Aroma hops are usually lower, around 5 percent and contribute a more desirable 
aroma and flavor to the beer. Several hop varieties are in-between and are used for 
both purposes. Bittering hops, also known as kettle hops, are added at the start of 
the boil and boiled for about an hour. Aroma hops are added towards the end of the 
boil and are typically boiled for 15 minutes or less. Aroma hops are also referred to 
as finishing hops. By adding different varieties of hops at different times during the 
boil, a more complex hop profile can be established that gives the beer a balance of 
hop bitterness, taste and aroma. Descriptions of the five main types of hop 
additions and their attributes follow.
First Wort Hopping 
An old yet recently rediscovered process (at least among homebrewers), first wort 
hopping (FWH) consists of adding a large portion of the finishing hops to the boil 
kettle as the wort is received from the lauter tun. As the boil tun fills with wort 
(which may take a half hour or longer), the hops steep in the hot wort and release 
their volatile oils and resins. The aromatic oils are normally insoluble and tend to 
evaporate to a large degree during the boil. By letting the hops steep in the wort 
prior to the boil, the oils have more time to oxidize to more soluble compounds and 
a greater percentage are retained during the boil. 
Only low alpha finishing hops should be used for FWH, and the amount should be 
no less than 30% of the total amount of hops used in the boil. This FWH addition 
therefore should be taken from the hops intended for finishing additions. Because 
more hops are in the wort longer during the boil, the total bitterness of the beer in 
increased but not by a substantial amount due to being low in alpha acid. In fact, 
one study among professional brewers determined that the use of FWH resulted in 
a more refined hop aroma, a more uniform bitterness (i.e. no harsh tones), and a 
more harmonious beer overall compared to an identical beer produced without 
FWH. 
Bittering 
The primary use of hops is for bittering. Bittering hops additions are boiled for 45-
90 minutes to isomerize the alpha acids; the most common interval being one hour. 
There is some improvement in the isomerization between 45 and 90 minutes (about 
5%), but only a small improvement at longer times ( <1%). The aromatic oils of 
the hops used in the bittering addition(s) tend to boil away, leaving little hop flavor 
and no aroma. Because of this, high alpha varieties (which commonly have poor 
aroma characteristics) can be used to provide the bulk of the bitterness without 
hurting the taste of the beer. If you consider the cost of bittering a beer in terms of 
the amount of alpha acid per unit weight of hop used, it is more economical to use 
a half ounce of a high alpha hop rather than 1 or 2 ounces of a low alpha hop. You 
can save your more expensive (or scarce) aroma hops for flavoring and finishing. 
Flavoring 
By adding the hops midway through the boil, a compromise between isomerization 
of the alpha acids and evaporation of the aromatics is achieved yielding 
characteristic flavors. These flavoring hop additions are added 40-20 minutes 
before the end of the boil, with the most common time being 30 minutes. Any hop 
variety may be used. Usually the lower alpha varieties are chosen, although some 
high alpha varieties such as Columbus and Challenger have pleasant flavors and are 
commonly used. Often small amounts (1/4-1/2 oz) of several varieties will be 
combined at this stage to create a more complex character.
Finishing 
When hops are added during the final minutes of the boil, less of the aromatic oils 
are lost to evaporation and more hop aroma is retained. One or more varieties of 
Pdf to jpeg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
change format from pdf to jpg; best way to convert pdf to jpg
Pdf to jpeg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
c# convert pdf to jpg; change pdf to jpg file
hop may be used, in amounts varying from 1/4 - 4 oz, depending on the character 
desired. A total of 1-2 oz. is typical. Finishing hop additions are typically 15 minutes 
or less before the end of the boil, or are added "at knockout" (when the heat is 
turned off) and allowed to steep ten minutes before the wort is cooled. In some 
setups, a "hopback" is used - the hot wort is run through a small chamber full of 
fresh hops before the wort enters a heat exchanger or chiller.
A word of caution when adding hops at knockout or using a hopback - depending on 
several factors, e.g. amount, variety, freshness, etc., the beer may take on a 
grassy taste due to tannins and other compounds which are usually neutralized by 
the boil. If short boil times are not yielding the desired hop aroma or a grassy 
flavor is evident, then I would suggest using FWH or Dry Hopping.
Dry Hopping 
Hops can also be added to the fermenter for increased hop aroma in the final beer. 
This is called "dry hopping" and is best done late in the fermentation cycle. If the 
hops are added to the fermenter while it is still actively bubbling, then a lot of the 
hop aroma will be carried away by the carbon dioxide. It is better to add the hops 
(usually about a half ounce per 5 gallons) after bubbling has slowed or stopped and 
the beer is going through the conditioning phase prior to bottling. The best way to 
utilize dry hopping is to put the hops in a secondary fermenter, after the beer has 
been racked away from the trub and can sit a couple of weeks before bottling, 
allowing the volatile oils to diffuse into the beer. Many homebrewers put the hops in 
a nylon mesh bag - a Hop Bag, to facilitate removing the hops before bottling. Dry 
hopping is appropriate for many pale ale and lager styles. 
When you are dry hopping there is no reason to worry about adding unboiled hops 
to the fermenter. Infection from the hops just doesn't happen.
5.2 Hop Forms 
It's rare for any group of brewers to agree on the best form of hops. Each of the 
common forms has its own advantages and disadvantages. What form is best for 
you will depend on where in the brewing process the hops are being used, and will 
probably change as your brewing methods change. 
Table 6 - Hop Forms  
Form
Advantages
Disadvantages
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
convert .pdf to .jpg; change pdf to jpg online
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert pdf to high quality jpg; convert pdf pages to jpg
Whole
They float, and are easy to 
strain from wort. 
Best aroma character, if 
fresh. 
Good form for dry hopping.
They soak up wort, resulting in some wort 
loss after the boil. 
Bulk makes them harder to weigh. 
Plug
Retain freshness longer 
than whole form. 
Convenient half ounce 
units. 
Behave like whole hops in 
the boil. 
Good form for dry hopping.
Difficult to use in other than half ounce 
increments. 
They soak up wort like whole hops.
Pellets
Easy to weigh.  
Small increase in 
isomerization due to 
shredding. 
Don't soak up wort. 
Best storability.
Forms hop sludge in boil kettle.  
Difficult to dry hop with. 
Aroma content tends to be less than other 
forms due to amount of processing.
Whichever form of hops you choose to use, freshness is important. Fresh hops 
smell fresh, herbal, and spicy, like evergreen needles and have a light green color 
like freshly mown hay. Old hops or hops that have been mishandled are often 
oxidized and smell like pungent cheese and may have turned brown. It is beneficial 
if hop suppliers pack hops in oxygen barrier bags and keep them cold to preserve 
the freshness and potency. Hops that have been stored warm and/or in non-barrier 
(thin) plastic bags can easily lose 50% of their bitterness potential in a few months. 
Most plastics are oxygen permeable; so when buying hops at a homebrew supply 
store, check to see if the hops are stored in a cooler or freezer and if they are 
stored in oxygen barrier containers. If you can smell the hops when you open the 
cooler door, then the hop aroma is leaking out through the packaging and they are 
not well protected from oxygen. If the stock turnover in the brewshop is high, non-
optimum storage conditions may not be a problem. Ask the shop owner if you have 
any concerns.
5.3 Hop Types 
Bittering Hop Varieties 
Name:
Brewer's Gold
Grown:
UK, US
Profile:
Poor aroma; Sharp bittering hop.
Usage:
Bittering for ales
AA Range:
8 - 9%
Substitute:  
Bullion, Northern Brewer
, Galena
Name:
Bullion
Grown:
UK (maybe discontinued), US
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
This example shows how to build a PDF document with three image files (BMP, JPEG and PNG). // Load 3 image files (BMP, JPEG and PNG).
conversion pdf to jpg; change from pdf to jpg on
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Raster
from stream or byte array, print images to tiff or pdf, annotate images C#.NET RasterEdge HTML5 Viewer supports various images formats, including JPEG, GIF, BMP
convert pdf image to jpg; .net convert pdf to jpg
Profile:
Poor aroma; Sharp bittering and black currant-like flavor when used in 
the boil.
Usage:
Bittering hop for British style ales, perhaps some finishing
AA Range:
8 - 11%
Substitute:
Brewer's Gold, Northern Brewer
Name:
Centennial
Grown:
US
Profile:
Spicy, floral, citrus aroma, often referred to as Super Cascade 
because of the similarity; A clean bittering hop.
Usage:
General purpose bittering, aroma, some dry hopping
Example:
Sierra Nevada Celebration Ale, Sierra Nevada Bigfoot Ale
AA Range:
9 - 11.5%
Substitute:
Cascade, Columbus
Name:
Challenger
Grown:
UK
Profile:
Strong, fine spicy aroma widely used for English Bitters; A clean 
bittering hop.
Usage:
Excellent bittering hop, also used for flavoring and aroma.
Example:
Full Sail IPA, Butterknowle Bitter
AA Range:
6 - 8%
Substitute:
Progress
Name:
Chinook
Grown:
US
Profile:
Heavy spicy aroma; Strong versatile bittering hop, cloying in large 
quantities
Usage:
Bittering
Example:
Sierra Nevada Celebration Ale, Sierra Nevada Stout
AA Range:
12 - 14%
Substitute:
Galena, Eroica, Brewer's Gold, Nugget, Bullion
Name:
Cluster
Grown:
US, Australia
Profile:
Small, spicy aroma; Sharp, clean bittering hop
Usage:
General purpose bittering (Aussie version has a better aroma and is 
used as finishing hop)
Example:
Winterhook
Christmas Ale
AA Range:
5.5 - 8.5%
Substitute:
Galena, Eroica, Cascade
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Jpeg, Png, Bmp, Gif Image to PDF. Jpeg to PDF Conversion in C#. In the following C# programming demo, we will firstly take Jpeg to PDF conversion as an example.
.pdf to jpg converter online; changing pdf to jpg
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Our XDoc.PDF allows C# developers to perform high performance conversions from PDF document to multiple image forms. Besides raster image Jpeg, images forms
.pdf to jpg; bulk pdf to jpg
Name:
Columbus
Grown:
US
Profile:
Strong fine herbal flavor and aroma; Solid, clean bittering hop
Usage:
Excellent general purpose bittering, flavoring and aroma hop.
Example:
Anderson Valley IPA, Full Sail Old Boardhead Barleywine
AA Range:
13-16%
Substitute:
Centennial, Chinook, Galena, Nugget
Name:
Eroica
Grown:
US
Profile:
Good bittering hop;
Usage:
Good general purpose bittering
Example:
Ballard Bitter, Blackhook
Porter, Anderson Valley Boont Amber
AA Range:
12-14%
Substitute:
Northern Brewer
, Galena
Name:
Galena
Grown:
US
Profile:
Strong, clean bittering hop
Usage:
General purpose bittering
Example:
The most widely used commercial bittering hop in the US.
AA Range:
12 - 14%
Substitute:
Cluster, Northern Brewer
, Nugget
Name:
Northern Brewer
Grown:
UK, US, Germany (called Hallertauer NB), and other areas (growing 
region affects profile greatly)
Profile:
Hallertauer NB has a fine, fragrant aroma; Dry, clean bittering hop
Usage:
Bittering and finishing for a wide variety of beers
Example:
Old Peculiar (bittering), Anchor Liberty (bittering), Anchor Steam 
(bittering, flavoring, aroma)
AA Range:
7 - 10%
Substitute:
Perle
Name:
Northdown
Grown:
UK
Profile:
Similar to Northern Brewer
, but with a better flavor and aroma than 
domestic NB; A clean bittering hop.
Usage:
General purpose bittering, flavor and aroma for heavier ales.
Example:
Fuller's ESB
AA Range:
7 - 8%
Substitute:
Northern Brewer
, Target
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Sometimes, to convert PDF document into BMP, GIF, JPEG and PNG raster images in Visual Basic .NET applications, you may need a third party tool and have some
change pdf file to jpg; convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
This VB. NET example shows how to build a PDF document with three image files (BMP, JPEG and PNG). ' Load 3 image files (BMP, JPEG and PNG).
convert pdf file to jpg; change pdf into jpg
Name:
Nugget
Grown:
US
Profile:
Heavy, spicy, herbal aroma; Strong bittering hop
Usage:
Strong bittering, some aroma uses
Example:
Sierra Nevada Porter & Bigfoot Ale, Anderson Valley ESB
AA Range:
12 - 14%
Substitute:
Galena, Chinook, Cluster
Name:
Perle
Grown:
Germany, US
Profile:
Pleasant aroma; Slightly spicy, almost minty, bittering hop
Usage:
General purpose bittering for all lagers 
Example:
Sierra Nevada Summerfest
AA Range:
7 - 9.5%
Substitute:
Northern Brewer
, Cluster, Tettnanger
Name:
Pride Of Ringwood
Grown:
Australia
Profile:
Poor, citric aroma; Clean bittering hop
Usage:
general purpose bittering
Example:
Most Australian beers.
AA Range:
9 - 11%
Substitute:
Cluster
Name:
Target
Grown:
UK
Profile:
Strong herbal aroma can be too strong for lagers; A clean bittering 
hop.
Usage:
Widely used bittering and flavoring hop for strong ales.
Example:
Fuller's Hock, Morrells Strong Country Bitter
AA Range:
8 - 10%
Substitute:
Northdown
Figure 29: Cascade Hops on the vine.  
The next group are common examples of Aroma hops. Aroma hops can be used for 
bittering also, and many homebrewers swear by this, claiming a finer, cleaner 
overall hop profile. I like to use Galena for bittering and save the good stuff for 
finishing. But making these decisions for yourself is what homebrewing is all about. 
There is a category of aroma hops, called the Noble Hops, that is considered to 
have the best aroma. These hops are principally four varieties grown in central 
Europe: Hallertauer Mittelfrüh, Tettnanger Tettnang, Spalter Spalt, and Czech Saaz. 
The location a hop is grown has a definite impact on the variety's character, so only 
a Tettnanger/Spalter hop grown in Tettnang/Spalt is truly noble. There are other 
varieties that are considered to be Noble-Type, such as Perle, Crystal, Mt. Hood, 
Liberty, and Ultra. These hops were bred from the noble types and have very 
similar aroma profiles. Noble hops are considered to be most appropriate for lager 
styles because the beer and the hops grew up together. This is purely tradition and 
as a homebrewer you can use whichever hop you like for whatever beer style you 
want. We are doing this for the fun of it, after all. 
Aroma Hop Varieties  
Name:
British Columbia (BC) Goldings
Grown:
Canada
Profile:
Earthy, rounded, mild aroma; Spicy flavor
Usage:
Bittering, finishing, dry hopping for British style ales. Used as a 
domestic substitute for East Kent Goldings. Not quite as good as EK.
AA Range:
4.5 - 7%
Substitute:  
EK Goldings
Name:
Cascade
Grown:
US
Profile:
Strong spicy, floral, citrus (i.e. grapefruit) aroma.
Usage:
The defining aroma for American style Pale ales. Used for bittering, 
finishing, and especially dry hopping. 
Example:
Anchor Liberty Ale & Old Foghorn Barleywine, Sierra Nevada Pale Ale
AA Range:
4.5 - 8%
Substitute:
Centennial
Name:
Crystal a.k.a. CJF-Hallertau.
Grown:
US
Profile:
Mild, pleasant, slightly spicy. One of three hops bred as domestic 
replacements for Hallertauer Mittelfrüh.
Usage:
Aroma/finishing/flavoring
AA Range:
2 - 5%
Substitute:
Hallertauer Mittelfrüh, Hallertauer Hersbrucker, Mount Hood, Liberty, 
Ultra
Name:
East Kent Goldings (EKG)
Grown:
UK
Profile:
Spicy/floral, earthy, rounded, mild aroma;
spicy flavor
Usage:
Bittering, finishing, dry hopping for British style ales
Example:
Young's Special London Ale, Samuel Smith
's Pale Ale, Fuller's ESB
AA Range:
4.5 - 7%
Substitute:
BC Goldings, Whitbread Goldings Variety
Name:
Fuggles
Grown:
UK, US, and other areas
Profile:
Mild, soft, grassy, floral aroma
Usage:
Finishing / dry hopping for all ales, dark lagers
Example:
Samuel Smith
's Pale Ale, Old Peculiar, Thomas Hardy's Ale
AA Range:
3.5 - 5.5%
Substitute:
East Kent Goldings, Willamette, Styrian Goldings
Name:
Hallertauer Hersbrucker
Grown:
Germany
Profile:
Pleasant, spicy/mild, noble, earthy aroma
Usage:
Finishing for German style lagers
Example:
Wheathook Wheaten Ale
AA Range:
2.5 - 5%
Substitute:
Hallertauer Mittelfrüh, Mt. Hood, Liberty, Crystal, Ultra
Name:
Hallertauer Mittelfrüh
Grown:
Germany
Profile:
Pleasant, spicy, noble, mild herbal aroma
Usage:
Finishing for German style lagers
Example:
Sam Adam's Boston Lager, Sam Adam's Boston Lightship
AA Range:
3 - 5%
Substitute:
Hallertauer Hersbruck, Mt. Hood, Liberty, Crystal, Ultra
Name:
Liberty
Grown:
US
Profile:
Fine, very mild aroma. One of three hops bred as domestic 
replacements for Hallertauer Mittelfrüh.
Usage:
Finishing for German style lagers
Example:
Pete's Wicked Lager
AA Range:
2.5 - 5%
Substitute:
Hallertauer Mittelfrüh, Hallertauer Hersbruck, Mt. Hood,
Crystal, Ultra
Name:
Mt. Hood
Grown:
US
Profile:
Mild, clean aroma. One of three hops bred as domestic replacements 
for Hallertauer Mittelfrüh.
Usage:
Finishing for German style lagers
Example:
Anderson Valley High Rollers Wheat Beer
AA Range:
3.5 - 8%
Substitute:
Hallertauer Mittelfrüh, Hallertauer Hersbrucker, Liberty,
Tettnang, Ultra
Name:
Progress
Grown:
UK
Profile:
Assertive fruity aroma
Usage:
Widely used for real cask ales.
Example:
Hobson's Best Bitter, Mansfield Bitter
AA Range:
5 - 6%
Substitute:
Fuggles, Whitbread Goldings Variety
Name:
Saaz
Grown:
Czechoslovakia
Profile:
Delicate, mild, floral aroma
Usage:
Finishing for Bohemian style lagers
Example:
Pilsener Urquell
AA Range:
2 - 5%
Substitute:
Tettnang, Spalt, Ultra (some would claim there is no substitute)
Name:
Spalt
Grown:
Germany/US
Profile:
Mild, pleasant, slightly spicy
Usage:
Aroma/finishing/flavoring, some bittering
AA Range:
3 - 6%
Substitute:
Saaz, Tettnang, Ultra
Name:
Styrian Goldings
Grown:
Yugoslavia (seedless Fuggles grown in Yugoslavia),
also grown in US
Profile:
Similar to Fuggles
Usage:
Bittering/finishing/dry hopping for a wide variety of beers,
popular in Europe, especially UK.
Example:
Ind Coope's Burton Ale, Timothy Taylor's Landlord
AA Range:
4.5 - 7
Substitute:
Fuggles, Willamette
Name:
Tettnang
Grown:
Germany, US
Profile:
Fine, spicy aroma
Usage:
Finishing for German style beers
Example:
Gulpener Pilsener, Sam Adam's Oktoberfest, Anderson Valley ESB, 
Redhook
ESB
AA Range:
3 - 6%
Substitute:
Saaz, Spalt, Ultra
Name:
Willamette
Grown:
US
Profile:
Mild, spicy, grassy, floral aroma
Usage:
Finishing / dry hopping for American / British style ales
Example:
Sierra Nevada Porter, Ballard Bitter, Anderson Valley Boont Amber, 
Redhook
ESB
AA Range:
4 - 7%
Substitute:
Fuggles
Name:
Whitbread Goldings Variety (WGV)
Grown:
UK
Profile:
Flowery, fruity, a cross between Goldings and a Fuggle.
Usage:
Often combined with other varieties in Bitters
Example:
Whitbread Best Bitter
AA Range:
4 - 5%
Substitute:
Progress, Fuggles, EKG
Name:
Ultra
Grown:
US
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested