Many brewers have made the mistake of trying to change the pH of their water with 
salts or acids to bring it to the mash pH range before adding the malts. You can do 
it that way if you have enough experience with a particular recipe to know what the 
mash pH will turn out to be; but it is like putting the cart before the horse. It is 
better to start the mash, check the pH with test paper and then make any additions 
you feel are necessary to bring the pH to the proper range. Most of the time 
adjustment won't be needed. 
However, most people don't like to trust to luck or go through the trial and error of 
testing the mash pH with pH paper and adding salts to get the right pH. There is a 
way to estimate your mash pH before you start and this method is discussed in a 
section to follow, but first, let's look at how the grain bill affects the mash  
15.2 Balancing the Malts and Minerals 
When you mash 100% base malt grist with distilled water, you will usually get a 
mash pH between 5.7-5.8. (Remember, the target is 5.1-5.5 pH.) The natural 
acidity of roasted specialty malt additions (e.g. caramel, chocolate, black) to the 
mash can have a large effect on the pH. Using a dark crystal or roasted malt as 
20% of the grainbill will often bring the pH down by half a unit (.5 pH). In distilled 
water, 100% caramel malt would typically yield a mash pH of 4.5-4.8, chocolate 
malt 4.3-4.5, and black malt 4.0-4.2. The chemistry of the water determines how 
much of an effect each malt addition has. The best way to explain this is to describe 
two of the world's most famous beers and their brewing waters. The Pilsen region 
of the Czech Republic was the birthplace of the Pilsener style of beer. A Pils is a 
crisp, golden clear lager with a very clean hoppy taste. The water of Pilsen is very 
soft, free of most minerals and very low in bicarbonates. The brewers used an acid 
rest with this water to bring the pH down to the target mash range of 5.1 - 5.5 
using only the pale lager malts. 
Table 14 - Influence of Brewing Water  
City
Ca
+2
Mg
+2
HCO
3
-1
Cl
-1
Na
+1
SO
4
-2
Pilsen 
10
3
3
4.3
4
-
Dublin 119
4
319
19
12
53
From "American Handy Book", 2:790, Wahl-Henius, 1902 
The other beer to consider is Guinness
, the famous stout from Ireland. The water of 
Ireland is high in bicarbonates (HCO
3
-1
), and has a fair amount of calcium but not 
enough to balance the bicarbonate. This results in hard, alkaline water with a lot of 
buffering power. The high alkalinity of the water makes it difficult to produce light 
pale beers that are not harsh tasting. The water does not allow the pH of a 100% 
base malt mash to hit the target range of 5 - 5.8, it remains higher and this 
extracts harsh phenolic and tannin compounds from the grain husks. The lower pH 
of an optimum mash (5.2-5.5) normally prevents these compounds from appearing 
in the finished beer. But why is this region of the world renowned for producing 
outstanding dark beers?. The reason is the dark malt itself. The highly roasted 
black malts used to make Guinness
add acidity to the mash. These malts match 
and counter the buffering capability of the carbonates in the water, lowering the 
mash pH into the target range. 
Pdf to jpeg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf photo to jpg
Pdf to jpeg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf to jpg converter; convert multipage pdf to jpg
The fact of the matter is that dark beer cannot be brewed in Pilsen, and light lagers 
can't be brewed in Dublin without adding the proper type and amount of buffering 
salts. Before you brew your first all-grain beer, you should get a water analysis 
from your local water utility and look at the mineral profile to establish which styles 
of beer can best be produced. The use of roasted malts such as Caramel, 
Chocolate, Black Patent, and the toasted malts such as Munich and Vienna, can be 
used successfully in areas where the water is alkaline (i.e., a pH greater than 7.5 
and a carbonate level of more than 200 parts per million) to produce good mash 
conditions. If you live in an area where the water is very soft (like Pilsen), then you 
can add brewing salts to the mash and sparge water to help achieve the target pH. 
The next two sections of this chapter, Residual Alkalinity and Mash pH, and Using 
Salts for Brewing Water Adjustment, discuss how to do this. 
The following table lists examples of classic beer styles and the mineral profile of 
the city that developed them. By looking at the city and its resulting style of beer, 
you will gain an appreciation for how malt chemistry and water chemistry 
interrelate. Descriptions of the region's beer styles are given below. 
Table 15 - Water Profiles From Notable Brewing Cities  
City
Calcium 
(Ca
+2
)
Magnesium 
(Mg
+2
)
Bicarbonate 
(HCO
3
-1
)
SO
4
-2
Na
+1
Cl
-1
Beer Style
Pilsen 
10
3
3
4
3
4
Pilsener
Dortmund 225
40
220
120
60
60
Export Lager
Vienna
163
68
243
216
8
39
Vienna Lager
Munich
109
21
171
79
2
36
Oktoberfest
London 
52
32
104
32
86
34
British Bitter
Edinburgh 100
18
160
105
20
45
Scottish Ale
Burton 
352
24
320
820
44
16
India Pale Ale
Dublin 
118
4
319
54
12
19
Dry Stout
Sources  
Burton: "The Practical Brewer", p. 10,  
Dortmund Noonen, G., "New Brewing Lager Beer" 
Dublin "The Practical Brewer", p. 10, 
Edinburgh 
London "Fermentation Technology", p. 13, Westermann and Huige 
Munich  
Pilsen "American Handy Book", 2:790, Wahl-Henius, 1902 
Vienna 
Pilsen - The very low hardness and alkalinity allow the proper mash pH to be 
reached with only base malts, achieving the soft rich flavor of fresh bread. The lack 
of sulfate provides for a mellow hop bitterness that does not overpower the soft 
maltiness; noble hop aroma is emphasized.  
Dortmund - Another city famous for pale lagers, Dortmund Export has less hop 
character than a Pilsner, with a more assertive malt character due to the higher 
levels of all minerals. The balance of the minerals is very similar to Vienna, but the 
beer is bolder, drier, and lighter in color. 
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
convert pdf to jpg file; change pdf file to jpg online
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
change pdf to jpg file; convert multiple page pdf to jpg
Vienna - The water of this city is similar to Dortmund, but lacks the level of 
calcium to balance the carbonates, and lacks as well the sodium and chloride for 
flavor. Attempts to imitate Dortmund Export failed miserably until a percentage of 
toasted malt was added to balance the mash, and Vienna's famous red-amber 
lagers were born. 
Munich - Although moderate in most minerals, alkalinity from carbonates is high. 
The smooth flavors of the dunkels, bocks and oktoberfests of the region show the 
success of using dark malts to balance the carbonates and acidify the mash. The 
relatively low sulfate content provides for a mellow hop bitterness that lets the malt 
flavor dominate. 
London - The higher carbonate level dictated the use of more dark malts to 
balance the mash, but the chloride and high sodium content also smoothed the 
flavors out, resulting in the well-known ruby-dark porters and copper-colored pale 
ales. 
Edinburgh - Think of misty Scottish evenings and you think of strong Scottish ale - 
dark ruby highlights, a sweet malty beer with a mellow hop finish. The water is 
similar to London's but with a bit more bicarbonate and sulfate, making a beer that 
can embrace a heavier malt body while using less hops to achieve balance. 
Burton-on-Trent - Compared to London, the calcium and sulfate are remarkably 
high, but the hardness and alkalinity are balanced to nearly the degree of Pilsen. 
The high level of sulfate and low level of sodium produce an assertive, clean hop 
bitterness. Compared to the ales of London, Burton ales are paler, but much more 
bitter, although the bitterness is balanced by the higher alcohol and body of these 
ales. 
Dublin - Famous for its stout, Dublin has the highest bicarbonate concentration of 
the cities of the British Isles, and Ireland embraces it with the darkest, maltiest 
beer in the world. The low levels of sodium, chloride and sulfate create an 
unobtrusive hop bitterness to properly balance all of the malt. 
15.3 Residual Alkalinity and Mash pH 
Before you conduct your first mash, you probably want to be assured that it will 
probably work. Many people want to brew a dark stout or a light pilsener for their 
first all-grain beer, but these very dark and very light styles need the proper 
brewing water to achieve the desired mash pH. While there is not any surefire way 
to predict the exact pH, there are empirical methods and calculations that can put 
you in the ballpark, just like for hop IBU calculations. To estimate your base-malt-
only mash pH, you will need the calcium, magnesium and alkalinity ion 
concentrations from your local water utility report. Unfortunately, you rarely want 
to brew a base-malt-only beer. 
To estimate your recipe mash pH, you will need the calcium, magnesium and 
alkalinity ion concentrations from the water report, plus the approximate color of 
the beer you are trying to brew.  
Background: 
In 1953, P. Kohlbach determined that 3.5 equivalents (Eq) of calcium reacts with 
malt phytin to release 1 equivalent of hydrogen ions which can "neutralize" 1 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
This example shows how to build a PDF document with three image files (BMP, JPEG and PNG). // Load 3 image files (BMP, JPEG and PNG).
convert pdf into jpg; convert pdf to 300 dpi jpg
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Raster
from stream or byte array, print images to tiff or pdf, annotate images C#.NET RasterEdge HTML5 Viewer supports various images formats, including JPEG, GIF, BMP
.net convert pdf to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg file
equivalent of water alkalinity. Magnesium, the other water hardness ion, also works 
but to a lesser extent, needing 7 equivalents to neutralize 1 equivalent of alkalinity. 
Alkalinity which is not neutralized is termed "residual alkalinity" (abbreviated RA). 
On a per volume basis, this can be expressed as:  
mEq/L RA = mEq/L Alkalinity - [(mEq/L Ca)/3.5 + (mEq/L Mg)/7]  
where mEq/L is defined as milliequivalents per liter. 
This residual alkalinity will cause an all-base-malt mash to have a higher pH than is 
desirable (ie. >6.0), resulting in tannin extraction, etc. To counteract the RA, 
brewers in alkaline water areas like Dublin added dark roasted malts which have a 
natural acidity that brings the mash pH back into the right range (5.2-5.6). To help 
you determine what your RA is, and what your mash pH will probably be for a 
100% base malt mash, I have put together the following nomograph that allows 
you to read the base-malt-mash-pH after marking-off your water's calcium, 
magnesium and alkalinity levels. To use the chart, you mark off the calcium and 
magnesium levels to determine an "effective" hardness (EH), then draw a line from 
that value through your alkalinity value to point to the RA and the approximate pH. 
The effective hardness is not the same as the "Total Hardness as CaCO3" you may 
see on your water report, it is a calculation of the effect that calcium and 
magnesium have on alkalinity. 
After determining your RA and probable pH, the chart offers you two options: 
a) You can plan to brew a style of beer that approximately matches the color guide 
above your RA, or 
b) You can estimate an amount of calcium or bicarbonate to add to the brewing 
water to hit a targeted residual alkalinity, one that is more appropriate to the color 
of the style you want to brew. 
I will show you how this works in the following example.  
Determining the Beer Styles That Best Suit Your Water 
1. A water report for Los Angeles, CA, states that the three ion concentrations are: 
Ca (ppm) = 70 
Mg (ppm) = 30 
Alkalinity = 120 ppm as CaCO3 
2. Mark these values on the appropriate scales. (Denoted by red and green circles 
here.) 
3. Draw a line between the Ca and Mg values to determine the Effective Hardness. 
(Denoted by a red square.)  
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Jpeg, Png, Bmp, Gif Image to PDF. Jpeg to PDF Conversion in C#. In the following C# programming demo, we will firstly take Jpeg to PDF conversion as an example.
convert pdf to jpg batch; convert pdf to jpg 300 dpi
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Our XDoc.PDF allows C# developers to perform high performance conversions from PDF document to multiple image forms. Besides raster image Jpeg, images forms
batch convert pdf to jpg; convert from pdf to jpg
4. From the value for EH, draw a line through the Alkalinity value (green circle) to 
intersect the RA/pH scale. This is your estimated base-malt-mash pH of 5.8 (blue 
square). 
5. Looking directly above the pH scale, the color guide shows a range of color which 
corresponds to most amber, red and brown ales and lagers. Most Pale Ale, Brown 
Ale and Porter recipes can be brewed with confidence. The amount of acidity in the 
specialty grains used in these styles should balance the residual alkalinity to 
achieve the proper mash pH (from 5.8 down to 5.2-5.6, depending on the darkness 
of the recipe). 
Determining Calcium Additions to Lower the Mash pH 
But what if you want to brew a much paler beer, like a Pilsener or a Helles? Then 
you will need to add more calcium to balance the alkalinity that your malt selection 
cannot. 
1. Go back to the nomograph and pick a point on the RA scale that is within the 
desired color range. In this example, I picked an RA value of -50. 
2. Draw a line from this RA value back through your Alkalinity value (from the 
water report), and determine your new EH value. 
3. From the original Mg value from the report, draw a line through the new EH 
value and determine the new Ca value needed to produce this effective hardness.  
4. Subtract the original Ca value from the new Ca value to determine how much 
calcium (per gallon) needs to be added. In this example, 145 ppm/gal. of additional 
calcium is needed. 
5. The source for the calcium can be either calcium chloride or calcium sulfate 
(gypsum). See the following section for guidelines on just how much of these salts 
to add. 
Determining Bicarbonate Addition to Raise the Mash pH 
Likewise, you can determine how much additional alkalinity (HCO
3
) would be 
needed to brew a dark stout if you have water with low alkalinity. 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Sometimes, to convert PDF document into BMP, GIF, JPEG and PNG raster images in Visual Basic .NET applications, you may need a third party tool and have some
convert pdf image to jpg; change file from pdf to jpg
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
This VB. NET example shows how to build a PDF document with three image files (BMP, JPEG and PNG). ' Load 3 image files (BMP, JPEG and PNG).
batch convert pdf to jpg online; convert online pdf to jpg
1. You determine your initial RA and base-malt-mash pH from your water report, 
and then determine your desired RA for the style you want to brew. In this 
example, I have selected an RA of 180 (base-malt-mash pH 6), which corresponds 
to a dark beer on the color guideline. 
2. The difference is that this time you draw a line from the desired RA to the 
original EH, passing through a new Alkalinity. 
3. Subtract the original alkalinity from the new alkalinity to determine the additional 
bicarbonate needed. The additional bicarbonate can be added by either using 
sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) or calcium carbonate. Using calcium carbonate 
additions would also affect the EH, causing you to re-evaluate the whole system, 
while using baking soda would also contribute high levels of sodium, which can 
contribute harsh flavors at high levels. You will probably want to add some of each 
to achieve the right bicarbonate level without adding too much sodium or calcium. 
Note: The full size nomograph now contains an approximate numeric correlation to 
beer color (SRM scale). This is intended to better help you target a residual 
alkalinity level based on the color of the beer style, but it is an approximation. 
There is a lot of variation in the malt-acidity to malt-color relationship. [Oct.'06] 
Figure 81: Full size nomograph for approximating your mash pH from your local 
water report 
15.4 Using Salts for Brewing Water Adjustment 
Brewing water can be adjusted (to a degree) by the addition of brewing salts. 
Unfortunately, the addition of salts to water is not a matter of 2 + 2 = 4, it tends to 
be 3.9 or 4.1, depending. Water chemistry can be complicated; the rules contain 
exceptions and thresholds where other rules and exceptions take over.  
Fortunately for most practical applications, you do not have to be that rigorous. You 
can add needed ions to your water with easily obtainable salts. To calculate how 
much to add, use the nomograph or another water chart to figure out what 
concentration is desired and then subtract your water's ion concentration to 
determine the difference. Next, consult Table 16 to see how much of an ion a 
particular salt can be expected to add. Don't forget to multiply the difference in 
concentration by the total volume of water you are working with. 
Let's look back at the nomograph example where we determined that we needed 
145 ppm of additional Calcium ion. Let's say that 4 gallons of water are used in the 
mash.  
1. Choose a salt to use to add the needed calcium. Let's use gypsum.  
2. From Table 16, gypsum adds 61.5 ppm of Ca per gram of gypsum added to 
1 gallon of water.  
3. Divide the 145 ppm by 61.5 to determine the number of grams of gypsum 
needed per gallon to make the desired concentration. 145/61.5 = 2.4 grams  
4. Next, multiply the number of grams per gallon by the number of gallons in 
the mash (4). 2.4 x 4 = 9.6 grams, which can be rounded to 10 grams.  
5. Unless you have a gram scale handy, you will want to convert that to 
teaspoons which is more convenient. There are 4 grams of gypsum per 
teaspoon, which gives us 10/4 = 2.5 teaspoons of gypsum to be added to 
the mash.  
6. Lastly, you need to realize how much sulfate this addition has made. 2.5 
grams per gallon equals 368 ppm of sulfate added to the mash, which is a 
lot. In this case, it would probably be a good idea to use calcium chloride for 
half of the addition. 
The following table provides information on the use and results of each salt's 
addition. Brewing salts should be used sparingly to make up for gross deficiencies 
or overabundance of ions. The concentrations given in Table 16 below are for 1 
gram dissolved in 1 gallon of distilled water. Dissolution of 1 gram of a salt in your 
water will result in a different value due to your water's specific mineral content 
and pH. However, the results should be reasonably close. Please refer to Appendix 
F - Recommended Reading, for better discussions of water chemistry and brewing 
water adjustment than I can provide here. 
Table 16 - Salts for Water Adjustment  
Brewing 
Saltand 
Common Name
Concentration 
at 1 
gram/gallon
Grams 
per level 
teaspoon
Effects
Comments
Calcium 
Carbonate 
(CaCO
3
a.k.a. Chalk
105 ppm  
Ca
+2
158 ppm CO
3
-2
1.8
Raises pH
Because of its limited 
solubility it is only 
effective when added 
directly to the mash. Use 
for making dark beers in 
areas of soft water. Use 
nomograph and monitor 
the mash pH with pH test 
papers to determine how 
much to add.
Calcium Sulfate 
(CaSO
4
*2 H
2
O) 
a.k.a. Gypsum
61.5 ppm  
Ca
+2
147.4 ppm  
SO
4
-2
4.0
Lowers pH
Useful for adding calcium 
if the water is low in 
sulfate. Can be used to 
add sulfate "crispness" to 
the hop bitterness.
Calcium 
Chloride 
(CaCl
2
*2H
2
O)
72 ppm 
Ca
+2
127 ppm 
Cl
-1
3.4
Lowers pH
Useful for adding Calcium 
if the water is low in 
chlorides.
Magnesium 
Sulfate 
(MgSO
4
*7H
2
O) 
a.k.a. Epsom 
Salt
26 ppm  
Mg
+2
103 ppm 
SO
4
-2
4.5
Lowers pH 
by a small 
amount.
Can be used to add sulfate 
"crispness" to the hop 
bitterness.
Sodium 
Bicarbonate 
(NaHCO
3
a.k.a. Baking 
Soda
75 ppm 
Na
+1
191 ppm  
HCO
3
-
4.4
Raises pH 
by adding 
alkalinity.
If your pH is too low 
and/or has low residual 
alkalinity, then you can 
add alkalinity. See 
procedure for calcium 
carbonate.
My final advice on the matter is that if you want to brew a pale beer and have 
water that is very high in carbonates and low in calcium, then your best bet is to 
use bottled water* from the store or to dilute your water with distilled water and 
add gypsum or calcium chloride to make up the calcium deficit. Watch your sulfate 
and chloride counts though. Mineral dilution with water is not as straightforward as 
it is with wort dilution, due to the various ion buffering effects, but it will be 
reasonably close. Good Luck! 
* You should be able to get an analysis of the bottled water by calling the 
manufacturer. I have done this with a couple of different brands. 
References 
Fix, G., Fix, L., An Analysis of Brewing Techniques
, Brewers Publications, Boulder 
Colorado, 1997. 
DeLange, AJ, personal communication, 1998. 
Daniels, R., Designing Great Beers, Brewers Publications, Boulder Colorado, 1997. 
Chapter 16 - The Methods of Mashing 
Overview 
In chapters 14 and 15 you learned about the chemistry going on in the mash tun. 
In this chapter we will discuss how the mash can be manipulated to create a 
desired character in the wort and the finished beer. There are two basic schemes 
for mashing: Single Temperature - a compromise temperature for all the mash 
enzymes, and Multi-Rest- where two or more temperatures are used to favor 
different enzyme groups. You can heat the mash in two ways also, by the addition 
of hot water (Infusion) or by heating the mash tun directly. There is also a 
combination method, called Decoction Mashing, where part of the mash is heated 
on the stove and added back to the main mash to raise the temperature. All of 
these mashing schemes are designed to achieve saccharification (starch conversion 
to fermentable sugars). But the route taken to that goal can have a considerable 
influence on the overall wort character. Certain beer styles need a particular mash 
scheme to arrive at the right wort for the style. 
16.1 Single Temperature Infusion 
This method is the simplest, and does the job for most beer styles. All of the 
crushed malt is mixed (infused) with hot water to achieve a mash temperature of 
150-158F, depending on the style of beer being made. The infusion water 
temperature varies with the water-to-grain ratio being used for the mash, but 
generally the initial "strike water" temperature is 10-15·°F above the target mash 
temperature. The equation is listed below in the section, "Calculations for 
Infusions." The mash should be held at the saccharification temperature for about 
an hour, hopefully losing no more than a couple degrees. The mash temperature 
can be maintained by placing the mash tun in a warm oven, an insulated box or by 
adding heat from the stove. The goal is to achieve a steady temperature. 
One of the best ways to maintain the mash temperature is to use an ice chest or 
picnic cooler as the mash tun. This is the method I recommend throughout the rest 
of this section of the book. Instructions for building a picnic cooler mash/lauter tun 
are given in Appendix D. 
If the initial infusion of water does not achieve the desired temperature, you can 
add more hot water according to the infusion calculations. 
16.2 Multi-Rest Mashing 
A popular multi-rest mash schedule is the 40°C - 60°C - 70°C (104 - 140 - 158°F) 
mash, using a half hour rest at each temperature, first advocated for homebrewers 
by George Fix. This mash schedule produces high yields and good fermentability. 
The time at 40°C improves the liquefaction of the mash and promotes enzyme 
activity. As can be seen in Figure 79 - Enzyme Ranges, several enzymes are at 
work, liquefying the mash and breaking down the starchy endosperm so the 
starches can dissolve. As mentioned in the previous chapter in the section on the 
Acid Rest, resting the mash at this temperature has been show to improve the 
yield, regardless of the malts used. Varying the times spent at the 60 and 70°C 
rests allows you to adjust the fermentable sugar profiles. For example, a 20 minute 
rest at 60°C, combined with a 40 minute rest at 70°C produces a sweet, heavy, 
dextrinous beer; while switching the times at those temperatures would produce a 
drier, lighter bodied, more alcoholic beer from the same grain bill. 
If you use less well-modified malts, such as German Pils malt, a multi-rest mash 
will produce maltier tasting beers although they need a protein rest to fully realize 
their potential. In this case the mash schedule suggested by Fix is 50 - 60 - 70°C, 
again with half hour rests. The rest at 50°C takes the place of the liquefaction rest 
at 40°C and provides the necessary protein rest. This schedule is well suited for 
producing continental lager beers. These schedules are provided as guidelines. You, 
as the brewer, have complete control over what you can choose to do. Play with the 
times and temperatures and have fun. 
Multi-rest mashes require you to add heat to the mash to achieve the various 
temperature rests. You can add the heat in a couple of ways, either by infusions or 
by direct heat. If you are using a kettle as a mash tun, you can heat it directly 
using the stove or a stand-alone hotplate. (See Fig. 84) The first temperature rest 
is achieved by infusion as in the Single Temperature mash described above. The 
subsequent rest(s) are achieved by carefully adding heat from the stove and 
constant stirring to keep the mash from developing hotspots and scorching. The 
mash can be placed in a pre-warmed oven (125 - 150 °F) to keep the mash from 
losing heat during the rests. After the conversion, the mash is carefully poured or 
ladled from the mash tun into the lauter tun and lautered. The hot mash and wort 
is susceptible to oxidation due to hot side aeration (HSA) due to splashing at this 
stage, which can lead to long term flavor stability problems. 
Figure 84 - Mashing on the Stove- The grist is added to a pot of hot water on the 
stove for the first temperature rest. The mash is then placed in the oven (warm) to 
help maintain the temperature for the desired time. Then the mash pot is returned 
to the stovetop to be heated to the next rest. After mashing the mash is transferred 
to the lauter tun and lautered into the boiling pot. The mash tun is then used to 
heat water for the sparge.  
If you are using a picnic cooler for your mash tun, multi-rest mashes are a bit 
trickier. You need to start out with a stiff mash (e.g. .75-1 quarts per pound of 
grain), to leave yourself enough room in the tun for the additional water. Usually 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested