xx
C# 4.0: The Complete Reference
Using StringComparer  881
Accessing a Collection via an Enumerator  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  882
Using an Enumerator  883
Using IDictionaryEnumerator  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  884
Implementing IEnumerable and IEnumerator  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  885
Using Iterators 
887
Stopping an Iterator  889
Using Multiple yield Directives  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  890
Creating a Named Iterator  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  890
Creating a Generic Iterator  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  892
Collection Initializers  893
26 Networking Through the Internet Using System.Net  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  895
The System.Net Members  895
Uniform Resource Identifi ers  897
Internet Access Fundamentals 898
WebRequest  899
WebResponse 900
HttpWebRequest and HttpWebResponse  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  901
A Simple First Example  901
Handling Network Errors  904
Exceptions Generated by Create( )  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  904
Exceptions Generated by GetReponse( )  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  905
Exceptions Generated by GetResponseStream( )  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  905
Using Exception Handling  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  905
The URI Class 907
Accessing Additional HTTP Response Information  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  908
Accessing the Header 
908
Accessing Cookies 910
Using the LastModifi ed Property  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  912
MiniCrawler: A Case Study 
913
Using WebClient  916
A Documentation Comment Quick Reference  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  921
The XML Comment Tags  921
Compiling Documentation Comments  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  922
An XML Documentation Example  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  923
Index 
925
Pdf merger online - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
add pdf files together online; add two pdf files together
Pdf merger online - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
best pdf merger; c# merge pdf files
Special Thanks
S
pecial thanks go to Michael Howard for his excellent technical edit of this book. His 
insights, suggestions, and advice were of great value.
xxi
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
SDK > C# > Merge and Split Document(s). "This online guide content ". C# PDF Merging & Splitting Application. This C#.NET PDF document merger & splitter
pdf combine files online; c# merge pdf files into one
C# Word: .NET Merger & Splitter Control to Merge & Split MS Word
From this online article, you will know C#.NET MS Word document merging and RasterEdge C#.NET MS Word (DOCX) document merger & splitter control add-on. C#
pdf merger; combine pdf online
This page intentionally left blank 
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Merger SDK to Combine TIFF Files
This online guide content is A 2: Yes, this VB.NET TIFF merger SDK allows developers to to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add pdf files together reader; pdf mail merge plug in
VB.NET Word: Merge Multiple Word Files & Split Word Document
Word processing and editing controls, this VB.NET Word merger and splitter are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
c# merge pdf; attach pdf to mail merge
Preface
W
e programmers are a demanding bunch, always looking for ways to improve the 
performance, efficiency, and portability of our programs. We also demand much 
from the tools we use, especially when it comes to programming languages. 
There are many programming languages, but only a few are great. A great programming 
. It must facilitate 
the creation of correct code while not getting in our way. It must support state-of-the-art 
features, but not trendy dead ends. Finally, a great programming language must have one 
mor
Created by Microsoft to support its .NET Framework, C# builds on a rich programming 
heritage. Its chief architect was long-time programming guru Anders Hejlsberg. C# is 
directly descended from two of the world’s most successful computer languages: C and 
C++. From C, it derives its syntax, many of its keywords, and most of its operators. It builds 
upon and improves the object model defined by C++. C# is also closely related to another 
very successful language: Java.
Sharing a common ancestry, but differing in many important ways, C# and Java are 
more like cousins. Both support distributed programming and both use intermediate code 
to achieve safety and portability, but the details differ. They both also provide a significant 
amount of runtime error checking, security, and managed execution, but again, the details 
differ. However, unlike Java, C# also gives you access to pointers—a feature supported by 
e, 
the trade-offs between power and safety are carefully balanced and are nearly transparent.
Throughout the history of computing, programming languages have evolved to 
accommodate changes in the computing environment, advances in computer language 
theory, and new ways of thinking about and approaching the job of programming. C# is 
no exception. In the ongoing process of refinement, adaptation, and innovation, C# has 
demonstrated its ability to respond rapidly to the changing needs of the programmer. This 
fact is testified to by the many new features added to C# since its initial 1.0 release in 2000. 
Consider the following.
The first major revision of C# was version 2.0. It added several features that made it easier 
for programmers to write more resilient, reliable, and nimble code. Without question, the 
most important 2.0 addition was generics. Through the use of generics, it became possible to 
create type-safe, r
the power and scope of the language.
The second major revision was version 3.0. It is not an exaggeration to say that 3.0 
added features that redefined the very core of C#, raising the bar in computer language 
development in the process. Of its many innovative features, two stand out: LINQ and 
lambda expressions. LINQ, which stands for Language Integrated Query, enables you to 
cressions 
implement a functional-style syntax that uses the => lambda operator, and lambda expressions 
are frequently used in LINQ expressions.
xxiii
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
C# PDF Page Processing: Sort PDF Pages - online C#.NET tutorial page for C# PDF Page Processing: Merge PDF Files - C#.NET PDF document merger APIs for
.net merge pdf files; batch combine pdf
C# PowerPoint: C# Codes to Combine & Split PowerPoint Documents
SDK is some like PowerPoint file merger in its PowerPoint files with the aid of online C# sample code powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
combine pdf; pdf merge documents
xxiv
C# 4.0: The Complete Reference
The third major r
upon the previous releases by providing a number of new features that streamline common 
programming tasks. For example, it adds named and optional arguments. These make some 
types of method calls more convenient. It adds the dynamic keyword, which facilitates the 
use of C# in situations in which a data type is obtained at runtime, such as when interfacing to 
COM or when using reflection. The covariance and contravariance features already supported 
by C# have been expanded for use with type parameters. Through enhancements to the .NET 
Framework (which is C#’s library), support for parallel programming is provided by the Task 
eate 
code that automatically scales to better utilize multicore computers. Thus, with the release of 
4.0, C# is ready to take advantage of high-performance computing platforms.
ogramming 
landscape, C# has remained a vibrant and innovative language. As a result, it defines one 
of the most powerful, feature-rich languages in modern computing. It is also a language 
that no programmer can afford to ignore. This book is designed to help you master it.
What’s Inside
This book describes C# 4.0. It is divided into two parts. Part I provides a comprehensive 
discussion of the C# language, including the new features added by version 4.0. This is the 
largest part in the book, and it describes the keywords, syntax, and features that define the 
language. I/O, file handling, reflection, and the preprocessor are also discussed in Part I.
Part II explores the C# class library, which is the .NET Framework class library. This 
e .NET 
Framework class library in one book. Instead, Part II focuses on the core library, which is 
contained in the System namespace. Also covered are collections, multithreading, the Task 
Parallel Library and PLINQ, and networking. These are the parts of the library that nearly 
every C# programmer will use.
A Book for All Programmers
This book does not require any previous programming experience. If you already know 
with those languages. If you don’t have any previous programming experience, you will 
still be able learn C# from this book, but you will need to work carefully through the 
examples in each chapter.
Required Software
To compile and run C# 4.0 programs, you must use Visual Studio 2010 or later.
Don’t Forget: Code on the Web
Remember, the source code for all of the programs in this book is available free-of-charge on 
the Web at www.mhprofessional.com.
VB.NET TIFF: Merge and Split TIFF Documents with RasterEdge .NET
Besides TIFF document merger and splitter, RasterEdge still In our online VB.NET tutorial, users can powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
acrobat combine pdf; pdf merge comments
VB.NET PowerPoint: Merge and Split PowerPoint Document(s) with PPT
here is what you are looking for - RasterEdge VB.NET PPT Document Merger and Splitter Note: If you want to see more PDF processing functions in VB.NET, please
combine pdfs online; add pdf together one file
For Further Study
C# 4.0: The Complete Reference is your gateway to the Herb Schildt series of programming 
books. Here are some others that you will find of interest.
To learn about Java programming, we recommend the following:
Java: The Complete Reference
Java: A Beginner’s Guide
Swing: A Beginner’s Guide
The Art of Java
Herb Schildt’s Java Programming Cookbook
To learn about C++, you will find these books especially helpful:
C++: The Complete Reference
C++: A Beginner’s Guide
C++ From the Ground Up
STL Programming From the Ground Up
The Art of C++
Herb Schildt’s C++ Programming Cookbook
If you want to learn more about the C language, the foundation of all modern 
programming, the following title will be of interest:
C: The Complete Reference
When you need solid answers, fast, turn to Herbert Schildt, 
the recognized authority on programming.
Preface
xxv
This page intentionally left blank 
I
The C# Language
P
art 1 discusses the elements of the C# language, including its 
keywords, syntax, and operators. Also described are several 
foundational C# techniques, such as using I/O and reflection, 
which are tightly linked with the C# language.
CHAPTER 1 The Creation of C#
CHAPTER 2 An Overview of C#
CHAPTER 3 Data Types, Literals, 
and Variables
CHAPTER 4 Operators
CHAPTER 5 Program Control 
Statements
CHAPTER 6 Introducing Classes 
and Objects
CHAPTER 7 Arrays and Strings
CHAPTER 8 A Closer Look at 
Methods and Classes
CHAPTER 9 Operator
Overloading
CHAPTER 10 Indexers and 
Properties
CHAPTER 11 Inheritance
CHAPTER 12 Interfaces,
Structures, and Enumerations
CHAPTER 13 Exception Handling
CHAPTER 14 Using I/O
CHAPTER 15 Delegates, Events, 
and Lambda Expressions
CHAPTER 16 Namespaces, the 
Preprocessor, and Assemblies
CHAPTER 17 Runtime Type ID, 
Refl ection, and Attributes
CHAPTER 18 Generics
CHAPTER 19 LINQ
CHAPTER 20 Unsafe Code, 
Pointers, Nullable Types, 
Dynamic Types, and 
Miscellaneous Topics
PART
This page intentionally left blank 
1
The Creation of C#
C
# is Microsoft’s premier language for .NET development. It leverages time-tested 
features with cutting-edge innovations and provides a highly usable, efficient way 
to write programs for the modern enterprise computing environment. It is, by any 
measure, one of the most important languages of the twenty-first century.
ces 
that drove its creation, its design philosophy, and how it was influenced by other computer 
languages. This chapter also explains how C# relates to the .NET Framework. As you will 
see, C# and the .NET Framework work together to create a highly refined programming 
environment.
C#’s Family Tree
Computer languages do not exist in a void. Rather, they relate to one another, with each 
e. In a process 
akin to cross-pollination, features from one language are adapted by another, a new 
innovation is integrated into an existing context, or an older construct is removed. In 
this way, languages evolve and the art of programming advances. C# is no exception.
C# inherits a rich programming legacy. It is directly descended from two of the world’s 
most successful computer languages: C and C++. It is closely related to another: Java. 
Understanding the nature of these relationships is crucial to understanding C#. Thus, we 
ee languages.
C: The Beginning of the Modern Age of Programming
The creation of C marks the beginning of the modern age of programming. C was invented 
by Dennis Ritchie in the 1970s on a DEC PDP-11 that used the UNIX operating system. 
was C that established the paradigm that still charts the course of programming today.
C grew out of the structuredprogramming revolution of the 1960s. Prior to structured 
programming, large programs were difficult to write because the program logic tended 
returns that is difficult to follow. Structured languages addressed this problem by adding 
well-defined control statements, subroutines with local variables, and other improvements. 
Through the use of structured techniques programs became better organized, more reliable, 
and easier to manage.
3
CHAPTER
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested