0′
The standard free energy change can be calculated
from the equilibrium constant K
eq
.
where R is the gas constant and T is the absolute tem-
perature (Chapter 8). It is important to note that the
actual ∆G may be larger or smaller than ∆G0′ depend-
ing on the concentrations of the various reactants, in-
cluding the solvent, various ions, and proteins.
In a biochemical system, an enzyme only speeds up
the attainment of equilibrium; it never alters the final
concentrations of the reactants at equilibrium.
ENDERGONIC PROCESSES PROCEED BY
COUPLING TO EXERGONIC PROCESSES
The vital processes—eg, synthetic reactions, muscular
contraction, nerve impulse conduction, and active
transport—obtain energy by chemical linkage, or cou-
pling,to oxidative reactions. In its simplest form, this
type of coupling may be represented as shown in Figure
10–1. The conversion of metabolite A to metabolite B
∆G
0′
=−RT lnK
eq
occurs with release of free energy. It is coupled to an-
other reaction, in which free energy is required to con-
vert metabolite C to metabolite D. The terms exer-
gonicand endergonicrather than the normal chemical
terms “exothermic” and “endothermic” are used to in-
dicate that a process is accompanied by loss or gain, re-
spectively, of free energy in any form, not necessarily as
heat. In practice, an endergonic process cannot exist in-
dependently but must be a component of a coupled ex-
ergonic-endergonic system where the overall net change
is exergonic. The exergonic reactions are termed catab-
olism (generally, the breakdown or oxidation of fuel
molecules), whereas the synthetic reactions that build
up substances are termed anabolism. The combined
catabolic and anabolic processes constitute metabo-
lism.
If the reaction shown in Figure 10–1 is to go from
left to right, then the overall process must be accompa-
nied by loss of free energy as heat. One possible mecha-
nism of coupling could be envisaged if a common oblig-
atory intermediate (I) took part in both reactions, ie,
Some exergonic and endergonic reactions in biologic
systems are coupled in this way. This type of system has
a built-in mechanism for biologic control of the rate of
oxidative processes since the common obligatory inter-
mediate allows the rate of utilization of the product of
the synthetic path (D) to determine by mass action the
rate at which A is oxidized. Indeed, these relationships
supply a basis for the concept of respiratory control,
the process that prevents an organism from burning out
of control. An extension of the coupling concept is pro-
vided by dehydrogenation reactions, which are coupled
to hydrogenations by an intermediate carrier (Figure
10–2).
An alternative method of coupling an exergonic to
an endergonic process is to synthesize a compound of
high-energy potential in the exergonic reaction and to
incorporate this new compound into the endergonic re-
action, thus effecting a transference of free energy from
the exergonic to the endergonic pathway (Figure 10–3).
The biologic advantage of this mechanism is that the
compound of high potential energy, ∼
E, unlike I
A+C→I→B+D
Figure 10–1.
Coupling of an exergonic to an ender-
gonic reaction.
∆G=∆H−T∆S
Figure 10–2.
Coupling of dehydrogenation and hy-
drogenation reactions by an intermediate carrier.
.Net pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf file into jpg; advanced pdf to jpg converter
.Net pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
changing pdf to jpg on; convert .pdf to .jpg
82 / CHAPTER 10
Figure 10–3.
Transfer of free energy from an exer-
gonic to an endergonic reaction via a high-energy in-
termediate compound (∼
E
).
Figure 10–4.
Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) shown
as the magnesium complex. ADP forms a similar com-
plex with Mg2+.
inthe previous system, need not be structurally related
to A, B, C, or D, allowing 
to serve as a transducer of
energy from a wide range of exergonic reactions to an
equally wide range of endergonic reactions or processes,
such as biosyntheses, muscular contraction, nervous ex-
citation, and active transport. In the living cell, the
principal high-energy intermediate or carrier com-
pound (designated ∼
in Figure 10–3) is adenosine
triphosphate (ATP).
HIGH-ENERGY PHOSPHATES PLAY A
CENTRAL ROLE IN ENERGY CAPTURE
AND TRANSFER
In order to maintain living processes, all organisms
must obtain supplies of free energy from their environ-
ment. Autotrophicorganisms utilize simple exergonic
processes; eg, the energy of sunlight (green plants), the
reaction Fe2
+
→ Fe3
+
(some bacteria). On the other
hand, heterotrophicorganisms obtain free energy by
coupling their metabolism to the breakdown of com-
plex organic molecules in their environment. In all
these organisms, ATP plays a central role in the trans-
ference of free energy from the exergonic to the ender-
gonic processes (Figure 10–3). ATP is a nucleoside
triphosphate containing adenine, ribose, and three
phosphate groups. In its reactions in the cell, it func-
tions as the Mg2
+
complex (Figure 10–4).
The importance of phosphates in intermediary me-
tabolism became evident with the discovery of the role
of ATP, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and inorganic
phosphate (P
i
) in glycolysis (Chapter 17).
The Intermediate Value for the Free
Energy of Hydrolysis of ATP Has Important
Bioenergetic Significance
The standard free energy of hydrolysis of a number of
biochemically important phosphates is shown in Table
10–1. An estimate of the comparative tendency of each
of the phosphate groups to transfer to a suitable accep-
tor may be obtained from the ∆G
0′
of hydrolysis at
37 °C. The value for the hydrolysis of the terminal
Table 10–1. Standard free energy of hydrolysis
ofsome organophosphates of biochemical
importance.1,2
G
0
Compound
kJ/mol kcal/mol
Phosphoenolpyruvate
−61.9
−14.8
Carbamoyl phosphate
−51.4
−12.3
1,3-Bisphosphoglycerate
−49.3
−11.8
(to 3-phosphoglycerate)
Creatine phosphate
−43.1
−10.3
ATP →ADP + P
i
−30.5
−7.3
ADP →AMP+P
i
−27.6
−6.6
Pyrophosphate
−27.6
−6.6
Glucose 1-phosphate
−20.9
−5.0
Fructose 6-phosphate
−15.9
−3.8
AMP
−14.2
−3.4
Glucose 6-phosphate
−13.8
−3.3
Glycerol 3-phosphate
−9.2
−2.2
1
P
i
, inorganic orthophosphate.
2
Values for ATP and most others taken from Krebs and Kornberg
(1957). They differ between investigators depending on the pre-
cise conditions under which the measurements are made.
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
All your JPG and PDF files will be permanently erased from our servers into image file format in C# application, then RasterEdge XDoc.PDF for .NET can also
best pdf to jpg converter online; change pdf into jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Your PDF and JPG files will be deleted from our servers an hour after RasterEdge PDF to JPEG converting control SDK (XDoc.PDF for .NET) supports converting
convert pdf pages to jpg online; pdf to jpeg converter
BIOENERGETICS: THE ROLE OF ATP / 83
Figure 10–5.
Structure of ATP, ADP, and AMP show-
ing the position and the number of high-energy phos-
phates (∼
P
).
phosphate of ATP divides the list into two groups.
Low-energy phosphates, exemplified by the ester
phosphates found in the intermediates of glycolysis,
have ∆G0′ values smaller than that of ATP, while in
high-energy phosphatesthe value is higher than that
of ATP. The components of this latter group, including
ATP, are usually anhydrides (eg, the 1-phosphate of
1,3-bisphosphoglycerate), enolphosphates (eg, phos-
phoenolpyruvate), and phosphoguanidines (eg, creatine
phosphate, arginine phosphate). The intermediate posi-
tion of ATP allows it to play an important role in en-
ergy transfer. The high free energy change on hydrolysis
of ATP is due to relief of charge repulsion of adjacent
negatively charged oxygen atoms and to stabilization of
the reaction products, especially phosphate, as reso-
nance hybrids. Other “high-energy compounds” are
thiol esters involving coenzyme A (eg, acetyl-CoA), acyl
carrier protein, amino acid esters involved in protein
synthesis, S-adenosylmethionine (active methionine),
UDPGlc (uridine diphosphate glucose), and PRPP 
(5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate).
High-Energy Phosphates Are 
Designated by ~ 
P
The symbol ∼
P
indicates that the group attached to
the bond, on transfer to an appropriate acceptor, results
in transfer of the larger quantity of free energy. For this
reason, the term group transfer potentialis preferred
by some to “high-energy bond.” Thus, ATP contains
two high-energy phosphate groups and ADP contains
one, whereas the phosphate in AMP (adenosine mono-
phosphate) is of the low-energy type, since it is a nor-
mal ester link (Figure 10–5).
HIGH-ENERGY PHOSPHATES ACT AS THE
“ENERGY CURRENCY” OF THE CELL
ATP is able to act as a donor of high-energy phosphate
to form those compounds below it in Table 10–1. Like-
wise, with the necessary enzymes, ADP can accept
high-energy phosphate to form ATP from those com-
pounds above ATP in the table. In effect, an ATP/
ADP cycleconnects those processes that generate ∼
P
to those processes that utilize ∼
P
(Figure 10–6), con-
tinuously consuming and regenerating ATP. This oc-
curs at a very rapid rate, since the total ATP/ADP pool
is extremely small and sufficient to maintain an active
tissue for only a few seconds.
There are three major sources of ∼
P
taking part in
energy conservationor energy capture:
(1)Oxidative phosphorylation:The greatest quan-
titative source of ∼
P
in aerobic organisms. Free energy
Figure 10–6.
Role of ATP/ADP cycle in transfer of
high-energy phosphate.
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# Guide for PDF to Bmp. Copy the code below to your .NET project to test fast PDF to Bmp conversion. C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion.
convert pdf file to jpg on; to jpeg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
Of course, our XDoc.Converter for .NET still enables you to RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. C:\input.tif"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert tiff to
convert pdf to jpg; change format from pdf to jpg
84 / CHAPTER 10
comes from respiratory chain oxidation using molecular
O
2
within mitochondria (Chapter 11).
(2)Glycolysis:A net formation of two ∼
P
results
from the formation of lactate from one molecule of glu-
cose, generated in two reactions catalyzed by phospho-
glycerate kinase and pyruvate kinase, respectively (Fig-
ure 17–2).
(3) The citric acid cycle:One∼
P
is generated di-
rectly in the cycle at the succinyl thiokinase step (Figure
16–3).
Phosphagens act as storage forms of high-energy
phosphate and include creatine phosphate, occurring in
vertebrate skeletal muscle, heart, spermatozoa, and
brain; and arginine phosphate, occurring in inverte-
brate muscle. When ATP is rapidly being utilized as a
source of energy for muscular contraction, phosphagens
permit its concentrations to be maintained, but when
the ATP/ADP ratio is high, their concentration can in-
crease to act as a store of high-energy phosphate (Figure
10–7).
When ATP acts as a phosphate donor to form those
compounds of lower free energy of hydrolysis (Table
10–1), the phosphate group is invariably converted to
one of low energy, eg,
ATP Allows the Coupling of
Thermodynamically Unfavorable
Reactions to Favorable Ones
The phosphorylation of glucose to glucose 6-phos-
phate, the first reaction of glycolysis (Figure 17–2), is
highly endergonic and cannot proceed under physio-
logic conditions.
To take place, the reaction must be coupled with an-
other—more exergonic—reaction such as the hydroly-
sis of the terminal phosphate of ATP.
When (1) and (2) are coupled in a reaction catalyzed by
hexokinase, phosphorylation of glucose readily pro-
ceeds in a highly exergonic reaction that under physio-
logic conditions is irreversible. Many “activation” reac-
tions follow this pattern.
Adenylyl Kinase (Myokinase)
Interconverts Adenine Nucleotides
This enzyme is present in most cells. It catalyzes the fol-
lowing reaction:
This allows:
(1)High-energy phosphate in ADP to be used in
the synthesis of ATP.
(2)AMP, formed as a consequence of several acti-
vating reactions involving ATP, to be recovered by
rephosphorylation to ADP.
(3) AMP to increase in concentration when ATP
becomes depleted and act as a metabolic (allosteric) sig-
nal to increase the rate of catabolic reactions, which in
turn lead to the generation of more ATP (Chapter 19).
When ATP Forms AMP, Inorganic
Pyrophosphate (PP
i
) Is Produced
This occurs, for example, in the activation of long-
chain fatty acids (Chapter 22):
This reaction is accompanied by loss of free energy
as heat, which ensures that the activation reaction will
go to the right; and is further aided by the hydrolytic
splitting of PP
i
, catalyzed by inorganic pyrophospha-
tase,a reaction that itself has a large ∆G
0′
of −27.6 kJ/
(2) ATP→ADP+P
i
(∆G
0′
=−30.5 kJ/mol)
(1) Glucose+P
i
→Glucose 6-phosphate+H
2
O
(∆G
0′
=+13.8 kJ/mol)
Figure 10–7.
Transfer of high-energy phosphate be-
tween ATP and creatine.
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
reader pdf to jpeg; convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF. VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer: Convert and Export PDF.
convert multiple page pdf to jpg; batch pdf to jpg online
BIOENERGETICS: THE ROLE OF ATP / 85
mol. Note that activations via the pyrophosphate path-
way result in the loss of two ∼
P
rather than one ∼
P
as
occurs when ADP and P
i
are formed.
A combination of the above reactions makes it pos-
sible for phosphate to be recycled and the adenine nu-
cleotides to interchange (Figure 10–8).
Other Nucleoside Triphosphates
Participate in the Transfer of 
High-EnergyPhosphate
By means of the enzyme nucleoside diphosphate ki-
nase,UTP, GTP, and CTP can be synthesized from
their diphosphates, eg,
All of these triphosphates take part in phosphoryla-
tions in the cell. Similarly, specific nucleoside mono-
phosphate kinases catalyze the formation of nucleoside
diphosphates from the corresponding monophosphates.
Thus, adenylyl kinase is a specialized monophosphate
kinase.
SUMMARY
• Biologic systems use chemical energy to power the
living processes.
• Exergonic reactions take place spontaneously with
loss of free energy (∆G is negative). Endergonic reac-
tions require the gain of free energy (∆G is positive)
and only occur when coupled to exergonic reactions.
• ATP acts as the “energy currency” of the cell, trans-
ferring free energy derived from substances of higher
energy potential to those of lower energy potential.
REFERENCES
de Meis L: The concept of energy-rich phosphate compounds:
Water, transport ATPases, and entropy energy. Arch Bio-
chem Biophys 1993;306:287.
Ernster L (editor): Bioenergetics.Elsevier, 1984.
Harold FM: The Vital Force: A Study of Bioenergetics. Freeman,
1986.
Klotz IM: Introduction to Biomolecular Energetics.Academic Press,
1986.
Krebs HA, Kornberg HL: Energy Transformations in Living Matter.
Springer, 1957. 
Figure 10–8.
Phosphate cycles and interchange of
adenine nucleotides.
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF. C#.NET WPF PDF Viewer Tool: Convert and Export PDF.
change pdf to jpg online; convert pdf to jpeg on
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Support create PDF from multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
change from pdf to jpg on; change pdf to jpg image
Biologic Oxidation
11
86
Peter A. Mayes, PhD, DSc, & Kathleen M. Botham, PhD, DSc
BIOMEDICAL IMPORTANCE
Chemically, oxidationis defined as the removal of elec-
trons and reductionas the gain of electrons. Thus, oxi-
dation is always accompanied by reduction of an elec-
tron acceptor. This principle of oxidation-reduction
applies equally to biochemical systems and is an impor-
tant concept underlying understanding of the nature of
biologic oxidation. Note that many biologic oxidations
can take place without the participation of molecular
oxygen, eg, dehydrogenations. The life of higher ani-
mals is absolutely dependent upon a supply of oxygen
for respiration,the process by which cells derive energy
in the form of ATP from the controlled reaction of hy-
drogen with oxygen to form water. In addition, molec-
ular oxygen is incorporated into a variety of substrates
by enzymes designated as oxygenases;many drugs, pol-
lutants, and chemical carcinogens (xenobiotics) are me-
tabolized by enzymes of this class, known as the cy-
tochrome P450 system.Administration of oxygen can
be lifesaving in the treatment of patients with respira-
tory or circulatory failure. 
FREE ENERGY CHANGES CAN 
BE EXPRESSED IN TERMS 
OF REDOX POTENTIAL
In reactions involving oxidation and reduction, the free
energy change is proportionate to the tendency of reac-
tants to donate or accept electrons. Thus, in addition to
expressing free energy change in terms of ∆G
0′
(Chapter
10), it is possible, in an analogous manner, to express it
numerically as an oxidation-reductionor redox po-
tential(E′
0
). The redox potential of a system (E
0
) is
usually compared with the potential of the hydrogen
electrode (0.0 volts at pH 0.0). However, for biologic
systems, the redox potential (E′
0
)is normally expressed
at pH 7.0, at which pH the electrode potential of the
hydrogen electrode is −0.42 volts. The redox potentials
of some redox systems of special interest in mammalian
biochemistry are shown in Table 11–1. The relative po-
sitions of redox systems in the table allows prediction of
the direction of flow of electrons from one redox couple
to another.
Enzymes involved in oxidation and reduction are
called oxidoreductases and are classified into four
* The term “oxidase” is sometimes used collectively to denote all
enzymes that catalyze reactions involving molecular oxygen.
groups: oxidases, dehydrogenases, hydroperoxidases,
and oxygenases.
OXIDASES USE OXYGEN AS A
HYDROGEN ACCEPTOR
Oxidases catalyze the removal of hydrogen from a sub-
strate using oxygen as a hydrogen acceptor.* They form
water or hydrogen peroxide as a reaction product (Fig-
ure 11–1).
Some Oxidases Contain Copper
Cytochrome oxidaseis a hemoprotein widely distrib-
uted in many tissues, having the typical heme pros-
thetic group present in myoglobin, hemoglobin, and
other cytochromes (Chapter 6). It is the terminal com-
ponent of the chain of respiratory carriers found in mi-
tochondria and transfers electrons resulting from the
oxidation of substrate molecules by dehydrogenases to
their final acceptor, oxygen. The enzyme is poisoned by
carbon monoxide, cyanide, and hydrogen sulfide. It has
also been termed cytochrome a
3
. It is now known that
cytochromes aand a
3
are combined in a single protein,
and the complex is known as cytochrome aa
3
.It con-
tains two molecules of heme, each having one Fe atom
that oscillates between Fe3
+
and Fe2
+
during oxidation
and reduction. Furthermore, two atoms of Cu are pre-
sent, each associated with a heme unit.
Other Oxidases Are Flavoproteins
Flavoprotein enzymes contain flavin mononucleotide
(FMN)or flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)as pros-
thetic groups. FMN and FAD are formed in the body
from the vitamin riboflavin(Chapter 45). FMN and
FAD are usually tightly—but not covalently—bound to
their respective apoenzyme proteins. Metalloflavopro-
teins contain one or more metals as essential cofactors.
Examples of flavoprotein enzymes include 
L
-amino
acid oxidase,an FMN-linked enzyme found in kidney
with general specificity for the oxidative deamination of
BIOLOGIC OXIDATION
/ 87
Table 11–1. Some redox potentials of special
interest in mammalian oxidation systems.
System
E
0
Volts
H+/H
2
−0.42
NAD
+
/NADH
−0.32
Lipoate; ox/red
−0.29
Acetoacetate/3-hydroxybutyrate
−0.27
Pyruvate/lactate
−0.19
Oxaloacetate/malate
−0.17
Fumarate/succinate
+0.03
Cytochrome b; Fe
3+
/Fe
2+
+0.08
Ubiquinone; ox/red
+0.10
Cytochrome c
1
; Fe3+/Fe2+
+0.22
Cytochrome a; Fe
3+
/Fe
2+
+0.29
Oxygen/water
+0.82
the naturally occurring 
L
-amino acids; xanthine oxi-
dase,which contains molybdenum and plays an impor-
tant role in the conversion of purine bases to uric acid
(Chapter 34), and is of particular significance in uri-
cotelic animals (Chapter 29); and aldehyde dehydro-
genase,an FAD-linked enzyme present in mammalian
livers, which contains molybdenum and nonheme iron
and acts upon aldehydes and N-heterocyclic substrates.
The mechanisms of oxidation and reduction of these
enzymes are complex. Evidence suggests a two-step re-
action as shown in Figure 11–2.
DEHYDROGENASES CANNOT USE
OXYGEN AS A HYDROGEN ACCEPTOR
There are a large number of enzymes in this class. They
perform two main functions:
(1)Transfer of hydrogen from one substrate to an-
other in a coupled oxidation-reduction reaction (Figure
11–3). These dehydrogenases are specific for their sub-
strates but often utilize common coenzymes or hydro-
gen carriers, eg, NAD
+
. Since the reactions are re-
versible, these properties enable reducing equivalents to
be freely transferred within the cell. This type of reac-
tion, which enables one substrate to be oxidized at the
expense of another, is particularly useful in enabling ox-
idative processes to occur in the absence of oxygen,
such as during the anaerobic phase of glycolysis (Figure
17–2).
(2)As components in the respiratory chainof elec-
tron transport from substrate to oxygen (Figure 12–3).
Many Dehydrogenases Depend 
on Nicotinamide Coenzymes
These dehydrogenases use nicotinamide adenine di-
nucleotide (NAD
+
) or nicotinamide adenine dinu-
cleotide phosphate (NADP
+
)—or both—and are
formed in the body from the vitamin niacin(Chapter
45). The coenzymes are reduced by the specific sub-
strate of the dehydrogenase and reoxidized by a suitable
electron acceptor (Figure 11–4).They may freely and
reversibly dissociate from their respective apoenzymes.
Generally, NAD-linked dehydrogenases catalyze ox-
idoreduction reactions in the oxidative pathways of me-
tabolism, particularly in glycolysis, in the citric acid
cycle, and in the respiratory chain of mitochondria.
NADP-linked dehydrogenases are found characteristi-
cally in reductive syntheses, as in the extramitochon-
drial pathway of fatty acid synthesis and steroid synthe-
sis—and also in the pentose phosphate pathway. 
Other Dehydrogenases Depend 
on Riboflavin
The flavin groups associated with these dehydrogenases
are similar to FMN and FAD occurring in oxidases.
They are generally more tightly bound to their apoen-
zymes than are the nicotinamide coenzymes. Most of
the riboflavin-linked dehydrogenases are concerned
with electron transport in (or to) the respiratory chain
(Chapter 12). NADH dehydrogenaseacts as a carrier
of electrons between NADH and the components of
higher redox potential (Figure 12–3). Other dehydro-
genases such as succinate dehydrogenase, acyl-CoA
dehydrogenase, and mitochondrial glycerol-3-phos-
phate dehydrogenasetransfer reducing equivalents di-
rectly from the substrate to the respiratory chain (Fig-
ure 12–4). Another role of the flavin-dependent
dehydrogenases is in the dehydrogenation (by dihy-
drolipoyl dehydrogenase) of reduced lipoate, an inter-
mediate in the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate
and α-ketoglutarate (Figures 12–4 and 17–5). The
electron-transferring flavoproteinis an intermediary
carrier of electrons between acyl-CoA dehydrogenase
and the respiratory chain (Figure 12–4).
1/
2
O
2
H
2
O
AH
2
(Red)
A
(Ox)
A
OXIDASE
O
2
H
2
O
2
AH
2
A
B
OXIDASE
Figure 11–1.
Oxidation of a metabolite catalyzed by
an oxidase (A)forming H
2
O, (B)forming H
2
O
2
.
88 / CHAPTER 11
H
3
C
H
3
C
N
N
N
NH
R
O
O
H
3
C
H
3
C
N
N
NH
R
O
O
H
N
H
3
C
H
3
C
N
NH
R
O
O
H
N
H
(H
+ e
)
(H
+ e
)
N
H
H
Figure 11–2.
Oxidoreduction of isoalloxazine ring in flavin nucleotides via a semi-
quinone (free radical) intermediate (center).
Cytochromes May Also Be Regarded 
as Dehydrogenases
The cytochromes are iron-containing hemoproteins in
which the iron atom oscillates between Fe3
+
and Fe2
+
during oxidation and reduction. Except for cytochrome
oxidase (previously described), they are classified as de-
hydrogenases. In the respiratory chain, they are in-
volved as carriers of electrons from flavoproteins on the
one hand to cytochrome oxidase on the other (Figure
12–4). Several identifiable cytochromes occur in the
respiratory chain, ie, cytochromes b, c
1
, c, a,and a
3
(cy-
tochrome oxidase). Cytochromes are also found in
other locations, eg, the endoplasmic reticulum (cy-
tochromes P450 and b
5
), and in plant cells, bacteria,
and yeasts.
HYDROPEROXIDASES USE HYDROGEN
PEROXIDE OR AN ORGANIC PEROXIDE
AS SUBSTRATE
Two type of enzymes found both in animals and plants
fall into this category: peroxidasesand catalase.
Hydroperoxidases protect the body against harmful
peroxides. Accumulation of peroxides can lead to gen-
eration of free radicals, which in turn can disrupt mem-
branes and perhaps cause cancer and atherosclerosis.
(See Chapters 14 and 45.)
Peroxidases Reduce Peroxides Using
Various Electron Acceptors
Peroxidases are found in milk and in leukocytes,
platelets, and other tissues involved in eicosanoid me-
tabolism (Chapter 23). The prosthetic group is proto-
heme. In the reaction catalyzed by peroxidase, hydro-
gen peroxide is reduced at the expense of several
substances that will act as electron acceptors, such as
ascorbate, quinones, and cytochrome c. The reaction
catalyzed by peroxidase is complex, but the overall reac-
tion is as follows:
In erythrocytes and other tissues, the enzyme glu-
tathione peroxidase, containing selenium as a pros-
thetic group, catalyzes the destruction of H
2
O
2
and
lipid hydroperoxides by reduced glutathione, protecting
membrane lipids and hemoglobin against oxidation by
peroxides (Chapter 20).
Catalase Uses Hydrogen Peroxide as
Electron Donor & Electron Acceptor
Catalase is a hemoprotein containing four heme groups.
In addition to possessing peroxidase activity, it is able
to use one molecule of H
2
O
2
as a substrate electron
donor and another molecule of H
2
O
2
as an oxidant or
electron acceptor.
Under most conditions in vivo, the peroxidase activity
of catalase seems to be favored. Catalase is found in
blood, bone marrow, mucous membranes, kidney, and
liver. Its function is assumed to be the destruction of
hydrogen peroxide formed by the action of oxidases.
2H
2
O
2
2H
2
O + O
2
CATALASE
H
2
O
2
+ AH
2
2H
2
O + A
PEROXIDASE
Carrier
(Ox)
Carrier–H
2
(Red)
AH
2
(Red)
A
(Ox)
DEHYDROGENASE
SPECIFIC FOR A
BH
2
(Red)
B
(Ox)
DEHYDROGENASE
SPECIFIC FOR B
Figure 11–3.
Oxidation of a metabolite catalyzed by
coupled dehydrogenases.
BIOLOGIC OXIDATION
/ 89
N
+
4
R
CONH
2
H
N
4
R
CONH
2
H
H
N
4
R
CONH
2
H
H
AH
2
AH
2
A + H
+
DEHYDROGENASE
SPECIFIC FOR A
DEHYDROGENASE
SPECIFIC FOR B
B Form
A Form
NAD
+
+ AH
2
NADH + H
+
+ A
Figure 11–4.
Mechanism of oxidation
and reduction of nicotinamide coen-
zymes. There is stereospecificity about
position 4 of nicotinamide when it is re-
duced by a substrate AH
2
. One of the hy-
drogen atoms is removed from the sub-
strate as a hydrogen nucleus with two
electrons (hydride ion, H) and is trans-
ferred to the 4 position, where it may be
attached in either the A or the B position
according to the specificity determined
by the particular dehydrogenase catalyz-
ing the reaction. The remaining hydro-
gen of the hydrogen pair removed from
the substrate remains free as a hydro-
genion.
Peroxisomesare found in many tissues, including liver.
They are rich in oxidases and in catalase, Thus, the en-
zymes that produce H
2
O
2
are grouped with the enzyme
that destroys it. However, mitochondrial and microso-
mal electron transport systems as well as xanthine oxi-
dase must be considered as additional sources of H
2
O
2
.
OXYGENASES CATALYZE THE DIRECT
TRANSFER & INCORPORATION 
OF OXYGEN INTO A SUBSTRATE
MOLECULE
Oxygenases are concerned with the synthesis or degra-
dation of many different types of metabolites. They cat-
alyze the incorporation of oxygen into a substrate mole-
cule in two steps: (1) oxygen is bound to the enzyme at
the active site, and (2) the bound oxygen is reduced or
transferred to the substrate. Oxygenases may be divided
into two subgroups, as follows.
Dioxygenases Incorporate Both Atoms 
of Molecular Oxygen Into the Substrate
The basic reaction is shown below:
Examples include the liver enzymes, homogentisate
dioxygenase (oxidase) and 3-hydroxyanthranilate
dioxygenase(oxidase), that contain iron; and 
L
-trypto-
phan dioxygenase (tryptophan pyrrolase) (Chapter
30), that utilizes heme.
A O
AO
+
2
2
Monooxygenases (Mixed-Function
Oxidases, Hydroxylases) Incorporate 
Only One Atom of Molecular Oxygen 
Into the Substrate
The other oxygen atom is reduced to water, an addi-
tional electron donor or cosubstrate (Z) being necessary
for this purpose.
Cytochromes P450 Are Monooxygenases
Important for the Detoxification of Many
Drugs & for the Hydroxylation of Steroids 
Cytochromes P450 are an important superfamily of
heme-containing monooxgenases, and more than 1000
such enzymes are known. Both NADH and NADPH
donate reducing equivalents for the reduction of these
cytochromes (Figure 11–5), which in turn are oxidized
by substrates in a series of enzymatic reactions collectively
known as the hydroxylase cycle(Figure 11–6). In liver
microsomes, cytochromes P450 are found together with
cytochrome b
5
and have an important role in detoxifica-
tion. Benzpyrene, aminopyrine, aniline, morphine, and
benzphetamine are hydroxylated, increasing their solubil-
ity and aiding their excretion. Many drugs such as phe-
nobarbital have the ability to induce the formation of mi-
crosomal enzymes and of cytochromes P450.
Mitochondrial cytochrome P450 systems are found
in steroidogenic tissues such as adrenal cortex, testis,
ovary, and placenta and are concerned with the biosyn-
A
H O
ZH
A
OH H H O O Z
+
+
+
+
2
2
2
90 / CHAPTER 11
NADH
NADPH
Amine oxidase, etc
Flavoprotein
2
Flavoprotein
3
Flavoprotein
1
Cyt b
5
CN
Cyt P450
Stearyl-CoA desaturase
Hydroxylation
Lipid peroxidation
Heme oxygenase
Figure 11–5.
Electron transport chain in microsomes. Cyanide (CN) inhibits the
indicated step.
thesis of steroid hormones from cholesterol (hydroxyla-
tion at C
22
and C
20
in side-chain cleavage and at the
11βand 18 positions). In addition, renal systems cat-
alyzing 1α- and 24-hydroxylations of 25-hydroxychole-
calciferol in vitamin D metabolism—and cholesterol
7α-hydroxylase and sterol 27-hydroxylase involved in
bile acid biosynthesis in the liver (Chapter 26)—are
P450 enzymes. 
SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE PROTECTS
AEROBIC ORGANISMS AGAINST 
OXYGEN TOXICITY
Transfer of a single electron to O
2
generates the poten-
tially damaging superoxide anion free radical (O
2
),
the destructive effects of which are amplified by its giv-
ing rise to free radical chain reactions (Chapter 14).
The ease with which superoxide can be formed from
oxygen in tissues and the occurrence of superoxide dis-
mutase, the enzyme responsible for its removal in all
aerobic organisms (although not in obligate anaerobes)
indicate that the potential toxicity of oxygen is due to
its conversion to superoxide.
Superoxide is formed when reduced flavins—pre-
sent, for example, in xanthine oxidase—are reoxidized
univalently by molecular oxygen.
Superoxide can reduce oxidized cytochrome c
O
Cyt Fe
O
Cyt Fe
2
3
2
2
+
+
+
+
c
c
(
)
(
)
Enz Flavin n H
O
Enz Flavin H H O
H
2
2
2
+
+
+
+
Substrate A-H
A-OH
P450-A-H
Fe
3
+
P450
Fe
3
+
P450-A-H
Fe
2
+
P450-A-H
Fe
2
+
O
2
O
2
CO
P450-A-H
Fe
2
+
O
2
2Fe
2
S
2
3
+
FADH
2
FAD
NADPH 
+
H
+
2H
+
e
e
H
2
O
NADP
+
2Fe
2
S
2
2
+
NADPH-CYT P450 REDUCTASE
Figure 11–6.
Cytochrome P450 hydroxylase cycle in microsomes. The system shown is typical
of steroid hydroxylases of the adrenal cortex. Liver microsomal cytochrome P450 hydroxylase does
not require the iron-sulfur protein Fe
2
S
2
. Carbon monoxide (CO) inhibits the indicated step.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested