0
1227: 
TREATISE ON NOMADOLOGY—THE WAR MACHINE □ 409
stant relations. Thus one throws the variables off, even changing the nature 
of  the  equations,  which  cease  to  be  immanent  to  matter-movement 
(inequations, adequations). The question is not whether such a translation 
is  conceptually  legitimate—it  is—but  what  intuition  gets  lost  in  it.  In 
short, what Simondon criticizes the hylomorphic model for is taking form 
and  matter  to  be  two  terms  defined  separately,  like  the  ends  of  two 
half-chains  whose  connection  can  no  longer  be  seen,  like  a  simple 
relation  of  molding  behind  which  there  is  a  perpetually  variable, 
continuous modulation that it is no longer possible to grasp.
92
The critique of 
the  hylomorphic  schema  is  based  on  "the  existence,  between  form  and 
matter, of a zone of medium and intermediary dimension," of energetic, 
molecular  dimension—a  space  unto  itself  that  deploys  its  materiality 
through matter, a number unto itself that propels its traits through form.
We  always  get  back  to  this  definition:  the 
machinic  phylum 
is  ma-
teriality,  natural  or  artificial,  and  both  simultaneously;  it  is  matter  in 
movement, in flux, in variation, matter as a conveyor of singularities and 
traits  of  expression.  This  has  obvious  consequences:  namely,  this 
matter-flow can only 
he followed. 
Doubtless, the operation that consists in 
following can be carried out in one place: an artisan who planes follows the 
wood, the  fibers of the wood,  without  changing location. But this  way  of 
following  is only one particular sequence in a more general process. For 
artisans are obliged to follow in another way as well, in other words, to go 
find  the wood  where  it  lies,  and to find  the  wood  with  the  right  kind  of 
fibers.  Otherwise,  they  must  have  it  brought  to  them:  it  is  only  because 
merchants  take  care  of  one  segment  of  the  journey  in  reverse  that  the 
artisans can avoid making  the trip themselves. But artisans are  complete 
only  if  they  are  also  prospectors;  and  the  organization  that  separates 
prospectors, merchants, and artisans already mutilates artisans in order to 
make "workers" of them. We will therefore define the artisan as one who 
is  determined  in  such  a  way  as  to  follow  a  flow  of  matter,  a 
machinic 
phylum. 
The  artisan is 
the itinerant, the ambulant. 
To follow  the  flow  of 
matter is to itinerate, to ambulate. It is intuition in action. Of course, there 
are second-order itinerancies where it is no longer a flow of matter that one 
prospects  and  follows,  but,  for  example,  a  market.  Nevertheless,  it  is 
always  a  flow  that  is  followed,  even  if  the  flow  is  not  always  that  of 
matter.  And,  above  all,  there  are  secondary  itinerancies,  which  derive 
from another "condition," even if they are necessarily entailed by it. For 
example,  a 
transhumant, 
whether  a farmer  or an  animal  raiser,  changes 
land  after  it  is  worn  out,  or  else  seasonally;  but  transhumants  only 
secondarily follow a  land flow, because they undertake a rotation  meant 
from the start to return them to the point from which they left,  after  the 
forest  has  regenerated,  the  land  has  rested,  the  weather  has  changed. 
Transhumants do not follow a flow, they draw a circuit; they only
Add page numbers to pdf document in preview - control SDK system:C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Introduction to Viewing PDF in HTML5 PDF Viewer Online
www.rasteredge.com
Add page numbers to pdf document in preview - control SDK system:VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Introduction to Viewing PDF in VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer Online
www.rasteredge.com
0
410 □ 
1227: TREATISE ON NOMADOLOGY—THE WAR MACHINE
follow the part of the flow that enters into the circuit, even an ever-wid-
ening one. Transhumants are therefore itinerant only consequentially, or 
become  itinerant  only  when  their  circuit  of  land  or  pasture  has  been 
exhausted, or when the rotation has become so wide that the flows escape 
the circuit. Even the merchant is a transhumant, to the extent that mercan-
tile flows are subordinated to the rotation between a point of departure and 
a point of arrival (go get-bring back, import-export, buy-sell). Whatever 
the reciprocal implications, there are considerable differences between a 
flow and a circuit. The 
migrant, 
we have seen, is something else again. And 
the 
nomad 
is not primarily defined as an 
itinerant 
or as a 
transhumant, 
nor 
as a 
migrant, 
even though nomads become these consequentially. The pri-
mary determination of nomads is to occupy and hold a smooth space: it is 
this  aspect  that  determines  them  as  nomad  (essence).  On  their  own 
account,  they  will  be  transhumants, or  itinerants,  only  by  virtue of  the 
imperatives imposed by the smooth spaces. In short, whatever the de facto 
mixes  between  nomadism,  itinerancy,  and  transhumance,  the  primary 
concept  is different  in the  three cases  (smooth space,  matter-flow,  rota-
tion). It is only on the basis of the distinct concept that we can make a judg-
ment  on  the  mix—on  when  it  is  produced,  on  the  form  in  which  it  is 
produced, and on the order in which it is produced.
But in the course of the preceding discussion, we have wandered from 
the question: Why is the 
machinic phylum, 
the flow of matter, essentially 
metallic or metallurgical? Here again, it is only the distinct concept that 
can give us an answer, in that it shows that there is a special, primary rela-
tion  between  itinerance  and  metallurgy  (deterritorialization).  However, 
the examples we took from Husserl and Simondon concerned wood and 
clay as well as metals. Besides, are there not flows of grass, water, herds, 
which form so many phyla or matters in movement? It is easier for us to 
answer these questions now. For it is as if metal and metallurgy imposed 
upon and raised to consciousness something that is only hidden or buried 
in the other matters and operations. The difference is that elsewhere the 
operations  occur  between  two  thresholds,  one  of  which  constitutes  the 
matter prepared for the operation, and the other the form to be incarnated 
(for example, the clay and the mold). The hylomorphic model derives its 
general value from this, since the incarnated form that marks the end of an 
operation can serve as the matter for a new operation, but in a fixed order 
marking a succession of thresholds. In metallurgy, on the other hand, the 
operations  are  always  astride  the  thresholds,  so  that  an  energetic 
materiality overspills the  prepared matter, and a qualitative  deformation 
or transformation  overspills  the form.
93
For example, quenching  follows 
forging and takes place after the form has been fixed. Or, to take another 
example, in molding, the metallurgist in a sense works inside the mold. Or
control SDK system:C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
offer them the ability to count the page numbers of generated document in C#.NET using this PDF document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# Word - Word Create or Build in C#.NET
also offer them the ability to count the page numbers of generated using this Word document adding control, you can add some additional Create Word From PDF.
www.rasteredge.com
0
1227: 
TREATISE ON NOMADOLOGY—THE WAR MACHINE D 411
again, steel that is melted and molded later undergoes a series of successive 
decarbonations. Finally, metallurgy has the option of melting down and 
reusing a matter to which it gives an 
ingot-form: 
the history of metal is 
inseparable  from  this very  particular form, which is  not  to  be confused 
with either a stock or a commodity; monetary value derives from it. More 
generally, the metallurgical idea of the "reducer" expresses this double lib-
eration of a materiality in relation to a prepared matter, and of a transfor-
mation  in  relation  to  the  form  to  be  incarnated.  Matter  and  form  have 
never seemed more rigid than in metallurgy; yet the succession of forms 
tends to be replaced by the form of a continuous development, and the var-
iability of matters tends to be replaced by the matter of a continuous varia-
tion. If metallurgy has an essential relation with music, it is by virtue not 
only of the sounds of the forge but also of the tendency within both arts to 
bring into its own, beyond separate forms, a continuous development of 
form,  and  beyond  variable  matters,  a  continuous  variation  of  matter:  a 
widened  chromaticism sustains both  music and  metallurgy; the musical 
smith was the first "transformer."
94
In short,  what metal and  metallurgy 
bring to light is a life proper to matter, a vital state of matter as such, a mate-
rial vitalism that doubtless exists everywhere but is ordinarily hidden or 
covered, rendered unrecognizable, dissociated by the hylomorphic model. 
Metallurgy is the consciousness or thought of the matter-flow, and metal 
the correlate of this consciousness. As expressed in panmetallism, metal is 
coextensive to the whole of matter, and the whole of matter to metallurgy. 
Even the waters, the grasses and varieties of wood, the animals are popu-
lated by salts or mineral elements. Not everything is metal, but metal is 
everywhere. Metal is the conductor of all matter. The machinic phylum is 
metallurgical, or at least has a metallic head, as its itinerant probe-head or 
guidance device. And thought is born more from metal than from stone: 
metallurgy  is  minor  science in person,  "vague"  science  or the  phenom-
enology of matter. The prodigious idea 
of Nonorganic Life
—the very same 
idea Worringer considered the barbarian  idea par excellence
95
—was the 
invention,  the  intuition  of  metallurgy.  Metal  is  neither  a  thing  nor  an 
organism, but a 
body 
without organs. The "Northern, or Gothic, line" is 
above  all  a  mining  or  metallic  line  delimiting  this  body.  The  relation 
between metallurgy and alchemy reposes not, as Jung believed, on the sym-
bolic value of metal and its correspondence with an organic soul but on the 
immanent power of corporeality in all matter, and on the esprit de corps 
accompanying it.
The  first and primary  itinerant is the artisan. But  artisans  are neither 
hunters, farmers, nor animal raisers. Neither are they winnowers or pot-
ters, who only secondarily take up craft activity. Rather, artisans are those 
who follow the matter-flow as pure productivity: therefore in mineral
control SDK system:C# PowerPoint - PowerPoint Creating in C#.NET
offer them the ability to count the page numbers of generated in C#.NET using this PowerPoint document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
www.rasteredge.com
control SDK system:C# Word - Word Creating in C#.NET
offer them the ability to count the page numbers of generated document in C#.NET using this Word document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
www.rasteredge.com
412 O 1227: TREATISE ON NOMADOLOGY—THE WAR MACHINE
form, and not in vegetable or animal form. They are not of the land, or of 
the soil, but of the subsoil. Because metal is the pure productivity of matter, 
those who follow metal are producers of objects par excellence. As demon-
strated by V. Gordon Childe, the metallurgist is the first specialized arti-
san,  and  in  this respect forms  a  collective 
body 
(secret  societies,  guilds, 
journeymen's  associations).  Artisans-metallurgists  are  itinerants  because 
they follow  the matter-flow  of the  subsoil. Of course  metallurgists have 
relations with "the others," those of the soil, land, and sky. They have rela-
tions with the farmers of the sedentary communities, and with the celestial 
functionaries of the empire who overcode those communities; in fact, they 
need them to survive, they depend on an imperial agricultural stockpile for 
their very sustenance.
96
But in their work, they have relations with the forest 
dwellers, and partially depend on them: they must establish their workshops 
near  the  forest  in  order to obtain the  necessary  charcoal. In their  space, 
they  have  relations with the  nomads, since the subsoil unites the  ground 
(sol) 
of smooth space and the land of striated space: there are no mines in 
the  alluvial  valleys  of  the  empire-dominated  farmers;  it  is  necessary  to 
cross  deserts, approach  the  mountains; and the  question  of  control  over 
the mines always involves nomadic peoples. 
Every mine is a line of flight 
that is in communication with smooth spaces—there are parallels today in 
the problems with oil.
Archaeology and history remain strangely silent on this question of the 
control over the mines. There have been empires with a strong metallurgi-
cal organization that had no mines; the Near East lacked tin, so necessary 
for  the fabrication  of bronze.  Large quantities  of metal arrived in ingot 
form, and from very far away (for instance, tin from Spain or even from 
Cornwall).  So  complex  a  situation  implies  not  only  a  strong  imperial 
bureaucracy  and  elaborate  long-distance  commercial  circuits;  it  also 
implies a shifting politics, in which States confront an outside, in which 
very different peoples confront one another, or else reach some accommo-
dation on particular aspects of the control of mines (extraction, charcoal, 
workshops, transportation). It is not enough to say that there are wars and 
mining  expeditions;  or  to  invoke  "a  Eurasian  synthesis  of  the  nomadic 
workshops  from  the  approaches  of  China  to  the  tip  of  Britanny,"  and 
remark that "the nomadic populations had been in contact with the princi-
pal metallurgical  centers of the ancient world since  prehistoric times."
97 
What is needed is a better knowledge of the nomads' relations with these 
centers,  with  the  smiths  they  themselves  employed  or  frequented,  with 
properly metallurgical peoples or groups who were their neighbors. What 
was the  situation in the  Caucasus and  in  the Altai? In  Spain and North 
Africa? Mines are a source of flow, mixture, and escape with few equiva-
lents in history. Even when they are well controlled by an empire that owns
control SDK system:C# Excel - Excel Creating in C#.NET
also offer them the ability to count the page numbers of generated in C#.NET using this Excel document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
www.rasteredge.com
0
1227: 
TREATISE ON NOMADOLOGY—THE WAR MACHINE □ 413
them (as in the Chinese and Roman empires), there is a major movement of 
clandestine exploitation, and of miners' alliances either with nomad and 
barbarian incursions or peasant revolts. The study of myths, and even eth-
nographic  considerations  on  the  status  of  smiths,  divert  us  from  these 
political questions. Mythology and ethnology do not have the right method 
in this regard. It is too often asked how 
the others 
"react" to the smith, and 
as a result, one succumbs to the usual platitudes about the ambivalence of 
feelings; 
it is said that the smith is simultaneously  honored,  feared, and 
scorned—more or less scorned among the nomads, more or less honored 
among the sedentaries.
98
But this loses sight of the reasons for this situa-
tion,  of the  specificity  of the  smiths themselves,  of the  nonsymmetrical 
relation  they  entertain with the nomads  and the  sedentaries,  the type of 
affects 
they invent (metallic affect). Before looking at the feelings of others 
toward smiths, it is necessary to evaluate the smiths themselves as Other; 
as such, they have different affective relations with the sedentaries and the 
nomads.
There are no nomadic or sedentary smiths. Smiths are ambulant, itiner-
ant. Particularly important in this respect is the way in which smiths live: 
their space is neither the striated space of the sedentary nor the smooth 
space of the nomad. Smiths may have a tent, they may have a house; they 
inhabit them in the manner of an "ore bed" (gite, shelter, home, mineral 
deposit), like metal itself, in the manner of a cave or a hole, a hut half or all 
underground.  They are  cave  dwellers not  by nature  but by  artistry and 
need." A splendid text by Elie Faure evokes the infernal progress of the 
itinerant peoples of India as they bore holes in space and create the fantas-
tic  forms  corresponding  to  these  breakthroughs,  the  vital  forms  of 
nonorganic life: "There at the shore of the sea, at the base of a mountain, 
they encountered a great wall of granite. Then they all entered the granite; 
in its shadows they lived, loved, worked, died, were born, and, three or four 
centuries afterward, they came out again, leagues away, having traversed 
the mountain.  Behind them  they left the emptied  rock,  its galleries hol-
lowed out in every direction, its sculptured, chiseled walls, its natural or 
artificial pillars turned into a deep lacework with ten thousand horrible or 
charming figures.. . . Here man confesses unresistingly his strength and his 
nothingness. He does not exact the affirmation of a determined ideal from 
form.... He extracts it rough from formlessness, according to the dictates 
of the formless. He utilizes the indentations and accidents of the rock."
100 
Metallurgical  India. Transpierce  the mountains  instead  of scaling  them, 
excavate the land instead of striating it, bore holes in space instead of keep-
ing it smooth, turn the earth  into  swiss cheese. An image from the film 
Strike 
[by Eisenstein] presents a holey space where a disturbing group of
Holey Space
people are rising, each emerging from his or  her hole as if from a field 
mined in all directions. The sign of Cain is the corporeal and affective sign 
of the subsoil, passing through both the striated land of sedentary space 
and the nomadic ground 
{sot) 
of smooth space without stopping at either 
one, the vagabond sign of itinerancy, the double theft and double betrayal 
of the metallurgist, who shuns agriculture at the same time as animal rais-
ing. Must we reserve the name Cainite for these metallurgical peoples who 
haunt the depths of History? Prehistoric Europe was crisscrossed by the 
battle-ax  people, 
who  came  in  off  the  steppes  like  a  detached  metallic 
branch of the nomads, and the people known for their bell-shaped pottery, 
the 
beaker  people, 
originating  in  Andalusia,  a  detached  branch  of 
mega-lithic  agriculture.
101
Strange  peoples,  dolicocephalics  and 
brachycephalics who mix and spread across all of Europe. Are they the ones 
who  kept  up  the  mines,  boring  holes  in  European  space  from  every 
direction, constituting our European space?
Smiths are not nomadic among the nomads and sedentary among the 
sedentaries, nor half-nomadic among the nomads, half-sedentary among 
sedentaries. Their relation to others results from their internal itinerancy,
414 □ 1227: TREATISE ON NOMADOLOGY—THE WAR MACHINE
0
1227: 
TREATISE ON NOMADOLOGY—THE WAR MACHINE □ 415
from their vague essence, and not the reverse. It is in their specificity, it is 
by virtue of their itinerancy, by virtue of their inventing a holey space, that 
they necessarily communicate with the sedentaries 
and 
with the nomads 
(and with others besides, with the transhumant forest dwellers). They are 
in themselves double: a hybrid, an alloy, a twin formation. As Griaule says, 
Dogon  smiths are  not  "impure"  but "mixed,"  and it is because they  are 
mixed  that  they  are 
endogamous, 
that  they  do  not  intermarry  with  the 
pure, who have a simplified progeny while they reconstitute a twin prog-
eny.
102
Childe  demonstrates  that  metallurgists  are  necessarily  doubled, 
that they exist two times, once as captured by and maintained within the 
apparatus of the oriental empire, again in the Aegean world, where they 
were much more mobile and much freer. 
But the two segments cannot be 
separated, 
simply by relating each of them to their particular context. The 
metallurgist belonging to an empire, the worker, presupposes a metallur-
gist-prospector, however far away; and the prospector ties in with a mer-
chant, who brings the metal to the first metallurgist. In addition, the metal 
is worked on by each segment, and the ingot-form is common to them all: 
we must imagine less separate segments than a chain of mobile workshops 
constituting, from hole to hole, a line of variation, a gallery. Thus the met-
allurgists' relation to the nomads and the sedentaries also passes through 
the relations  they have with other metallurgists.
103
This hybrid  metallur-
gist,  a  weapon-  and  toolmaker,  communicates with  the  sedentaries 
and 
with the nomads at the same time. Holey space itself communicates with 
smooth  space and  striated  space. In effect,  the  machinic  phylum or  the 
metallic  line  passes  through  all  of  the  assemblages:  nothing  is  more 
deterritorialized  than  matter-movement.  But  it  is  not  at  all  in  the  same 
way, and the two communications are not symmetrical. Worringer, in the 
domain of aesthetics, said that the abstract line took on two quite different 
expressions, one in barbarian Gothic art, the other in the organic classical 
art. Here, we would say that the phylum simultaneously has two different 
modes of liaison: it is always 
connected 
to nomad space, whereas it 
conju-
gates 
with sedentary space. On the side of the nomadic assemblages and 
war machines, it is a kind of rhizome, with its gaps, detours, subterranean 
passages, stems, openings, traits, holes, etc. On the other side, the seden-
tary assemblages and State apparatuses effect a capture of the phylum, put 
the  traits  of  expression  into  a  form  or  a  code,  make  the holes  resonate 
together, plug the lines of flight, subordinate the technological operation to 
the work model, impose upon the connections a whole regime of arbor-
escent conjunctions.
A
XIOM 
III. 
The nomad war machine is the form of expression, of which 
itinerant metallurgy is the correlative form of content.
0
416 □ 
1227: TREATISE ON NOMADOLOGY—THE WAR MACHINE
Content
Expression
Substance
Holey space
(machinic phylum
or matter-flow)
Smooth space
Form
Itinerant 
metallurgy
Nomad war 
machine
P
ROPOSITION 
IX. 
War does not necessarily have the battle as its object, 
and more important, the war machine does not necessarily have war as 
its object,  although  war  and the battle  may be its necessary result 
(under certain conditions).
We  now  come  to  three  successive  problems.  First,  is  the  battle  the 
"object" of war? But also, is war the "object" of the war machine? And 
finally, to what extent is the war machine the "object" of the State appara-
tus? The ambiguity of the first two problems is certainly due to the term 
"object," but implies their dependency on the third. We must nevertheless 
approach these problems gradually, even if we are reduced to multiplying 
examples. The first question, that of the battle, requires an immediate dis-
tinction to be made between two cases: when a battle is sought, and when it 
is essentially avoided by the war machine. These two cases in no way coin-
cide  with  the  offensive  and  the  defensive.  But  war  in  the  strict  sense 
(according to a conception of it that culminated in Foch) does seem to have 
the battle as its object, whereas guerrilla warfare  explicitly aims for the 
nonbattle. 
However, the development of war into the war of movement, 
and into total war, also places the notion of the battle in question, as much 
from  the offensive  as  the  defensive  points  of  view:  the  concept  of  the 
nonbattle seems capable of expressing the speed of a flash attack, and the 
counterspeed of  an immediate  response.
104
Conversely,  the development 
of guerilla warfare implies a moment when, and forms under which, a bat-
tle  must  be  effectively sought,  in connection with exterior  and  interior 
"support points." And it is true that guerrilla warfare and war proper are 
constantly borrowing each  other's  methods  and that  the borrowings run 
equally in both directions (for example, stress has often been laid on the 
inspirations land-based guerrilla warfare received from maritime war). All 
we can say is that the battle and the nonbattle are the double object of war, 
according to a criterion that does not coincide with the offensive and the 
defensive, or even with war proper and guerrilla warfare.
That is why we push the question further back, asking if war itself is the
0
1227: 
TREATISE ON NOMADOLOGY—THE WAR MACHINE D 417
object of the war machine. It is not at all obvious. To the extent that war 
(with  or  without  the  battle)  aims for  the  annihilation  or capitulation  of 
enemy forces, the war machine does not necessarily have war as its object 
(for example, the 
raid can 
be seen as another object, rather than as a partic-
ular form of war). But more generally, we have seen that the war machine 
was the invention of the nomad, because it is in its essence the constitutive 
element  of  smooth  space,  the  occupation  of  this  space,  displacement 
within this space, and the corresponding composition of people: this is its 
sole and  veritable  positive  object 
(nomos). 
Make the  desert,  the steppe, 
grow; do not depopulate it, quite the contrary. If war necessarily results, it 
is  because  the  war  machine  collides  with  States  and  cities,  as  forces  (of 
stri-ation) opposing its positive object: from then on, the war machine has as 
its enemy the State, the city, the state and urban phenomenon, and adopts 
as its objective their annihilation. It is at this point that the war machine 
becomes war: annihilate the forces of the State, destroy the State-form. The 
Attila,  or  Genghis  Khan,  adventure  clearly  illustrates  this  progression 
from the positive object to the negative object. Speaking like Aristotle, we 
would  say  that  war  is  neither  the  condition  nor  the  object  of  the  war 
machine,  but  necessarily  accompanies  or  completes  it;  speaking  like 
Derrida, we would say that war is the "supplement" of the war machine. It 
may even  happen  that  this  supplementarity  is  comprehended  through  a 
progressive, anxiety-ridden revelation. Such, for example, was the adven-
ture of Moses: leaving the Egyptian State behind, launching into the desert, 
he begins by forming a war machine, on the inspiration of the old past of 
the nomadic Hebrews and on the advice of his father-in-law, who came 
from the nomads. This is the machine of the Just, already a war machine, 
but one that does not yet have war as its object. Moses realizes, little by lit-
tle, in stages, that war is the necessary supplement of that machine, because 
it encounters or must cross cities and States, because it must send ahead 
spies 
(armed observation), 
then perhaps take things to extremes 
(war of 
annihilation). 
Then the Jewish people experience doubt, and fear that they 
are not strong enough; but Moses also doubts, he shrinks before the revela-
tion of this supplement. And it will be Joshua, not Moses, who is charged 
with waging war. Finally, speaking like Kant, we would say that the relation 
between war and the war machine is necessary but "synthetic" (Yahweh is 
necessary for the synthesis).
The question of war, in turn, is pushed further back and is subordinated 
to the relations between the war machine and the State apparatus. States 
were not the first to make war: war, of course, is not a phenomenon one 
finds in the universality of Nature, as nonspecific violence. But war is not 
the object of States, quite the contrary. The most archaic States do not even 
seem to have had a war machine, and their domination, as we will see, was
0
418  
□1227: TREATISE ON NOMADOLOGY—THE WAR MACHINE
based on other agencies (comprising, rather, the police and prisons). It is 
safe to assume that the intervention of an extrinsic or nomad war machine 
that  counterattacked  and  destroyed the  archaic  but powerful  States  was 
one of the mysterious reasons for their sudden annihilation. But the State 
learns fast. One of the biggest questions from the point of view of universal 
history is: How will the State 
appropriate 
the war machine, that is, consti-
tute one for itself, in conformity with its size, its domination, and its aims? 
And with what risks? (What we call a military institution, or army, is not at 
all the war machine in itself, but the form under which it is appropriated by 
the State.) In order to grasp the paradoxical character of such an undertak-
ing,  we  must  recapitulate  the  hypothesis  in  its  entirety.  (1)  The  war 
machine  is that nomad invention that in fact has war not as its primary 
object but as its second-order, supplementary or synthetic objective, in the 
sense that it is determined in such a way as to destroy the State-form and 
city-form with which it collides. (2) When the State appropriates the war 
machine, the  latter obviously changes in nature and function, since it  is 
afterward  directed  against  the  nomad  and  all  State  destroyers,  or  else 
expresses relations between States, to the extent that a State undertakes 
exclusively to destroy another State or impose its aims upon it. (3) It is pre-
cisely after the war machine has been appropriated by the State in this way 
that it tends to take war for its direct and primary object, for its "analytic" 
object (and that war tends to take the battle for its object). In short, it is at 
one  and  the  same  time  that  the  State  apparatus  appropriates  a  war 
machine, that the  war machine  takes war as its object, and that war  be-
comes subordinated to the aims of the State.
This question of appropriation is so varied historically that it is neces-
sary to distinguish between several kinds of problems. The first concerns 
the possibility of the operation: it is precisely because war is only the sup-
plementary or synthetic object of the nomad war machine that it experi-
ences the hesitation that proves fatal to it, and that the State apparatus for 
its part is able to lay hold of war and thus turn the war machine back against 
the nomads. The hesitation of the nomad is legendary: What is to be done 
with the lands conquered and crossed? Return them to the desert, to the 
steppe, to open pastureland? Or let a State apparatus survive that is capa-
ble of exploiting them directly, at the risk of becoming, sooner or later, sim-
ply a new dynasty of that apparatus: sooner or later because Genghis Khan 
and his followers were able to hold out for a long time by partially integrat-
ing themselves into the conquered empires, while at the same time main-
taining a smooth space on the steppes to which the imperial centers were 
subordinated.  That  was their genius,  the 
Pax Mongolica. 
It remains the 
case that the integration of the nomads into the conquered empires was one 
of the most powerful factors of appropriation of the war machine by the
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested