devexpress asp.net mvc pdf viewer : Change format from pdf to jpg SDK control API wpf web page asp.net sharepoint How_To_Brew_-_By_John_Palmer22-part820

Appendix B - Brewing Metallurgy 
For routine cleaning of copper and other metals, percarbonate-based cleaners like 
PBW are the best choice. For heavily oxidized conditions, acetic acid is very 
effective, especially when hot. Acetic acid is available in grocery stores as white 
distilled vinegar at a standard concentration of 5% acetic acid by volume. It is 
important to use only white distilled vinegar as opposed to cider or wine vinegar 
because these other types may contain live acetobacteria cultures, which are the 
last thing you want in your beer.  
Brewers who use immersion wort chillers are always surprised how bright and shiny 
the chiller is the first time it comes out of the wort. If the chiller wasn't bright and 
shiny when it went into the wort, guess where the grime and oxides ended up? Yep, 
in your beer. The oxides of copper are more readily dissolved by the mildly acidic 
wort than is the copper itself. By cleaning copper tubing with acetic acid once 
before the first use and rinsing with water immediately after each use, the copper 
will remain clean with no oxide or wort deposits that could harbor bacteria. 
Cleaning copper with vinegar should only occasionally be necessary.  
The best sanitizer for counterflow wort chillers is Star San. It is acidic and can be 
used to clean copper as well as sanitize. Star San can be left in the chiller overnight 
to soak-clean the inside. 
Cleaning and sanitizing copper with bleach solutions is not recommended. The 
chlorine and hypochlorites in bleach cause oxidation and blackening of copper and 
brass. If the oxides come in contact with the mildly acidic wort, the oxides will 
quickly dissolve, possibly exposing yeast to unhealthy levels of copper during 
fermentation.  
Cleaning Brass 
Some brewers use brass fittings in conjunction with their wort chillers or other 
brewing equipment and are concerned about the lead that is present in brass 
alloys. A solution of two parts white vinegar to one part hydrogen peroxide 
(common 3% solution) will remove tarnish and surface lead from brass parts when 
they are soaked for 5-10 minutes at room temperature. The brass will turn a 
buttery yellow color as it is cleaned. If the solution starts to turn green and the 
brass darkens, then the parts have been soaking too long and the copper in the 
brass is beginning to dissolve, exposing more lead. The solution has become 
contaminated and the part should be re-cleaned in a fresh solution. 
Cleaning Stainless Steel and Aluminum 
For general cleaning, mild detergents or percarbonate-based cleaners are best for 
steel and aluminum. Bleach should be avoided because the high pH of a bleach 
solution can cause corrosion of aluminum and to a lessor degree of stainless steel. 
Do not clean aluminum shiny bright or use bleach to clean an aluminum brewpot 
because this removes the protective oxides and can result in a metallic taste. This 
taste-detectable level of aluminum is not hazardous. There is more aluminum in a 
common antacid tablet than would be present in a batch of beer made in an 
aluminum pot. 
As with aluminum, the corrosion inhibitor in stainless steel is the passive oxide 
layer that protects the surface. The 300-series alloys (a.k.a. 18-8 alloys) commonly 
used in the brewing industry are very corrosion-resistant to most chemicals. 
Unfortunately, chlorine is one of the few chemicals to which these steels are not 
resistant. The chlorine in bleach acts to destabilize the passive oxide layer on steel, 
Convert pdf to jpg file - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
changing pdf to jpg file; convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi
Convert pdf to jpg file - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert pdf document to jpg; best program to convert pdf to jpg
creating corrosion pits. This type of attack is accelerated by localization and is 
generally known as crevice or pitting corrosion. 
Many brewers have experienced pinholes in stainless-steel vessels that have been 
filled with a bleach-water solution and left to soak for several days. On a 
microscopic scale, a scratch or crevice from a gasket can present a localized area 
where the surface oxide can be destabilized by the chlorine. The chlorides can 
combine with the oxygen, both in the water and on the steel surface, to form 
chlorite ions, depleting that local area of protection. If the water is not circulating, 
the crevice becomes a tiny, highly active site relative to the more passive stainless 
steel around it and corrodes. The same thing can happen at the liquid surface if the 
pot is only half full of bleach solution. A dry stable area above, a less stable but 
very large area below, and the crevice corrosion occurs at the waterline. Usually 
this type of corrosion will manifest as pitting or pinholes because of the accelerating 
effect of localization. 
A third way chlorides can corrode stainless steel is by concentration. This mode is 
very similar to the crevice mode described above. By allowing chlorinated water to 
evaporate and dry on a steel surface, those chlorides become concentrated and 
destabilize the surface oxides at that site. The next time the surface is wetted, the 
oxides will quickly dissolve, creating a shallow pit. When the pot is allowed to dry, 
that pit probably will be one of the last sites to evaporate, causing chloride 
concentration again. At some point in the cleaning life of the pot, that site will 
become deep enough for crevice corrosion to take over and the pit to corrode 
through. 
It is best to not use bleach to clean stainless steel and other metal. There are other 
cleaners available that work just as well without danger of corrosion. The 
percarbonate-based cleaners like PBW are the best choice for general cleaning.  
If you have a particularly tough stain liked burn malt extract then you may need 
something stronger. There are oxalic acid based cleansers available at the grocery 
store that are very effective for cleaning stains and deposits from stainless. They 
also work well for copper. One example is Revere Ware Copper and Stainless 
Cleanser, another is Bar Keeper's Friend, and another is Kleen King Stainless Steel 
Cleanser. Use according to the manufacturer's directions and rinse thoroughly with 
water afterwards. 
B.1 Passivating Stainless Steel 
A situation that often comes up is, "Hey, my stainless steel is rusting! Why? What 
can I do to fix it?" 
Stainless steel is stainless because of the protective chromium oxides on the 
surface. If those oxides are removed by scouring, or by reaction with bleach, then 
the iron in the steel is exposed and can be rusted. Stainless steel is also vulnerable 
to contamination by plain carbon steel, the kind found in tools, food cans, and steel 
wool. This non-stainless steel tends to rub off on the surface (due to iron-to-iron 
affinity), and readily rusts. Once rust has breached the chromium oxides, the iron 
in the stainless steel can also rust. Fixing this condition calls for re-passivation. 
Passivating stainless steel is normally accomplished in industry by dipping the part 
in a bath of nitric acid. Nitric acid dissolves any free iron or other contaminants 
from the surface, which cleans the metal, and it re-oxidizes the chromium; all in 
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start immediately to sort the files, try out some settings and then create the
reader pdf to jpeg; convert from pdf to jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert pdf into jpg; .net convert pdf to jpg
about 20 minutes. But you don't need a nitric acid bath to passivate. The key is to 
clean the stainless steel to bare metal. Once the metal is clean (and dry), the 
oxygen in the atmosphere will form the protective chromium oxides. The steel will 
be every bit as passivated as that which was dipped in acid. The only catch is that it 
takes longer-- about a week or two. 
To passivate stainless steel at home without using a nitric acid bath, you need to 
clean the surface of all dirt, oils and oxides. The best way to do this is to use an 
oxalic acid based cleanser like those mentioned above, and a non-metallic green 
scrubby pad. Don't use steel wool, or any metal pad, even stainless steel, because 
this will actually promote rust. Scour the surface thoroughly and then rinse and dry 
it with a towel. Leave it alone for a week or two and it will re-passivate itself. You 
should not have to do this procedure more than once, but it can be repeated as 
often as necessary. 
B.2 Galvanic Corrosion 
All corrosion is essentially galvanic. The electrochemical difference between two 
metals (when wet) causes electrons to flow and ions to be created. These ions 
combine with oxygen or other elements to create corrosion products. What this 
means to a brewer is that cleaning off the corrosion products will not solve the 
problem. The cause of the corrosion is usually the environment (brewing) and the 
metals themselves.  
Each metal has a small inherent electrical potential; it's what allows you to make 
batteries out of potatoes. The electricity does not come from the potato, but from 
the difference in potential of metals that you stuck into it - like copper wire and an 
iron nail. All metals have a particular potential and a ranking of the metals from the 
most passive (lowest potential - platinum), to the most active (highest potential - 
magnesium), is shown below. See Table 1. 
Table 19- Galvanic Series in Seawater 
Magnesium 
Zinc 
Aluminum (pure)  
Cadmium 
Aluminum lloys 
Mild Steel and Iron 
Un-passivated Stainless Steels 
Lead-Tin Solders 
Lead 
Tin 
Un-passivated Nickel Alloys 
Brass 
Copper 
Bronze 
Silver Solder 
Passivated Nickel Alloys 
Passivated Stainless Steels 
Silver 
Titanium 
Graphite 
Gold 
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
change file from pdf to jpg; changing pdf to jpg
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Dicom Image File to Raster Images
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc. PowerPoint.dll. This demo code convert dicom file all pages to jpg images.
convert pdf to jpg batch; change pdf file to jpg
Platinum 
Place any two metals in wet contact with one another and a galvanic reaction takes 
place. The more active metal of the two will dissolve (ionize). The farther apart the 
two metals are on the galvanic series, the greater the difference in potential and 
the stronger the dissolution will be. Size also makes a difference - if the more 
active piece of metal is smaller than the more passive, the corrosion will be 
enhanced but if more passive metal is smaller than the more active, the corrosion 
will be diminished.  
Okay, enough chemistry. What this means to the brewer is that if he has copper or 
brass fitting in contact with passivated stainless steel, the copper will corrode over 
time. Brass fittings and silver solder have a potential that is close to copper and 
behave the same way relative to stainless steel. In a wort chiller situation (copper, 
brass and solder), the silver solder is the most passive and it has the smallest area, 
so very little corrosion takes place.  
With the relatively short usage times that homebrewing equipment sees, corrosion 
between metals is not a big problem. I am presenting this information so that if you 
do experience some corrosion, you will hopefully understand what is causing it and 
can take care of the problem. 
B.3 Soldering, Brazing, and Welding Tips 
Soldering with a propane torch is the easiest way to join copper and brass. You can 
even use solder to join copper or brass to stainless steel, you just need the proper 
flux. But there are a couple tips to keep in mind to make it work right the first time: 
1. Use a liquid flux instead of a paste flux. The paste flux tends to leave tacky 
residue that is difficult to clean off. If you must use a paste flux, use it 
sparingly.  
2. Use plumbing (silver) solder only. Do not use electrical or jeweler's solder 
because these often contain lead or cadmium. These are toxic metals.  
3. Apply solder separately to each of your parts before joining them. This 
practice is known as "tinning" and makes joining the parts easier.  
4. Heat the parts, not the solder. Play the flame all around the joint to get it 
good and hot before you apply the solder. This allows the solder to flow 
evenly over the joint. 
Brazing is like soldering but it is done at higher temperatures and is applicable to 
more metals. It can readily join stainless steel to itself, and is an alternative to 
welding. The recommended filler rod for brewing service is AWS type BAg-5, and its 
temperature range 1370-1550°F (743-843°C). While brazing can provide a 
stronger joint, the high brazing temperatures can be bad for stainless steel. At 
those temperatures, carbon in the stainless steel can form chromium carbides 
which takes the chromium out of solution, making the steel non-stainless near the 
joint. This area is prone to rust and cracking after it is in service. The problem 
cannot be fixed by re-passivation so it is best to avoid excessively heating the parts 
during the braze and keep the total time at temperature to four minutes or less. 
Propane torches are usually not adequate for brazing. You will need to use MAPP 
gas or acetylene. 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
C# Create PDF from Raster Images, .NET Graphics and REImage File with XDoc Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp
convert pdf file into jpg; convert multi page pdf to jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Turn multipage PDF file into image files in .NET WinForm application. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET.
change from pdf to jpg; change pdf into jpg
Welding is the best methods for joining stainless steel, but it takes skill to make a 
good joint. There are two welding processes that will work- MIG (auto-wire feed 
type) and TIG (tungsten electrode type). TIG welding allows the best control for 
these small joints. Your best bet is to look in the Yellow Pages of your phonebook 
for a stainless steel welder to do the job for you. The cost should be minimal, $20-
50 depending on the amount of welding needed. I had pipe nipples welded onto 3 
converted kegs for 20 dollars. If you want to do it yourself, or you have a friend 
that welds but has not done stainless before, here is what you need to know: 
Table 20 - Suggested Welding Parameters  
Method
Steel 
Thickness 
(inches)
Current 
(amps)
Voltage 
(volts)
Weld 
Wire 
(AWS 
spec)
Argon 
Flow 
(ft^3/hr)
Weld 
Speed 
(in./min.)
Wire 
Feed 
(in./min.)
MIG
.063
85 DCEP
21
ER316L
15
19
184
TIG
.045-.090
37-70 
DCEN
12-14
ER316L
12
2-4
As Req'd
Ideally, the backside of the weld should be purged with the argon gas to prevent 
heavy oxidation. But, most welders don't bother, so the backside of the weld joint 
should be ground/sanded down afterwards to expose clean metal. Do not use steel 
wool! To clean off the black/blue-ish oxides that could initiate corrosion in the heat 
affected zone around the weld or braze joints on stainless steel, use the oxalic acid 
based cleansers and procedures mentioned above in the passivating section. 
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF. C#.NET WPF PDF Viewer Tool: Convert and Export PDF.
convert pdf photo to jpg; convert pdf image to jpg
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff. jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List foreach (string file in imagePaths) { Bitmap tmpBmp = new Bitmap
changing pdf to jpg on; convert pdf pictures to jpg
Appendix C - Chillers 
Wort chillers are copper heat exchangers that help cool the wort quickly after the 
boil. There are two basic types, Immersion and Counterflow. The first works by 
circulating cold water through the tubing and submersing the cooling coil in the hot 
wort. The counterflow version works by running the hot wort through the tubing 
while cold water runs outside in the opposite direction. The basic material for both 
types is 3/8 inch diameter soft copper tubing. Half inch dia. tubing also works well, 
especially for large scale immersion chilling, but 3/8" is the most common. Do not 
use less than 3/8" because the restricted water flow impairs cooling efficiency.  
Immersion Chiller 
Immersion chillers are the simplest to build and work very well for small boils done 
on the stove in the kitchen. An immersion chiller is easy to construct. Simply coil 
about 30 feet of soft copper tubing around a pot or other cylindrical form. Spring-
like tube benders can be used to prevent kinks from bending during forming. Be 
sure to bring both ends of the tube up high enough to clear the top of your boiling 
pot. Attach compression-to-pipe thread fittings to the tubing ends. Then attach a 
pipe thread-to- standard garden hose fitting. This is the easiest way to run water 
through the chiller without leaking. The cold water IN fitting should connect to the 
top coil and the hot water OUT should be coming from the bottom coil for best 
chilling performance. An illustration of a immersion chiller is shown below. 
Figure 157 - Immersion Wort Chiller  
The advantages of an immersion chiller are that it is easily sanitized by placing it in 
the boil and will cool the wort before it is poured into the fermenter. Make sure the 
chiller is clean before you put it into the wort. Place it in the boiling wort the last 
few minutes before the heat is turned off and it will be thoroughly sanitized. 
Working with cool wort is much safer than hot wort. The cool wort can be poured 
into the fermenter with vigorous splashing for aeration without having to worry 
about oxidation damage. The wort can also be poured through a strainer to keep 
the spent hops and much of the break material out of the fermenter.  
Figure 158 - Chilling in Place.  
Counterflow Chillers 
Counterflow Chillers are a bit more difficult to build but cool the wort a bit better. 
Counterflow chillers use more water to cool a smaller volume of wort faster than an 
immersion chiller so you get a better cold break and clearer beer. The drawbacks 
are keeping the inside of the chiller clean between batches and preventing hops and 
break material in the kettle from clogging the intake. A copper pot scrubby can be 
attached to the end of the racking cane to help filter out hop particles. 
The increased efficiency of a counterflow chiller lets you use a shorter length of 
tubing to achieve the same amount of wort cooling. The tube-within-a-tube chiller 
can be coiled into a convenient roll. The hot side of the chiller, the racking tube 
intake, needs to be copper or another heat resistant material. Plastic racking canes 
tend to melt from the heat of the pot when the hot wort is siphoned into the chiller. 
Counterflow chillers are best used when there is a spigot mounted on the side of 
the pot negating the need to siphon the wort. 
Figure 159 - Suggested Counterflow Wort Chiller Design  
Figure 159 shows one example for building the counterflow fittings and assembling 
the copper tubing inside the garden hose. The parts are common 1/2 inch ID rigid 
copper tube, an end cap and T sweat-type fittings. The parts are soldered together 
using lead-free silver solder and a propane torch. The ends of the garden hose are 
cut off and reattached via the tube clamps to the T's. The 3/8 inch diameter soft 
copper tubing that the wort travels thru exits the end cap thru a 3/8 inch diameter 
hole. The opening for the tubing is sealed with a fillet joint soldered around the 
hole. 
There is a company that manufactures fittings exclusively for building counterflow 
chillers. These fittings are known as Phil's Phittings from the Listermann Mfg Co. 
The fittings make building a counterflow chiller very easy.  
Hybrid Chillers 
There is a third type of chiller that can be considered a hybrid of the previous two 
types. This chiller has the hot wort flow through the copper tubing like a 
counterflow, but the cooling water bathes the coil similar to an immersion chiller. 
This type of chiller is very popular and can be built for about the same cost as a 
counterflow. The basic material is 2 feet of 6 inch diameter PVC pipe. Brass or 
plastic hose barbs can be used for the water fittings but brass compression fittings 
should be used to attach the copper tubing to the hot side of the chiller. To obtain a 
good seal, a rubber washer and the "flat" of the compression/NPT fitting should be 
on the inside of the PVC pipe. With this type of chiller, it is important to have good 
water throughput to get a good chill. Another option is to place a smaller diameter 
closed PVC pipe inside the copper coil to increase the flow of cooling water along 
the coils, rather than thru the middle of the chiller body. 
Figure 160 - Hybrid chiller inside a PVC pipe. 
Appendix D - Building a Mash/Lauter Tun 
What to look for in a Cooler 
In this section I will describe how to build a mash/lauter tun out of a common picnic 
cooler. Building one is easy and inexpensive and is the easiest way to start all-grain 
brewing. You may use either a rectangular chest cooler or a cylindrical beverage 
cooler. You can use either rigid copper tubing with slip fittings or soft copper tubing 
with compression fittings. Everything you need to build one of these tuns is readily 
available at a hardware store. 
The shape of the cooler is only important in that it determines the grainbed depth. 
It is important to have a minimum grainbed depth of at least 4 inches. The 
optimum depth at this scale is probably about 1 foot. If it is too shallow, it won't 
clear sufficiently; too deep and it will tend to get stuck. A five gallon round 
cylindrical Gott cooler works well for 5 gallon batches; it can hold 12 pounds of 
grain and the water to mash it. Naturally, the 10 gallon size is good for doing 10 
gallon batches. These coolers have convenient spigots which can be removed to 
make it easy to drain the wort.  
Figure 161 - Beverage Cooler and Detail of Modified Spigot Hole. A suggested 
method for securing the manifold outlet through the cooler spigot hole is shown 
here. Threaded plastic or brass bulkhead fittings can also be used. 
The rectangular ice chest coolers may have drains but often do not. These coolers 
are usually sized at 20, 24, 34 or 48 quarts (5-12 gallons) and offer a good choice 
for any batch size. My preference for most 5 gallon batches is the 5 gallon 
cylindrical or the 24 quart rectangular coolers. These sizes give a good grainbed 
depth for 1.040 - 1.060 beers. If you are using a rectangular cooler that does not 
have a drainage opening or spigot, lautering works just as well if you come over the 
side with a vinyl hose - siphoning the wort out. You should use a stopcock or clamp 
to regulate the flow, and as long as you keep air bubbles out of the line, it will work 
great. 
Figure 162 - A 6 gallon Rectangular Mash/Lauter Tun. The slotted manifold 
connects to vinyl tubing with a stopcock for controlling the flow. 
D.1 Building the Manifold 
The heart of the lauter tun is the wort collection manifold. It can be made of either 
soft or rigid copper tubing . Choose the form to suit your cooler and design. In a 
round cooler, the ideal shape is a circle divided into quadrants. See Figure 162. In a 
rectangular cooler, the ideal shape is rectangular with several legs to adequately 
cover the floor area. When designing your manifold, keep in mind the need to 
provide full coverage of the grainbed while minimizing the total distance the wort 
has to travel to reach the drain. Figure 163 illustrates this issue for a rectangular 
cooler.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested