OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 1 - Introduction Page 1-7
If the vehicle you operate is registered under IRP 
and you are a motor carrier licensed under IFTA, 
then you are required to comply with the mandatory 
record keeping requirements for operating the vehicle. 
A universally accepted method of capturing this 
information is through the completion of an Individual 
Vehicle Distance Record (IVDR), sometimes times 
referred to as a Driver Trip Report. This document 
reflects the distance traveled and fuel purchased for 
a vehicle that operates interstate under apportioned 
(IRP) registration and IFTA fuel tax credentials.
Although the actual format of the IVDR may vary, the 
information that is required for proper record keeping 
does not.
In order to satisfy the requirements for Individual 
Vehicle Distance Records, these documents must 
include the following information:
Distance
Per Article IV of the IRP Plan
(i). Date of trip (starting and ending)
(ii). Trip origin and destination – City and State or 
Province
(iii). Route(s) of travel
(iv). Beginning and ending odometer or hubometer 
reading of the trip
(v). Total distance traveled
(vi). In-Jurisdiction distance
(vii). Power unit number or vehicle identification 
number.
Fuel
Per Section P560 of the IFTA Procedures Manual
.300 An acceptable receipt or invoice must include, but 
shall not be limited to, the following:
.005 Date of purchase
.010 Seller's name and address
.015 Number of gallons or liters purchased;
.020 Fuel type
.025 Price per gallon or liter or total amount of sale
.030 Unit number or other unique vehicle identifier
.035 Purchaser's name
An example of an IVDR that must be completed in its 
entirety for each trip can be found in Figure 1 below. 
Each individual IVDR should be filled out for only one 
vehicle. The rules to follow when trying to determine 
how and when to log an odometer reading are the 
following:
▪ At the beginning of the day
▪ When leaving the state or province
▪ At the end of the trip/day
Not only do the trips need to be logged, but the fuel 
purchases need to be documented as well. You must 
obtain a receipt for all fueling and include it with your 
completed IVDR.
Make sure that any trips that you enter are always 
filled out in descending order and that your trips 
include all state/provinces that you traveled 
through on your route.
There are different routes that a driver may take, and 
most of the miles may be within one state or province. 
Whether or not the distance you travel is primarily in 
one jurisdiction or spread among several jurisdictions, 
all information for the trip must be recorded. This 
includes the dates, the routes, odometer readings and 
fuel purchases.
By completing this document in full and keeping all 
records required by both the IRP and the IFTA, you 
will have ensured that you and your company are in 
compliance with all state and provincial laws surrounding 
fuel and distance record keeping requirements.
The IVDR serves as the source document for the 
calculation of fees and taxes that are payable to the 
jurisdictions in which the vehicle is operated, so these 
original records must be maintained for a minimum of 
four years.
In addition, these records are subject to audit by the 
taxing jurisdictions. Failure to maintain complete and 
accurate records could result in fines, penalties and 
suspension or revocation of IRP registrations and IFTA 
licenses.
For additional information on the IRP and the 
requirements related to the IRP, contact your base 
jurisdiction motor vehicle department or IRP, Inc., the 
official repository for the IRP. Additional information 
can be found online at www.irponline.org. There is a 
training video on the Website home page available in 
English, Spanish and French.
For additional information on IFTA and the requirements 
related to IFTA, contact the appropriate agency in your 
base jurisdiction. You will also find useful information 
about the Agreement at the official repository of IFTA 
at www.iftach.org.
Convert from pdf to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
batch pdf to jpg online; convert pdf image to jpg online
Convert from pdf to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
.pdf to jpg converter online; changing pdf to jpg
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 1 - Introduction Page 1-8
Figure 1 – Individual Vehicle Mileage & Fuel Record (Example)
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Online JPEG to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start
convert pdf into jpg online; convert pdf to high quality jpg
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Easy converting! We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your PDF files to JPG.
pdf to jpg; convert pdf images to jpg
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 2 - Driving Safely Page 2-1
Section 2 
DRIVING SAFELY
This Section Covers
· 
Vehicle Inspection
· 
Basic Control of Your Vehicle
· 
Shifting Gears
· 
Seeing
· 
Communicating
· 
Space Management
· 
Controlling Your Speed
· 
Seeing Hazards
· 
Distracted Driving
· 
Aggressive Drivers/Road Rage
· 
Night Driving & Driver Fatigue
· 
Driving in Fog
· 
Winter Driving
· 
Hot Weather Driving
· 
Railroad-highway Crossings
· 
Mountain Driving
· 
Driving Emergencies
· 
Antilock Braking Systems
· 
Skid Control and Recovery
· 
Accident Procedures
· 
Fires
· 
Alcohol, Other Drugs, and Driving
· 
Hazardous Materials Rules
This section contains knowledge and safe driving 
information that all commercial drivers should know. 
You must pass a test on this information to get a CDL. 
This section does not have specific information on air 
brakes, combination vehicles, doubles, or passenger 
vehicles. When preparing for the Vehicle Inspection 
Test, you must review the material in Section 11 in 
addition to the information in this section. This section 
does have basic information on hazardous materials 
(HazMat) that all drivers should know. If you need a 
HazMat endorsement, you should study Section 9.
2.1 – Vehicle Inspection
2.1.1 – Why Inspect
Safety is the most important reason you inspect your 
vehicle, safety for yourself and for other road users.
A vehicle defect found during an inspection could save 
you problems later. You could have a breakdown on 
the road that will cost time and dollars, or even worse, 
a crash caused by the defect.
Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect 
their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may 
inspect your vehicles. If they judge the vehicle to be 
unsafe, they will put it "out of service" until it is fixed.
2.1.2 – Types of Vehicle Inspection
A vehicle inspection will help you find problems that 
could cause a crash or breakdown.
Each pre-trip inspections test is a time-limited test. The 
maximum time allowed to complete the test is thirty 
minutes.
During a Trip.  For safety you should:
• Watch gauges for signs of trouble.
• Use your senses to check for problems (look, listen, 
smell, feel).
• Check critical items when you stop:
Tires, wheels and rims.
Brakes.
Lights and reflectors.
Brake and electrical connections to trailer.
Trailer coupling devices.
Cargo securement devices.
After-trip Inspection and Report.  You should do an 
after-trip inspection at the end of the trip, day, or tour of 
duty on each vehicle you operated. It may include filling 
out a vehicle condition report listing any problems you 
find. The inspection report helps a motor carrier know 
when the vehicle needs repairs.
2.1.3 – What to Look For
Tire Problems
• Too much or too little air pressure.
• Bad wear. You need at least 4/32-inch tread depth in 
every major groove on front tires. You need 2/32-inch 
on other tires. No fabric should show through the 
tread or sidewall.
• Cuts or other damage.
• Tread separation.
• Dual tires that come in contact with each other or 
parts of the vehicle.
• Mismatched sizes.
• Radial and bias-ply tires used together.
• Cut or cracked valve stems.
• Re-grooved, recapped, or retreaded tires on the front 
wheels of a bus are prohibited.
Wheel and Rim Problems
• Damaged rims.
• Rust around wheel nuts may mean the nuts are 
loose — check tightness. After a tire has been 
changed, stop a short while later and re-check 
tightness of nuts.
• Missing clamps, spacers, studs, or lugs means 
danger.
• Mismatched, bent, or cracked lock rings are 
dangerous.
• Wheels or rims that have had welding repairs are not 
safe.
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
This demo code just converts first page to jpeg image. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
changing pdf file to jpg; convert pdf into jpg format
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code will convert first page to jpeg image. C:\input.tif"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert tiff to jpg.
best pdf to jpg converter for; bulk pdf to jpg
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 2 - Driving Safely Page 2-2
Bad Brake Drums or Shoes
• Cracked drums.
• Shoes or pads with oil, grease, or brake fluid on 
them.
• Shoes worn dangerously thin, missing, or broken.
Steering System Defects
• Missing nuts, bolts, cotter keys, or other parts.
• Bent, loose, or broken parts, such as steering 
column, steering gear box, or tie rods.
• If power steering equipped, check hoses, pumps, 
and fluid level; check for leaks.
• Steering wheel play of more than 10 degrees 
(approximately two inches movement at the rim of a 
20-inch steering wheel) can make it hard to steer.
Figure 2.1
Suspension System Defects.  The suspension system 
holds up the vehicle and its load. It keeps the axles 
in place. Therefore, broken suspension parts can be 
extremely dangerous. Look for:
Spring hangers that allow movement of axle from 
proper position. See Figure 2.2.
Figure 2.2
• Cracked or broken spring hangers.
• Missing or broken leaves in any leaf spring. If one-
fourth or more are missing, it will put the vehicle "out 
of service", but any defect could be dangerous. See 
Figure 2.3.
Figure 2.3
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage.
convert pdf to jpg; reader pdf to jpeg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Resize converted image files in VB.NET. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP.NET. Embed PDF to image converter in viewer.
changing pdf to jpg file; pdf to jpg converter
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 2 - Driving Safely Page 2-3
• Broken leaves in a multi-leaf spring or leaves that 
have shifted so they might hit a tire or other part.
• Leaking shock absorbers.
• Torque rod or arm, U-bolts, spring hangers, or other 
axle positioning parts that are cracked, damaged, or 
missing.
• Air suspension systems that are damaged and/or 
leaking. See Figure 2.4.
Figure 2.4
• Any loose, cracked, broken, or missing frame 
members.
Exhaust System Defects.  A broken exhaust system 
can let poison fumes into the cab or sleeper berth. Look 
for:
• Loose, broken, or missing exhaust pipes, mufflers, 
tailpipes, or vertical stacks.
• Loose, broken, or missing mounting brackets, 
clamps, bolts, or nuts.
• Exhaust system parts rubbing against fuel system 
parts, tires, or other moving parts of vehicle.
• Exhaust system parts that are leaking.
Emergency Equipment.  Vehicles must be equipped 
with emergency equipment. Look for:
• Fire extinguisher(s).
• Spare electrical fuses (unless equipped with circuit 
breakers).
• Warning devices for parked vehicles (for example, 
three reflective warning triangles or 6 fusees or 3 
liquid burning flares).
Cargo (Trucks).  You must make sure the truck is not 
overloaded and the cargo is balanced and secured 
before each trip. If the cargo contains hazardous 
materials, you must inspect for proper papers and 
placarding.
2.1.4 – CDL Vehicle Inspection Test
In order to obtain a CDL you will be required to pass 
Vehicle Inspection Test. You will be tested to see if 
you know whether your vehicle is safe to drive. You 
will be asked to do a vehicle inspection of your vehicle 
and explain to the examiner what you would inspect 
and why. The following seven-step inspection method 
should be useful.
2.1.5 – Seven-step Inspection Method
Method of Inspection.  You should do a vehicle 
inspection the same way each time so you will learn all 
the steps and be less likely to forget something.
Approaching the Vehicle.  Notice general condition. 
Look for damage or vehicle leaning to one side. Look 
under the vehicle for fresh oil, coolant, grease, or fuel 
leaks. Check the area around the vehicle for hazards 
to vehicle movement (people, other vehicles, objects, 
low-hanging wires, limbs, etc.).
Vehicle Inspection Guide
Step 1: Vehicle Overview
Review last vehicle inspection report. Drivers may have 
to make a vehicle inspection report in writing each day. 
The motor carrier must repair any items in the report 
that affect safety and certify on the report that repairs 
were made or were unnecessary. You must sign the 
report only if defects were noted and certified to be 
repaired or not needed to be repaired.
Step 2: Check Engine Compartment
• Check That the Parking Brakes Are On and/or 
Wheels Chocked.
• You may have to raise the hood, tilt the cab (secure 
loose things so they don't fall and break something), 
or open the engine compartment door.
• Check the following:
Engine oil level.
Coolant level in radiator; condition of hoses.
Power steering fluid level; hose condition (if so 
equipped).
Windshield washer fluid level.
Battery fluid level, connections and tie downs 
(battery may be located elsewhere)
Automatic transmission fluid level (may require 
engine to be running).
Check belts for tightness and excessive wear 
(alternator, water pump, air compressor) — learn 
how much "give" the belts should have when 
adjusted right, and check each one.
Leaks in the engine compartment (fuel, coolant, 
oil, power steering fluid, hydraulic fluid, battery 
fluid).
Cracked, worn electrical wiring insulation.
Lower and secure hood, cab, or engine 
compartment door.
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
Use C# Code to Convert Jpeg to Tiff. string[] imagePaths = { @"C:\demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List<REImage> object.
convert pdf to jpg file; c# convert pdf to jpg
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
Convert JPEG (JPG) Images to, from PDF Images on Windows. Features and Benefits. Powerful image converter to convert images of JPG, JPEG formats to PDF files;
change pdf into jpg; change pdf to jpg
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 2 - Driving Safely Page 2-4
Step 3: Start Engine and Inspect Inside the Cab
Get In and Start Engine
• Make sure parking brake is on.
• Put gearshift in neutral (or "park" if automatic).
• Start engine; listen for unusual noises.
• If equipped, check the Anti-lock Braking System 
(ABS) indicator lights. Light on dash should come on 
and then turn off. If it stays on the ABS is not working 
properly. For trailers only, if the yellow light on the left 
rear of the trailer stays on, the ABS is not working 
properly.
Look at the Gauges
Oil pressure.  Should come up to normal within 
seconds after engine is started. See Figure 2.5
OIL PRESSURE
• Idling 
5 – 20 PSI
• Operating 35 – 75 PSI
• Low, Dropping, Fluctuating:
STOP IMMEDIATELY!
Without oil the engine can be 
destroyed rapidly.
Figure 2.5
Air pressure.  Pressure should build from 50 to 90 psi 
within 3 minutes. Build air pressure to governor cut-out 
(usually around 120 – 140 psi. Know your vehicle’s 
requirements.
Ammeter and/or voltmeter.  Should be in normal 
range(s).
Coolant temperature.  Should begin gradual rise to 
normal operating range.
Engine oil temperature.  Should begin gradual rise to 
normal operating range.
Warning lights and buzzers.  Oil, coolant, charging 
circuit warning, and antilock brake system lights should 
go out right away.
Check Condition of Controls.  Check all of the 
following for looseness, sticking, damage, or improper 
setting:
• Steering wheel.
• Clutch.
• Accelerator ("gas pedal").
• Brake controls.
• Foot brake.
• Trailer brake (if vehicle has one).
• Parking brake.
• Retarder controls (if vehicle has them).
• Transmission controls.
• Interaxle differential lock (if vehicle has one).
• Horn(s).
• Windshield wiper/washer.
• Lights.
• Headlights.
• Dimmer switch.
• Turn signal.
• Four-way flashers.
• Parking, clearance, identification, marker switch(es).
Check Mirrors and Windshield.  Inspect mirrors and 
windshield for cracks, dirt, illegal stickers, or other 
obstructions to seeing clearly. Clean and adjust as 
necessary.
Check Emergency Equipment:
• Spare electrical fuses (unless vehicle has circuit 
breakers).
• Three red reflective triangles, 6 fusees or 3 liquid 
burning flares.
• Properly charged and rated fire extinguisher.
Check for optional items such as:
• Chains (where winter conditions require).
• Tire changing equipment.
• List of emergency phone numbers.
• Accident reporting kit (packet).
Check Safety Belt.  Check that the safety belt is 
securely mounted, adjusts; latches properly and is not 
ripped or frayed.
Step 4: Turn Off Engine and Check Lights
Make sure the parking brake is set, turn off the engine, 
and take the key with you. Turn on headlights (low 
beams) and four-way emergency flashers, and get out 
of the vehicle.
Step 5: Do Walk-around Inspection
• Go to front of vehicle and check that low beams are 
on and both of the four-way flashers are working.
• Push dimmer switch and check that high beams 
work.
• Turn off headlights and four-way emergency 
flashers.
• Turn on parking, clearance, side-marker, and 
identification lights.
• Turn on right turn signal, and start walk-around 
inspection.
General
• Walk around and inspect.
• Clean all lights, reflectors, and glass as you go 
along.
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 2 - Driving Safely Page 2-5
Left Front Side
• Driver's door glass should be clean.
• Door latches or locks should work properly.
• Left front wheel.
• Condition of wheel and rim — missing, bent, broken 
studs, clamps, lugs, or any signs of misalignment.
• Condition of tires — properly inflated, valve stem and 
cap OK, no serious cuts, bulges, or tread wear.
• Use wrench to test rust-streaked lug nuts, indicating 
looseness.
• Hub oil level OK, no leaks.
• Left front suspension.
• Condition of spring, spring hangers, shackles,
• U-bolts.
• Shock absorber condition.
• Left front brake.
• Condition of brake drum or disc.
• Condition of hoses.
Front
• Condition of front axle.
• Condition of steering system.
• No loose, worn, bent, damaged or missing parts.
• Must grab steering mechanism to test for looseness.
• Condition of windshield.
• Check for damage and clean if dirty.
• Check windshield wiper arms for proper spring 
tension.
• Check wiper blades for damage, "stiff" rubber, and 
securement.
• Lights and reflectors.
• Parking, clearance, and identification lights clean, 
operating, and proper color (amber at front).
• Reflectors clean and proper color (amber at front).
• Right front turn signal light clean, operating, and 
proper color (amber or white on signals facing 
forward).
Right Side
• Right front: check all items as done on left front.
• Primary and secondary safety cab locks engaged (if 
cab-over-engine design).
• Right fuel tank(s).
• Securely mounted, not damaged, or leaking.
• Fuel crossover line secure.
• Tank(s) contain enough fuel.
• Cap(s) on and secure.
• Condition of visible parts.
• Rear of engine — not leaking.
• Transmission — not leaking.
• Exhaust system — secure, not leaking, not touching 
wires, fuel, or air-lines.
• Frame and cross members — no bends or cracks.
• Air-lines and electrical wiring — secured against 
snagging, rubbing, wearing.
• Spare tire carrier or rack not damaged (if so 
equipped).
• Spare tire and/or wheel securely mounted in rack.
• Spare tire and wheel adequate (proper size, properly 
inflated).
• Cargo securement (trucks).
• Cargo properly blocked, braced, tied, chained, etc.
• Header board adequate, secure (if required).
• Side boards, stakes strong enough, free of damage, 
properly set in place (if so equipped).
• Canvas or tarp (if required) properly secured to 
prevent tearing, billowing, or blocking of mirrors.
• If oversize, all required signs (flags, lamps, and 
reflectors) safely and properly mounted and all 
required permits in driver's possession.
• Curbside cargo compartment doors in good 
condition, securely closed, latched/locked and 
required security seals in place.
Right Rear
• Condition of wheels and rims — no missing, bent, or 
broken spacers, studs, clamps, or lugs.
• Condition of tires — properly inflated, valve stems 
and caps OK, no serious cuts, bulges, tread wear, 
tires not rubbing each other, and nothing stuck 
between them.
• Tires same type, e.g., not mixed radial and bias 
types.
• Tires evenly matched (same sizes).
• Wheel bearing/seals not leaking.
Suspension
• Condition of spring(s), spring hangers, shackles, and 
U-bolts.
• Axle secure.
• Powered axle(s) not leaking lube (gear oil).
• Condition of torque rod arms, bushings.
• Condition of shock absorber(s).
• If retractable axle equipped, check condition of lift 
mechanism. If air powered, check for leaks.
• Condition of air ride components.
Brakes
• Brake adjustment.
• Condition of brake drum(s) or discs.
• Condition of hoses — look for any wear due to 
rubbing.
Lights and reflectors
• Side-marker lights clean, operating, and proper color 
(red at rear, others amber).
• Side-marker reflectors clean and proper color (red at 
rear, others amber).
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 2 - Driving Safely Page 2-6
Rear
• Lights and reflectors.
• Rear clearance and identification lights clean, 
operating, and proper color (red at rear).
• Reflectors clean and proper color (red at rear).
• Taillights clean, operating, and proper color (red at 
rear).
• Right rear turn signal operating, and proper color 
(red, yellow, or amber at rear).
• License plate(s) present, clean, and secured.
• Splash guards present, not damaged, properly 
fastened, not dragging on ground, or rubbing tires.
• Cargo secure (trucks).
• Cargo properly blocked, braced, tied, chained, etc.
• Tailboards up and properly secured.
• End gates free of damage, properly secured in stake 
sockets.
• Canvas or tarp (if required) properly secured to 
prevent tearing, billowing, or blocking of either the 
rearview mirrors or rear lights.
• If over-length, or over-width, make sure all signs 
and/or additional lights/flags are safely and properly 
mounted and all required permits are in driver's 
possession.
• Rear doors securely closed, latched/locked.
Left Side
Check all items as done on right side, plus:
• Battery(ies) (if not mounted in engine compartment).
• Battery box(es) securely mounted to vehicle.
• Box has secure cover.
• Battery(ies) secured against movement.
• Battery(ies) not broken or leaking.
• Fluid in battery(ies) at proper level (except 
maintenance-free type).
• Cell caps present and securely tightened (except 
maintenance-free type).
• Vents in cell caps free of foreign material (except 
maintenance-free type).
Step 6: Check Signal Lights
• Get In and Turn Off Lights
Turn off all lights.
Turn on stop lights (apply trailer hand brake or 
have a helper put on the brake pedal).
Turn on left turn signal lights.
• Get Out and Check Lights
Left front turn signal light clean, operating and 
proper color (amber or white on signals facing the 
front).
Left rear turn signal light and both stop lights 
clean, operating, and proper color (red, yellow, or 
amber).
• Get In Vehicle
Turn off lights not needed for driving.
Check for all required papers, trip manifests, 
permits, etc.
Secure all loose articles in cab (they might 
interfere with operation of the controls or hit you in 
a crash).
Start the engine.
Step 7: Start the Engine and Check
Test for Hydraulic Leaks.  If the vehicle has hydraulic 
brakes, pump the brake pedal three times. Then apply 
firm pressure to the pedal and hold for five seconds. 
The pedal should not move. If it does, there may be 
a leak or other problem. Get it fixed before driving. If 
the vehicle has air brakes, do the checks described in 
Sections 5 and 6 of this manual.
Brake System
Test Parking Brake(s)
• Fasten safety belt
• Set parking brake (power unit only).
• Release trailer parking brake (if applicable).
• Place vehicle into a low gear.
• Gently pull forward against parking brake to make 
sure the parking brake holds.
Repeat the same steps for the trailer with trailer parking 
brake set and power unit parking brakes released (if 
applicable).
If it doesn't hold vehicle, it is faulty; get it fixed.
Test Service Brake Stopping Action
• Go about five miles per hour.
• Push brake pedal firmly
"Pulling" to one side or the other can mean brake 
trouble.
Any unusual brake pedal "feel" or delayed stopping 
action can mean trouble.
If you find anything unsafe during the vehicle inspection, 
get it fixed. Federal and state laws forbid operating an 
unsafe vehicle.
2.1.6 – Inspection during a Trip
Check Vehicle Operation Regularly
You should check:
• Instruments.
• Air pressure gauge (if you have air brakes).
• Temperature gauges.
• Pressure gauges.
• Ammeter/voltmeter.
• Mirrors.
• Tires.
• Cargo, cargo covers.
• Lights, etc
If you see, hear, smell, or feel anything that might mean 
trouble, check it out.
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 2 - Driving Safely Page 2-7
Safety Inspection.  Drivers of trucks and truck tractors 
when transporting cargo must inspect the securement 
of the cargo within the first 50 miles of a trip and every 
150 miles or every three hours (whichever comes first) 
after.
2.1.7 – After-trip Inspection and Report
You may have to make a written report each day on the 
condition of the vehicle(s) you drove. Report anything 
affecting safety or possibly leading to mechanical 
breakdown.
Subsection 2.1
Test Your Knowledge
The vehicle inspection report tells the motor carrier 
about problems that may need fixing. Keep a copy of 
your report in the vehicle for one day. That way, the next 
driver can learn about any problems you have found.
◆ What is the most important reason for doing a 
vehicle inspection?
◆ What things should you check during a trip?
◆ Name some key steering system parts.
◆ Name some suspension system defects.
◆ What three kinds of emergency equipment must 
you have?
◆ What is the minimum tread depth for front tires? 
For other tires?
◆ Name some things you should check on the front 
of your vehicle during the walk around inspection.
◆ What should wheel bearing seals be checked for?
◆ How many red reflective triangles should you 
carry?
◆ How do you test hydraulic brakes for leaks?
◆ Why put the starter switch key in your pocket dur-
ing the vehicle inspection?
These questions may be on your test. If you can’t 
answer them all, re-read Subsection 2.1.
2.2 – Basic Control of Your Vehicle
To drive a vehicle safely, you must be able to control its 
speed and direction. Safe operation of a commercial 
vehicle requires skill in:
• Accelerating.
• Steering.
• Stopping.
• Backing safely.
Fasten your seatbelt when on the road. Apply the 
parking brake when you leave your vehicle.
2.2.1 – Accelerating
Don't roll back when you start. You may hit someone 
behind you. If you have a manual transmission vehicle, 
partly engage the clutch before you take your right 
foot off the brake. Put on the parking brake whenever 
necessary to keep from rolling back. Release the 
parking brake only when you have applied enough 
engine power to keep from rolling back. On a tractor-
trailer equipped with a trailer brake hand valve, the 
hand valve can be applied to keep from rolling back.
Speed up smoothly and gradually so the vehicle does 
not jerk. Rough acceleration can cause mechanical 
damage. When pulling a trailer, rough acceleration can 
damage the coupling.
Speed up very gradually when traction is poor, as in 
rain or snow. If you use too much power, the drive 
wheels may spin. You could lose control. If the drive 
wheels begin to spin, take your foot off the accelerator.
2.2.2 – Steering
Hold the steering wheel firmly with both hands. Your 
hands should be on opposite sides of the wheel. If you 
hit a curb or a pothole (chuckhole), the wheel could pull 
away from your hands unless you have a firm hold.
2.2.3 – Stopping
Push the brake pedal down gradually. The amount of 
brake pressure you need to stop the vehicle will depend 
on the speed of the vehicle and how quickly you need 
to stop. Control the pressure so the vehicle comes to a 
smooth, safe stop. If you have a manual transmission, 
push the clutch in when the engine is close to idle.
2.2.4 – Backing Safely
Because you cannot see everything behind your 
vehicle, backing is always dangerous. Avoid backing 
whenever you can. When you park, try to park so you 
will be able to pull forward when you leave. When you 
have to back, here are a few simple safety rules:
• Start in the proper position.
• Look at your path.
• Use mirrors on both sides.
• Back slowly.
• Back and turn toward the driver's side whenever 
possible.
• Use a helper whenever possible.
These rules are discussed in turn below.
Start in the Proper Position.  Put the vehicle in the 
best position to allow you to back safely. This position 
will depend on the type of backing to be done.
Look at Your Path.  Look at your line of travel before 
you begin. Get out and walk around the vehicle. Check 
your clearance to the sides and overhead, in and near 
the path your vehicle will take.
Use Mirrors on Both Sides.  Check the outside mirrors 
on both sides frequently. Get out of the vehicle and 
check your path if you are unsure.
Back Slowly.  Always back as slowly as possible. Use 
the lowest reverse gear. That way you can more easily 
correct any steering errors. You also can stop quickly 
if necessary.
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 2 - Driving Safely Page 2-8
Back and Turn Toward the Driver's Side.  Back to the 
driver's side so that you can see better. Backing toward 
the right side is very dangerous because you can't see 
as well. If you back and turn toward the driver's side, 
you can watch the rear of your vehicle by looking out 
the side window. Use driver-side backing — even if it 
means going around the block to put your vehicle in 
this position. The added safety is worth it.
Use a Helper.  Use a helper when you can. There 
are blind spots you can't see. That's why a helper is 
important. The helper should stand near the back of 
your vehicle where you can see the helper. Before you 
begin backing, work out a set of hand signals that you 
both understand. Agree on a signal for "stop."
2.3 – Shifting Gears
Correct shifting of gears is important. If you can't get 
your vehicle into the right gear while driving, you will 
have less control.
2.3.1 – Manual Transmissions
Basic Method for Shifting Up.  Most heavy vehicles 
with manual transmissions require double clutching to 
change gears. This is the basic method:
• Release accelerator, push in clutch and shift to 
neutral at the same time.
• Release clutch.
• Let engine and gears slow down to the rpm required 
for the next gear (this takes practice).
• Push in clutch and shift to the higher gear at the 
same time.
• Release clutch and press accelerator at the same 
time.
Shifting gears using double clutching requires practice. 
If you remain too long in neutral, you may have difficulty 
putting the vehicle into the next gear. If so, don't try 
to force it. Return to neutral, release clutch, increase 
engine speed to match road speed, and try again.
Knowing When to Shift Up.  There are two ways of 
knowing when to shift:
Use Engine Speed (rpm).  Study the driver's manual 
for your vehicle and learn the operating rpm range. 
Watch your tachometer, and shift up when your engine 
reaches the top of the range. (Some newer vehicles 
use "progressive" shifting: the rpm at which you shift 
becomes higher as you move up in the gears. Find out 
what's right for the vehicle you will operate.)
Use Road Speed (mph).  Learn what speeds each 
gear is good for. Then, by using the speedometer, you'll 
know when to shift up.
With either method, you may learn to use engine 
sounds to know when to shift.
Basic Procedures for Shifting Down
• Release accelerator, push in clutch, and shift to 
neutral at the same time.
• Release clutch.
• Press accelerator, increase engine and gear speed 
to the rpm required in the lower gear.
• Push in clutch and shift to lower gear at the same 
time.
• Release clutch and press accelerator at the same 
time.
Downshifting, like upshifting, requires knowing when 
to shift. Use either the tachometer or the speedometer 
and downshift at the right rpm or road speed.
Special conditions where you should downshift 
are:
• Before Starting Down a Hill.  Slow down and shift 
down to a speed that you can control without using 
the brakes hard. Otherwise the brakes can overheat 
and lose their braking power.
• Downshift before starting down the hill.  Make 
sure you are in a low enough gear, usually lower 
than the gear required to climb the same hill.
• Before Entering a Curve.  Slow down to a safe 
speed, and downshift to the right gear before 
entering the curve. This lets you use some power 
through the curve to help the vehicle be more stable 
while turning. It also allows you to speed up as soon 
as you are out of the curve.
2.3.2 – Multi-speed Rear Axles and Auxiliary 
Transmissions
Multi-speed rear axles and auxiliary transmissions are 
used on many vehicles to provide extra gears. You 
usually control them by a selector knob or switch on 
the gearshift lever of the main transmission. There are 
many different shift patterns. Learn the right way to 
shift gears in the vehicle you will drive.
2.3.3 – Automatic Transmissions
Some vehicles have automatic transmissions. You 
can select a low range to get greater engine braking 
when going down grades. The lower ranges prevent 
the transmission from shifting up beyond the selected 
gear (unless the governor rpm is exceeded). It is very 
important to use this braking effect when going down 
grades.
2.3.4 – Retarders
Some vehicles have "retarders." Retarders help slow a 
vehicle, reducing the need for using your brakes. They 
reduce brake wear and give you another way to slow 
down. There are four basic types of retarders (exhaust, 
engine, hydraulic, and electric). All retarders can be 
turned on or off by the driver. On some vehicles the 
retarding power can be adjusted. When turned "on," 
retarders apply their braking power (to the drive wheels 
only) whenever you let up on the accelerator pedal all 
the way.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested