asp net core 2.0 mvc pdf : Add pdf together application SDK utility azure winforms web page visual studio Matched%20-%20Ally%20Condie0-part1083

Add pdf together - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
c# merge pdf files into one; acrobat combine pdf
Add pdf together - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
c# pdf merge; apple merge pdf
Matched
Ally Condie
Dutton Juvenile (2010)
Tags:
Social Issues, Love & Romance, Juvenile Fiction, Fantasy & Magic, Fiction, Fantasy,
General, Marriage, Manga, Dystopias, Comics & Graphic Novels
Amazon.com Review
Matched, the Society Officials have determined optimal outcomes for all aspects of daily life, thereby removing the "burden" of choice. When
Cassia's best friend is identified as her ideal marriage Match it confirms her belief that Society knows best, until she plugs in her Match microchip
and a different boy’s face flashes on the screen. This improbable mistake sets Cassia on a dangerous path to the unthinkable—rebelling against
the predetermined life Society has in store for her. As author Ally Condie’s unique dystopian Society takes chilling measures to maintain the status
quo, Matched reminds readers that freedom of choice is precious, and not without sacrifice.—Seira Wilson
Amazon Exclusive: Author Q&A; with Ally Condie
Q: What inspired you to write Matched?
A: Matched was inspired by several experiences—specific ones, like a conversation with my husband and chaperoning a high school prom—and
general ones, like falling in love and becoming a parent.
Q: How do you think Matched differs from other dystopian novels?
A: I think it’s different in that it’s perhaps less action-oriented and more introspective. This is really the story of one girl, Cassia, learning to choose.
Q: The cover for Matched is so eye-catching and mysterious. What does the image represent to you?
A: I cannot imagine a more perfect cover for this book. To me, the image is a clear representation of Cassia, the main character, and the way she
is trapped in her world. It’s kind of a lovely world—the bubble is beautiful—but it’s confining nonetheless. And, of course, the color green is very
important to the book. I’m just so thrilled about this cover. Theresa Evangelista, the designer, and Samantha Aide, the photographer and model, are
incredibly talented.
Q: In Matched, each member of the Society is not only assigned a spouse, they’re also assigned a job, and Cassia, your main
character, is a data sorter. If you lived in the Society, what job do you think you’d have?
A: I would definitely not be a data sorter. I am terrible with numbers and patterns. I think I would probably be a teacher or instructor. Or maybe one of
the people did a mundane task, like dishwashing. I have a feeling that I wouldn’t fare very well in the Society.
Q: Dylan Thomas’ classic poem, “Do Not Go Gentle,” is part of a theme that you’ve woven throughout Matched. Do you remember
when you first came across this poem? What made you decide to use it in your novel?
A: I don’t remember when I first read this poem, which is pretty embarrassing. But I do remember the first time I heard a recording of the author
reading it. I remember feeling almost reverent, and paying close attention to how he said the words and went through the lines. This poem came to
mind almost immediately when I started writing the book. It’s probably the most universal poem I’ve ever encountered. The first line alone resonates
immediately with almost everyone.
Q: What do you like about writing for teenagers?
A: Everything. I like talking with teenagers themselves about books. I like trying to capture the teenage voice. And I like writing about teenagers
because they have SO MUCH happening in their lives, and they are passionate about those things.
Q: What were some of the books you loved as a teen? Did any of these books influence Matched at all?
A: I loved (and still do) Anne Tyler and Wallace Stegner. I remember being introduced to those authors in ninth grade and being floored by the
beauty of their writing. I also loved anything by Agatha Christie. I think these books did influence me—not in any concrete, specific way, but in that I
wanted to write a story about a character worth caring about even though/because of the fact that she is flawed and human.
Q: What would you like your readers to take away from the experience of reading Matched?
A: I hope they can take away whatever they need from the story. I hope there is something there for a reader—whether it’s relating to a character or
reading a scene that feels true or anything else.
Q: Will there be more books featuring Cassia, or set in the world of Matched?
A: Yes! There will be two more books in the Matched trilogy.
From
“Do not go gentle into that good night.” Cassia’s feelings of security disintegrate after her grandfather hands her a slip of paper just before his
scheduled death at age 80. Not only does she now possess an illegal poem, but she also has a lingering interest in the boy who fleetingly appeared
on her viewscreen, the one who wasn’t her match, the man she will eventually marry. What’s worse, she knows him—his name is Ky, and he is an
C# PowerPoint - Merge PowerPoint Documents in C#.NET
together according to its loading sequence, and then saved and output as a single PowerPoint with user-defined location. C# DLLs: Merge PowerPoint Files. Add
how to combine pdf files; pdf split and merge
C# Word - Merge Word Documents in C#.NET
and appended together according to its loading sequence, and then saved and output as a single Word with user-defined location. C# DLLs: Merge Word File. Add
pdf merger; pdf combine two pages into one
orphan from the Outer Provinces. How could she love him as much as Xander, her match and best friend since childhood? The stunning clarity and
attention to detail in Condie’s Big Brother–like world is a feat. Some readers might find the Society to be a close cousin of Lois Lowry’s dystopian
future in The Giver (1993), with carefully chosen work placements, constant monitoring, and pills for regulating emotional extremes. However, the
author just as easily tears this world apart while deftly exploring the individual cost of societal perfection and the sacrifices inherent in freedom of
choice. Grades 9-12. —Courtney Jones
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
MSWordDocx.dll", which, when used together with other online tutorial on how to add & insert one powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
attach pdf to mail merge in word; pdf merge comments
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
some other PDF tools convert PDF to text by a method loses the original PDF document layout and all the paragraphs are joining together, our C# PDF to text
merge pdf files; add pdf pages together
1
VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.
Our VB.NET PDF Document Add-On enables you to search for text in target PDF document by For example, you can locate the searched text together with methods
batch pdf merger; add pdf together one file
C# Image: How to Draw Text on Images within Rasteredge .NET Image
txt" to the new project folder, together with .NET short but useful C# code example to add text and powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
all jpg to one pdf converter; reader create pdf multiple files
Table of Contents
Title Page
Copyright Page
Dedication
CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 2
CHAPTER 3
CHAPTER 4
CHAPTER 5
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 8
CHAPTER 9
CHAPTER 10
CHAPTER 11
CHAPTER 12
CHAPTER 13
CHAPTER 14
CHAPTER 15
CHAPTER 16
CHAPTER 17
CHAPTER 18
CHAPTER 19
CHAPTER 20
CHAPTER 21
CHAPTER 22
CHAPTER 23
CHAPTER 24
CHAPTER 25
CHAPTER 26
CHAPTER 27
CHAPTER 28
CHAPTER 29
CHAPTER 30
CHAPTER 31
CHAPTER 32
Acknowledgements
ALLY CONDIE
C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
files to Tiff, like Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, and images. Enable to add XImage.OCR for .NET into C# C#.NET application by using barcode reader SDK together.
break a pdf into multiple files; add pdf files together
C# Excel - Merge Excel Documents in C#.NET
and appended together according to its loading sequence, and then saved and output as a single Excel with user-defined location. C# DLLs: Merge Excel Files. Add
batch pdf merger online; acrobat combine pdf files
DUTTON BOOKS
A member of Penguin Group (USA) Inc.
Published by the Penguin Group 
Penguin Group (USA) Inc., 375 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10014, U.S.A. | Penguin Group 
(Canada), 90 Eglinton Avenue East, Suite 700, Toronto, Ontario M4P 2Y3, Canada 
(a division of Pearson Penguin Canada Inc.) | Penguin Books Ltd, 80 Strand, London WC2R 0RL, 
England | Penguin Ireland, 25 St Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2, Ireland (a division of Penguin Books Ltd) 
| Penguin Group (Australia), 250 Camberwell Road, Camberwell, Victoria 3124, Australia (a division of 
Pearson Australia Group Pty Ltd) | Penguin Books India Pvt Ltd, 
11 Community Centre, Panchsheel Park, New Delhi—110 017, India | Penguin Group (NZ), 
67 Apollo Drive, Rosedale, North Shore 0632, New Zealand (a division of Pearson 
New Zealand Ltd.) | Penguin Books (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd, 24 Sturdee Avenue, 
Rosebank, Johannesburg 2196, South Africa 
Penguin Books Ltd, Registered Offices: 80 Strand, London WC2R 0RL, England
This book is a work of fiction.
Names, characters, places, and incidents are either 
the product of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously, 
and any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, 
business establishments, events, or locales is entirely coincidental.
Copyright (c) 2010 by Allyson Braithwaite Condie
All rights reserved.
No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form 
or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, 
or any information storage and retrieval system now known or to be invented, 
without permission in writing from the publisher, except by a reviewer 
who wishes to quote brief passages in connection with a review 
written for inclusion in a magazine, newspaper, or broadcast. 
The publisher does not have any control over and does not assume 
any responsibility for author or third-party websites or their content.
“Poem in October”—By Dylan Thomas, from THE POEMS OF DYLAN THOMAS, 
copyright (c) 1945 by The Trustees for the Copyrights of Dylan Thomas, first published in POETRY. 
“Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night”—By Dylan Thomas, 
from THE POEMS OF DYLAN THOMAS, copyright (c) 1952 by Dylan Thomas. 
CIP Data is available.
Published in the United States by Dutton Books, 
a member of Penguin Group (USA) Inc. 
345 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10014 
www.penguin.com/youngreaders
eISBN : 978-1-101-44544-0
http://us.penguingroup.com
For Scott, who always believes
CHAPTER 1
Now that I’ve found the way to fly, which direction should I go into the night? My wings aren’t white or feathered; they’re green, made of green silk,
which shudders in the wind and bends when I move—first in a circle, then in a line, finally in a shape of my own invention. The black behind me
doesn’t worry me; neither do the stars ahead.
I smile at myself, at the foolishness of my imagination. People cannot fly, though before the Society, there were myths about those who could. I
saw a painting of them once. White wings, blue sky, gold circles above their heads, eyes turned up in surprise as though they couldn’t believe what
the artist had painted them doing, couldn’t believe that their feet didn’t touch the ground.
Those stories weren’t true. I know that. But tonight, it’s easy to forget. The air train glides through the starry night so smoothly and my heart
pounds so quickly that it feels as though I could soar into the sky at any moment.
“What are you smiling about?” Xander wonders as I smooth the folds of my green silk dress down neat.
“Everything,” I tell him, and it’s true. I’ve waited so long for this: for my Match Banquet. Where I’ll see, for the first time, the face of the boy who will
be my Match. It will be the first time I hear his name.
I can’t wait. As quickly as the air train moves, it still isn’t fast enough. It hushes through the night, its sound a background for the low rain of our
parents’ voices, the lightning-quick beats of my heart.
Perhaps Xander can hear my heart pounding, too, because he asks, “Are you nervous?” In the seat next to him, Xander’s older brother begins to
tell my mother the story of his Match Banquet. It won’t be long now until Xander and I have our own stories to tell.
“No,” I say. But Xander’s my best friend. He knows me too well.
“You lie,” he teases. “You are nervous.”
“Aren’t you?”
“Not me. I’m ready.” He says it without hesitation, and I believe him. Xander is the kind of person who is sure about what he wants.
“It doesn’t matter if you’re nervous, Cassia,” he says, gentle now. “Almost ninety-three percent of those attending their Match Banquet exhibit
some signs of nervousness.”
“Did you memorize all of the official Matching material?”
“Almost,” Xander says, grinning. He holds his hands out as if to say, What did you expect?
The gesture makes me laugh, and besides, I memorized all of the material, too. It’s easy to do when you read it so many times, when the decision
is so important. “So you’re in the minority,” I say. “The seven percent who don’t show any nerves at all.”
“Of course,” he agrees.
“How could you tell I was nervous?”
“Because you keep opening and closing that.” Xander points to the golden object in my hands. “I didn’t know you had an artifact.” A few treasures
from the past float around among us. Though citizens of the Society are allowed one artifact each, they are hard to come by. Unless you had
ancestors who took care to pass things along through the years.
“I didn’t, until a few hours ago,” I tell him. “Grandfather gave it to me for my birthday. It belonged to his mother.”
“What’s it called?” Xander asks.
“A compact,” I say. I like the name very much. Compact means small. I am small. I also like the way it sounds when you say it: com-pact. Saying
the word makes a sound like the one the artifact itself makes when it snaps shut.
“What do the initials and numbers mean?”
“I’m not sure.” I run my finger across the letters ACM and the numbers 1940 carved across the golden surface. “But look,” I tell him, popping the
compact open to show him the inside: a little mirror, made of real glass, and a small hollow where the original owner once stored powder for her
face, according to Grandfather. Now, I use it to hold the three emergency tablets that everyone carries—one green, one blue, one red.
“That’s convenient,” Xander says. He stretches out his arms in front of him and I notice that he has an artifact, too—a pair of shiny platinum cuff
links. “My father lent me these, but you can’t put anything in them. They’re completely useless.”
“They look nice, though.” My gaze travels up to Xander’s face, to his bright blue eyes and blond hair above his dark suit and white shirt. He’s
always been handsome, even when we were little, but I’ve never seen him dressed up like this. Boys don’t have as much leeway in choosing clothes
as girls do. One suit looks much like another. Still, they get to select the color of their shirts and cravats, and the quality of the material is much finer
than the material used for plainclothes. “You look nice.” The girl who finds out that he’s her Match will be thrilled.
“Nice?” Xander says, lifting his eyebrows. “That’s all?”
“Xander,” his mother says next to him, amusement mingled with reproach in her voice.
You look beautiful,” Xander tells me, and I flush a little even though I’ve known Xander all my life. I feel beautiful, in this dress: ice green, floating,
full-skirted. The unaccustomed smoothness of silk against my skin makes me feel lithe and graceful.
Next to me, my mother and father each draw a breath as City Hall comes into view, lit up white and blue and sparkling with the special occasion
lights that indicate a celebration is taking place. I can’t see the marble stairs in front of the Hall yet, but I know that they will be polished and shining.
All my life I have waited to walk up those clean marble steps and through the doors of the Hall, a building I have seen from a distance but never
entered.
I want to open the compact and check in the mirror to make sure I look my best. But I don’t want to seem vain, so I sneak a glance at my face in its
surface instead.
The rounded lid of the compact distorts my features a little, but it’s still me. My green eyes. My coppery-brown hair, which looks more golden in
the compact than it does in real life. My straight small nose. My chin with a trace of a dimple like my grandfather’s. All the outward characteristics
that make me Cassia Maria Reyes, seventeen years old exactly.
I turn the compact over in my hands, looking at how perfectly the two sides fit together. My Match is already coming together just as neatly,
beginning with the fact that I am here tonight. Since my birthday falls on the fifteenth, the day the Banquet is held each month, I’d always hoped that I
might be Matched on my actual birthday—but I knew it might not happen. You can be called up for your Banquet anytime during the year after you
turn seventeen. When the notification came across the port two weeks ago that I would, indeed, be Matched on the day of my birthday, I could
almost hear the clean snap of the pieces fitting into place, exactly as I’ve dreamed for so long.
Because although I haven’t even had to wait a full day for my Match, in some ways I have waited all my life.
“Cassia,” my mother says, smiling at me. I blink and look up, startled. My parents stand up, ready to disembark. Xander stands, too, and
straightens his sleeves. I hear him take a deep breath, and I smile to myself. Maybe he is a little nervous after all.
“Here we go,” he says to me. His smile is so kind and good; I’m glad we were called up the same month. We’ve shared so much of childhood, it
seems we should share the end of it, too.
I smile back at him and give him the best greeting we have in the Society. “I wish you optimal results,” I tell Xander.
“You too, Cassia,” he says.
As we step off the air train and walk toward City Hall, my parents each link an arm through mine. I am surrounded, as I always have been, by their
love.
It is only the three of us tonight. My brother, Bram, can’t come to the Match Banquet because he is under seventeen, too young to attend. The first
one you attend is always your own. I, however, will be able to attend Bram’s banquet because I am the older sibling. I smile to myself, wondering
what Bram’s Match will be like. In seven years I will find out.
But tonight is my night.
It is easy to identify those of us being Matched; not only are we younger than all of the others, but we also float along in beautiful dresses and
tailored suits while our parents and older siblings walk around in plainclothes, a background against which we bloom. The City Officials smile
proudly at us, and my heart swells as we enter the Rotunda.
In addition to Xander, who waves good-bye to me as he crosses the room to his seating area, I see another girl I know named Lea. She picked
the bright red dress. It is a good choice for her, because she is beautiful enough that standing out works in her favor. She looks worried, however,
and she keeps twisting her artifact, a jeweled red bracelet. I am a little surprised to see Lea there. I would have picked her for a Single.
“Look at this china,” my father says as we find our place at the Banquet tables. “It reminds me of the Wedgwood pieces we found last year …”
My mother looks at me and rolls her eyes in amusement. Even at the Match Banquet, my father can’t stop himself from noticing these things. My
father spends months working in old neighborhoods that are being restored and turned into new Boroughs for public use. He sifts through the relics
of a society that is not as far in the past as it seems. Right now, for example, he is working on a particularly interesting Restoration project: an old
library. He sorts out the things the Society has marked as valuable from the things that are not.
But then I have to laugh because my mother can’t help but comment on the flowers, since they fall in her area of expertise as an Arboretum
worker. “Oh, Cassia! Look at the centerpieces. Lilies.” She squeezes my hand.
“Please be seated,” an Official tells us from the podium. “Dinner is about to be served.”
It’s almost comical how quickly we all take our seats. Because we might admire the china and the flowers, and we might be here for our Matches,
but we also can’t wait to taste the food.
“They say this dinner is always wasted on the Matchees,” a jovial-looking man sitting across from us says, smiling around our table. “So excited
they can’t eat a bite.” And it’s true; one of the girls sitting farther down the table, wearing a pink dress, stares at her plate, touching nothing.
I don’t seem to have this problem, however. Though I don’t gorge myself, I can eat some of everything—the roasted vegetables, the savory meat,
the crisp greens, and creamy cheese. The warm light bread. The meal seems like a dance, as though this is a ball as well as a banquet. The
waiters slide the plates in front of us with graceful hands; the food, wearing herbs and garnishes, is as dressed up as we are. We lift the white
napkins, the silver forks, the shining crystal goblets as if in time to music.
My father smiles happily as a server sets a piece of chocolate cake with fresh cream before him at the end of the meal. “Wonderful,” he whispers,
so softly that only my mother and I can hear him.
My mother laughs a little at him, teasing him, and he reaches for her hand.
I understand his enthusiasm when I take a bite of the cake, which is rich but not overwhelming, deep and dark and flavorful. It is the best thing I
have eaten since the traditional dinner at Winter Holiday, months ago. I wish Bram could have some cake, and for a minute I think about saving
some of mine for him. But there is no way to take it back to him. It wouldn’t fit in my compact. It would be bad form to hide it away in my mother’s
purse even if she would agree, and she won’t. My mother doesn’t break the rules.
I can’t save it for later. It is now, or never.
I have just popped the last bite in my mouth when the announcer says, “We are ready to announce the Matches.”
I swallow in surprise, and for a second, I feel an unexpected surge of anger: I didn’t get to savor my last bite of cake.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested