OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 9 - Hazardous Materials Page 9-15
9.6.10 – Where to Keep Shipping Papers and 
Emergency Response Information
Do not accept a hazardous materials shipment without 
a properly prepared shipping paper. A shipping 
paper for hazardous materials must always be easily 
recognized. Other people must be able to find it quickly 
after a crash.
Clearly distinguish hazardous materials shipping 
papers from others by tabbing them or keeping them 
on top of the stack of papers.
When you are behind the wheel, keep shipping papers 
within your reach (with your seat belt on), or in a pouch 
on the driver's door. They must be easily seen by 
someone entering the cab.
When not behind the wheel, leave shipping papers in 
the driver's door pouch or on the driver's seat.
Emergency response information must be kept in the 
same location as the shipping paper.
9.6.11 – Papers for Division 1.1, 1.2 or, 1.3 
Explosives.
A carrier must give each driver transporting Division 
1.1, 1.2, or 1.3 explosives a copy of Federal Motor 
Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSR), Part 397. The 
carrier must also give written instructions on what to 
do if delayed or in an accident. The written instructions 
must include:
• The names and telephone numbers of people to 
contact (including carrier agents or shippers).
• The nature of the explosives transported.
• The precautions to take in emergencies such as 
fires, accidents, or leaks.
• Drivers must sign a receipt for these documents.
You must be familiar with, and have in your possession 
while driving, the:
• Shipping papers.
• Written emergency instructions.
• Written route plan.
• A copy of FMCSR, Part 397.
9.6.12 – Equipment for Chlorine
A driver transporting chlorine in cargo tanks must have 
an approved gas mask in the vehicle. The driver must 
also have an emergency kit for controlling leaks in 
dome cover plate fittings on the cargo tank.
9.6.13 – Stop before Railroad Crossings
Stop before a railroad crossing if your vehicle:
• Is placarded.
• Carries any amount of chlorine.
• Has cargo tanks, whether loaded or empty used for 
hazardous materials.
You must stop 15 to 50 feet before the nearest rail. 
Proceed only when you are sure no train is coming and 
you can clear the tracks without stopping. Don't shift 
gears while crossing the tracks.
9.7 – Hazardous Materials – Emergencies
9.7.1 – Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG)
The Department of Transportation has a guidebook 
for firefighters, police, and industry workers on how 
to protect themselves and the public from hazardous 
materials. The guide is indexed by proper shipping 
name and hazardous materials identification number. 
Emergency personnel look for these things on the 
shipping paper. That is why it is vital that the proper 
shipping name, identification number, label, and 
placards are correct.
9.7.2 – Crashes/Incidents
As a professional driver, your job at the scene of a 
crash or an incident is to:
• Keep people away from the scene.
• Limit the spread of material, only if you can safely do 
so.
• Communicate the danger of the hazardous materials 
to emergency response personnel.
• Provide emergency responders with the shipping 
papers and emergency response information.
Follow this checklist:
• Check to see that your driving partner is OK.
• Keep shipping papers with you.
• Keep people far away and upwind.
• Warn others of the danger.
• Call for help.
• Follow your employer's instructions.
9.7.3 – Fires
You might have to control minor truck fires on the road. 
However, unless you have the training and equipment 
to do so safely, don't fight hazardous materials fires. 
Dealing with hazardous materials fires requires special 
training and protective gear.
When you discover a fire, call for help. You may use 
the fire extinguisher to keep minor truck fires from 
spreading to cargo before firefighters arrive. Feel trailer 
doors to see if they are hot before opening them. If 
hot, you may have a cargo fire and should not open 
the doors. Opening doors lets air in and may make 
the fire flare up. Without air, many fires only smolder 
until firemen arrive, doing less damage. If your cargo 
is already on fire, it is not safe to fight the fire. Keep 
the shipping papers with you to give to emergency 
personnel as soon as they arrive. Warn other people of 
the danger and keep them away.
If you discover a cargo leak, identify the hazardous 
materials leaking by using shipping papers, labels, 
or package location. Do not touch any leaking 
material — many people injure themselves by touching 
hazardous materials. Do not try to identify the material 
or find the source of a leak by smell. Toxic gases can 
destroy your sense of smell and can injure or kill you 
even if they don't smell. Never eat, drink, or smoke 
around a leak or spill.
Convert pdf photo to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
convert pdf file to jpg; change pdf to jpg file
Convert pdf photo to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
convert multipage pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg batch
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 9 - Hazardous Materials Page 9-16
If hazardous materials are spilling from your vehicle, 
do not move it any more than safety requires. You 
may move off the road and away from places where 
people gather, if doing so serves safety. Only move 
your vehicle if you can do so without danger to yourself 
or others.
Never continue driving with hazardous materials 
leaking from your vehicle in order to find a phone 
booth, truck stop, help, or similar reason. Remember, 
the carrier pays for the cleanup of contaminated 
parking lots, roadways, and drainage ditches. The 
costs are enormous, so don't leave a lengthy trail of 
contamination. If hazardous materials are spilling from 
your vehicle:
• Park it.
• Secure the area.
• Stay there.
• Send someone else for help.
When sending someone for help, give that person:
• A description of the emergency.
• Your exact location and direction of travel.
• Your name, the carrier's name, and the name of the 
community or city where your terminal is located.
• The proper shipping name, hazard class, and 
identification number of the hazardous materials, if 
you know them.
This is a lot for someone to remember. It is a good idea 
to write it all down for the person you send for help. The 
emergency response team must know these things to 
find you and to handle the emergency. They may have 
to travel miles to get to you. This information will help 
them to bring the right equipment the first time, without 
having to go back for it.
Never move your vehicle, if doing so will cause 
contamination or damage the vehicle. Keep upwind 
and away from roadside rests, truck stops, cafes, and 
businesses. Never try to repack leaking containers. 
Unless you have the training and equipment to 
repair leaks safely, don't try it. Call your dispatcher or 
supervisor for instructions and, if needed, emergency 
personnel.
9.7.4 – Responses to Specific Hazards
Class 1 (Explosives).  If your vehicle has a breakdown 
or accident while carrying explosives, warn others 
of the danger. Keep bystanders away. Do not allow 
smoking or open fire near the vehicle. If there is a fire, 
warn every one of the danger of explosion.
Remove all explosives before separating vehicles 
involved in a collision. Place the explosives at least 200 
feet from the vehicles and occupied buildings. Stay a 
safe distance away.
Class 2 (Compressed Gases).  If compressed gas is 
leaking from your vehicle, warn others of the danger. 
Only permit those involved in removing the hazard or 
wreckage to get close. You must notify the shipper if 
compressed gas is involved in any accident.
Unless you are fueling machinery used in road 
construction or maintenance, do not transfer a 
flammable compressed gas from one tank to another 
on any public roadway.
Class 3 (Flammable Liquids).  If you are transporting 
a flammable liquid and have an accident or your vehicle 
breaks down, prevent bystanders from gathering. Warn 
people of the danger. Keep them from smoking.
Never transport a leaking cargo tank farther than 
needed to reach a safe place. Get off the roadway if 
you can do so safely. Don't transfer flammable liquid 
from one vehicle to another on a public roadway except 
in an emergency.
Class 4 (Flammable Solids) and Class 5 (Oxidizing 
Materials).  If a flammable solid or oxidizing material 
spills, warn others of the fire hazard. Do not open 
smoldering packages of flammable solids. Remove 
them from the vehicle if you can safely do so. Also, 
remove unbroken packages if it will decrease the fire 
hazard.
Class 6 (Poisonous Materials and Infectious 
Substances).  It is your job to protect yourself, other 
people, and property from harm. Remember that many 
products classed as poison are also flammable. If you 
think a Division 2.3 (Poison Gases) or Division 6.1 
(Poison Materials) might be flammable, take the added 
precautions needed for flammable liquids or gases. Do 
not allow smoking, open flame, or welding. Warn others 
of the hazards of fire, of inhaling vapors, or coming in 
contact with the poison.
A vehicle involved in a leak of Division 2.3 (Poison 
Gases) or Division 6.1 (Poisons) must be checked for 
stray poison before being used again.
If a Division 6.2 (Infectious Substances) package is 
damaged in handling or transportation, you should 
immediately contact your supervisor. Packages that 
appear to be damaged or show signs of leakage should 
not be accepted.
Class 7 (Radioactive Materials).  If radioactive 
material is involved in a leak or broken package, tell 
your dispatcher or supervisor as soon as possible. 
If there is a spill, or if an internal container might be 
damaged, do not touch or inhale the material. Do not 
use the vehicle until it is cleaned and checked with a 
survey meter.
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Support various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
change pdf file to jpg; convert pdf file to jpg format
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Support various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
change pdf file to jpg file; batch convert pdf to jpg
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 9 - Hazardous Materials Page 9-17
Class 8 (Corrosive Materials).  If corrosives spill or 
leak during transportation, be careful to avoid further 
damage or injury when handling the containers. Parts 
of the vehicle exposed to a corrosive liquid must be 
thoroughly washed with water. After unloading, wash 
out the interior as soon as possible before reloading.
If continuing to transport a leaking tank would be 
unsafe, get off the road. If safe to do so, contain any 
liquid leaking from the vehicle. Keep bystanders away 
from the liquid and its fumes. Do everything possible to 
prevent injury to yourself and to others.
9.7.5 – Required Notification
The National Response Center helps coordinate 
emergency response to chemical hazards. It is a 
resource to the police and firefighters. It maintains a 
24-hour toll-free line listed below. You or your employer 
must phone when any of the following occur as a direct 
result of a hazardous materials incident:
• A person is killed.
• An injured person requires hospitalization.
• Estimated property damage exceeds $50,000.
• The general public is evacuated for more than one 
hour.
• One or more major transportation arteries or facilities 
are closed for one hour or more.
• Fire, breakage, spillage, or suspected radioactive 
contamination occurs.
• Fire, breakage, spillage or suspected contamination 
occur involving shipment of etiologic agents (bacteria 
or toxins).
• A situation exists of such a nature (e.g., continuing 
danger to life exists at the scene of an incident) that, 
in the judgment of the carrier, should be reported.
National Response Center 
(800) 424-8802
Persons telephoning the National Response Center 
should be ready to give:
• Their name.
• Name and address of the carrier they work for.
• Phone number where they can be reached.
• Date, time, and location of incident.
• The extent of injuries, if any.
• Classification, name, and quantity of hazardous 
materials involved, if such information is available.
• Type of incident and nature of hazardous materials 
involvement and whether a continuing danger to life 
exists at the scene.
• If a reportable quantity of hazardous substance 
was involved, the caller should give the name of the 
shipper and the quantity of the hazardous substance 
discharged.
Be prepared to give your employer the required 
information as well. Carriers must make detailed written 
reports within 30 days of an incident.
CHEMTREC 
(800) 424-9300
The Chemical Transportation Emergency Center 
(CHEMTREC) in Washington also has a 24-hour 
toll-free line. CHEMTREC was created to provide 
emergency personnel with technical information about 
the physical properties of hazardous materials. The 
National Response Center and CHEMTREC are in 
close communication. If you call either one, they will 
tell the other about the problem when appropriate.
Do not leave radioactive yellow - II or yellow - III labeled 
packages near people, animals, or film longer than 
shown in Figure 9.10
RADIOACTIVE SEPARATION
Table A
TOTAL 
TRANSPORT 
INDEX
MINIMUM DISTANCE IN FEET TO 
NEAREST UNDEVELOPED FILM
TO PEOPLE OR CARGO 
COMPARTMENT 
PARTITIONS
0 - 2 
Hrs.
2 - 4 
Hrs.
4 - 8 
Hrs.
8 - 12 
Hrs.
Over 12 
Hrs.
None
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.1 to 1.0
1
2
3
4
5
1
1.1 to 5.0
3
4
6
8
11
2
5.1 to 10.0
4
6
9
11
15
3
10.1 to 
20.0
5
8
12
16
22
4
20.1 to 
30.0
7
10
15
20
29
5
30.1 to 
40.0
8
11
17
22
33
6
40.1 to 
50.0
9
12
19
24
36
Figure 9.10
VB.NET Image: How to Save Image & Print Image Using VB.NET
and printing multi-page document files, like PDF and Word different image encoders, including tif encoder, jpg encoder, png VB.NET Code to Save Image / Photo.
change from pdf to jpg on; batch pdf to jpg
VB.NET Image: Tutorial for Flipping Image Using Our .NET Image SDK
SDK, an image (including BMP, PNG, JPG, etc) can be becomes a mirror reflection of the photo on the powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
.pdf to .jpg online; convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 9 - Hazardous Materials Page 9-18
Classes of Hazardous Materials
Hazardous materials are categorized into nine major 
hazard classes and additional categories for consumer 
commodities and combustible liquids. The classes of 
hazardous materials are listed in Figure 9.11.
HAZARD CLASS DEFINITIONS
Table B
Class
Class Name
Example
1
Explosives
Ammunition, Dynamite, 
Fireworks
2
Gases
Propane, Oxygen, 
Helium
3
Flammable 
Gasoline Fuel, Acetone
4
Flammable Solids
Matches, Fuses
5
Oxidizers
Ammonium Nitrate, 
Hydrogen Peroxide
6
Poisons
Pesticides, Arsenic
7
Radioactive
Uranium, Plutonium
8
Corrosives
Hydrochloric Acid, 
Battery Acid
9
Miscellaneous 
Hazardous Materials
Formaldehyde, 
Asbestos
None
ORM-D (Other 
Regulated Material-
Domestic)
Hair Spray or Charcoal
None
Combustible Liquids
Fuel Oils, Lighter Fluid
Figure 9.11
Subsections 9.6 and 9.7
Test Your Knowledge
◆ If your placarded trailer has dual tires, how often 
should you check the tires?
◆ What is a safe haven?
◆ How close to the traveled part of the roadway can 
you park with Division 1.2 or 1.3 materials?
◆ How close can you park to a bridge, tunnel, or 
building with the same load?
◆ What type of fire extinguisher must placarded 
vehicles carry?
◆ You’re hauling 100 pounds of Division 4.3 (dan-
gerous when wet) materials. Do you need to stop 
before a railroad-highway crossing?
◆ At a rest area you discover your hazardous ma-
terials shipments slowly leaking from the vehicle. 
There is no phone around. What should you do?
◆ What is the Emergency Response Guide (ERG)?
These questions may be on your test. If you can’t 
answer them all, re-read Subsections 9.6 and 9.7.
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET convert PDF to SVG. vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned signature remove multiple or all images from PDF document.
.pdf to .jpg converter online; bulk pdf to jpg converter online
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned signature or all image objects from PDF document in
convert pdf pages to jpg online; c# pdf to jpg
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 9 - Hazardous Materials Page 9-19
9.8 – Hazardous Materials Glossary
This glossary presents definitions of certain terms used 
in this section. A complete glossary of terms can be 
found in the federal Hazardous Materials Rules (49 
CFR 171.8). You should have an current copy of these 
rules for your reference.
Note:  You will not be tested on this glossary.
Section 171.8 Definitions and abbreviations.
Bulk packaging –  Packaging, other than a vessel, or a 
barge, including a transport vehicle or freight container, 
in which hazardous materials are loaded with no 
intermediate form of containment and which has:
• A maximum capacity greater than 450 L (119 
gallons) as a receptacle for a liquid;
• A maximum net mass greater than 400 kg (882 
pounds) or a maximum capacity greater than 450 L 
(119 gallons) as a receptacle for a solid; or
• A water capacity greater than 454 kg (1000 pounds) 
as a receptacle for a gas as defined in Sec. 173.115.
Cargo tank –  A bulk packaging which:
• Is a tank intended primarily for the carriage of 
liquids or gases and includes appurtenances, 
reinforcements, fittings, and closures (for "tank", see 
49 CFR 178.3451(c), 178.3371, or 178.3381, as 
applicable);
• Is permanently attached to or forms a part of a motor 
vehicle, or is not permanently attached to a motor 
vehicle but which, by reason of its size, construction, 
or attachment to a motor vehicle is loaded or 
unloaded without being removed from the motor 
vehicle; and
• Is not fabricated under a specification for cylinders, 
portable tanks, tank cars, or multiunit tank car tanks.
Carrier –  A person engaged in the transportation of 
passengers or property by:
• Land or water as a common, contract, or private 
carrier, or
• Civil aircraft.
Consignee –  The business or person to whom a 
shipment is delivered.
Division –  A subdivision of a hazard class.
EPA –  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
FMCSR –  The Federal Motor Carrier Safety 
Regulations.
Freight container –  a reusable container having 
a volume of 64 cubic feet or more, designed and 
constructed to permit being lifted with its contents intact 
and intended primarily for containment of packages (in 
unit form) during transportation.
Fuel tank –  A tank, other than a cargo tank, used 
to transport flammable or combustible liquid or 
compressed gas for the purpose of supplying fuel 
for propulsion of the transport vehicle to which it is 
attached, or for the operation of other equipment on 
the transport vehicle.
Gross weight or gross mass –  The weight of the 
packaging plus the weight of its contents.
Hazard class –  The category of hazard assigned to 
a hazardous material under the definitional criteria of 
Part 173 and the provisions of the Sec. 172.101 Table. 
A material may meet the defining criteria for more than 
one hazard class but is assigned to only one hazard 
class.
Hazardous materials –  A substance or material which 
has been determined by the Secretary of Transportation 
to be capable of posing an unreasonable risk to health, 
safety, and property when transported in commerce, 
and which has been so designated. The term includes 
hazardous substances, hazardous wastes, marine 
pollutants, elevated temperature materials and 
materials designated as hazardous in the hazardous 
materials table of §172.101, and materials that meet 
the defining criteria for hazard classes and divisions in 
§173, Subchapter C.
Hazardous substance –  A material, including its 
mixtures and solutions, that is:
• Listed in Appendix A to Sec. 172.101;
• In a quantity, in one package, which equals or 
exceeds the reportable quantity (RQ) listed in 
Appendix A to Sec. 172.101; and
• When in a mixture or solution - 
For radionuclides, conforms to paragraph 7 of 
Appendix A to Sec. 172.101.
For other than radionuclides, is in a concentration 
by weight which equals or exceeds the 
concentration corresponding to the RQ of the 
material, as shown in Figure 9.12.
HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE CONCENTRATIONS
RQ Pounds 
(Kilograms)
Concentration by Weight
Percent
PPM
5,000 (2,270)
10
100,000
1,000 (454)
2
20,000
100 (45.4)
.2
2,000
10 (4.54)
.02
200
1 (0.454)
.002
20
Figure 9.12
This definition does not apply to petroleum products 
that are lubricants or fuels (see 40 CFR 300.6).
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
pasting and cutting from adobe PDF file in image formats, including Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif and cut vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned signature
convert pdf into jpg online; convert pdf file to jpg on
VB.NET Image: Create Image from Stream; Stream to Image Converter
to capture image from web url, convert image to like image sharpening and old photo effect adding powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
change pdf file to jpg online; change pdf to jpg on
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 9 - Hazardous Materials Page 9-20
Hazardous waste –  For the purposes of this 
chapter, means any material that is subject to the 
Hazardous Waste Manifest Requirements of the U.S. 
Environmental Protection Agency specified in 40 CFR 
Part 262.
Intermediate bulk container (IBC) –  A rigid or flexible 
portable packaging, other than a cylinder or portable 
tank, which is designed for mechanical handling. 
Standards for IBCs manufactured in the United States 
are set forth in subparts N and O §178.
Limited quantity –  The maximum amount of a 
hazardous material for which there may be specific 
labeling or packaging exception.
Marking –  The descriptive name, identification 
number, instructions, cautions, weight, specification, 
or UN marks or combinations thereof, required by this 
subchapter on outer packaging of hazardous materials.
Mixture –  A material composed of more than one 
chemical compound or element.
Name of contents –  The proper shipping name as 
specified in Sec. 172.101.
Non-bulk packaging –  A packaging, which has:
• A maximum capacity of 450 L (119 gallons) as a 
receptacle for a liquid;
• A maximum net mass less than 400 kg (882 pounds) 
and a maximum capacity of 450 L (119 gallons) or 
less as a receptacle for a solid; or
A water capacity greater than 454 kg (1,000 
pounds) or less as a receptacle for a gas as 
defined in Sec. 173.115.
N.O.S. –  Not otherwise specified.
Outage or ullage –  The amount by which a packaging 
falls short of being liquid full, usually expressed in 
percent by volume.
Portable tank –  Bulk packaging (except a cylinder 
having a water capacity of 1,000 pounds or less) 
designed primarily to be loaded onto, or on, or 
temporarily attached to a transport vehicle or ship and 
equipped with skids, mountings, or accessories to 
facilitate handling of the tank by mechanical means. It 
does not include a cargo tank, tank car, multiunit tank 
car tank, or trailer carrying 3AX, 3AAX, or 3T cylinders.
Proper shipping name –  The name of the hazardous 
materials shown in Roman print (not italics) in Sec. 
172.101.
P.s.i. or psi –  Pounds per square inch.
P.s.i.a. or psia –  Pounds per square inch absolute.
Reportable quantity (RQ) –  The quantity specified 
in Column 2 of the Appendix to Sec. 172.101 for any 
material identified in Column 1 of the Appendix.
RSPA – now PHMSA –  The Pipeline and Hazardous 
Materials Safety Administration, U.S. Department of 
Transportation, Washington, DC 20590.
Shipper's certification –  A statement on a shipping 
paper, signed by the shipper, saying he/she prepared 
the shipment properly according to law. For example:
"This is to certify that the above named 
materials are properly classified, described, 
packaged, marked and labeled, and are in 
proper condition for transportation according to 
the applicable regulations or the Department of 
Transportation."; or
I hereby declare that the contents of this 
consignment are fully and accurately described 
above by the proper shipping name and are 
classified, packaged, marked and labeled/
placarded, and are in all respects in proper 
condition for transport by * according 
to applicable international and national 
government regulations."
*words may be inserted here to indicate mode 
of transportation (rail, aircraft, motor vehicle, 
vessel)
Shipping paper –  A shipping order, bill of lading, 
manifest, or other shipping document serving a similar 
purpose and containing the information required by 
Sec. 172.202, 172.203, and 172.204.
Technical name –  A recognized chemical name or 
microbiological name currently used in scientific and 
technical handbooks, journals, and texts.
Transport vehicle –  A cargo-carrying vehicle such as 
an automobile, van, tractor, truck, semi-trailer, tank car, 
or rail car used for the transportation of cargo by any 
mode. Each cargo-carrying body (trailer, rail car, etc.) 
is a separate transport vehicle.
UN standard packaging –  A specification 
packaging conforming to the standards in the UN 
recommendations.
UN –  United Nations.
VB.NET PowerPoint: Use .NET Converter to Convert PPT to Raster
so it is not widely used for digital photo. If temp IsNot Nothing Then temp.Convert( imageStream, ImageFormat & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
changing file from pdf to jpg; convert pdf image to jpg
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Planet Barcode Generator for Image, Picture &
gif, jpeg, bmp and tiff) and a document file (supported files are PDF, Word & TIFF to decide the output barcode image format as you need, including JPG, GIF, BMP
convert pdf pictures to jpg; change pdf to jpg format
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 10 - School Bus Page 10-1
Section 10  
SCHOOL BUSES
This Section Covers
▪ Danger Zones and Use of Mirrors
▪ Loading and Unloading
▪ Emergency Exit and Evacuation
▪ Railroad-Highway Grade Crossings
▪ Student Management
▪ Antilock Braking Systems
▪ Special Safety Considerations
Because state and local laws and regulations regulate 
so much of school transportation and school bus 
operations, many of the procedures in this section may 
differ from state to state. You should be thoroughly 
familiar with the laws and regulations in your state and 
local school district.
10.1 – Danger Zones and Use of Mirrors
10.1.1 – Danger Zones
The danger zone is the area on all sides of the bus 
where children are in the most danger of being hit, 
either by another vehicle or their own bus. The danger 
zones may extend as much as 30 feet from the front 
bumper with the first 10 feet being the most dangerous, 
10 feet from the left and right sides of the bus and 
10 feet behind the rear bumper of the school bus. 
In addition, the area to the left of the bus is always 
considered dangerous because of passing cars. Figure 
10.1 illustrates these danger zones.
10.1.2 – Correct Mirror Adjustment
Proper adjustment and use of all mirrors is vital to the 
safe operation of the school bus in order to observe 
the danger zone around the bus and look for students, 
traffic, and other objects in this area. You should always 
check each mirror before operating the school bus to 
obtain maximum viewing area. If necessary, have the 
mirrors adjusted.
0RVW'DQJHURXV
7+('$1*(5=21(6
0RVW'DQJHURXV
'DQJHU=RQHV
6&+22/%86
)HHW
)HHW
)HHW
:DONLQJ$UHD
)HHW
'DQJHU)URP3DVVLQJ&DUV
Figure 10.1
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 10 - School Bus Page 10-2
10.1.3 – Outside Left and Right Side Flat Mirrors
These mirrors are mounted at the left and right front 
corners of the bus at the side or front of the windshield. 
They are used to monitor traffic, check clearances and 
students on the sides and to the rear of the bus. There 
is a blind spot immediately below and in front of each 
mirror and directly in back of the rear bumper. The blind 
spot behind the bus extends 50 to 150 feet and could 
extend up to 400 feet depending on the length and 
width of the bus.
Ensure that the mirrors are properly adjusted so you 
can see:
200 feet or 4 bus lengths behind the bus.
Along the sides of the bus.
The rear tires touching the ground.
Figure 10.2 shows how both the outside left and right 
side flat mirrors should be adjusted.
/()7$1'5,*+76,'(
)/$70,55256
0D\XVHLQFRQMXQFWLRQZLWKWKHOHIWDQGULJKW
VLGHFRQYH[PLUURUVWRREWDLQGHVLUHGYLVLELOLW\
%OLQGVSRWFDQEH ʒ± ±   ʒ
Figure 10.2
10.1.4 – Outside Left and Right Side 
Convex Mirrors
The convex mirrors are located below the outside flat 
mirrors. They are used to monitor the left and right 
sides at a wide angle. They provide a view of traffic, 
clearances, and students at the side of the bus. These 
mirrors present a view of people and objects that does 
not accurately reflect their size and distance from the 
bus.
You should position these mirrors to see:
The entire side of the bus up to the mirror mounts.
Front of the rear tires touching the ground.
At least one traffic lane on either side of the bus.
Figure 10.3 shows how both the outside left and right 
side convex mirrors should be adjusted.
0D\XVHLQFRQMXQFWLRQZLWKWKHOHIWDQGULJKWVLGH
VWDQGDUG IODW PLUURUVWRREWDLQGHVLUHGYLVLELOLW\
)HHW
)HHW
)HHW
)HHW
/()7$1'5,*+76,'(
&219(;0,55256
Figure 10.3
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 10 - School Bus Page 10-3
10.1.5 – Outside Left and Right Side  
Crossover Mirrors
These mirrors are mounted on both left and right front 
corners of the bus. They are used to see the front 
bumper “danger zone” area directly in front of the 
bus that is not visible by direct vision, and to view the 
“danger zone” area to the left side and the right side 
of the bus, including the service door and front wheel 
area. The mirror presents a view of people and objects 
that does not accurately reflect their size and distance 
from the bus. The driver must ensure that these mirrors 
are properly adjusted.
Ensure that the mirrors are properly adjusted so you 
can see:
• The entire area in front of the bus from the front 
bumper at ground level to a point where direct vision 
is possible. Direct vision and mirror view vision 
should overlap.
• The right and left front tires touching the ground.
• The area from the front of the bus to the service 
door.
These mirrors, along with the convex and flat mirrors, 
should be viewed in a logical sequence to ensure that 
a child or object is not in any of the danger zones.
Figure 10.4 illustrates how the left and right side 
crossover mirrors should be adjusted.
/()7$1'5,*+76,'(
&526629(50,55256
&URVVRYHU0LUURU
&URVVRYHU0LUURU
6&+22/%86
6&+22/%86
extended.
• Make a final check to see that all traffic has stopped 
before completely opening the door and signaling 
students to approach.
10.2.2 – Loading Procedures
• Perform a safe stop as described in Subsection 
10.2.1.
• Students should wait in a designated location for the 
school bus, facing the bus as it approaches.
• Students should board the bus only when signaled 
by the driver.
• Monitor all mirrors continuously.
• Count the number of students at the bus stop and 
be sure all board the bus. If possible, know names of 
students at each stop. If there is a student missing, 
ask the other students where the student is.
• Have the students board the school bus slowly, in 
single file, and use the handrail. The dome light 
should be on while loading in the dark.
• Wait until students are seated and facing forward 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested