Online Catalogs: What Users and Librarians Want   43
The next chart lists from most to least chosen all of the desired data quality 
enhancements from respondents to the end-user pop-up survey. The multiple-choice 
list of enhancements presented in the survey was (necessarily) not the same as the 
list presented in the library survey, but there were some comparable choices. 
End users’ top two enhancements were to add more links to online content/full text 
and more subject information. Tied for third are more tables of contents and add 
summaries/abstracts. From more subject information through add sample text/
excerpts, end users appear to be asking for data elements that are not generally 
included in a standard catalog description. The end-user responses ranked the 
enhancements related to correcting data (remove duplicate records and increase 
accuracy (e.g., name, subject headings) as 8th and 17th, respectively.
Desired Data Quality Enhancements
What changes would be most helpful to you in identifying the item that you need? 
Base: End-user pop-up survey respondents
36%
32%
18%
18%
16%
14%
12%
12%
11%
10%
10%
9%
9%
7%
7%
7%
7%
6%
5%
5%
0%
5%
10%
20%
15%
25%
30%
35%
40%
More links to online content/full text
More subject information
More tables of contents
Add summaries/abstracts
More information in the “details” tab*
More author information
Add sample text/excerpts
Remove duplicate records
More edition information
More selection of non-English
language items
More cover art
More reader reviews
More citation information
Add recommendations
Add editorial reviews from
popular publications
More publisher information
Increase accuracy 
(e.g., name, subject headings)
More format/type information
Add ratings
Other
Source: Online Catalogs: What Users and Librarians Want, OCLC, 2009 (End-user pop-up survey)
*At the time of the pop-up survey, the WorldCat.org “details” tab contained basic bibliographic 
information plus enriched data such as table of contents and summary/abstract, if available.
Data Quality: Librarians and End Users
Convert pdf file to jpg format - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf to jpg for; convert pdf file to jpg format
Convert pdf file to jpg format - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
change pdf to jpg; batch pdf to jpg converter online
44   Online Catalogs: What Users and Librarians Want
The multiple-choice lists of enhancements differed, but suffi cient overlap exists to 
make some comparisons useful. Library survey and end-user survey respondents 
seem to agree on the importance of adding tables of contents and adding 
summaries/abstracts; beyond that, various differences emerge. Tabulating the 
overlapping choices on the two survey lists, and sorting each ranked choice into 
the top, middle or bottom third of the two lists yields the results detailed in the 
following chart. In these results, the difference between library and end-user survey 
respondents’ choices pertaining to adding more links to online content seems the 
most signifi cant; while this enhancement was the fi rst choice of end users, library 
and staff respondents ranked it in the bottom third of their choices. End-user interest 
in adding sample text/excerpts also seems considerably keener than library and staff 
respondents’ interest in this enhancement. 
Relative Ranking of Data Quality Enhancements 
in Library and End-user Surveys
Which of the following enhancements would you recommend? (Library survey)
What changes would be most helpful to you in identifying the item that you need?
(End-user pop-up survey)  
Relative Ranking
Library Survey Respondents   
z 
End-user Survey Respondents
Comparable Enhancements Choice*
Top Third
Middle Third
Bottom Third
Merge duplicate records
#1 Choice
z
More links to online content
z
#1 Choice
z
Add tables of contents to records
z
Add summaries to records
z
Add cover art to results
z
z
Add more formats
z
z
More records for non-English materials
z
z
Add excerpts to the records
z
z
Source: Online Catalogs: What Users and Librarians Want, OCLC, 2009 (Library survey and end-user pop-up survey)
*Note: This is a subset of responses from both the library survey and the end-user pop-up survey.
Data Quality: Librarians and End Users
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start to sort the files, try out some settings and then create the PDF files with
convert pdf image to jpg online; change pdf to jpg online
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert multiple pdf to jpg online; convert pdf into jpg
Online Catalogs: What Users and Librarians Want   45
Advanced searching, refi ning searches and faceted search
As noted in an earlier chapter, supporting advanced searching, browsing and faceted 
navigation of search results involves fi elded indexing of bibliographic data elements 
and usually the establishment and maintenance of controlled forms of headings 
(for names and subjects) to ensure the consistent and reliable collocation of search 
results in the catalog. 
Library survey respondents’ enhancement choices placed a good deal more 
emphasis than end users’ choices did on correcting errors (like merging duplicates 
and fi xing typographical and MARC coding errors) that compromise the ability of 
catalog data elements to effectively support advanced and faceted searching. The 
end users in this study’s focus groups found advanced and faceted searching helpful 
in certain circumstances—especially when working with large retrieval sets—but 
end users tend to be unaware of the data structures and practices required to 
support this functionality. Librarians and staff are aware of what it takes to support 
more sophisticated search features, and so it makes sense that library survey 
respondents—especially those who reported cataloging responsibilities—gave higher 
priority than end users did to database correction activities. 
Librarians’ Perceptions of What End Users Want
Library survey participants who work directly with users were asked to predict what 
enhancements their end users would recommend (their perceptions are labeled as 
“Librarians’ Perception of End Users’ View” when presented in charts). This section 
provides the results of the perceived end-user views and where applicable, compares 
the perceived user views to the actual views of end-user respondents.
From a list of 18 enhancements (see chart on next page), library survey respondents 
who work directly with users were asked to select one, then other enhancements to 
WorldCat that would be the most helpful for their libraries’ users. Nearly half of the 
library and staff respondents (48%) felt that adding cover art to search result lists 
would be helpful to their users, followed by 44% who felt adding tables of contents 
to records and 43% who felt adding summaries/abstracts to search result lists would 
be helpful. 
An analysis of the library survey results segmented by type of library revealed that 
respondents from public libraries were signifi cantly more likely than academic and 
special library librarians to feel that adding cover art to search result lists would be 
helpful to their users (Public = 69%, compared to Academic = 45% and Special = 
31%). 
Data Quality: Librarians and End Users
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
PDF to multiple image forms, including Jpg, Png, Bmp load a program with an incorrect format", please check can use this sample code to convert PDF file to Png
changing pdf file to jpg; convert pdf to gif or jpg
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
C#.NET Example: Convert One Image to PDF in Visual C# .NET Class. Here, we take Gif image file as an example. // Load a GIF image file.
convert pdf to jpg c#; best pdf to jpg converter for
46   Online Catalogs: What Users and Librarians Want
A quarter or more of total library survey respondents who work directly with users 
selected adding summaries/abstracts to detailed bibliographic records (39%), 
adding more clickable links to online content (31%) and adding more formats (25%) 
as enhancements that would be helpful to their users. 
Librarians’ Perception of End Users’ View: 
All Desired Data Quality Enhancements
Which of the following enhancements would be 
most helpful for your patrons?
Base: Librarians who work directly with users
48%
44%
43%
39%
31%
25%
22%
21%
21%
18%
16%
11%
11%
7%
4%
4%
3%
2%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
Fix MARC coding errors
Make it easier to correct records
Enable more libraries to make corrections
Upgrade brief records
Fix typos
Add support for multilingual searching/
record displays
Greater exposure of holdings on the Web
More records for non-English materials
Merge duplicate records
More records for online resources
Increase accuracy of library
holding information
Add excerpts to the records
Add more formats
More clickable links to online content
Add summaries to records
Add summaries to results
Add tables of contents to records
Add cover art to results
Source: Online Catalogs: What Users and Librarians Want, OCLC, 2009 (Library survey)
Data Quality: Librarians and End Users
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Also supports convert PDF files to jpg, jpeg images. to TIFF conversion control, C# developers can render and convert PDF document to TIFF image file with no
convert .pdf to .jpg online; .pdf to jpg
JPEG Image Viewer| What is JPEG
an easy-to-use interface enabling you to quickly convert your JPEG images into other file formats, including Bitmap, Png, Gif, Tiff, PDF, MS-Word
convert pdf picture to jpg; convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi
Online Catalogs: What Users and Librarians Want   47
Thus, librarians and library staff are aware of the importance that end users place 
on enriched content such as summaries/abstracts, of their desire for more clickable 
links to online content/full text, and of the priority end users place on sample text/
excerpts. These priorities are mirrored in the choices end users made from the 
enhancement list that was presented to them in the end user survey, shown below. 
Desired Data Quality Enhancements
What changes would be most helpful to you in identifying the item that you need? 
Base: End-user pop-up survey respondents
36%
32%
18%
18%
16%
14%
12%
12%
11%
10%
10%
9%
9%
7%
7%
7%
7%
6%
5%
5%
0%
5%
10%
20%
15%
25%
30%
35%
40%
More links to online content/full text
More subject information
More tables of contents
Add summaries/abstracts
More information in the “details” tab*
More author information
Add sample text/excerpts
Remove duplicate records
More edition information
More selection of non-English
language items
More cover art
More reader reviews
More citation information
Add recommendations
Add editorial reviews from
popular publications
More publisher information
Increase accuracy 
(e.g., name, subject headings)
More format/type information
Add ratings
Other
Source: Online Catalogs: What Users and Librarians Want, OCLC, 2009 (End-user pop-up survey)
*At the time of the pop-up survey, the WorldCat.org “details” tab contained basic bibliographic 
information plus enriched data such as table of contents and summary/abstract, if available.
Data Quality: Librarians and End Users
C# Image: How to Download Image from URL in C# Project with .NET
image to byte, and how to convert an image image from a URL to your local file using Visual provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
change from pdf to jpg; batch pdf to jpg converter
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
2. To TIFF. Export PDF to TIFF file format. 3. To TXT. Export and convert PDF to TXT file. 4. To Image. Convert PDF to image formats, such as PNG, JPG, BMP and
convert multipage pdf to jpg; reader pdf to jpeg
48   Online Catalogs: What Users and Librarians Want
Adding cover art to results, adding tables of contents to records, adding summaries to 
results and adding summaries to the bibliographic records top the list of discovery-
related enhancements that librarians and staff feel would be helpful to their users. 
To aid in discovery, end users reported that they want more subject information
followed by the addition of evaluative information similar to what librarians 
predicted—adding tables of contents and summaries/abstracts.
Top Discovery-related Data Quality Enhancements
What changes would be most helpful to you in identifying the item that you need? 
(End-user pop-up survey) 
Which of the following enhancements would be most 
helpful for your patrons? (Library survey)
16%
18%
18%
32%
0%
10%
20%
40%
30%
50%
60%
More information in the “details” tab
Add tables of contents
Add summaries/abstracts
More subject information
39%
43%
44%
48%
Add summaries to records
Add summaries to  results
Add tables of contents to records
Add cover art to results
End-user pop-up survey respondents
Librarians’ perceptions of end users’ view
Source: Online Catalogs: What Users and Librarians Want, OCLC, 2009 (End-user pop-up survey and library survey)
On the delivery side, more links to online content topped both librarian (perception 
of end users’ views) and end-user survey respondents’ enhancement choices. 
Librarians and staff also predicted that end users would be helped by increasing the 
accuracy of library holdings information—an enhancement that undoubtedly would 
be helpful in improving the end-user’s delivery experience, but of which end users 
would likely be unaware. 
Top Delivery-related Data Quality Enhancements
What changes would be most helpful to you in identifying the item that you need?
(End-user pop-up survey) 
Which of the following enhancements would be most 
helpful for your patrons? (Library survey)
36%
0%
10%
20%
40%
30%
50%
More links to online content/full text
21%
31%
Increase accuracy of library
holding information
More clickable links to online content
End-user pop-up survey respondents
Librarians’ perceptions of end users’ view
Source: Online Catalogs: What Users and Librarians Want, OCLC, 2009 (End-user pop-up survey and library survey)
Data Quality: Librarians and End Users
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif Append one PDF file to the end of another one in RasterEdge PDF merging library is a mature library SDK which
convert pdf file into jpg; convert pdf page to jpg
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif to load a program with an incorrect format", please check In addition, C# users can append a PDF file to the
convert online pdf to jpg; change pdf file to jpg file
Online Catalogs: What Users and Librarians Want   49
Conclusions
Librarians and End Users
The study found important differences between the catalog data quality priorities 
of end users and those who work in libraries. End users, librarians and library staff 
approach library catalogs purposefully. When end users approach catalogs, they 
generally want to satisfy information needs; librarians and library staff generally have 
work assignments to carry out. The purpose for which catalog data is being used 
seems to be an important driver of differences in data quality priorities. 
The study also found signifi cant differences between data quality priorities of 
librarians/staff by work role, type of library and region. Work role and region seem to 
be the primary drivers of differences among types of library survey respondents in 
this study. 
The understanding that those who work with catalog data have of how its data 
structures work—and the lack of that understanding among end users—is another 
driver of different data quality priorities among end users and some librarians. End 
users are largely unaware of the catalog’s infrastructure, although the end-user focus 
group participants in this study responded favorably to some of the features that rely 
on it (e.g., facets, advanced search).
The fact that end-user participants found the ability to conduct an advanced search 
helpful suggests that the investment in separate indexes and controlled forms 
of names and subjects can benefi t the end user’s discovery experience in next-
generation library catalogs.
To the extent that librarians and staff approach their own catalogs and WorldCat in 
comparable ways, this study supports the view that those with different roles in their 
libraries have somewhat different data quality priorities. In particular, those with 
roles in cataloging and acquisitions certainly place higher priority on database error 
correction activities than end users, but also compared to librarians and staff in other 
job roles. Cataloging and acquisitions staff place a high value on—and recognize 
the importance of—the catalog’s formally structured data, for example, fi elded 
indexes and authorized forms of headings that support advanced searching, search 
limits, faceted browsing and other features of the catalog that rely on the catalog’s 
infrastructure. They also place the highest priority on merging duplicates (more than 
one record for the same edition) and fi xing inaccuracies in structured data.   
50   Online Catalogs: What Users and Librarians Want
Balancing What End Users and Librarians Want
Catalogs have many constituencies, both inside and outside the library. This study’s 
results suggest that end users place a high priority on enrichment data (tables of 
contents, summaries, etc.) and on links to online content, both text and media. 
Librarians and library staff are also important catalog users, and their data quality 
priorities tend to be different than end users’ priorities. If their data quality needs are 
met, they can do their jobs more effi ciently and effectively. And, some of librarians’ 
data quality requirements (to be able to fi x mistakes and control heading forms, for 
example), while not shared by end users, play a role in fulfi lling end users’ needs.   
In a world of unlimited human and fi nancial resources, a data quality program for 
a library’s online catalog could meet all end users’ needs and all librarian and staff 
needs. In a world of limited resources, library leaders must make choices, creatively 
deploy the resources they have, and balance competing data quality requirements. A 
data quality program that strikes a balance between what end users and librarians/
staff want and need, but gives an edge to the desires of end users, seems more likely 
to assure the library will continue to thrive in the end-user communities it serves.  
Usability, User-centered Design and the Principles of 
Information Organization
An interesting insight arises from reading the chapter in Fran Miksa’s dissertation 
that covers the development and thinking behind Charles Cutter’s nineteenth century 
Rules for a Dictionary Catalog;
1
then immediately reading the fi rst chapter of the 
fi rst full draft of Resource Description and Access (RDA),
2
which carries forward the 
concepts of Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Description (FRBR).
3
While 
Cutter’s rules and RDA were or will be applied at very different points in history, 
reading the two texts suggests the principles of information organization underlying 
them are consistent. One can discern an unbroken thread of development from Cutter 
to RDA. 
Yet with a few exceptions of rigorous user studies that may take shape around 
FRBR concepts,
4
there is no evidence that Cutter or the framers of FRBR or RDA 
systematically tested their assumptions with end users of information systems. 
Fran Miksa, who has over the course of his long career publicly noted librarianship’s 
relatively separate and parallel developments of the principles of information 
organization on the one hand, and use and user studies on the other, has said, “I 
conclude that the idea of information users and use remains rather mysterious in its 
overall sense—rather like the images we see while driving in a fog.”
5
As Web information services have taken off, commanding a great deal of attention 
from all segments of the information-seeking public, those who built them 
appeared to pay little heed (if they were aware at all), of the conceptual frameworks 
for information organization embraced by librarianship. Instead a good deal of 
experimentation, trial and error seemed to be the rule.  
Conclusions
Online Catalogs: What Users and Librarians Want   51
As it became clearer to Web developers what worked and what didn’t, many also 
learned to take advantage of new opportunities in the Web’s virtual world—lessons 
that have emerged as some very different ways of organizing large volumes of 
information, for example, on Flickr or Facebook. On the Web, the principles of 
usability and user-centered design might be said to have displaced the traditional 
principles of information organization, at least as librarians have practiced them. 
David Weinberger, writing about new ways of bringing order to masses of digital 
information, notes that “everything is connected and therefore everything is 
metadata.”
6
Based on their experiences with popular Web sites, Internet-savvy end 
users expect to be able to search on a rich store of metadata from many sources and 
easily fi nd and get just what they want.
Given these two different traditions for bringing order to information on end users’ 
behalf—one from librarianship and the other from the Web—this study’s results are 
not surprising. Librarians’ perspectives about data quality remain highly infl uenced 
by classical principles of information organization, while end users’ expectations 
of data quality arise from their experiences of how information is organized on 
popular Web sites. What is needed now is to integrate the best of both worlds in new, 
expanded defi nitions of what “quality” means in library online catalogs, as well as 
who is responsible for providing it.        
Metadata and Content
Delivery, Links and More Online Content in the Catalog
In this study, end user respondents, but not library survey respondents, gave the 
highest priority to enhancing the catalog with more links to online content. End users 
appear to perceive the process of moving through discovery and selection to access 
as one continuous fl ow, while librarians tend to think about user tasks as separate 
and distinct. In a blog post on FRBR, Karen Coyle goes so far as to say, “The FRBR user 
tasks [fi nd, identify, select, obtain] are limited in scope, and as such they limit how 
we think about users and catalogs.”
7
Because end users come from an information world where a huge amount of 
content is online, it is natural for them to expect to be able to access content—not 
just discover, select and be directed how to get it (the modus operandi of the 
library catalog). As Google Book Search gains the attention of those who use library 
collections, an end user’s appetite for linking immediately to the digitized content of 
books, or at least to snippets, can be expected to increase even more. The end-user 
expectation to link to content extends beyond text and includes the expressed desire 
to link to samples of music and video.     
Discovery, Delivery and Enrichment Data
These results suggest that end users want to reduce the difference between the 
description of an item (its catalog record) and the item itself by enriching the basic 
catalog record with tables of contents, summaries/abstracts, cover art and excerpts 
Conclusions
52   Online Catalogs: What Users and Librarians Want
or sample content. For some end users (in this study, undergraduates), social content 
like user reviews, ratings and tags was also seen as helpful. Librarians seem to agree 
that at least tables of contents should be added to catalog records. 
In keeping with the fi nding that delivery is as important, if not more important than 
discovery, end users generally don’t see the point of fi nding things they can’t get 
or spending time to get things that won’t meet their information need. Not wanting 
to waste their time or energy, end users seem to want this enriched content to help 
them decide if it’s worth their time to try to obtain the item. 
“Physical delivery has long been the ignored stepchild of the library world.”
8
These 
words begin Valerie Horton’s 2009 report on the second ‘Moving Mountains’ 
conference on the physical delivery of library materials. Her article describing the 
state of library delivery (interlibrary loan, consortial borrowing, home delivery) 
through a variety of conference presentations is a good starting point for considering 
how to raise the priority of delivery in libraries. 
Subject Headings and Subject Information
When end-user survey respondents selected “more subject information” as an 
enhancement priority, what did they mean? It is unlikely, given the relatively few 
unique subject-rich words contributed to a catalog description by controlled subject 
headings,
9
that they mean more controlled subject headings. Given end-user survey 
respondents’ top choices for catalog enhancement and what end-user focus group 
participants reported, “more subject information” is more likely to be interpreted as 
subject-rich data elements not generally included in a standard catalog description. 
At the same time, controlled subject terms and phrases serve end users in a number 
of ways: as subject-rich index terms; to support multilingual subject searching (when 
records contain subject headings in more than one language); as facets for refi ning 
or expanding searches; for browsing; as words or phrases linked to classifi cation 
or other terminologies; as a factor in determining relevance ranking; and more. 
To support these features, today’s catalogs rely on labor-intensive practices for 
producing controlled subject headings. Given the growing concern that these 
traditional methods are not sustainable going forward, it may be necessary for 
libraries to fi nd more economical means to achieve the benefi ts to end users that 
controlled subject vocabularies provide. 
Standard Numbers
The fi ndings suggest that standard numbers like the ISBN are critical to support 
librarians’ work. Despite what end users selected as essential elements for 
identifying wanted items, standard numbers can also be essential to support 
end-user tasks. The presence of standard numbers is essential, for example, for 
providing reliable links to (and movement of data between) the same item in multiple 
repositories, as well as supporting a variety of machine-to-machine interactions that 
improve the end user’s discovery or delivery experience. 
Conclusions
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested