utensils expressly for brewing; don't stir with a spatula that you often use to cook 
onions. More instruction on cleaning is given later in this chapter. 
Table 2 - Cleaning and Sanitizing Checklist  
Brewpot
__ Clean
Stirring Spoon
__ Clean
Tablespoon
__ Clean
__ Sanitize
Measuring Cup
__ Clean
__ Sanitize
Yeast Starter Jar
__ Clean
__ Sanitize
Fermentor and Lid     __ Clean
__ Sanitize
Airlock
__ Clean
__ Sanitize
Thermometer
__ Clean
__ Sanitize
Preparing The Yeast - This step is paramount; without yeast, you can not make 
beer. The yeast should be prepared at the beginning of the brewing session (if not 
before) so you can tell if it's alive and ready to work beforehand. If you have spent 
time preparing the equipment and making the wort and then you have nothing to 
ferment it with, you will be very disappointed. See Chapter 6 for detailed 
information on yeast preparation. 
The Boil - Weigh out your hop additions and place them in separate bowls for the 
different addition times during the boil. If you are going to steep crushed specialty 
grain (see Chapter 12), then weigh, package and steep it before adding your 
extract to the boiling pot.  
Cooling After The Boil - If you plan to chill the wort using a water bath, i.e., 
setting the pot in the sink or the bathtub, make sure you have enough ice on hand 
to cool the wort quickly. A quick chill from boiling is necessary to help prevent 
infection and to generate the Cold Break in the wort. A good cold break precipitates 
proteins, polyphenols and beta glucans which are believed to contribute to beer 
instability during storage. A good cold break also reduces the amount of chill haze 
in the final beer. 
Sanitizing - Anything that touches the cooled wort must be sanitized. This includes 
the fermentor, airlock, and any of the following, depending on your transfer 
methods: Funnel, strainer, stirring spoon and racking cane. Sanitizing techniques 
are discussed later in this chapter. 
By taking the time to prepare for your brewday, the brewing will go smoothly and 
you will be less likely to forget any steps. Cleaning and sanitizing your equipment 
beforehand will allow you to pay more attention to your task at hand (and maybe 
prevent a messy boilover). Preparing your yeast by either re-hydrating and 
proofing or making a Starter will ensure that the afternoon's work will not have 
been in vain. Having your ingredients laid out and measured will prevent any 
mistakes in the recipe. Finally, preparing for each stage of the brewing process by 
having the equipment ready and the process planned out will make the whole 
operation simple and keep it fun. Your beer will probably benefit too. As in all 
things, a little preparation goes a long way to improving the end result. 
Bulk pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
batch convert pdf to jpg online; convert pdf to high quality jpg
Bulk pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
change file from pdf to jpg on; best pdf to jpg converter online
2.2 Sanitation 
Cleanliness is the foremost concern of the brewer. Providing good growing 
conditions for the yeast in the beer also provides good growing conditions for other 
micro-organisms, especially wild yeast and bacteria. Cleanliness must be 
maintained throughout every stage of the brewing process. 
Figure 17: The yeast cells are the round things, the worms are bacteria. 3000X  
The definition and objective of sanitization is to reduce bacteria and contaminants 
to insignificant or manageable levels. The terms clean, sanitize and sterilize are 
often used interchangeably, but should not be. Items may be clean but not 
sanitized or vice versa. Here are the definitions:  
• Clean - To be free from dirt, stain, or foreign matter.  
• Sanitize - To kill/reduce spoiling microorganisms to negligible levels.  
• Sterilize - To eliminate all forms of life, especially microorganisms, either by 
chemical or physical means. 
Cleaning is the process of removing all the dirt and grime from a surface, thereby 
removing all the sites that can harbor bacteria. Cleaning is usually done with a 
detergent and elbow grease. None of the sanitizing agents used by homebrewers 
are capable of eliminating all bacterial spores and viruses. The majority of chemical 
agents homebrewers use will clean and sanitize but not sterilize. However, 
sterilization is not necessary. Instead of worrying about sterilization, homebrewers 
can be satisfied if they consistently reduce these contaminants to negligible levels. 
All sanitizers are meant to be used on clean surfaces. A sanitizer's ability to kill 
microorganisms is reduced by the presence of dirt, grime or organic material. 
Organic deposits can harbor bacteria and shield the surface from being reached by 
the sanitizer. So it is up to you to make sure the surface of the item to be sanitized 
is as clean as possible. 
C# Imaging - Planet Barcode Generation Guide
Draw, paint PLANET bar codes on images of jpeg/jpg, png, gif, and bmp formats. Creating single or bulk PLANET bar codes on documents such as PDF, Office Word
convert pdf to jpeg; best pdf to jpg converter for
2.2.1 Cleaning Products 
Cleaning requires a certain amount of scrubbing, brushing and elbow grease. It is 
necessary because a dirty surface can never be a completely sanitized one. Grungy 
deposits can harbor bacteria that will ultimately contaminate your beer. The ability 
of a sanitizing agent to kill bacteria is reduced by the presence of any extra organic 
matter, so prior cleaning is necessary to assure complete sanitization. Several 
cleaning products available to the homebrewer are discussed below. Cleaning 
recommendations for the equipment you will be using follow.
Detergents 
Dish and laundry detergents and cleansers should be used with caution when 
cleaning your brewing equipment. These products often contain perfumes that can 
be adsorbed onto plastic equipment and released back into the beer. In addition, 
some detergents and cleansers do not rinse completely and often leave behind a 
film that can be tasted in the beer. Several rinses with hot water may be necessary 
to remove all traces of the detergent. Detergents containing phosphates generally 
rinse more easily than those without, but because phosphates are pollutants, they 
are slowly being phased out. A mild unscented dish washing detergent like Ivory is 
a good choice for most of your routine equipment cleaning needs. Only stubborn 
stains or burnt-on deposits will require something stronger.
Bleach 
Bleach is one of the most versatile cleaners available to the homebrewer. When 
dissolved in cold water, it forms a caustic solution that is good at breaking up 
organic deposits like food stains and brewing gunk. Bleach is an aqueous solution of 
chlorine, chlorides and hypochlorites. These chemical agents all contribute to 
bleach's bactericidal and cleaning powers, but are also corrosive to a number of 
metals used in brewing equipment. Bleach should not be used for cleaning brass 
and copper because it causes blackening and excessive corrosion. Bleach can be 
used to clean stainless steel, but you need to be careful to prevent corrosion and 
pitting. 
There are a few simple guidelines to keep in mind when using bleach to clean 
stainless steel. 
1. 
Do not leave the metal in contact with chlorinated water for extended 
periods of time (no more than an hour). 
2. 
Fill vessels completely so corrosion does not occur at the waterline. 
3. 
After the cleaning or sanitizing treatment, rinse the item with boiled water 
and dry the item completely. 
Percarbonates 
Sodium percarbonate is sodium carbonate (i.e. Arm and Hammer Super Washing 
Soda) reacted with hydrogen peroxide and it is a very effective cleaner for all types 
of brewing equipment. It rinses easily. Several products (e.g. Straight-A, Powder 
Brewery Wash, B-Brite, and One-Step) are approved by the FDA as cleaners in 
food-manufacturing facilities. One-Step is labeled as a light cleaner and final rinse 
agent, and produces hydrogen peroxide in solution. Hydrogen peroxide will 
effectively sanitize surfaces and containers that are already clean. As with all 
sanitizers, the effectiveness of hydrogen peroxide as a sanitizing agent is 
comprimised by organic soil. Use these cleaners according to the manufacturer's 
instructions, but generally use one tablespoon per gallon (4 ml per liter) and rinse 
after cleaning.
In my opinion, percarbonate-based cleaners are the best choice for equipment 
cleaning, and Straight-A from Logic Inc
., and Powder Brewery Wash (PBW) from 
Five Star Chemicals, Inc. are the best of them. These products combine sodium 
metasilicate with the percarbonate in a stable form which increases its effectivity 
and prevents the corrosion of metals like copper and aluminum that strong alkaline 
solutions can cause.
Trisodium Phosphate 
Trisodium phosphate (TSP) and chlorinated TSP (CTSP) are very effective cleaners 
for post-fermentation brewing deposits and the chlorinated form is also a sanitizer. 
TSP and CTSP are becoming harder to find, but are still available at hardware 
stores in the paint section. (Painters use it for washing walls because it can be 
rinsed away completely.) The recommended usage is one tablespoon per gallon of 
hot water. Solutions of TSP and CTSP should not be left to soak for more than an 
hour because a white mineral film can sometimes deposit on glass and metal which 
requires an acid (vinegar) solution to remove. This is not usually a problem 
however.
Automatic Dishwashers 
Using dishwashers to clean equipment and bottles is a popular idea among 
homebrewers but there are a few limitations: 
• The narrow openings of hoses, racking canes and bottles usually prevent the 
water jets and detergent from effectively cleaning inside. 
• If detergent does get inside these items, there is no guarantee that it will 
get rinsed out again. 
• Dishwasher drying additives (Jet Dry, for example) can ruin the head 
retention of beer. Drying additives work by putting a chemical film on the 
items that allows them to be fully wetted by the water so droplets don't 
form; preventing spots. The wetting action destabilizes the proteins that 
form the bubbles.
With the exceptions of spoons, measuring cups and wide mouth jars, it is probably 
best to only use automatic dishwashers for heat sanitizing, not cleaning. Heat 
sanitizing is discussed later in this chapter.
Oven Cleaner 
Commonly known as lye, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) is the caustic main ingredient 
of most heavy-duty cleaners like oven and drain cleaner. Potassium hydroxide 
(KOH) is also commonly used. Even in moderate concentrations, these chemicals 
are very hazardous to skin and should only be used when wearing rubber gloves 
and goggle-type eye protection. Vinegar is useful for neutralizing sodium hydroxide 
that gets on your skin, but if sodium hydroxide gets in your eyes it could cause 
severe burns or blindness. Spray-on oven cleaner is the safest and most convenient 
way to use sodium hydroxide. Brewers often scorch the bottoms of their brewpots 
resulting in a black, burned wort area that is difficult to remove for fear of scouring 
a hole in the pot. The easiest solution is to apply oven cleaner and allow it to 
dissolve the stain. After the burned-on area has been removed, it is important to 
thoroughly rinse the area of any oven cleaner residue to prevent subsequent 
corrosion of the metal. 
Sodium hydroxide is very corrosive to aluminum and brass. Copper and stainless 
steel are generally resistant. Pure sodium hydroxide should not be used to clean 
aluminum brewpots because the high pH causes the dissolution of the protective 
oxides, and a subsequent batch of beer might have a metallic taste. Oven cleaner 
should not affect aluminum adversely if it is used properly.
2.2.2 Cleaning Your Equipment 
Cleaning Plastic 
There are basically three kinds of plastic that you will be cleaning: opaque white 
polypropylene, hard clear polycarbonate and clear soft vinyl tubing. You will often 
hear the polypropylene referred to as "food grade plastic", though all three of these 
plastics are. Polypropylene is used for utensils, fermenting buckets and fittings. 
Polycarbonate is used for racking canes and measuring cups. The vinyl tubing is 
used for siphons and the like. 
The main thing to keep in mind when cleaning plastics is that they may adsorb 
odors and stains from the cleaning products you use. Dish detergents are your best 
bet for general cleaning, but scented detergents should be avoided. Bleach is useful 
for heavy duty cleaning, but the odor can remain and bleach tends to cloud vinyl 
tubing. Percarbonate cleaners have the benefit of cleaning as well as bleach without 
the odor and clouding problems. 
Dishwashers are a convenient way to clean plastic items providing that the water 
can get inside. Also, the heat might warp polycarbonate items. 
Cleaning Glass 
Glass has the advantage of being inert to everything you might use to clean it with. 
The only considerations are the danger of breakage and the potential for stubborn 
lime deposits when using bleach and TSP in hard water areas. When it comes to 
cleaning your glass bottles and carboys, you will probably want to use bottle and 
carboy brushes so you can effectively clean the insides. 
Cleaning Copper 
For routine cleaning of copper and other metals, percarbonate-based cleaners like 
PBW are the best choice. For heavily oxidized conditions, acetic acid is very 
effective, especially when hot. Acetic acid is available in grocery stores as white 
distilled vinegar at a standard concentration of 5% acetic acid by volume. It is 
important to use only white distilled vinegar as opposed to cider or wine vinegar 
because these other types may contain live acetobacteria cultures, which are the 
last thing you want in your beer.  
Brewers who use immersion wort chillers are always surprised how bright and shiny 
the chiller is the first time it comes out of the wort. If the chiller wasn't bright and 
shiny when it went into the wort, guess where the grime and oxides ended up? Yep, 
in your beer. The oxides of copper are more readily dissolved by the mildly acidic 
wort than is the copper itself. By cleaning copper tubing with acetic acid once 
before the first use and rinsing with water immediately after each use, the copper 
will remain clean with no oxide or wort deposits that could harbor bacteria. 
Cleaning copper with vinegar should only occasionally be necessary.  
The best sanitizer for counterflow wort chillers is Star San'. It is acidic and can be 
used to clean copper as well as sanitize. Star San can be left in the chiller overnight 
to soak-clean the inside. 
Cleaning and sanitizing copper with bleach solutions is not recommended. The 
chlorine and hypochlorites in bleach cause oxidation and blackening of copper and 
brass. If the oxides come in contact with the mildly acidic wort, the oxides will 
quickly dissolve, possibly exposing yeast to unhealthy levels of copper during 
fermentation.  
Cleaning Brass 
Some brewers use brass fittings in conjunction with their wort chillers or other 
brewing equipment and are concerned about the lead that is present in brass 
alloys. A solution of two parts white vinegar to one part hydrogen peroxide 
(common 3% solution) will remove tarnish and surface lead from brass parts when 
they are soaked for 15 minutes at room temperature. The brass will turn a buttery 
yellow color as it is cleaned. If the solution starts to turn green, then the parts have 
been soaking too long and the copper in the brass is beginning to dissolve. The 
solution has become contaminated and the part should be re-cleaned in a fresh 
solution. 
Cleaning Stainless Steel and Aluminum 
For general cleaning, mild detergents or percarbonate-based cleaners are best for 
steel and aluminum. Bleach should be avoided because the high pH of a bleach 
solution can cause corrosion of aluminum and to a lessor degree of stainless steel. 
Do not clean aluminum shiny bright or use bleach to clean an aluminum brewpot 
because this removes the protective oxides and can result in a metallic taste. This 
detectable level of aluminum is not hazardous. There is more aluminum in a 
common antacid tablet than would be present in a batch of beer made in an 
aluminum pot. 
There are oxalic acid based cleansers available at the grocery store that are very 
effective for cleaning stubborn stains, deposits, and rust from stainless. They also 
work well for copper. One example is Revere Ware Copper and Stainless Cleanser 
and another is Kleen King Stainless Steel Cleanser. Use according to the 
manufacturer's directions and rinse thoroughly with water afterwards. 
2.2.3 Sanitizing Your Equipment 
Once your equipment is clean, it is time to sanitize it before use. Only items that 
will contact the wort after the boil need to be sanitized, namely: fermentor, lid, 
airlock, rubber stopper, yeast starter jar, thermometer, funnel, and siphon. Your 
bottles will need to be sanitized also, but that can wait until bottling day. There are 
two very convenient ways to sanitize your equipment: chemical and heat. When 
using chemical sanitizers, the solution can usually be prepared in the fermentor 
bucket and all the equipment can be soaked in there. Heat sanitizing methods 
depend on the type of material being sanitized. 
Chemical 
Bleach 
The cheapest and most readily available sanitizing solution is made by adding 1 
tablespoon of bleach to 1 gallon of water (4 ml per liter). Let the items soak for 20 
minutes, and then drain. Rinsing is supposedly not necessary at this concentration, 
but many brewers, myself included, rinse with some boiled water anyway to be 
sure of no off-flavors from the chlorine. 
Star San 
Star San is an acidic sanitizer from the makers of PBW and was developed 
especially for sanitizing brewing equipment. It requires only 30 seconds of contact 
time and does not require rinsing. Unlike other no-rinse sanitizers, Star San will not 
contribute off-flavors at higher than recommended concentrations. The 
recommended usage is one fluid ounce per 5 gallons of water. The solution can be 
put in a spray bottle and used as a spray-on sanitizer for glassware or other items 
that are needed in a hurry. The foam is just as effective as immersion in the 
solution. Also, the surfactant used in Star San will not affect the head retention of 
beer like those used in detergents. 
Star San is my preferred sanitizer for all usages except those that I can 
conveniently do in the dishwasher. A solution of Star San has a long usage life and 
an open bucket of it will remain active for several days. Keeping a solution of Star 
San in a closed container will increase its shelf life. The viability of the solution can 
be judged by its clarity; it turns cloudy as the viability diminishes. 
One last note on this product: Because it is listed as a sanitizer and bactricide by 
the FDA and EPA, the container must list disposal warnings that are suitable for 
pesticides. Do not be alarmed, it is less hazardous to your skin than bleach. 
Iodophor 
Iodophor is a solution of iodine complexed with a polymer carrier that is very 
convenient to use. One tablespoon in 5 gallons of water (15ml in 19 l) is all that is 
needed to sanitize equipment with a two minute soak time. This produces a 
concentration of 12.5 ppm of titratable iodine. Soaking equipment longer, for 10 
minutes, at the same concentration will disinfect surfaces to hospital standards. At 
12.5 ppm the solution has a faint brown color that you can use to monitor the 
solution's viability. If the solution loses its color, it no longer contains enough free 
iodine to work. There is no advantage to using more than the specified amount of 
iodophor. In addition to wasting the product, you risk exposing yourself and your 
beer to excessive amounts of iodine.  
Iodophor will stain plastic with long exposures, but that is only a cosmetic problem. 
The 12.5 ppm concentration does not need to be rinsed, but the item should be 
allowed to drain before use. Even though the recommended concentration is well 
below the taste threshold, I rinse everything with a little bit of cooled boiled water 
to avoid any chance of off-flavors, but that's me. 
Heat 
Heat is one of the few means by which the homebrewer can actually sterilize an 
item. Why would you need to sterilize an item? Homebrewers that grow and 
maintain their own yeast cultures want to sterilize their growth media to assure 
against contamination. When a microorganism is heated at a high enough 
temperature for a long enough time it is killed. Both dry heat (oven) and steam 
(autoclave, pressure cooker or dishwasher) can be used for sanitizing. 
Oven 
Dry heat is less effective than steam for sanitizing and sterilizing, but many 
brewers use it. The best place to do dry heat sterilization is in your oven. To 
sterilize an item, refer to the following table for temperatures and times required. 
Table 3 - Dry Heat Sterilization  
Temperature       
Duration
338°F (170°C) 
60 minutes 
320°F (160°C) 
120 minutes 
302°F (150°C) 
150 minutes 
284°F (140°C) 
180 minutes 
250°F (121°C) 
12 hours (Overnight)
The times indicated begin when the item has reached the indicated temperature. 
Although the durations seem long, remember this process kills all microorganisms, 
not just most as in sanitizing. To be sterilized, items need to be heat-proof at the 
given temperatures. Glass and metal items are prime candidates for heat 
sterilization.  
Some homebrewers bake their bottles using this method and thus always have a 
supply of clean sterile bottles. The opening of the bottle can be covered with a 
piece of aluminum foil prior to heating to prevent contamination after cooling and 
during storage. They will remain sterile indefinitely if kept wrapped.  
One note of caution: bottles made of soda lime glass are much more susceptible to 
thermal shock and breakage than those made of borosilicate glass and should be 
heated and cooled slowly (e.g. 5 °F per minute). You can assume all beer bottles 
are made of soda lime glass and that any glassware that says Pyrex or Kimax is 
made of borosilicate. 
Autoclaves, Pressure Cookers and Dishwashers 
Typically when we talk about using steam we are referring to the use of an 
autoclave or pressure cooker. These devices use steam under pressure to sterilize 
items. Because steam conducts heat more efficiently, the cycle time for such 
devices is much shorter than when using dry heat. The typical amount of time it 
takes to sterilize a piece of equipment in an autoclave or pressure cooker is 20 
minutes at 257° F (125 °C) at 20 pounds per square inch (psi).  
Dishwashers can be used to sanitize, as opposed to sterilize, most of your brewing 
equipment, you just need to be careful that you don't warp any plastic items. The 
steam from the drying cycle will effectively sanitize all surfaces. Bottles and other 
equipment with narrow openings should be pre-cleaned. Run the equipment 
through the full wash cycle without using any detergent or rinse agent. Dishwasher 
Rinse Agents will destroy the head retention on your glassware. If you pour a beer 
with carbonation and no head, this might be the cause.  
Cleaning and Sanitizing Bottles 
Dishwashers are great for cleaning the outside of bottles and heat sanitizing, but 
will not clean the insides effectively. If your bottles are dirty or moldy, soak them in 
a mild bleach solution or sodium percarbonate type cleaners (ex. PBW) for a day or 
two to soften the residue. You'll still need to scrub them thoroughly with a bottle 
brush to remove any stuck residue. To eliminate the need to scrub bottles in the 
future, rinse them thoroughly after each use.  
Table 4 - Cleaning and Sanitizing Summary Table  
Product
Amount
Comments
Cleaners
Detergents
(squirt)
It is important to use unscented 
detergents that won't leave any perfumey 
odors behind. Be sure to rinse well.
Straight-A 
PBW™
1/4 cup per 5 gallons 
(<1 Tbs per gallon)
Best all purpose cleaner for grunge on all 
brewing equipment. Most effective in 
warm water.
Sodium 
Percarbonate
1 tablespoon per 
gallon.
Effective cleaner for grungy brewing 
deposits. Will not harm metals.
Bleach
1 - 4 tablespoons per 
gallon.
Good cleaner for grungy brewing deposits. 
Do not allow bleach to contact metals for 
more than an hour. Corrosion may occur.
TSP, CTSP
1 tablespoon per 
gallon.
Good cleaner for grungy brewing deposits. 
May often be found in paint and hardware 
stores.  
Prolonged exposure times may cause 
mineral deposits.
Dishwasher
Normal amount of 
automatic dishwater 
detergent
Recommended for utensils and glassware. 
Do not use scented detergents or those 
with rinse agents. 
Oven Cleaner
Follow product 
instructions.
Often the only way to dissolve burned-on 
sugar from a brewpot.
White Distilled 
Vinegar
Full Strength as 
necessary. Most 
effective when hot.
Useful for cleaning copper wort chillers. 
Cleansers made for Stainless Steel and 
Copper pots and pans are also useful.
Vinegar and  
Hydrogen 
Peroxide
2:1 volume ratio  
of vinegar to peroxide
Use for removing surface lead and 
cleaning brass.
Oxalic Acid 
based  
Cleansers
As Needed with 
Scrubby
Use for removing stains and oxides.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested