building web api with asp.net core mvc pdf : C# combine pdf SDK software service wpf winforms windows dnn MapInfoProfessionalUserGuide38-part1014

Chapter 14: Working with Coordinate Systems and Projections
Building Blocks of a Coordinate System
MapInfo Professional 10.5
381
User Guide
Building Blocks of a Coordinate System
In this section, we provide the tables required to create your own coordinate systems using map 
projections, datums, units, Origins, Standard Parallels, Azimuths, Scale Factors, False Eastings, 
False Northings, and Ranges. You might want to create your own coordinate system if accuracy is 
crucial to understanding your data or if your data is specified in relation to a non-standard point, and 
you would prefer to keep your data in that custom coordinate system.
Coordinate Systems, Projections, and their Parameters
By specifying a projection type and various required parameters, you create a mathematical 
algorithm for producing equivalent coordinates in degrees for the projected coordinate system. Each 
projection has specific parameters you can customize to make your maps more geographically 
accurate. The following table details each major coordinate system type and the parameters you can 
use to customize that system. The parameters are listed in the order they appear in the relevant 
projection entries in the MAPINFOW.PRJ file. To create your own coordinate system using a 
particular projection, you must add an entry into the MAPINFOW.PRJ file.
The parameters of a coordinate system are (in this order):
• Coordinate System Name
• Projection Type
• Datum
• Units
• Original Longitude
• Original Latitude
• Standard Parallel 1
• Standard Parallel 2
• Azimuth
• Scale Factor
• False Easting
• False Northing
• Range
L
Each of these headings is described in detail in the next few pages.
For a complete list of common coordinate systems and their necessary parameters, see 
Projections and Their Parameters on page452
C# combine pdf - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
c# merge pdf files into one; add pdf pages together
C# combine pdf - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
scan multiple pages into one pdf; c# merge pdf pages
Chapter 14: Working with Coordinate Systems and Projections
Building Blocks of a Coordinate System
MapInfo Professional 10.5
382
User Guide
Projection Types
The following list names the projection types used in the MAPINFOW.PRJ file. These projection 
types indicate the type of map you are using as the basis for your projection.
Number
Projection
9
Albers Equal-Area Conic
28
Azimuthal Equidistant (all origin latitudes)
5
Azimuthal Equidistant (polar aspect only)
30
Cassini-Soldner
2
Cylindrical Equal-Area
14
Eckert IV
15
Eckert VI
6
Equidistant Conic, also known as Simple Conic
33
Equidistant Cylindrical
17
Gall
7
Hotine Oblique Mercator
4
Lambert Azimuthal Equal-Area (polar aspect only)
29
Lambert Azimuthal Equal-Area
3
Lambert Conformal Conic
19
Lambert Conformal Conic (modified for Belgium 1972)
1
Longitude/Latitude
10
Mercator
11
Miller Cylindrical
13
Mollweide
18
New Zealand Map Grid
31
Prince Edward Island Double Stereographic
27
Polyconic
26
Regional Mercator
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
C#.NET PDF Merger to Combine PDF Files. Using following C#.NET PDF document merging APIs, you can easily merge two or more independent PDF files to create a
pdf merger; acrobat reader merge pdf files
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
using which C# developers can split target PDF document file by specifying a page or pages. If needed, developers can also combine generated split PDF document
pdf merger online; pdf combine two pages into one
Chapter 14: Working with Coordinate Systems and Projections
Building Blocks of a Coordinate System
MapInfo Professional 10.5
383
User Guide
Specifying the Bounds for Coordinate Systems 
You can specify the bounds for coordinate systems in the Mapinfo Professional .PRJ file. To do so, 
add 2000 to the projection number and list the bounds after the projection parameters. The general 
form is:
name, projectionnum + 2000, projection parameters, x1, y1, x2, y2
For example, to define a UTM Zone 10 coordinate system with bounds of (100000, 400000) to 
(200000, 450000), use this line:
“UTM Zone 10”, 2008, 74, 7, -123, 0, 0.9996, 500000, 0, 100000, 400000,
200000, 450000
To define a Longitude / Latitude coordinate system with bounds of (-50, 30) to (-48, 35), use this line:
“Longitude / Latitude”, 2000, 0, -50, 30, -48, 35
You can also define a coordinate system with bounds and an affine transformation. In that case, add 
3000 to the projection number, and list the bounds after the affine transformation constants. The 
general form is:
name, projectionnum + 3000, projection parameters, unitnum, A, B, C, D,
E, F, x1, y1, x2, y2
Accounting for Affine Transformations and Explicit Bounds in Projection Types
You can modify projection type entries in the MAPINFOW.PRJ to add a constant value to account 
for affine transformations and explicit bounds. Valid constant values are listed in the next table:
12
Robinson
16
Sinusoidal
20
Stereographic
25
Swiss Oblique Mercator
8
Transverse Mercator (also known as Gauss-Kruger)
21
Transverse Mercator (modified for Danish System 34 Jylland-Fyn)
22
Transverse Mercator (modified for Danish System 34 Sjaelland)
23
Transverse Mercator (modified for Danish System 34/45 Bornholm) 
24
Transverse Mercator (modified for Finnish KKJ) 
Number
Projection
C# Word - Merge Word Documents in C#.NET
Combine and Merge Multiple Word Files into One Using C#. This part illustrates how to combine three Word files into a new file in C# application.
pdf merge files; pdf mail merge plug in
Online Merge PDF files. Best free online merge PDF tool.
RasterEdge C#.NET PDF document merging toolkit (XDoc.PDF) is designed to help .NET developers combine PDF document files created by different users to one PDF
how to combine pdf files; add pdf together
Chapter 14: Working with Coordinate Systems and Projections
Building Blocks of a Coordinate System
MapInfo Professional 10.5
384
User Guide
Example:
In this example we use the Transverse Mercator coordinate system with the NAD 1983 datum. You 
might have this line in your MAPINFOW.PRJ file: 
"UTM Zone 1 (NAD 83)", 8, 74, 7, -177, 0, 0.9996, 500000, 0
If you want to account for an affine transformation for this system, you would add the constant to the 
projection type and append the parameters of the affine transformation as listed below:
Units=meters; A=0.5; B=-0.866; C=0; D=0.866; E=0.5; and F=0
Therefore, the new entry to append the parameters of the affine transformation would be:
"UTM Zone 1 (NAD 83) - rotated 60 degrees", 1008, 74, 7, -177, 0,
0.9996, 500000, 0, 7, 0.5, -0.866, 0, 0.866, 0.5, 0
where:
To supply explicit bounds to the coordinate system (x1, y1, x2, y2)=(-500000, 0, 500000, 1000000), 
the required line entries would be: 
"UTM Zone 1 (NAD 83) - bounded", 2008, 74, 7, -177, 0, 0.9996, 500000,
0, -500000, 0, 500000, 1000000
where:
Constant
Coordinate System has:
Parameters
1000
Affine transformations
Affine units specifier and coefficients appear after the 
regular parameters for the system.
2000
Explicit bounds
Bounds appear after the regular parameters for the 
system.
3000
Both affine transformations 
and bounds
Affine parameters follow system’s parameters; 
bounds follow affine parameters.
Entry
Description
1008
Achieved by adding the constant (1000) to the projection type (8)
7
Units for the affine transformation (7 = meters)
0.5, -0.866, 0, 0.866, 0.5, 0 Affine parameters. )
Entry
Description
2008
Produced by adding the constant (2000) to the projection type (8)
-500000, 0, 500000, 1000000 Explicit bounds parameters
C# PowerPoint - Merge PowerPoint Documents in C#.NET
Combine and Merge Multiple PowerPoint Files into One Using C#. This part illustrates how to combine three PowerPoint files into a new file in C# application.
add two pdf files together; c# merge pdf
VB.NET PDF: Use VB.NET Code to Merge and Split PDF Documents
Please get the latest XDoc.PDF C# Developer Guide here. destn As [String]) Implements PDFDocument.Combine End Sub. APIs for Splitting PDF document in VB Class.
pdf split and merge; append pdf
Chapter 14: Working with Coordinate Systems and Projections
Building Blocks of a Coordinate System
MapInfo Professional 10.5
385
User Guide
To customize the coordinate system using both the affine transformation and explicit bounds, the 
entry in the MAPINFOW.PRJ would be: 
"UTM Zone 1 (NAD 83) - rotated and bounded", 3008, 74, 7, -177, 0,
0.9996, 500000, 0, 7, 0.5, -0.866, 0, 0.866, 0.5, 0, -500000, 0,
500000, 1000000
where:
Datums 
A datum is established by tying a reference ellipsoid to a particular point on the earth. The following 
Datums table lists the details for each datum:
• The number used to identify the datum in the MAPINFOW.PRJ file.
• The datum’s name
• The maps for which the datum is typically used
• The datum’s reference ellipsoid
For a comprehensive list of supported projection datums, see Projection Datums on page456. For 
a list of datum changes by version, see Coordinate System Enhancements by Version on 
page467.
L
To create a custom datum, see Defining Custom Datums in the Help System.
Converting Coordinates from One Datum to Another 
When converting coordinates from one datum to another, MapInfo Professional has used the 
Molodensky (3-parameter) and Bursa-Wolfe (7-parameter) methods. These are general-purpose 
methods that can convert coordinates from any datum to any other datum.
After the NAD 83 datum was introduced, NOAA developed a program called NADCON, which 
stands for North American Datum CONversion. This is a very specialized program that converts 
coordinates only from NAD 27 to NAD 83 and vice versa. For this specialized task, it's much more 
accurate than the Molodensky general-purpose method; NADCON is accurate to about 0.1 meter, 
and Molodensky is accurate to only 10-30 meters. Most U.S. government agencies, including the 
Census Bureau, have standardized on NADCON for converting between NAD 27 and NAD 83.
Entry
Description
3008
Produced by adding the constant (3000) to the projection type (8)
7
Units for the affine transformation (7 = meters)
0.5, -0.866, 0, 0.866, 0.5, 0 
Affine parameters
-500000, 0, 500000, 1000000 Explicit bounds parameters (See Accounting for Affine 
Transformations and Explicit Bounds in Projection Types on 
page383.)
VB.NET TIFF: Merge and Split TIFF Documents with RasterEdge .NET
get the latest XDoc.Tiff C# Developer Guide here docList As [String]()) TIFFDocument.Combine(filePath, docList & profession imaging controls, PDF document,
break a pdf into multiple files; pdf merge
C# PowerPoint: C# Codes to Combine & Split PowerPoint Documents
dirs) { docList.Add(doc); } PPTXDocument.Combine(docList, combinedPath Following demo code in C# is offered to & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
combine pdf files; c# combine pdf
Chapter 14: Working with Coordinate Systems and Projections
Building Blocks of a Coordinate System
MapInfo Professional 10.5
386
User Guide
The NADCON algorithm is used to convert coordinates between NAD 27 and NAD 83 if those 
coordinates lie within the areas covered by NADCON (United States, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin 
Islands). If the coordinates lie outside those areas, or if they use datums other than NAD 27 or NAD 
83, MapInfo Professional uses the Molodensky or Bursa-Wolfe conversion methods.
Due to the file access required, the NADCON conversion method can be slightly slower than the 
Molodensky method. If you want to turn off the NADCON conversion, add a “NADCON” entry to the 
registry. The registry entry should have this path:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\MapInfo\MapInfo\Common\NADCON
If this entry is set to zero, then the Molodensky conversion method will be used instead of NADCON.
NADCON=0
Units
The units indicate the measurement that the projection uses to keep track of space. To find a 
complete list of units and their corresponding projection entries, see Units on page464.
Coordinate System Origin
The coordinate system origin is the point on the Earth (specified as longitude and latitude degrees) 
from which all coordinate distances are to be measured. X = 0 and Y = 0 at the origin point, unless a 
false easting and/or false northing is used (see below). It is chosen to optimize the accuracy of a 
particular coordinate system. As we move north from the origin, Y increases; X increases as we 
move east. These coordinate values are generally called northings and eastings.
For the Transverse Mercator projection, the origin’s longitude defines the central meridian. In 
constructing the Transverse Mercator projection a cylinder is positioned tangent to the earth. The 
central meridian is the line of tangency. The scale of the projected map is true along the central 
meridian.
In creating a Hotine Oblique Mercator projection it is necessary to specify a great circle that is not 
the equator nor a meridian. MapInfo Professional does this by specifying one point on the ellipsoid 
and an azimuth from that point. That point is the origin of the coordinate system. 
Standard Parallels (Conic Projections)
In conic projections a cone is passed through the earth intersecting it along two parallels of latitude. 
These are the standard parallels. One is to the north and one is to the south of the projection zone. 
To use a single standard parallel specify that latitude twice. Both are expressed in degrees of 
latitude.
Oblique Azimuth (Hotine Oblique Mercator)
When specifying a great circle (such as the Hotine Oblique Mercator) using a point and an azimuth 
(arc), the azimuth is called the Oblique Azimuth and is expressed in degrees.
Chapter 14: Working with Coordinate Systems and Projections
Building Blocks of a Coordinate System
MapInfo Professional 10.5
387
User Guide
Scale Factor (Transverse Mercator)
A scale factor is applied to cylindrical coordinates to average scale error over the central area of the 
map while reducing the error along the east and west boundaries. The scale factor has the effect of 
recessing the cylinder into the earth so that it has two lines of intersection. Scale is true along these 
lines of intersection.
You may see the scale factor expressed as a ratio, such as 1:25000. In this case it is generally 
called the scale reduction. The relationship between scale factor and scale reduction is:
scale factor = 1-scale reduction
In this case the scale factor would be 1-(1/25000) or 0.99996.
False Easting and False Northing
As you can see in the Longitude/Latitude Projection Map on page377, X and Y coordinate 
parameters are commonly designated in relationship to a single point. Points to the left of that center 
point are negative and points to the right are positive. Points above that center point are positive and 
points below that point are negative. 
In the days of the tall ships, these calculations and computations were done by hand. Using positive 
and negative signs made these calculations more complicated. The terms “false easting” and “false 
northing” were used to remove these signs and refer to the absolute value of the X and Y 
coordinates. MapInfo Professional handles these computations, but these parameters still have to 
be accounted for in the projections that use them. 
Range (Azimuthal Projections)
The range specifies, in degrees, how much of the Earth is visible. The range can be between 1 and 
180. When you specify 90, you see a hemisphere. When you specify 180 you see the whole earth, 
though much of it is very distorted.
Chapter 14: Working with Coordinate Systems and Projections
Building Blocks of a Coordinate System
MapInfo Professional 10.5
388
User Guide
About Polyconic Coordinate Systems
The following description has been copied from “Map Projections – A Working Manual”, USGS 
Professional Paper 1395, by John P. Snyder.
The Polyconic projection, usually called the American Polyconic in Europe, achieved its name 
because the curvature of the circular arc for each parallel on the map is the same as it would be 
following the unrolling of a cone which had been wrapped around the globe tangent to the 
particular parallel of latitude, with the parallel traced onto the cone. Thus, there are many (”poly-
”) cones involved, rather than the single cone of each regular conic projection.
The Polyconic projection is neither equal-area nor conformal. Along the central meridian, 
however, it is both distortion free and true to scale. Each parallel is true to scale, but the 
meridians are lengthened by various amounts to cross each parallel at the correct position along 
the parallel, so that no parallel is standard in the sense of having conformality (or correct angles), 
except at the central meridian. Near the central meridian, distortion is extremely small.
This projection is not intended for mapping large areas. The conversion algorithms used break 
down when mapping wide longitude ranges. For example, WORLD.TAB, from the sample data 
shipped with MapInfo Professional, may exhibit anomalies if reprojected using Polyconic.
Examples of Projection Entries in the MAPINFOW.PRJ File
The MAPINFOW.PRJ file lists the parameters for each coordinate system on a separate line, as in 
the following examples:
“Mollweide (Equal Area)”, 13, 62, 7, 0
“Albers Equal–Area Conic (Alaska)”, 9, 63, 7, –154, 50, 55, 65, 0, 0
“UTM Zone 9 (NAD 27 for Canada)”, 8, 66, 7, –129, 0, 0.9996, 500000, 0
This is a basic list of the elements of a coordinate system, for review. There are some projections 
that do not require all of the elements in the list. Following this list, you can see some entries from 
the .PRJ file. 
1. The first element in each list is the name of the projection in quotes. 
2. The second element in each list is the number that identifies the projection number as indicated 
in Projection Types on page382
3. The third element in each list is the datum ID that identifies the appropriate datum for the 
projection. See Datums on page385 for a complete list of supported datums.
4. The fourth element in each list is the units, which indicate the units of the projection. See Units 
on page464 for a current list of the supported units.
5. The next element in some lists is the coordinate system origin. See Coordinate System Origin 
on page386 for a complete description of this entry.
6. The remaining elements are specific to particular types of projections. You can see their 
descriptions in Standard Parallels (Conic Projections) on page386Oblique Azimuth 
(Hotine Oblique Mercator) on page386Scale Factor (Transverse Mercator) on page387
Chapter 14: Working with Coordinate Systems and Projections
Adding Projections to the MAPINFOW.PRJ File
MapInfo Professional 10.5
389
User Guide
False Easting and False Northing on page387 and Range (Azimuthal Projections) on 
page387.
L
Each element in a projection entry is separated by a comma. 
Let’s look at some specific coordinate systems to prepare you to create your own projection. It is 
important to remember that the elements of a projection are different for each projection. Here are 
some examples we have already seen:
L
There are additional examples in the Help System.
Adding Projections to the MAPINFOW.PRJ File
Once you understand the structure of the entries in the MAPINFOW.PRJ file, you are ready to 
create a new projection entry for your coordinate system. You may want to make a copy of the 
MAPINFOW.PRJ file in case you want to revert back to it later.
To create a new projection entry for the coordinate system in the MAPINFOW.PRJ file: 
1. Open MAPINFOW.PRJ in a text editor or word processor. In this file, you are going to add the 
new projection entries.
Figure:MAPINFOW.PRJ in Notepad
2. Scroll down in this list to find the type of projection you want to base your map on. See 
Understanding Coordinate Systems on page376 for descriptions of the different projection 
types.
3. Add a new line at the end of the projection list you are modifying.
For example, to add a new Universal Transverse Mercator projection (Australian Map Grid using 
AGD66 datum), scroll down to that entry and type the new projection at the end of the list.
Chapter 14: Working with Coordinate Systems and Projections
Adding Projections to the MAPINFOW.PRJ File
MapInfo Professional 10.5
390
User Guide
Figure:Adding a Line in the MAPINFOW.PRJ File
4. On a new line, type the new parameter entries based on the required parameters described for 
that projection type in the table Projections and Their Parameters on page452. 
• If the name of your projection does not appear in the Common Map Projections list, consider 
the kind of projection you are creating (Latitude/Longitude, Conic, Transverse, etc.) and 
follow the table entries for the type of projection you want.
• Remember to include constant values (Accounting for Affine Transformations and 
Explicit Bounds in Projection Types on page383) to indicate an affine transformation, 
specific bounds, or both if appropriate or necessary.
L
The order of parameters is vitally important. Remember to separate each parameter with 
a comma.
5. Save your edited MAPINFOW.PRJ file in the directory in your user directory. 
L
In the past the MAPINFOW.PRJ file was saved in your installation directory but this did not 
allow different users to have different PRJ files. This new file placement permits this.
Things to keep in mind when editing the MAPINFOW.PRJ file:
• You must record the X and Y coordinates of the origin point in decimal degrees.
• Remember to include a negative sign for west longitudes and south latitudes. 
• You must list the origin longitude first in the MAPINFOW.PRJ file entry.
• Carry out decimals to at least five (5) places for greater accuracy.
• Do not use commas to represent thousands or millions in large numbers. Only use commas 
to separate parameters from one another.
• When specifying projection, datum and units, use the number that represents the parameter. 
These numbers are listed in the table for each parameter earlier in this section. In our 
example, 6 represents Equidistant Conic projection; 74 represents NAD 83 datum, and 7 
represents meters.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested