building web api with asp.net core mvc pdf : Add pdf together one file SDK control API .net azure html sharepoint MapInfoProfessionalUserGuide43-part1020

Chapter 16: Specialized Topics in MapInfo Professional
Creating Expressions
MapInfo Professional 11.0
431
User Guide
Columns can be referred to by name or by number, where the number designates the order the 
column has in Select Columns. Thus, "col1" and "col6" refer to the first and sixth columns, 
respectively. The number must be preceded by the letters "col".
• For more instructions and related topics, see the Using Expressions to Create a New Column 
topic in the Help System.
Constructing Complex Expressions
Now consider examples 9 and 10, that are a bit more complex than 1 through 8:
1. POP_1990 > POP_1980*1.2
2. round((POP_1980*1.2)/TOTAL_AREA,.1)
We created expression 9 by taking expression 3 and replacing the constant “17893” with the whole 
of expression 6. Similarly, we created expression 10 by taking expression 8 and replacing 
“POP_1990” with expression 6.
In general, you create complex expressions by combining simple expressions. Perhaps the best way 
to learn how to do this is look at some of the examples we have provided (above and following) and 
create your own expressions based on those examples. However, there are two very general 
techniques for creating complex expressions.
• Replace a column name or a specific value with a simple expression.
• Combine expressions using logical operators (and, not, or).
Example six illustrates the first technique. There are many examples of the second technique 
throughout this entry. See particularly the discussion following Using Logical Operators in 
Expressions.
Entering Specific Values (Constants) into Expressions 
Use the Expression dialog box to formulate mathematical and alphanumeric expressions in several 
MapInfo Professional dialog boxes.
When entering specific character strings, numbers, and dates into expressions, you need to observe 
the following conventions.
Character Strings in Expressions
When typing a particular string into an expression you must enclose it in double quotes. MapInfo 
Professional then treats it as a string rather than as a column name. For example, strings 1 and 2 
shown below are valid string constants, while 3 and 4 are not.
1. "Orange"
2. "New York"
3. Orange
4. New York
Add pdf together one file - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
reader combine pdf pages; batch pdf merger online
Add pdf together one file - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
c# merge pdf; c# combine pdf
Chapter 16: Specialized Topics in MapInfo Professional
Creating Expressions
MapInfo Professional 11.0
432
User Guide
Numbers in Expressions
When entering specific numerical values, do not use commas, dollar signs, or any characters other 
than numerals, decimal points, and the minus sign for negative numbers. You can use E to denote 
numbers in exponentiation. 
Date Values in Expressions
Dates consist of a month, a day, and an optional year. The year is specified by two or four digits and 
enclosed in double quotes. The components of a date are separated by hyphens or slashes. If the 
year is not specified, it defaults to the year set on your computer's clock. The following are valid data 
constants:
Using Mathematical Operators in Expressions 
Use the Expression dialog box to formulate mathematical and alphanumeric expressions in several 
MapInfo Professional dialog boxes. Mathematical operators are often used in creating expressions. 
The following chart shows the operator's symbol, name, example, and how the operators handle 
different data types.
System 
Order
What MapInfo Professional Expects
M/d/yy
02/28/2005
M/d/yyyy
02/28/2005
MM/dd/yy
02/28/2005
MM/dd/yyyy
02/28/2005
yy/MM/dd
2005/02/28
dd-MMM-yy
02-28-2005
Symbol
Description
Example
Detailed Example
+
plus
A + B
Date + Number: Date
04/01/2007 + 4: 04/05/2007
FloatNumber + Date: Date
4 + 232: 236
-
minus
A - B (subtraction)
-A (negative)
Date - Number: Date
Number - Date: Date
236 - 4: 232
some number - some number: Float
*
times 
A * B
some integer * some integer: Integer
some number * some number: Float
C# Word - Merge Word Documents in C#.NET
C# DLLs: Merge Word File. Add references: Combine and Merge Multiple Word Files into One Using C#. You may also combine more Word documents together.
apple merge pdf; append pdf files reader
C# PowerPoint - Merge PowerPoint Documents in C#.NET
can easily merge and append one PowerPoint document to can be merged and appended together according to Add necessary XDoc.PowerPoint DLL libraries into your
acrobat combine pdf files; add pdf files together reader
Chapter 16: Specialized Topics in MapInfo Professional
Creating Expressions
MapInfo Professional 11.0
433
User Guide
The following calculations are possible:
• Adding numbers to dates to yield another date.
• Subtracting a number from a date to yield another date.
• Subtracting a date from a date to yield a number.
When you add numbers to dates or subtract numbers from dates, MapInfo Professional treats the 
numbers as specifying a number of days. When you add or subtract a week, you use the number 7.
When you add or subtract a month, you use 30 or 31. When MapInfo Professional subtracts a date 
from a date, the result indicates a number of days.
Using String Operators in
Expressions 
Strings must be enclosed in double quotes. Consider the following example:
”Ms.” + Last_Name
When MapInfo Professional evaluates this as part of an expression it places “Ms. “in front of each 
last name. Note that the string constant (“Ms. “) is in quotes. Similarly,
”Hello,” + ”world”
gives you “Hello, world.” And
”4”+”5”
gives you “45.”
Using Comparison Operators in Expressions 
Use the Expression dialog box to formulate mathematical and alphanumeric expressions in several 
MapInfo Professional dialog boxes. Comparison operators are often used in creating expressions. 
The following chart shows the comparison operator symbols and a description.
/
divided by 
A / B
some number / some number: Float
^
exponentiation
A ^ B
some number ^ some number: Float
+
“concatenation” — connects strings and string expressions.
&
(can be used if preceded by a space)
Operators
Description
=
“equals” 
<>
“not equals”
>
“greater than”
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
MSWordDocx.dll", which, when used together with other online tutorial on how to add & insert one powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
add two pdf files together; add multiple pdf files into one online
C# Excel - Merge Excel Documents in C#.NET
SDK, C# developers can easily merge and append one Excel document to Excel documents can be merged and appended together according to Add necessary references:
c# merge pdf pages; acrobat split pdf into multiple files
Chapter 16: Specialized Topics in MapInfo Professional
Creating Expressions
MapInfo Professional 11.0
434
User Guide
The Help System contains these related topics:
• Numerical Comparison
• String Comparison
• Date Comparison
• Logical Comparison
Numerical Comparison
Numerical comparisons are based on the numerical values of the expressions and numerical 
constants. 
English: All rows where the household income is above $65,000.
1. HH_INC>65000
Comment: Don’t add the dollar sign or comma. MapInfo Professional doesn’t know what to do with it 
and gives you an error message. 
English: All rows where the median age is 42.
1. MED_AGE=42
Comment: This expression selects only those records where the median age is exactly 42. When 
your median age data contains a decimal portion (which is the case for MapInfo Professional-
supplied demographic data) then it is unlikely that there are many regions with a median age of 
exactly 42. 
The following expression gives you better results:
1. Round(MED_AGE, 1)=42
Comment: The function “round(somenumber, somenumber)” rounds the first number in the way 
specified by the second. In this example, the first number is the median age (MED_AGE) and the 
second is 1, indicating that median age is to be rounded to the nearest whole number.
English: All rows where the amount does not equal $23,000.
1. AMOUNT<>23000
Comment: You might want to use the Round function, as in 10, if you are not concerned that the 
value be exactly 23000. 
<
“less than”
>=
“greater than or equal to”
<=
“less than or equal to”
Operators
Description
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
PDF document layout and all the paragraphs are joining together, our C# RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic' or any other assembly or one of
break a pdf into multiple files; pdf split and merge
VB.NET Image: VB.NET ISSN Barcode Reader & Scanner; Decode Barcode
be integrated and used in VB.NET class application together. VB.NET ISSN barcode scanner control add-on can barcode recognition from one page PDF file works in
combine pdf online; attach pdf to mail merge
Chapter 16: Specialized Topics in MapInfo Professional
Creating Expressions
MapInfo Professional 11.0
435
User Guide
String Comparison
String comparisons are based on the exact character content of the string. In this case “>” means 
“alphabetically greater than” (for example, comes after in the alphabet) and “<” means 
“alphabetically less than.” 
When typing a string into an expression, you should enclose it in quotes so that MapInfo 
Professional knows to treat it as a string, rather than treating it as a column name.
English: All rows where the vendor is Acme.
1. VENDOR=”Acme”
Comment: Note that Acme is in quotes so that MapInfo Professional knows to treat it literally (as a 
character string) rather than to search for a column named Acme. 
English: All rows where the vendor is not Acme.
1. VENDOR<>”Acme”
Date Comparison
English: All entries received on October 9, 1991.
1. RECEIVED=”10–9–91”
L
Consider these conventions:
• The date is enclosed in quotes
• It is in the form: Month, Day, Year
• The numbers in the data are separated by a hyphen or a slash (/)
• Two characters were used for the year. You can also use four characters (1991)
English: All received after October 9, 1991.
1. RECEIVED>”10–9–91”
Comment: This expression does not select those received on October 9, 1991. When you want them 
as well:
1. RECEIVED>=”10–9–91”
English: Records for all received before August.
1. Month(RECEIVED)<8
Comment: This expression uses the Month function to extract the month in the date. It doesn’t 
specify any particular year. When your database has records for several years, this expression does 
not pay attention to the particular year. 
Logical Comparison
English: All that have shipped.
1. Shipped
C# Image: Document Image Processing SDK Programming in C#.NET
RasterEdge.Imaging.MSWordDocx.dll; RasterEdge.Imaging.PDF.dll; Before you use any programming add-ons from your C#.NET project, usually together with integrated
scan multiple pages into one pdf; pdf merge comments
C# PowerPoint: C# Codes to Combine & Split PowerPoint Documents
or a list of PowerPoint documents together and create a String doc in dirs) { docList.Add(doc); } PPTXDocument & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
combine pdfs online; acrobat merge pdf
Chapter 16: Specialized Topics in MapInfo Professional
Creating Expressions
MapInfo Professional 11.0
436
User Guide
Comment: The column “Shipped” is a logical column. It contains “T” for true, or yes, and “F” for false, 
or no. When an order is shipped, it is marked “T”. Otherwise, it is not shipped. For orders that are 
shipped, expression 28 evaluates to true. For orders not shipped it evaluates to false.
English: All that have not shipped.
1. Str$(Shipped)=”F”
2. Not Shipped 
Using Geographic Operators in Expressions
MapInfo Professional has several geographic operators. Use them to select objects on the basis of 
their spatial relationship to some other object. MapInfo Professional has a special keyword you use 
with geographical operators: “obj” or “object”. This keyword tells MapInfo Professional that it has to 
get values based on the graphical objects in the table rather than the tabular data. 
The geographic operators go between the objects being specified. Select the geographic operators 
from the Operators menu. Here are the geographic operators:
“Contains Part” and “Partly Within” are exactly equivalent to “Intersects”—these are all treated the 
same way by MapInfo Professional, so the standard syntax “Intersects” is almost universally used.
“Contains” and “Within” are concerned only with objects' centroids.
“Contains Entire” and “Entirely Within” are concerned with the area covered by a region object; the 
location of the centroid doesn't matter. See examples in Using Geographic Operators in Expressions 
in the Help System.
Contains
Object A Contains object B if B’s centroid is anywhere within A’s boundary.
Contains Entire e Object A Contains Entire object B if B’s boundary is entirely within A’s boundary.
Contains Part
Object A Contains Part object B if B’s boundary is partly within A’s boundary.
Within
Object A is Within object B if its centroid is inside B’s boundary.
Entirely Within
Object A is Entirely Within object B if A’s boundary is entirely within B’s 
boundary.
Partly Within
Object A is Partly Within object B if A’s boundary is partly within B’s boundary.
Intersects
Object A Intersects object B if they have at least one point in common.
Chapter 16: Specialized Topics in MapInfo Professional
Creating Expressions
MapInfo Professional 11.0
437
User Guide
Using Logical Operators in Expressions 
“And”, “or”, and “not” are logical operators. You use them to combine expressions in Select and the 
Where Condition clause of SQL Select. MapInfo Professional treats each such an expression as a 
test, which it applies to each record in the table. For each test it gets a yes/no (true/false) answer. 
MapInfo Professional uses the logical operators to tell it how to combine the individual yes/no 
answers into an overall yes/no answer: Does the current record meet the selection condition?
Suppose you want to select all properties that are worth $250,000 or more and are in Columbia 
county. Each record has to meet two criteria, each of which can be formulated as a simple 
expression:
1. VALUE >= 250000
2. COUNTY = “Columbia”
You could perform one selection for all properties worth $250,000 or more. Then you could perform 
another selection on that result, looking for all properties in Columbia county. However, it is easier to 
combine the two operations into one using the logical operator “and”.
1. COUNTY = “Columbia” and VALUE >= 250000
When MapInfo Professional examines a record to see whether or not it meets the condition set by 
this expression, it makes the two tests: Does COUNTY equal Columbia? Is the VALUE equal to or 
greater than 250000? When the answer to both of these questions is true (or yes), then the record is 
accepted into the current selection. When the answer to one or both of the questions is no (or false), 
then the record is not accepted into the current selection.
Operator
Description
and
is “true” if (and only if) both of its arguments (the expressions it joins together) are 
true. A record must satisfy both of these conditions if it is to be selected.
or
is “true” if either one, or both, of its arguments (the expressions it joins together) 
are true. A record need satisfy only one of these conditions if it is to be selected. It 
is also selected if both of its conditions are satisfied.
not
is “true” if its argument (the expression it applies to) is false. A record is selected if 
it does not meet the stated condition.
Chapter 16: Specialized Topics in MapInfo Professional
Creating Expressions
MapInfo Professional 11.0
438
User Guide
Now, what if you want all properties worth $250,000 or more and not in Columbia county? You can 
use “not” to negate the first clause of expression 33, yielding expression 34:
1. not (COUNTY=”Columbia”) and VALUE>=250000
Only records where the county is not Columbia satisfy the first clause of expression 34. Now 
consider expression 35:
1. not (COUNTY=”Columbia” and VALUE>=250000)
Expression 35 is simply the negation of expression 33. Any record that would satisfy 33 does not 
satisfy 35. Any record that does not satisfy 33 satisfies 35. 
You can use “or” when you want to specify alternative conditions, such as:
1. COUNTY=”Columbia” or COUNTY=”Greene” 
Any record evaluated against this condition is accepted if its county is any one of the two specified 
counties. One could, of course, use numerical tests as well. For example:
1. TOTAL_AREA>40 or VALUE>250000
This tests to see whether the area is greater than 40 or the value is greater than 250000. When 
either one is true of a record, then that record is accepted into the selection.
In formulating expressions using logical operators you have to be careful how you use them. The 
following expression, while it seems OK, does not work:
1. COUNTY=“Columbia” or “Greene”
Judging from its English translation—COUNTY equals Columbia or Greene—this expression should 
operate just like expression 36 and give us any record containing Columbia County or Greene 
County. But the rules of computational logic and the rules of English are a bit different. 
When MapInfo Professional reads expressions it reads them from left to right. One of the things it 
has to do is to determine how the items in the expression are grouped. Think of this operation as 
inserting parentheses into the expression. MapInfo Professional reads expression 35 as though it 
were grouped like expression 39, which is what we intend. 
It reads expression 38 as though it were grouped like 40, which is not at all what we want.
1. (COUNTY=”Columbia”) or (COUNTY=”Greene”)
2. (COUNTY=”Columbia”) or (”Greene”)
Both 39 and 40 have the same first clause. But their second clauses (after the “or”) are quite 
different. The second clause of 40 is simply a literal string, “Greene.” By convention, MapInfo 
Professional evaluates a record against a literal string as being true if that record is not blank.
When 
MapInfo Professional evaluates records against expression 40, all non-blank records are evaluated 
as true and be accepted into the selection. It does not make any difference how a record evaluates 
on the first clause. Any non-blank record evaluates as true on the second clause, and one “true” is 
all it takes to evaluate the entire expression as true.
Let us consider one final example, which is the negation of expression 36:
1. not (COUNTY=”Greene” or COUNTY=”Columbia”)
Chapter 16: Specialized Topics in MapInfo Professional
Creating Expressions
MapInfo Professional 11.0
439
User Guide
Expression 39 is satisfied if the county is Greene or if it is Columbia, but not if it is Montgomery or 
Warren. Expression 41 is satisfied by any county other than Greene or Columbia, including 
Montgomery and Warren.
The Help System contains these related topics:
• Numeric Clauses
• String Clauses
• Date Clauses
• Keyword Clauses
Understanding Operator Precedence 
When MapInfo Professional evaluates expressions it needs to know which components of an 
expression to evaluate first. This is called precedence. By convention, certain operators are 
assigned different levels of precedence. Those with the highest level are evaluated first. The 
following table lists MapInfo Professional’s operators in the order in which they are evaluated. 
Exponentiation evaluates from the right. This affects expressions with multiple exponents: 2 ^ -3 ^ -4 
= 2 ^ ( - (3 ^ (-4)))
Operators at the same level of precedence are evaluated from left to right.
For example, the expression 3+4*2 produces a result of 11. That is because multiplication has a 
higher precedence than addition and is performed first, in effect:
3+4*2=
3+8=
11
We can add parenthesis to force MapInfo Professional to do the addition first:
(3+4)*2=
7*2=
14
Highest Priority: Parenthesis
Exponentiation
Negation
Multiplication, Division
Addition, Subtraction
Geographic operators, Comparison operators
Not
And
Lowest Priority:
Or
Chapter 16: Specialized Topics in MapInfo Professional
Working with the MapBasic Window
MapInfo Professional 11.0
440
User Guide
Now consider expression 60, which is intended to select all records July or September of 1989.
1. year(RECEIVED)=89 and month(RECEIVED)=7 or month(RECEIVED)=9
Because “and” has higher precedence than “or”, MapInfo Professional treats this expression as 
though “year(RECEIVED)=89 and month(RECEIVED)=7” was enclosed in parentheses. 
1. (year(RECEIVED)=89 and month(RECEIVED)=7) or month(RECEIVED)=9
In this case, any record for July of 89 or for September of any year would be selected. That’s 
probably not what you want. However, by adding parentheses to the second expression, you can get 
this:
1. year(RECEIVED)=89 and (month(RECEIVED)=7 or month(RECEIVED)=9)
In this expression, the parentheses tell MapInfo Professional that “month(RECEIVED)=7” and 
“month(RECEIVED)=9” are alternatives in the second clause of the expression. MapInfo 
Professional treats this the same as it treats number 53 above.
L
When you are not sure how MapInfo Professional evaluates an expression with several 
operators, you should use parentheses to group elements as you want them. 
Using Functions in Expressions
Functions take data values and perform some operation on them to produce a new value. Functions 
have the following form:
SomeFunction(parameters)
Most of MapInfo Professional’s functions take one or two parameters. A parameter can be a column 
or another expression. MapInfo Professional uses the keyword “obj” or “object” with the geographic 
functions: Area, CentroidX, CentroidY, ObjectLen, and Perimeter. This keyword tells MapInfo 
Professional that it has to get values based on graphical objects in the table rather than tabular data. 
• For more information about specific functions, see the Help System.
Working with the MapBasic Window
This section allows advanced MapInfo Professional users to go behind the scenes and take 
advantage of functions that enhance the use of MapInfo Professional through the MapBasic window. 
MapBasic is MapInfo Professional’s programming language that allows you to customize and 
automate MapInfo Professional functionality. When MapBasic was created, the MapBasic Window 
feature was added to MapInfo Professional as a means of testing and debugging code for an 
application. It became apparent that the MapBasic window is also a useful tool to MapInfo 
Professional users for doing certain tasks such as complex selections and queries based on object 
information.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested