asp.net mvc generate pdf report : Convert image pdf to excel application software tool html windows web page online HSY76058-part925

OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 7 - Doubles and Triples Page 7-1
Section 7  
DOUBLES AND TRIPLES
This Section covers
▪ Pulling Double/Triple Trailers
▪ Coupling and Uncoupling
▪ Inspecting Doubles and Triples
▪ Checking Air Brakes
This section has information you need to pass the 
CDL knowledge test for driving safely with double and 
triple trailers. It tells about how important it is to be very 
careful when driving with more than one trailer, how 
to couple and uncouple correctly, and about inspecting 
doubles and triples carefully. (You should also study 
Sections 2, 5, and 6.)
7.1 – Pulling Double/Triple Trailers
Take special care when pulling two and three trailers. 
There are more things that can go wrong, and doubles/
triples are less stable than other commercial vehicles. 
Some areas of concern are discussed below.
7.1.1 – Prevent Trailer from Rolling Over
To prevent trailers from rolling over, you must steer 
gently and go slowly around corners, on ramps, off 
ramps, and curves. A safe speed on a curve for a 
straight truck or a single trailer combination vehicle 
may be too fast for a set of doubles or triples.
7.1.2 – Beware of the Crack-the-whip Effect
Doubles and triples are more likely to turn over than 
other combination vehicles because of the "crack-
the-whip" effect. You must steer gently when pulling 
trailers. The last trailer in a combination is most likely 
to turn over. If you don't understand the crack-the-whip 
effect, study Subsection 6.1.2 of this manual.
7.1.3 –  Inspect Completely
There are more critical parts to check when you 
have two or three trailers. Check them all. Follow the 
procedures described later in this section.
7.1.4 – Look Far Ahead
Doubles and triples must be driven very smoothly to 
avoid rollover or jackknife. Therefore, look far ahead 
so you can slow down or change lanes gradually when 
necessary.
7.1.5 – Manage Space
Doubles and triples take up more space than other 
commercial vehicles. They are not only longer, but 
also need more space because they can't be turned or 
stopped suddenly. Allow more following distance. Make 
sure you have large enough gaps before entering or 
crossing traffic. Be certain you are clear at the sides 
before changing lanes.
7.1.6 – Adverse Conditions
Be more careful in adverse conditions. In bad weather, 
slippery conditions, and mountain driving, you must be 
especially careful if you drive double and triple bottoms. 
You will have greater length and more dead axles to 
pull with your drive axles than other drivers. There is 
more chance for skids and loss of traction.
7.1.7 – Parking the Vehicle
Make sure you do not get in a spot you cannot pull 
straight through. You need to be aware of how parking 
lots are arranged in order to avoid a long and difficult 
escape.
7.1.8 – Antilock Braking Systems on Converter 
Dollies
Converter dollies built on or after March 1, 1998, are 
required to have antilock brakes. These dollies will 
have a yellow lamp on the left side of the dolly.
7.2 – Coupling and Uncoupling
Knowing how to couple and uncouple correctly is 
basic to safe operation of doubles and triples. Wrong 
coupling and uncoupling can be very dangerous. 
Coupling and uncoupling steps for doubles and triples 
are listed below.
7.2.1 – Coupling Twin Trailers
Secure Second (Rear) Trailer
If the second trailer doesn't have spring brakes, drive 
the tractor close to the trailer, connect the emergency 
line, charge the trailer air tank, and disconnect the 
emergency line. This will set the trailer emergency 
brakes (if the slack adjusters are correctly adjusted). 
Chock the wheels if you have any doubt about the 
brakes.
For the safest handling on the road, the more heavily 
loaded semitrailer should be in first position behind the 
tractor. The lighter trailer should be in the rear.
A converter gear on a dolly is a coupling device of one 
or two axles and a fifth wheel by which a semitrailer can 
be coupled to the rear of a tractor-trailer combination 
forming a double bottom rig. See Figure 7.1.
Figure 7.1
Convert pdf file to jpg - Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
How to convert PDF to JPEG using C#.NET PDF to JPEG conversion / converter library control SDK
pdf to jpeg; changing pdf to jpg
Convert pdf file to jpg - VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.net, ASP.NET MVC, WinForms, WPF project
Online Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB.NET Image Application
conversion pdf to jpg; convert pdf to jpg 100 dpi
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 7 - Doubles and Triples Page 7-2
Position Converter Dolly in Front of Second (Rear) 
Trailer
• Release dolly brakes by opening the air tank 
petcock. (Or, if the dolly has spring brakes, use the 
dolly parking brake control.)
• If the distance is not too great, wheel the dolly into 
position by hand so it is in line with the kingpin.
• Or, use the tractor and first semitrailer to pick up the 
converter dolly:
• Position combination as close as possible to 
converter dolly.
• Move dolly to rear of first semitrailer and couple it to 
the trailer.
• Lock pintle hook.
• Secure dolly support in raised position.
• Pull dolly into position as close as possible to nose 
of the second semitrailer.
• Lower dolly support.
• Unhook dolly from first trailer.
• Wheel dolly into position in front of second trailer in 
line with the kingpin.
Connect Converter Dolly to Front Trailer
• Back first semitrailer into position in front of dolly 
tongue.
• Hook dolly to front trailer.
• Lock pintle hook.
• Secure converter gear support in raised position.
Connect Converter Dolly to Rear Trailer
• Make sure trailer brakes are locked and/or wheels 
chocked.
• Make sure trailer height is correct. (It must be slightly 
lower than the center of the fifth wheel, so trailer is 
raised slightly when dolly is pushed under.)
• Back converter dolly under rear trailer.
• Raise landing gear slightly off ground to prevent 
damage if trailer moves.
• Test coupling by pulling against pin of the second 
semitrailer.
• Make visual check of coupling. (No space between 
upper and lower fifth wheel. Locking jaws closed on 
kingpin.)
• Connect safety chains, air hoses, and light cords.
• Close converter dolly air tank petcock and shut-
off valves at rear of second trailer (service and 
emergency shut-offs).
• Open shut-off valves at rear of first trailer (and on 
dolly if so equipped).
• Raise landing gear completely.
• Charge trailer brakes (push "air supply" knob in), and 
check for air at rear of second trailer by opening the 
emergency line shut-off. If air pressure isn't there, 
something is wrong and the brakes won't work.
7.2.2 – Uncoupling Twin Trailers
Uncouple Rear Trailer
• Park rig in a straight line on firm level ground.
• Apply parking brakes so rig won't move.
• Chock wheels of second trailer if it doesn't have 
spring brakes.
• Lower landing gear of second semitrailer enough to 
remove some weight from dolly.
• Close air shut-offs at rear of first semitrailer (and on 
dolly if so equipped).
• Disconnect all dolly air and electric lines and secure 
them.
• Release dolly brakes.
• Release converter dolly fifth wheel latch.
• Slowly pull tractor, first semitrailer, and dolly forward 
to pull dolly out from under rear semitrailer.
Uncouple Converter Dolly
• Lower dolly landing gear.
• Disconnect safety chains.
• Apply converter gear spring brakes or chock wheels.
• Release pintle hook on first semi-trailer.
• Slowly pull clear of dolly.
• Never unlock the pintle hook with the dolly still under 
the rear trailer. The dolly tow bar may fly up, possibly 
causing injury, and making it very difficult to re-
couple.
7.2.3 – Coupling and Uncoupling Triple Trailers
Couple Tractor/First Semitrailer to Second/Third 
Trailers
• Couple tractor to first trailer. Use the method already 
described for coupling tractor-semitrailers.
• Move converter dolly into position and couple first 
trailer to second trailer using the method for coupling 
doubles. Triples rig is now complete.
Uncouple Triple-trailer Rig
• Uncouple third trailer by pulling the dolly out, then 
unhitching the dolly using the method for uncoupling 
doubles.
• Uncouple remainder of rig as you would any double-
bottom rig using the method already described.
7.2.4 – Coupling and Uncoupling Other 
Combinations
The methods described so far apply to the more 
common tractor-trailer combinations. However, there 
are other ways of coupling and uncoupling the many 
types of truck-trailer and tractor-trailer combinations 
that are in use. There are too many to cover in this 
manual. You will need to learn the correct way to couple 
and uncouple the vehicle(s) you will drive according to 
the manufacturer and/or owner specifications.
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
Convert a JPG to PDF. You can drag and drop your JPG file in the box, and then start immediately to sort the files, try out some settings and then create the
convert pdf to jpg for; convert pdf into jpg online
Online Convert PDF to Jpeg images. Best free online PDF JPEG
Online PDF to JPEG Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to JPG. Drag and drop your PDF in the box above and we'll convert the files for you.
convert pdf file into jpg format; convert pdf to gif or jpg
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 7 - Doubles and Triples Page 7-3
7.3 – Inspecting Doubles and Triples
Use the seven-step inspection procedure described in 
Section 2 to inspect your combination vehicle. There 
are more things to inspect on a combination vehicle 
than on a single vehicle. Many of these items are simply 
more of what you would find on a single vehicle. (For 
example, tires, wheels, lights, reflectors, etc.) However, 
there are also some new things to check. These are 
discussed below.
7.3.1 – Additional Checks
Do these checks in addition to those already listed in 
Section 2, Step 5: Do a Walk-around Inspection.
Coupling System Areas
• Check fifth wheel (lower).
Securely mounted to frame.
No missing or damaged parts.
Enough grease.
No visible space between upper and lower fifth 
wheel.
Locking jaws around the shank, not the head of 
kingpin.
Release arm properly seated and safety latch/lock 
engaged.
• Check fifth wheel (upper).
Glide plate securely mounted to trailer frame.
Kingpin not damaged.
Air and electric lines to trailer.
Electrical cord firmly plugged in and secured.
Air-lines properly connected to glad hands, no 
air leaks, properly secured with enough slack for 
turns.
All lines free from damage.
• Sliding fifth wheel.
Slide not damaged or parts missing.
Properly greased.
All locking pins present and locked in place.
If air powered, no air leaks.
Check that fifth wheel is not so far forward that the 
tractor frame will hit landing gear, or cab will hit 
the trailer, during turns.
Landing Gear
• Fully raised, no missing parts, not bent or otherwise 
damaged.
• Crank handle in place and secured.
• If power operated, no air or hydraulic leaks.
Double and Triple Trailers
• Shut-off valves (at rear of trailers, in service and 
emergency lines).
• Rear of front trailers: OPEN.
• Rear of last trailer: CLOSED.
• Converter dolly air tank drain valve: CLOSED.
• Be sure air-lines are supported and glad hands are 
properly connected.
• If spare tire is carried on converter gear (dolly), make 
sure it's secured.
• Be sure pintle-eye of dolly is in place in pintle hook 
of trailer(s).
• Make sure pintle hook is latched.
• Safety chains should be secured to trailer(s).
• Be sure light cords are firmly in sockets on trailers.
7.3.2 – Additional Things to Check during a Walk-
around Inspection
Do these checks in addition to Subsection 5.3, 
Inspecting Air Brake Systems.
7.4 – Doubles/Triples Air Brake Check
Check the brakes on a double or triple trailer as you 
would any combination vehicle. Subsection 6.5.2 
explains how to check air brakes on combination 
vehicles. You must also make the following checks on 
your double or triple trailers
7.4.1 – Additional Air Brake Checks
Check That Air Flows to All Trailers (Double and 
Triple Trailers).  Use the tractor parking brake and/
or chock the wheels to hold the vehicle. Wait for air 
pressure to reach normal, then push in the red "trailer 
air supply" knob. This will supply air to the emergency 
(supply) lines. Use the trailer handbrake to provide 
air to the service line. Go to the rear of the rig. Open 
the emergency line shut-off valve at the rear of the 
last trailer. You should hear air escaping, showing the 
entire system is charged. Close the emergency line 
valve. Open the service line valve to check that service 
pressure goes through all the trailers (this test assumes 
that the trailer handbrake or the service brake pedal is 
on), and then close the valve. If you do NOT hear air 
escaping from both lines, check that the shut-off valves 
on the trailer(s) and dolly(ies) are in the OPEN position. 
You MUST have air all the way to the back for all the 
brakes to work.
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
C# sample code for PDF to jpg image conversion. This demo code convert PDF file all pages to jpg images. // Define input and output files path.
reader convert pdf to jpg; pdf to jpg converter
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Dicom Image File to Raster Images
RasterEdge.XDoc.Office.Inner.Office03.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. This demo code convert dicom file all pages to jpg images.
convert .pdf to .jpg online; conversion pdf to jpg
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 7 - Doubles and Triples Page 7-4
Test Tractor Protection Valve.  Charge the trailer air 
brake system. (That is, build up normal air pressure 
and push the "air supply" knob in.) Shut the engine off. 
Step on and off the brake pedal several times to reduce 
the air pressure in the tanks. The trailer air supply 
control (also called the tractor protection valve control) 
should pop out (or go from "normal" to "emergency" 
position) when the air pressure falls into the pressure 
range specified by the manufacturer. (Usually within 
the range of 20 to 45 psi.)
If the tractor protection valve doesn't work properly, an 
air hose or trailer brake leak could drain all the air from 
the tractor. This would cause the emergency brakes to 
come on, with possible loss of control.
Test Trailer Emergency Brakes.  Charge the trailer 
air brake system and check that the trailer rolls freely. 
Then stop and pull out the trailer air supply control 
(also called tractor protection valve control or trailer 
emergency valve) or place it in the "emergency" 
position. Pull gently on the trailer with the tractor to 
check that the trailer emergency brakes are on.
Test Trailer Service Brakes.  Check for normal air 
pressure, release the parking brakes, move the vehicle 
forward slowly, and apply trailer brakes with the hand 
control (trolley valve), if so equipped. You should feel 
the brakes come on. This tells you the trailer brakes 
are connected and working. (The trailer brakes should 
be tested with the hand valve, but controlled in normal 
operation with the foot pedal, which applies air to the 
service brakes at all wheels.)
Section 7
Test Your Knowledge
◆ What is a converter dolly?
◆ Do converter dollies have spring brakes?
◆ What three methods can you use to secure a sec-
ond trailer before coupling?
◆ How do you check to make sure trailer height is 
correct before coupling?
◆ What do you check when making a visual check of 
coupling?
◆ Why should you pull a dolly out from under a trailer 
before you disconnect it from the trailer in front?
◆ What should you check for when inspecting the 
converter dolly? The pintle hook?
◆ Should the shut-off valves on the rear of the last 
trailer be open or closed? On the first trailer in a set 
of doubles? On the middle trailer of a set of triples?
◆ How can you test that air flows to all trailers?
◆ How do you know if your converter dolly is 
equipped with antilock brakes?
These questions may be on your test. If you can’t 
answer them all, re-read Section 7.
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
C# Create PDF from Raster Images, .NET Graphics and REImage File with XDoc Batch convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp
changing pdf file to jpg; convert multiple page pdf to jpg
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Convert PDF documents to multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage. Turn multipage PDF file into image
.net convert pdf to jpg; change from pdf to jpg on
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 8 - Tank Vehicles Page 8-1
Section 8  
TANK VEHICLES
This Section covers
▪ Inspecting Tank Vehicles
▪ Driving Tank Vehicles
▪ Safe Driving Rules
This section has information needed to pass the CDL 
knowledge test for driving a tank vehicle. (You should 
also study Sections 2, 5, 6, and 9). A tank endorsement 
is required for certain vehicles that transport liquids 
or gases. The liquid or gas does not have to be a 
hazardous material. A tank endorsement is required if 
your vehicle needs a Class A or B CDL and you want to 
haul a liquid or liquid gas in a tank or tanks having an 
individual rated capacity of more than 119 gallons and 
an aggregate rated capacity of 1000 gallons or more 
that is either permanently or temporarily attached to 
the vehicle or the chassis. A tank endorsement is also 
required for Class C vehicles when the vehicle is used 
to transport hazardous materials in liquid or gas form in 
the above described rated tanks.
Before loading, unloading, or driving a tanker, inspect 
the vehicle. This makes sure that the vehicle is safe to 
carry the liquid or gas and is safe to drive.
8.1 –  Inspecting Tank Vehicles
Tank vehicles have special items that you need to 
check. Tank vehicles come in many types and sizes. 
You need to check the vehicle's operator manual to 
make sure you know how to inspect your tank vehicle.
8.1.1 – Leaks
On all tank vehicles, the most important item to check 
for is leaks. Check under and around the vehicle for 
signs of any leaking. Don't carry liquids or gases in 
a leaking tank. To do so is a crime. You will be cited 
and prevented from driving further. You may also be 
liable for the clean-up of any spill. In general, check the 
following:
Check the tank's body or shell for dents or leaks.
Check the intake, discharge, and cut-off valves. 
Make sure the valves are in the correct position 
before loading, unloading, or moving the vehicle.
Check pipes, connections, and hoses for leaks, 
especially around joints.
Check manhole covers and vents. Make sure the 
covers have gaskets and they close correctly. 
Keep the vents clear so they work correctly.
8.1.2 – Check Special Purpose Equipment
If your vehicle has any of the following equipment, 
make sure it works:
Vapor recovery kits.
Grounding and bonding cables.
Emergency shut-off systems.
Built in fire extinguisher.
Never drive a tank vehicle with open valves or manhole 
covers.
8.1.3 – Special Equipment
Check the emergency equipment required for your 
vehicle. Find out what equipment you're required to 
carry and make sure you have it (and it works).
8.2 – Driving Tank Vehicles
Hauling liquids in tanks requires special skills because 
of the high center of gravity and liquid movement. See 
Figure 8.1.
Figure 8.1
8.2.1 – High Center of Gravity
High center of gravity means that much of the load's 
weight is carried high up off the road. This makes the 
vehicle top-heavy and easy to roll over. Liquid tankers 
are especially easy to roll over. Tests have shown that 
tankers can turn over at the speed limits posted for 
curves. Take highway curves and on ramp/off ramp 
curves well below the posted speeds.
8.2.2 – Danger of Surge
Liquid surge results from movement of the liquid in 
partially filled tanks. This movement can have bad 
effects on handling. For example, when coming to a 
stop, the liquid will surge back and forth. When the 
wave hits the end of the tank, it tends to push the truck 
in the direction the wave is moving. If the truck is on 
a slippery surface such as ice, the wave can shove a 
stopped truck out into an intersection. The driver of a 
liquid tanker must be very familiar with the handling of 
the vehicle.
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Convert PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF. C#.NET WPF PDF Viewer Tool: Convert and Export PDF.
convert pdf into jpg format; convert pdf to jpg converter
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Convert JPEG Images to TIFF
demo1.jpg", @"C:\demo2.jpg", @"C:\demo3.jpg" }; // Construct List in imagePaths) { Bitmap tmpBmp = new Bitmap(file); if (null Use C# Code to Convert Png to Tiff.
convert pdf into jpg; bulk pdf to jpg converter online
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 8 - Tank Vehicles Page 8-2
8.2.3 – Bulkheads
Some liquid tanks are divided into several smaller 
tanks by bulkheads. When loading and unloading the 
smaller tanks, the driver must pay attention to weight 
distribution. Don't put too much weight on the front or 
rear of the vehicle.
8.2.4 – Baffled Tanks
Baffled liquid tanks have bulkheads in them with holes 
that let the liquid flow through. The baffles help to 
control the forward and backward liquid surge. Side-
to-side surge can still occur. This can cause a roll over.
8.2.5 – Un-baffled Tanks
Un-baffled liquid tankers (sometimes called "smooth 
bore" tanks) have nothing inside to slow down the 
flow of the liquid. Therefore, forward-and-back surge 
is very strong. Un-baffled tanks are usually those that 
transport food products (milk, for example). (Sanitation 
regulations forbid the use of baffles because of 
the difficulty in cleaning the inside of the tank.) Be 
extremely cautious (slow and careful) in driving smooth 
bore tanks, especially when starting and stopping.
8.2.6 – Outage
Never load a cargo tank totally full. Liquids expand as 
they warm and you must leave room for the expanding 
liquid. This is called "outage." Since different liquids 
expand by different amounts, they require different 
amounts of outage. You must know the outage 
requirement when hauling liquids in bulk.
8.2.7 – How Much to Load?
A full tank of dense liquid (such as some acids) may 
exceed legal weight limits. For that reason, you may 
often only partially fill tanks with heavy liquids. The 
amount of liquid to load into a tank depends on:
• The amount the liquid will expand in transit.
• The weight of the liquid.
• Legal weight limits.
8.3 – Safe Driving Rules
In order to drive tank vehicles safely, you must 
remember to follow all the safe driving rules. A few of 
these rules are:
8.3.1 – Drive Smoothly
Because of the high center of gravity and the surge 
of the liquid, you must start, slow down, and stop very 
smoothly. Also, make smooth turns and lane changes.
8.3.2 – Controlling Surge
Keep a steady pressure on the brakes. Do not release 
too soon when coming to a stop.
Brake far in advance of a stop and increase your 
following distance.
If you must make a quick stop to avoid a crash, use 
controlled or stab braking. If you do not remember 
how to stop using these methods, review Subsection 
2.17.2. Also, remember that if you steer quickly while 
braking, your vehicle may roll over.
8.3.3 – Curves
Slow down before curves, then accelerate slightly 
through the curve. The posted speed for a curve may 
be too fast for a tank vehicle.
8.3.4 – Stopping Distance
Keep in mind how much space you need to stop your 
vehicle. Remember that wet roads double the normal 
stopping distance. Empty tank vehicles may take 
longer to stop than full ones.
8.3.5 – Skids
Don't over steer, over accelerate, or over brake. If you 
do, your vehicle may skid. On tank trailers, if your drive 
wheels or trailer wheels begin to skid, your vehicle may 
jackknife. When any vehicle starts to skid, you must 
take action to restore traction to the wheels.
Section 8
Test Your Knowledge
◆ How are bulkheads different than baffles?
◆ Should a tank vehicle take curves, on ramps, or off 
ramps at the posted speed limits?
◆ How are smooth bore tankers different to drive 
than those with baffles?
◆ What three things determine how much liquid you 
can load?
◆ What is outage?
◆ How can you help control surge?
◆ What two reasons make special care necessary 
when driving tank vehicles?
These questions may be on the test. If you can't 
answer them all, re-read Section 8.
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 9 - Hazardous Materials Page 9-1
Section 9  
HAZARDOUS MATERIALS
This 
Section
Covers
▪ The Intent of the Regulations
▪ Bulk Tank Loading, Unloading, and Marking
▪ Driver Responsibilities
▪ Driving and Parking Rules
▪ Communications Rules
▪ Emergencies
▪ Loading and Unloading
Hazardous materials are products that pose a risk to 
health, safety, and property during transportation. The 
term often is shortened to ‘HAZMAT,’ which you may 
see on road signs, or to ‘HM’ in government regulations. 
Hazardous materials include explosives, various types 
of gas, solids, flammable and combustible liquid, and 
other materials. Because of the risks involved and the 
potential consequences these risks impose, all levels 
of government regulate the handling of hazardous 
materials.
The Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) is found 
in parts 100 - 185 of Title 49 of the Code of Federal 
Regulations. The common reference for these 
regulations is 49 CFR 100 - 185.
The Hazardous Materials Table in the regulations 
contains a list of these items. However, this list is not 
all-inclusive. Whether or not a material is considered 
hazardous is based on its characteristics and the 
shipper's decision on whether or not the material meets 
a definition of a hazardous material in the regulations.
The regulations require vehicles transporting certain 
types or quantities of hazardous materials to display 
diamond-shaped, square on point, warning signs 
called placards.
This section is designed to assist you in understanding 
your role and responsibilities in hauling hazardous 
materials. Due to the constantly changing nature of 
government regulations, it is impossible to guarantee 
absolute accuracy of the materials in this section. An 
up-to-date copy of the complete regulations is essential 
for you to have. Included in these regulations is a 
complete glossary of terms.
You must have a commercial driver license (CDL) with 
a hazardous materials endorsement before you drive 
any size vehicle that is used to transport hazardous 
material as defined in 49 CFR 383.5. You must pass a 
written test about the regulations and requirements to 
get this endorsement.
Everything you need to know to pass the written test is 
in this section. However, this is only a beginning. Most 
drivers need to know much more on the job. You can 
learn more by reading and understanding the federal 
and state rules applicable to hazardous materials, as 
well as, attending hazardous materials training courses. 
Your employer, colleges and universities, and various 
associations usually offer these courses. You can get 
copies of the Federal Regulations (49 CFR) through 
the federal government printing office bookstore and 
industry publishers. Union or company offices often 
have copies of the rules for driver use. Find out where 
you can get your own copy to use on the job.
The regulations require training and testing for all 
drivers involved in transporting hazardous materials. 
Your employer or a designated representative is 
required to provide this training and testing. Hazardous 
materials employers are required to keep a record of 
training for each employee as long as that employee 
is working with hazardous materials, and for 90 days 
thereafter. The regulations require that hazardous 
materials employees be trained and tested at least 
once every three years.
All drivers must be trained in the security risks of 
hazardous materials transportation. This training must 
include how to recognize and respond to possible 
security threats.
The regulations also require that drivers have special 
training before driving a vehicle transporting certain 
flammable gas materials or highway route controlled 
quantities of radioactive materials. In addition, drivers 
transporting cargo tanks and portable tanks must 
receive specialized training. Each driver’s employer or 
his or her designated representative must provide such 
training.
Some locations require permits to transport certain 
explosives or bulk hazardous wastes. States and 
counties also may require drivers to follow special 
hazardous materials routes. The federal government 
may require permits or exemptions for special 
hazardous materials cargo such as rocket fuel. Find 
out about permits, exemptions, and special routes for 
the places you drive.
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 9 - Hazardous Materials Page 9-2
9.1 – The Intent of the Regulations
9.1.1 – Contain the Material
Transporting hazardous materials can be risky. The 
regulations are intended to protect you, those around 
you, and the environment. They tell shippers how to 
package the materials safely and drivers how to load, 
transport, and unload the material. These are called 
"containment rules."
9.1.2 – Communicate the Risk
To communicate the risk, shippers must warn 
drivers and others about the material's hazards. The 
regulations require shippers to put hazard warning 
labels on packages, provide proper shipping papers, 
emergency response information, and placards. These 
steps communicate the hazard to the shipper, the 
carrier, and the driver.
9.1.3 – Assure Safe Drivers and Equipment
In order to get a hazardous materials endorsement on 
a CDL, you must pass a written test about transporting 
hazardous materials. To pass the test, you must know 
how to:
• Identify what are hazardous materials.
• Safely load shipments.
• Properly placard your vehicle in accordance with the 
rules.
• Safely transport shipments.
Learn the rules and follow them. Following the rules 
reduces the risk of injury from hazardous materials. 
Taking shortcuts by breaking rules is unsafe. Non-
compliance with regulations can result in fines and jail.
Inspect your vehicle before and during each trip. 
Law enforcement officers may stop and inspect 
your vehicle. When stopped, they may check your 
shipping papers, vehicle placards, and the hazardous 
materials endorsement on your driver license, and your 
knowledge of hazardous materials.
9.2 – Hazardous Materials Transportation 
— Who Does What
9.2.1 – The Shipper
• Sends products from one place to another by truck, 
rail, vessel, or airplane.
• Uses the hazardous materials regulations to 
determine the product’s:
Identification number
Proper shipping name.
Hazard class.
Packing group.
Correct packaging.
Correct label and markings.
Correct placards.
• Must package, mark, and label the materials; 
prepare shipping papers; provide emergency 
response information; and supply placards.
• Certify on the shipping paper that the shipment 
has been prepared according to the rules (unless 
you are pulling cargo tanks supplied by you or your 
employer).
9.2.2 – The Carrier
• Takes the shipment from the shipper to its 
destination.
• Prior to transportation, checks that the shipper 
correctly described, marked, labeled, and otherwise 
prepared the shipment for transportation.
• Refuses improper shipments.
• Reports accidents and incidents involving hazardous 
materials to the proper government agency.
9.2.3 – The Driver
• Makes sure the shipper has identified, marked, and 
labeled the hazardous materials properly.
• Refuses leaking packages and shipments.
• Placards vehicle when loading, if required.
• Safely transports the shipment without delay.
• Follows all special rules about transporting 
hazardous materials.
• Keeps hazardous materials shipping papers and 
emergency response information in the proper place.
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 9 - Hazardous Materials Page 9-3
9.3 – Communication Rules
9.3.1 – Definitions
Some words and phrases have special meanings when 
talking about hazardous materials. Some of these 
may differ from meanings you are used to. The words 
and phrases in this section may be on your test. The 
meanings of other important words are in the glossary 
at the end of Section 9.
A material's hazard class reflects the risks associated 
with it. There are nine different hazard classes. The 
types of materials included in these nine classes are 
in Figure 9.1.
HAZARDOUS MATERIALS CLASS
Class
Division
Name of Class 
or Division
Examples
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
Mass Explosion
Projection Hazard
Fire Hazard
Minor Explosion
Very Insensitive
Extremely 
Insensitive
Dynamite
Flares
Display Fireworks
Ammunition
Blasting Agents
Explosive Devices
2
2.1
2.2
2.3
Flammable Gases
Non-Flammable 
Gases
Poisonous/Toxic 
Gases
Propane
Helium
Fluorine, 
Compressed
3
-
Flammable Liquids s Gasoline
4
4.1
4.2
4.3
Flammable Solids
Spontaneously 
Combustible
Dangerous When 
Wet
Ammonium Picrate, 
Wetted
White Phosphorus
Sodium
5
5.1
5.2
Oxidizers
Organic Peroxides
Ammonium Nitrate
Methyl Ethyl Ketone 
Peroxide
6
6.1
6.2
Poison (Toxic 
Material)
Infectious 
Substances
Potassium Cyanide
Anthrax Virus
7
-
Radioactive
Uranium
8
-
Corrosives
Battery Fluid
9
-
Miscellaneous 
Hazardous 
Materials
Polychlorinated 
Biphenyls (PCB)
e
-
ORM-D (Other 
Regulated 
Material-Domestic)
Food Flavorings, 
Medicines
-
Combustible 
Liquids
Fuel Oil
Figure 9.1
A shipping paper describes the hazardous materials 
being transported. Shipping orders, bills of lading, and 
manifests are all shipping papers. Figure 9.6 in Section 
9.3.4 - The Shipping Paper shows a shipping paper 
example.
After an accident or hazardous materials spill or 
leak, you may be injured and unable to communicate 
the hazards of the materials you are transporting. 
Firefighters and police can prevent or reduce the 
amount of damage or injury at the scene if they know 
what hazardous materials are being carried. Your life, 
and the lives of others, may depend on quickly locating 
the hazardous materials shipping papers. For that 
reason the rules require:
• Shippers to describe hazardous materials correctly 
and include an emergency response telephone 
number on shipping papers.
• Carriers and drivers to quickly identify hazardous 
materials shipping papers, or keep them on top 
of other shipping papers and keep the required 
emergency response information with the shipping 
papers.
• Drivers to keep hazardous materials shipping 
papers:
In a pouch on the driver's door, or
In clear view within immediate reach while the 
seat belt is fastened while driving, or
On the driver's seat when out of the vehicle.
9.3.2 – Package Labels
Shippers put diamond-shaped hazard warning labels 
on most hazardous materials packages. These labels 
inform others of the hazard. If the diamond label won't 
fit on the package, shippers may put the label on a 
tag securely attached to the package. For example, 
compressed gas cylinders that will not hold a label will 
have tags or decals. Labels look like the examples in 
Figure 9.2.
Figure 9.2 HAZMAT Labels Examples 
OHIO COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE MANUAL — 2011 CDL TESTING MODEL Version: JULY 2014
Section 9 - Hazardous Materials Page 9-4
9.3.3 – Lists of Regulated Products
Placards.  Placards are used to warn others of 
hazardous materials. Placards are signs put on the 
outside of a vehicle and on bulk packages, which 
identify the hazard class of the cargo. A placarded 
vehicle must have at least four identical placards.
They are put on the front, rear, and both sides of the 
vehicle. See Figure 9.3. Placards must be readable 
from all four directions. They are at least 10-3/4 inches 
square, square-on-point, in a diamond shape. Cargo 
tanks and other bulk packaging display the identification 
number of their contents on placards or orange panels 
or white square-on-point displays that are the same 
size as placards.
Figure 9.3 HAZMAT Placards Examples
Identification numbers are a four-digit code used by 
first responders to identify hazardous materials. An 
identification number may be used to identify more than 
one chemical. The letters “NA or “UN” will precede the 
identification number. The United States Department 
of Transportation’s Emergency Response Guidebook
(ERG) lists the chemicals and the identification 
numbers assigned to them.
There are three main lists used by shippers, carriers, 
and drivers when trying to identify hazardous materials. 
Before transporting a material, look for its name on 
three lists. Some materials are on all lists, others on 
only one. Always check the following lists:
• Section 172.101, Hazardous Materials Table.
• Appendix A to Section 172.101, List of Hazardous 
Substances and Reportable Quantities.
• Appendix B to Section 172.101, List of Marine 
Pollutants.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested