asp net core 2.0 mvc pdf : C# merge pdf files into one Library software component asp.net winforms .net mvc McGraw.Hill.CSharp.4.0.The.Complete.Reference.Apr.201010-part1166

74
Part I: The C# Language
The assignment operator does have one interesting attribute that you may not be 
familiar with: It allows you to create a chain of assignments. For example, consider this 
fragment:
int x, y, z;
x = y = z = 100; // set x, y, and z to 100
This fragment sets the variables x,y, and z to 100 using a single statement. This works 
because the = is an operator that yields the assigned value. Thus, the value of z = 100 is 100, 
which is then assigned to y, which in turn is assigned to x. Using a “chain of assignment” is 
an easy way to set a group of variables to a common value.
Compound Assignments
C# pr
e:
x = x + 10;
can be written using a compound assignment as
x += 10;
The operator pair += tells the compiler to assign to x the value of x plus 10.
Here is another example. The statement
x = x - 100;
is the same as
x -= 100;
Both statements assign to x the value of x minus 100.
There ar
those that require two operands). The general form of the shorthand is
var-name op = expression;
Thus, the arithmetic and logical assignment operators are
+=
–=
*=
/=
%=
&=
|=
^=
Because the compound assignment statements are shorter than their noncompound 
equivalents, the compound assignment operators are also sometimes called the shorthand
assignment operators.
The compound assignment operators provide two benefits. First, they are more compact 
than their “longhand” equivalents. Second, they can result in more efficient executable code 
(because the left-hand operand is evaluated only once). For these reasons, you will often see 
the compound assignment operators used in professionally written C# programs.
C# merge pdf files into one - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
attach pdf to mail merge in word; pdf mail merge
C# merge pdf files into one - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
add pdf files together online; .net merge pdf files
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 4: Operators 
75
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
The Bitwise Operators
C# provides a set of bitwise operators that expand the types of problems to which C# can be 
applied. The bitwise operators act directly upon the bits of their operands. They are defined 
only for integer operands. They cannot be used on bool,float, or double.
They are called the bitwise operators because they are used to test, set, or shift the bits 
that comprise an integer value. Among other uses, bitwise operations are important to a 
wide variety of systems-level programming tasks, such as analyzing status information 
from a device. Table 4-1 lists the bitwise operators.
The Bitwise AND, OR, XOR, and NOT Operators
The bitwise operators AND, OR, XOR, and NOT are &,|,^, and ~. They perform the same 
operations as their Boolean logic equivalents described earlier. The difference is that the 
operation using 1s and 0s:
p
q
p & q
p | q
p ^ q
~p
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
In terms of its most common usage, you can think of the bitwise AND as a way to turn 
bits off. That is, any bit that is 0 in either operand will cause the corresponding bit in the 
outcome to be set to 0. For example
1 1 0 1  0 0 1 1
&   1 0 1 0  1 0 1 0
--------------------
1 0 0 0  0 0 1 0
Operator
Result
&
Bitwise AND
|
Bitwise OR
^
Bitwise exclusive OR (XOR)
>>
Shift right
<<
Shift left
~
One’s complement (unary NOT)
T
ABLE
4-1 The Bitwise Operators
Online Merge PDF files. Best free online merge PDF tool.
We try to make it as easy as possible to merge your PDF files. RasterEdge C#.NET PDF document merging toolkit (XDoc.PDF) is designed to help .NET
c# merge pdf files into one; attach pdf to mail merge
C# Word - Merge Word Documents in C#.NET
Combine and Merge Multiple Word Files into One Using C#. This part illustrates how to combine three Word files into a new file in C# application.
acrobat combine pdf; c# pdf merge
76
Part I: The C# Language
The following program demonstrates the & by using it to convert odd numbers into 
even numbers. It does this by turning off bit zero. For example, the low-order byte of the 
number 9 in binary is 0000 1001. When bit zero is turned off, this number becomes 8, 
or 0000 1000 in binary.
// Use bitwise AND to make a number even.
using System;
class MakeEven {
static void Main() {
ushort num;
ushort i;
for(i = 1; i <= 10; i++) {
num = i;
Console.WriteLine("num: " + num);
num = (ushort) (num & 0xFFFE);
Console.WriteLine("num after turning off bit zero: "
+  num + "\n");
}
}
}
The output from this program is shown here:
num: 1
num after turning off bit zero: 0
num: 2
num after turning off bit zero: 2
num: 3
num after turning off bit zero: 2
num: 4
num after turning off bit zero: 4
num: 5
num after turning off bit zero: 4
num: 6
num after turning off bit zero: 6
num: 7
num after turning off bit zero: 6
num: 8
num after turning off bit zero: 8
num: 9
num after turning off bit zero: 8
C# PowerPoint - Merge PowerPoint Documents in C#.NET
Combine and Merge Multiple PowerPoint Files into One Using C#. This part illustrates how to combine three PowerPoint files into a new file in C# application.
add pdf pages together; acrobat reader merge pdf files
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Example: Convert More than Two Type Images to PDF in C#.NET Application. This example shows how to build a PDF document with three image files (BMP, JPEG
add pdf files together; best pdf merger
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 4: Operators 
77
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
num: 10
num after turning off bit zero: 10
The value 0xFFFE used in the AND statement is the hexadecimal representation of 
1111 1111 1111 1110. Therefore, the AND operation leaves all bits in num unchanged except 
for bit zero, which is set to zero. Thus, even numbers are unchanged, but odd numbers are 
made even by reducing their value by 1.
The f. 
For example, this program determines if a number is odd:
//  Use bitwise AND to determine if a number is odd.
using System;
class IsOdd {
static void Main() {
ushort num;
num = 10;
if((num & 1) == 1)
Console.WriteLine("This won't display.");
num = 11;
if((num & 1) == 1)
Console.WriteLine(num + " is odd.");
}
}
The output is shown here:
11 is odd.
In the if statements, the value of num is ANDed with 1. If bit zero in num is set, the result 
ofnum & 1 is 1; otherwise, the result is zero. Therefore, the if statement can succeed only 
when the number is odd.
You can use the bit-testing capability of the bitwise & to create a program that uses the 
bitwise& to show the bits of a byte value in binary format. Here is one approach:
// Display the bits within a byte.
using System;
class ShowBits {
static void Main() {
int t;
byte val;
val = 123;
for(t=128; t > 0; t = t/2) {
if((val & t) != 0) Console.Write("1 ");
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
C# PDF Page Processing: Merge PDF Files - C#.NET PDF document merger APIs for combining two different PDF documents into one large PDF file.
batch merge pdf; break pdf file into multiple files
C# Create PDF from CSV to convert csv files to PDF in C#.net, ASP.
document, it's unnecessary to convert CSV files to .xls This C# sample code illustrates how to convert CSV to Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF and save it into
append pdf files reader; pdf combine two pages into one
78
Part I: The C# Language
if((val & t) == 0) Console.Write("0 ");
}
}
}
The output is shown here:
0 1 1 1 1 0 1 1
Thefor loop successively tests each bit in val, using the bitwise AND, to determine if it is on 
or off. If the bit is on, the digit 1 is displayed; otherwise, 0 is displayed.
The bitwise OR can be used to turn bits on. Any bit that is set to 1 in either operand will 
cause the corresponding bit in the variable to be set to 1. For example
1 1 0 1  0 0 1 1
|    1 0 1 0  1 0 1 0
--------------------
1 1 1 1  1 0 1 1
You can make use of the OR to change the make-even program shown earlier into a 
make-odd program, as shown here:
//  Use bitwise OR to make a number odd.
using System;
class MakeOdd {
static void Main() {
ushort num;
ushort i;
for(i = 1; i <= 10; i++) {
num = i;
Console.WriteLine("num: " + num);
num = (ushort) (num | 1);
Console.WriteLine("num after turning on bit zero: "
+  num + "\n");
}
}
}
The output from this program is shown here:
num: 1
num after turning on bit zero: 1
num: 2
num after turning on bit zero: 3
num: 3
num after turning on bit zero: 3
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
C#. VB.NET. Home > .NET Imaging SDK > C# > Merge and Split C# PDF Merging & Splitting Application. This C#.NET PDF to one PDF file and split source PDF file into
reader combine pdf pages; pdf merge files
VB.NET TWAIN: Scanning Multiple Pages into PDF & TIFF File Using
most cases, those scanned individual image files need to New PDFDocument(imgSouce) doc1.Save("outputPDF.pdf") End Sub Written in managed C# code, this VB.NET
c# merge pdf; reader create pdf multiple files
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 4: Operators 
79
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
num: 4
num after turning on bit zero: 5
num: 5
num after turning on bit zero: 5
num: 6
num after turning on bit zero: 7
num: 7
num after turning on bit zero: 7
num: 8
num after turning on bit zero: 9
num: 9
num after turning on bit zero: 9
num: 10
num after turning on bit zero: 11
The pr
produces a value in binary in which only bit zero is set. When this value is ORed with any 
other value, it produces a result in which the low-order bit is set and all other bits remain 
unchanged. Thus, a value that is even will be increased by 1, becoming odd.
An exclusive OR, usually abbreviated XOR, will set a bit on if, and only if, the bits being 
compared are different, as illustrated here:
 1  1  1  1  1  1  1
^    1  0  1  1  1  0  0  1
-------------------------
 1  0  0  0  1  1  0
The XOR operator has an interesting property that is useful in a variety of situations. 
When some value X is XORed with another value Y, and then that result is XORed with Y 
again, X is produced. That is, given the sequence
R1 = X ^ Y;
R2 = R1 ^ Y;
value produces the original value. This feature of the XOR can be put into action to create 
message by XORing the characters in that message. To encode, the XOR operation is applied 
the first time, yielding the ciphertext. To decode, the XOR is applied a second time, yielding 
eak. 
It does, however, provide an interesting way to demonstrate the effects of the XOR, as the 
following program shows:
// Demonstrate the XOR.
using System;
80
Part I: The C# Language
class Encode {
static void Main() {
char ch1 = 'H';
char ch2 = 'i';
char ch3 = '!';
int key = 88;
Console.WriteLine("Original message: " + ch1 + ch2 + ch3);
// Encode the message.
ch1 = (char) (ch1 ^ key);
ch2 = (char) (ch2 ^ key);
ch3 = (char) (ch3 ^ key);
Console.WriteLine("Encoded message: " + ch1 + ch2 + ch3);
// Decode the message.
ch1 = (char) (ch1 ^ key);
ch2 = (char) (ch2 ^ key);
ch3 = (char) (ch3 ^ key);
Console.WriteLine("Decoded message: " + ch1 + ch2 + ch3);
}
}
Here is the output:
Original message: Hi!
Encoded message: ❑1y
Decoded message: Hi!
As you can see, the result of two XORs using the same key produces the decoded message. 
(Remember, this simple XOR cipher is not suitable for any real-world, practical use because 
it is inherently insecure.)
The unary one’s complement (NOT) operator reverses the state of all the bits of the 
operand. For example, if some integer called A has the bit pattern 1001 0110, then ~A
produces a result with the bit pattern 0110 1001.
The following program demonstrates the NOT operator by displaying a number and its 
complement in binary:
// Demonstrate the bitwise NOT.
using System;
class NotDemo {
static void Main() {
sbyte b = -34;
for(int t=128; t > 0; t = t/2) {
if((b & t) != 0) Console.Write("1 ");
if((b & t) == 0) Console.Write("0 ");
}
Console.WriteLine();
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 4: Operators 
81
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
// reverse all bits
b = (sbyte) ~b;
for(int t=128; t > 0; t = t/2) {
if((b & t) != 0) Console.Write("1 ");
if((b & t) == 0) Console.Write("0 ");
}
}
}
Here is the output:
1 1 0 1 1 1 1 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1
The Shift Operators
a specified amount. C# defines the two bit-shift operators shown here:
<<
Left shift
>>
Right shift
The general forms for these operators are shown here:
value << num-bits
value >> num-bits
Here, value is the value being shifted by the number of bit positions specified by num-bits.
A
zero bit to be brought in on the right. A right shift causes all bits to be shifted right one 
position. In the case of a right shift on an unsigned value, a 0 is brought in on the left. 
In the case of a right shift on a signed value, the sign bit is preserved. Recall that negative 
numbers are represented by setting the high-order bit of an integer value to 1. Thus, if 
is positive, each right shift brings in a 0 on the left.
For both left and right shifts, the bits shifted out are lost. Thus, a shift is not a rotate and 
there is no way to retrieve a bit that has been shifted out.
Here is a program that graphically illustrates the effect of a left and right shift. Here, an 
integer is given an initial value of 1, which means that its low-order bit is set. Then, eight 
shifts are performed on the integer. After each shift, the lower eight bits of the value are 
shown. The process is then repeated, except that a 1 is put in the eighth bit position, and 
right shifts are performed.
// Demonstrate the shift << and >> operators.
using System;
class ShiftDemo {
static void Main() {
int val = 1;
82
Part I: The C# Language
for(int i = 0; i < 8; i++) {
for(int t=128; t > 0; t = t/2) {
if((val & t) != 0) Console.Write("1 ");
if((val & t) == 0) Console.Write("0 ");
}
Console.WriteLine();
val = val << 1; // left shift
}
Console.WriteLine();
val = 128;
for(int i = 0; i < 8; i++) {
for(int t=128; t > 0; t = t/2) {
if((val & t) != 0) Console.Write("1 ");
if((val & t) == 0) Console.Write("0 ");
}
Console.WriteLine();
val = val >> 1; // right shift
}
}
}
The output from the program is shown here:
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
or divide an integer by 2. A shift left doubles a value. A shift right halves it. Of course, this 
works only as long as you are not shifting bits off one end or the other. Here is an example:
// Use the shift operators to multiply and divide by 2.
using System;
class MultDiv {
static void Main() {
int n;
n = 10;
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 4: Operators 
83
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
Console.WriteLine("Value of n: " + n);
// Multiply by 2.
n = n << 1;
Console.WriteLine("Value of n after n = n * 2: " + n);
// Multiply by 4.
n = n << 2;
Console.WriteLine("Value of n after n = n * 4: " + n);
// Divide by 2.
n = n >> 1;
Console.WriteLine("Value of n after n = n / 2: " + n);
// Divide by 4.
n = n >> 2;
Console.WriteLine("Value of n after n = n / 4: " + n);
Console.WriteLine();
// Reset n.
n = 10;
Console.WriteLine("Value of n: " + n);
// Multiply by 2, 30 times.
n = n << 30; // data is lost
}
}
The output is shown here:
Value of n: 10
Value of n after n = n * 2: 20
Value of n after n = n * 4: 80
Value of n after n = n / 2: 40
Value of n after n = n / 4: 10
Value of n: 10
Value of n after left-shifting 30 places: -2147483648
is lost because bits are shifted out of the range of an int. In this case, the garbage value 
produced is negative because a 1 bit is shifted into the high-order bit, which is used as a 
sign bit, causing the number to be interpreted as negative. This illustrates why you must be 
car
an explanation of signed vs. unsigned data types.)
Bitwise Compound Assignments
following two statements both assign to x the outcome of an XOR of x with the value 127:
x = x ^ 127;
x ^= 127;
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested