asp net core 2.0 mvc pdf : Acrobat reader merge pdf files control Library system web page asp.net html console MBJFall2013lr3-part1146

fall 2013
|
maine bar journal 203
Lawrence M. Leonard, M.D.
 
Independent Medical Evaluations
for plaintiff or defense
 
Fellow of Am. Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons
Diplomate of Am. Board of Orthopedic Surgery
Consultant Staff: Maine Medical Center
Courtesy Staff: Mercy Hospital
 
telephone:  781-2426
e-mail: lleonar1@maine.rr.com
F
F
F
E
E
E
D
D
D
E
E
E
R
R
R
A
A
A
L
L
L
E
E
E
M
M
M
P
P
P
L
L
L
O
O
O
Y
Y
Y
E
E
E
E
E
E
R
R
R
I
I
I
G
G
G
H
H
H
T
T
T
S
S
S
_________________________________ 
Representing Federal employees in 
discrimination, retirement,workers 
compensation, and employment cases
in FEDERAL COURT andat all levels 
involving the EEOC, MSPB, FERS, OPM, 
OWCP,and FECA 
John F. Lambert, Jr.
Samuel K. Rudman
Robyn G. March
(207) 874-4000     
www.lambertcoffin.com
Acrobat reader merge pdf files - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
c# merge pdf; c# combine pdf
Acrobat reader merge pdf files - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
add pdf together one file; pdf merger online
204 maine bar journal 
| fall 2013
Jest Is For All
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Merge, split PDF files. Insert, delete PDF pages. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF.
add pdf files together; reader create pdf multiple files
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. By using the Windows Viewer, you can convert word files as follows: Convert to PDF.
acrobat split pdf into multiple files; batch pdf merger online
fall 2013
|
maine bar journal 205
2014 MSBA Benefit 
Golf Tournament
August 25, 2014
Belgrade Lakes Golf Club
Winding Down Your Practice? 
Image copyright jwblinn. Used under license from Shutterstock.com.
Are you planning for retirement or winding down your prac-
tice for other reasons? Are you interested in connecting with 
a new lawyer who could take over your practice?  
The MSBA may be able to help. For more information,  
contact Bill Robitzek (wrobitzek@bermansimmons.com) who 
is coordinating the MSBA efforts on succession planning.
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
best pdf combiner; pdf merge documents
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
Features and Benefits. Powerful image converter to convert images of JPG, JPEG formats to PDF files; No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader; Seamlessly integrated into
best pdf merger; combine pdf online
206 maine bar journal 
| fall 2013
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
break pdf into multiple files; merge pdf
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
all jpg to one pdf converter; attach pdf to mail merge
fall 2013
|
maine bar journal 207
jonathan mermin is Of Counsel at Preti  
Flaherty.
He can be reached at jmermin@
preti.com.
by Jonathan Mermin
Lawyers And 
Numbers
omething has been bugging me. 
Not something of great conse-
quence—but small problems have 
the virtue of being solvable. 
My small problem is with the odd 
practice some lawyers have of writing 
numbers in both word and numeral form. 
周ere is one (1) reason not to do this: it is, 
with just a few possible exceptions, point-
less. 
In certain situations there is at least a 
glimmer of a rationale for the word (nu-
meral) format. A promissory note for “five 
hundred sixty-seven (567) dollars” might 
be harder to alter or forge than if it just 
said “five hundred sixty-seven” or “567.” 
Or a handwritten contract (if such things 
still exist) might be less prone to being 
misread if it required the parties to give 
notice “thirty (30) days” before termina-
tion, instead of just “thirty” or “30” days.  
More vexing is a statement in a brief 
that a witness had testified to seeing “four 
(4) armed men get out of the car.” Or that 
the defendant had offered up “five (5) de-
position dates.” Or this actual First Cir-
cuit docket entry: “NINE (9) paper copies 
of appellant/petitioner brief submitted.” 
周is is a funny way to write. 
Is there something unclear about 
“five” deposition dates that “five (5)” 
clarifies? Do we imagine our readership to 
include individuals who would recognize 
either “five” or “5,” but not both? Or that 
a judge could mistakenly assume that by 
“five” we intend, not the first Merriam-
Webster.com definition (“a number that is 
one more than four”), but the seventh: “a 
slapping of extended right hands by two 
people (as in greeting or celebration)”? Or 
that a witness who testified to having seen 
“four” armed men get out of the car might 
have been alerting the jury that she was 
about to hit a golf ball?
1
No. 周ere is no reason at all to write 
“five (5) deposition dates” or “four (4) 
armed men.” It makes about as much 
sense as it would to refer to the “Equal (=) 
Protection Clause.” Look at it this way: 
would the number “8,675,318” ever been 
written—except in a promissory note or 
maybe a contract—as “eight million, six 
hundred seventy-five thousand, three 
hundred eighteen (8,675,318)”? It would 
not be, because there’s no reason for it to 
be. Nor should other numbers be written 
that way just because they happen to be 
small.
Once upon a time, legal documents 
were handwritten, or copied on primitive 
machines. It may have made sense be-
fore the computer age to write “five (5)” 
to guard against illegibility. Or to make 
a document harder to alter. At least with 
a number in a document that had actual 
legal force.  
But legal documents are no longer 
written on parchment or carbon paper. 
And no one—not the judge, not opposing 
counsel, not the FedEx guy—is scheming 
to change the five deposition dates in your 
motion to six. 
Even if forgery and legibility could 
be viewed as legitimate concerns with 
documents produced on laser printers and 
copied in numerous tangible and intan-
gible locations, most numbers we write 
just don’t need to be that precise. Even 
if your adversaries had an agent in the 
judge’s chambers with access to your ex-
pert witness disclosure and the inclination 
to change his “16” years of experience to 
“14,” or the judge’s vision was such that 
under certain low light conditions she 
might mistake a “6” for a “4”—so what? 
Why take special precautions to ensure 
the precision of a number that doesn’t 
need to be precise?
What about contracts? Because num-
bers in contracts may have actual legal 
force, should we write that notice must be 
given “thirty (30)” days before termina-
tion? 周is is a closer question, as it does 
matter that if 30 is the number the parties 
agreed to, the contract so indicate.
But does writing “thirty (30)” do any-
thing to advance that cause? My guess is 
that any conceivable legibility or forgery-
deterrent benefit would be cancelled out 
by the increased risk of proof-reading er-
ror—if you attempt to write “thirty (30)” 
enough times, one day you may find your-
self with “thirty (03).” Proofreading is not 
made easier by generating more characters 
to proofread and introducing a potential 
for inconsistency that would not other-
wise exist. 
So even in a contract, it should be 
unnecessary to write numbers twice. But 
custom is a powerful thing; the repetition 
somehow looks right in a contract. Logic 
aside, a contractual provision for a “30-
day notice” requirement may strike the 
experienced attorney as being inadequate. 
So that habit could be hard to kick, even 
if it deserves to be kicked. In a brief or 
memo, however, or a letter or email, “thir-
ty (30)” just looks silly.
周e easy solution to this small prob-
lem is to use words for numbers up to 
nine, numerals for 11 and above, and de-
cide for yourself what to do with ten (10) 
(just don’t do that). Except don’t begin a 
sentence with a numeral, and when a set 
of numbers refer to items in the same 
category—“the resolution passed by 12 
votes to 8”—let the general rule yield to 
consistency. 
1. OK, golfers say “fore,” not “four.” But re-
member, we’re dealing with a hypothetical reader 
who might not realize that “four” and “4” are the 
same thing. So don’t tell me that reader necessar-
ily knows “four” isn’t the word one selects when 
hitting a golf ball.
S
GIF to PDF Converter | Convert GIF to PDF, Convert PDF to GIF
PDF files to GIF images with high quality. It can be functioned as an integrated component without the use of external applications & Adobe Acrobat Reader.
reader combine pdf; combine pdfs online
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
interface; Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader & print driver during conversion; Support
pdf split and merge; add pdf pages together
208 maine bar journal 
| fall 2013
Sustaining and Supporaine State Bar Association. As established by the 
MSBA’s Board of Governors, an individual Sustaining Membership is $75 in addition to a member’s regular membership dues, and an individual Supporting Membership is $50 in 
addition to a member’s regular membership dues. For details, please call MSBA at 1-800-475-7523.
Sustaining and Supporting Members  
of the Maine State Bar Association
周e Hon. Donald G. Alexander
Deborah L. Aronson
Richard M. Balano
Joseph M. Baldacci
Henri A. Benoit, II
Jens-Peter W. Bergen
Andrew J. Bernstein
Michael T. Bigos
Joseph L. Bornstein
Ronald D. Bourque
C. J. Newman Boyd
M. Ray Bradford, Jr.
Craig Bramley
James W. Brannan
Stephen J. Burlock
Tracey Giles Burton
Brian L. Champion
Edward M. Collins
Eric N. Columber
Alicia F. Curtis
周e Hon. Howard H. Dana, Jr.
Roberta L. de Araujo
周e Hon. 周omas E. Delahanty, II
Joel A. Dearborn, Sr.
Brieanna G. Dietrich
Diane Dusini
Matthew F. Dyer
Susan A. Faunce
周e Hon. Joseph H. Field
Robert H. Furbish
John P. Gause
Benjamin R. Gideon
周e Hon. Peter J. Goranites
Stanley F. Greenberg
Carl R. Griffin, III
Kristin A. Gustafson
Walter Hanstein III
Alan M. Harris
Brian C. Hawkins
Naomi Honeth
Philip P. Houle
Anthony Irace
Miriam A. Johnson
Phillip E. Johnson
Daniel G. Kagan
Douglas S. Kaplan
Timothy M. Kenlan
t makes possible some of 
the work of the Association on behalf of the lawyers and residents of our state.
Andrew Ketterer
Robert W. Kline
Daniel S. Knight
Jon A. Languet
Michael J. Levey
Robert A. Levine
Gene R. Libby
周e Hon. Kermit V. Lipez
Paul F. Macri
周e Hon. Francis C. Marsano
周e Hon. John D. McElwee
周e Hon. Andrew M. Mead
Janet E. Michael
David R. Miller
Barry K. Mills
Christopher K. Munoz
Stephen D. Nelson
Charles L. Nickerson
Jodi Nofsinger
Daniel Nuzzi
Timothy J. O’Brien
James E. O’Connell, III
周omas P. Peters, II
Jonathan S. Piper
2012-2013 and 2013-2014 Sustaining Members:
Judy R. Potter
Jane Surran Pyne
William D. Robitzek
John E. Sedgewick
Warren C. Shay
Steven D. Silin
周e Hon. Warren M. Silver
Jack H. Simmons
James Eastman Smith
周e Hon. David J. Soucy
Julian L. Sweet
Sheldon J. Tepler
James E. Tierney
Joel H. Timmins
Talia D. Timmins
John S. Webb
David G. Webbert
Scott Webster
Neal L. Weinstein
Tanna B. Whitman
Gail Kingsley Wolfahrt
Steven Wright
Adam B. Zimmerman
2012-2013 and 2013-2014  Supporting Members:
周omas G. Ainsworth
周e Hon. Donald G. Alexander
Justin W. Askins
Esther R. Barnhart
John R. Bass, II
Randall Bates
John J. Cronan
周e Hon. Kevin M. Cuddy
Stephanie F. Davis
Joel A. Dearborn, Sr.
Brieanna G. Dietrich
周e Hon. Beth Dobson
John P. Doyle, Jr.
Martin I. Eisenstein
Daniel W. Emery
Edward F. Feibel
Jerome J. Gamache
Peter C. Gamache
周e Hon. Peter J. Goranites
Bradley J. Graham
Stanley F. Greenberg
Clarke C. Hambley
James S. Hewes
周e Hon. D. Brock Hornby
Carly S. Joyce
Mary Kellogg
周e Hon. E. Mary Kelly
Christopher P. Leddy
Michael J. Levey
Robert S. Linnell
周e Hon. Kermit V. Lipez
James L. McCarthy
Mary E. McInerny
Frederick C. Moore
周e Hon. M. Michaela Murphy
William Lewis Neilson
Stephen D. Nelson
Charles L. Nickerson
Daniel Nuzzi
周e Hon. Susan E. Oram
James L. Peakes
Paul T. Pierson
Lance Proctor
Jane Surran Pyne
Robert M. Raftice, Jr.
Stephen J. Schwartz
James J. Shirley
Carly R. Smith
Terry N. Snow
Richard D. Solman
David E. Stearns
Sheldon J. Tepler
John A. Turcotte
Michael F. Vaillancourt
Edwinna Vanderzanden
Randall B. Weill
Christopher J. Whalley
Debby L. Willis
Fredda Fisher Wolf
Steven Wright
Joseph C. Zamboni
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
batch pdf merger; merge pdf online
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat. profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and components
pdf mail merge; split pdf into multiple files
fall 2013
|
maine bar journal 209
Classified Ads
Elizabeth Miller and David Body: 
Encouraging Education
When they met, Elizabeth Miller and David Body were at turning 
points in their lives. Miller had decided to pursue a passion: 
teaching. Encouraged by her example, Body began working as a 
substitute teacher.  
Making the financial arrangements that come with joining 
lives, the couple began to think of their legacy. 周ey wanted to 
encourage students to continue their education so they set up a 
scholarship at the Maine Community Foundation. 周eir fund 
will support residents of Portland or South Portland in special 
education or ESL classes who wish to pursue further schooling. 
Miller and Body will make a difference in someone else’s life 
when it truly matters. 
Contact: Jennifer Southard, Director, Philanthropic Services 
jsouthard@mainecf.org    www.mainecf.org    877-700-6800  
Good for you. Good for your clients. Good for Maine.
Give forever.
Wanted—Want to purchase minerals and other 
oil/gas interests.  Send details to:  P. O. Box 13557, 
Denver, CO  80201. 
Wanted—PretiFlaherty is forging new relation-
ships with successful partner-level lawyers who 
want to grow and enhance their practice and client 
base. Opportunities include:
 •       Business/Corporate
 •       Bankruptcy/Workout
 •       Tax
 •       Employment/Labor
 •       Real Estate/Real Estate Development 
For more information, visit www.preti.com or con-
tact Dennis Sbrega at (207)791-3215.
210 maine bar journal 
| fall 2013
fall 2013
|
maine bar journal 211
Interview and photos 
by Daniel J. Murphy
Beyond The Law:  
Heather 
Sanborn
enjamin Franklin, the American statesman, is fa-
mously attributed as stating that “beer is proof that 
God loves us and wants us to be happy.” Heather 
Sanborn, a lawyer and craft brewer, has found her bliss in 
making beer. In 2010, Sanborn opened Rising Tide Brew-
ing Company with her husband, Nathan. Since that time, 
Rising Tide has received rave reviews and a very loyal fol-
lowing. Sanborn spoke with the Maine Bar Journal about 
her interests. 
mbj: Please tell our readers about your interest in brewing beer.
HS: My husband, Nathan, was a home brewer for about 
12 years before we started Rising Tide in 2010. He was 
brewing beer with an increasing level of obsessiveness.  
We were having dinner parties once a week with all our 
friends, who could not drink all of the beer that he was 
making. People were really impressed with the quality 
of his homebrew. He was a stay-at-home dad, and so we 
talked about what he was going to do once our son went 
to kindergarten. He dreamed of opening his own brewery 
and we were able to make it happen. 
mbj: What is the origin of the name for your business, rising tide?
HS: 周e name Rising Tide comes from the concept of 
a rising tide lifting all boats. I believe that it is originally 
something that John F. Kennedy said in a speech. In the 
craft beer industry right now, that’s really what’s going on. 
More craft brewers are out there making great beer, more 
bars and restaurants are putting in additional tap lines, 
more stores are adding additional space to sell craft beer, 
and more people are trying it. 
B
212 maine bar journal 
| fall 2013
mbj: Could you describe the growth of the craft 
brewery movement that is occurring right now?
HS: In the late 1970s, there were 
89 breweries in the country. Now 
there are more than 2,500 breweries, 
with an equal number of breweries 
in planning throughout the country. 
In Maine, we’ve seen the same type 
of explosive growth. 周ere are more 
than 40 breweries in Maine now, with 
probably another 10 to 20 in the works. 
Really what we’re seeing happen is a 
decentralization of beer. People are 
very interested in trying new varieties, 
experimenting, and innovating. It has 
led to a phenomenal explosion in sales 
as well, with double-digit growth for 
craft beer sales over the last four years 
throughout the country, as well as in 
Maine.
mbj: What sets rising tide apart from other beer 
makers?
HS: We built our own brewery–
rather than contracting with another 
brewery to brew our beer–so that we 
could control quality from start to 
finish. Our beers are well balanced 
and informed by traditional beer 
styles, but not beholden to them. As a 
small family-owned company, we also 
emphasize our relationship with other 
small businesses. We get our boxes 
from a local company in Biddeford. We 
buy our glass bottles locally. We source 
much of our grain from Maine farms. 
We work with other small businesses 
in the tasting room too, such as food 
trucks, screen printers, and beer tour 
companies. 周is emphasis on working 
with other small businesses is also part 
of the concept of the rising tide that 
lifts all boats. 
mbj: How did you navigate the transition from 
home brewing to commercial brewing?
HS: It was quite a step. We started on 
a very small scale, as a proof of concept. 
We leased a 1,500-square-foot space off 
Riverside Street in Portland. We built 
basically a gigantic homebrew setup. 
Rather than brewing 5 or 10 gallons at 
a time as you might in your kitchen, 
we started brewing 55 gallons at a time. 
We brewed in fermenters that allowed 
us to do between three to five batches 
at a time over a one- to two-day period. 
Nathan did that for a year and a half. 
We were able to get our beer into a lot 
of the bars and restaurants in Portland, 
as well as into a lot of places where craft 
beer bottles are sold, such as RSVP in 
Portland, Whole Foods, Trader Joe’s 
and many other independent retailers 
throughout the state based on that 
proof of concept. It was an important 
transition for us to the 900-gallon 
batches that we make now. 
mbj: do you remember the first time you saw 
your beer in a retail setting?
HS: I remember the first time that we 
were at a bar and folks were able to try 
our beer, which was almost three years 
ago. It was interesting and humbling 
to have folks who weren’t around our 
dinner table drinking our beer. Now 
that same bar–Novare Res–is one of 
our best customers. It’s been great 
fun to build that relationship over the 
last three years and continue to work 
with such great bars and restaurants 
throughout Maine. 
mbj: What makes a great beer?
HS: A couple of things. I think bal-
ance is really important to good beer. 
A beer should be very drinkable. It 
shouldn’t be a challenge to get it down 
just to prove that you have the chops or 
that you can tolerate hoppy bitterness. 
It should be drinkable, and it should 
pair well with food and enhance the 
experience of eating a great meal.
mbj: right now, how many varieties is rising 
tide brewing?
HS: We brew three year-round va-
rieties and then a seasonal beer in the 
summertime and in the wintertime. 
And we have special release beers that 
we do throughout the course of the 
year as well. So in Maine, where all our 
special release beers are available, we 
might have between four to six beers 
on sale at any given time.
mbj: do you have a current favorite among the 
beers that you brew?
HS: I never like that question. It’s like 
having to choose your favorite child. I 
guess my favorite is whatever is in my 
glass at that time, which is sometimes 
determined by my mood or by the 
weather outside. But I really like all of 
our beers. We wouldn’t brew them if 
we didn’t like them. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested