asp net core 2.0 mvc pdf : Add pdf pages together software SDK cloud windows winforms asp.net class McGraw.Hill.CSharp.4.0.The.Complete.Reference.Apr.201027-part1184

244
Part I: The C# Language
Here is a program that illustrates this conversion operator:
// An example that uses an implicit conversion operator.
using System;
// A three-dimensional coordinate class.
class ThreeD {
int x, y, z; // 3-D coordinates
public ThreeD() { x = y = z = 0; }
public ThreeD(int i, int j, int k) { x = i; y = j; z = k; }
// Overload binary +.
public static ThreeD operator +(ThreeD op1, ThreeD op2)
{
ThreeD result = new ThreeD();
result.x = op1.x + op2.x;
result.y = op1.y + op2.y;
result.z = op1.z + op2.z;
return result;
}
// An implicit conversion from ThreeD to int.
public static implicit operator int(ThreeD op1)
{
return op1.x * op1.y * op1.z;
}
// Show X, Y, Z coordinates.
public void Show()
{
Console.WriteLine(x + ", " + y + ", " + z);
}
}
class ThreeDDemo {
static void Main() {
ThreeD a = new ThreeD(1, 2, 3);
ThreeD b = new ThreeD(10, 10, 10);
ThreeD c = new ThreeD();
int i;
Console.Write("Here is a: ");
a.Show();
Console.WriteLine();
Console.Write("Here is b: ");
b.Show();
Console.WriteLine();
c = a + b; // add a and b together
Console.Write("Result of a + b: ");
c.Show();
Add pdf pages together - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
merge pdf files; adding pdf pages together
Add pdf pages together - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
reader merge pdf; pdf merge comments
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 9: Operator Overloading 
245
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
Console.WriteLine();
i = a; // convert to int
Console.WriteLine("Result of i = a: " + i);
Console.WriteLine();
i = a * 2 - b; // convert to int
Console.WriteLine("result of a * 2 - b: " + i);
}
}
This program displays the output:
Here is a: 1, 2, 3
Here is b: 10, 10, 10
Result of a + b: 11, 12, 13
Result of i = a: 6
result of a * 2 - b: -988
As the program illustrates, when a ThreeD object is used in an integer expression, such as 
i = aeturns the 
value 6, which is the product of coordinates stored in a. However, when an expression does 
not require a conversion to int, the conversion operator is not called. This is why c = a + b
does not invoke operator int( ).
Remember that you can create different conversion operators to meet different needs. You 
could define a second conversion operator that converts ThreeD to double, for example. 
Each conversion is applied automatically and independently.
equired 
in an expr
explicit cast to the target type is used. Alternatively, you can create an explicit conversion 
operator, which is invoked only when an explicit cast is used. An explicit conversion operator 
is not invoked automatically. For example, here is the previous program reworked to use an 
explicit conversion to int:
// Use an explicit conversion.
using System;
// A three-dimensional coordinate class.
class ThreeD {
int x, y, z; // 3-D coordinates
public ThreeD() { x = y = z = 0; }
public ThreeD(int i, int j, int k) { x = i; y = j; z = k; }
// Overload binary +.
public static ThreeD operator +(ThreeD op1, ThreeD op2)
{
ThreeD result = new ThreeD();
C# Word - Merge Word Documents in C#.NET
and appended together according to its loading sequence, and then saved and output as a single Word with user-defined location. C# DLLs: Merge Word File. Add
add pdf together one file; attach pdf to mail merge
C# PowerPoint - Merge PowerPoint Documents in C#.NET
together according to its loading sequence, and then saved and output as a single PowerPoint with user-defined location. C# DLLs: Merge PowerPoint Files. Add
batch merge pdf; c# merge pdf files into one
246
Part I: The C# Language
result.x = op1.x + op2.x;
result.y = op1.y + op2.y;
result.z = op1.z + op2.z;
return result;
}
// This is now explicit.
public static explicit operator int(ThreeD op1)
{
return op1.x * op1.y * op1.z;
}
// Show X, Y, Z coordinates.
public void Show()
{
Console.WriteLine(x + ", " + y + ", " + z);
}
}
class ThreeDDemo {
static void Main() {
ThreeD a = new ThreeD(1, 2, 3);
ThreeD b = new ThreeD(10, 10, 10);
ThreeD c = new ThreeD();
int i;
Console.Write("Here is a: ");
a.Show();
Console.WriteLine();
Console.Write("Here is b: ");
b.Show();
Console.WriteLine();
c = a + b; // add a and b together
Console.Write("Result of a + b: ");
c.Show();
Console.WriteLine();
i = (int) a; // explicitly convert to int -- cast required
Console.WriteLine("Result of i = a: " + i);
Console.WriteLine();
i = (int)a * 2 - (int)b; // casts required
Console.WriteLine("result of a * 2 - b: " + i);
}
}
int must be 
explicitly cast. For example, in this line:
i = (int) a; // explicitly convert to int -- cast required
if you remove the cast, the program will not compile.
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
some other PDF tools convert PDF to text by a method loses the original PDF document layout and all the paragraphs are joining together, our C# PDF to text
c# pdf merge; batch combine pdf
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
online tutorial on how to add & insert and extracting single or multiple Word pages at one provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
.net merge pdf files; attach pdf to mail merge in word
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 9: Operator Overloading 
247
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
There are a few restrictions to conversion operators:
• Either the target type or the source type of the conversion must be the class in which 
the conversion is declared. You cannot, for example, redefine the conversion from 
double to int.
• You cannot define a conversion to or from object.
• Yce 
and target types.
• You cannot define a conversion from a base class to a derived class. (See Chapter 11 
for a discussion of base and derived classes.)
• You cannot define a conversion from or to an interface. (See Chapter 12 for a 
discussion of interfaces.)
In addition to these rules, there are suggestions that you should normally follow when 
choosing between implicit and explicit conversion operators. Although convenient, implicit 
ently error-
free. To ensure this, implicit conversions should be created only when these two conditions 
are met: First, that no loss of information, such as truncation, overflow, or loss of sign, 
occurs, or that such loss of information is acceptable based on the circumstances. Second, 
requirements, then you should use an explicit conversion.
Operator Overloading Tips and Restrictions
not bear any relationship to that operator’s default usage, as applied to C#’s built-in types. 
However, for the purposes of the structure and readability of your code, an overloaded 
operator should reflect, when possible, the spirit of the operator’s original use. For example, 
the+ relative to ThreeD is conceptually similar to the + relative to integer types. There would 
be little benefit in defining the + operator relative to some class in such a way that it acts 
more the way you would expect the / operator to perform, for instance. The central concept 
when its new meaning is related to its original meaning.
There are some restrictions to overloading operators. You cannot alter the precedence of 
any operator. You cannot alter the number of operands required by the operator, although 
youroperator method could choose to ignore an operand. There are several operators that 
you cannot overload. Perhaps most significantly, you cannot overload any assignment 
operator, including the compound assignments, such as +=. Here are the other operators 
e discussed later in 
this book.)
&&
( )
.
?
??
[ ]
||
=
=>
–>
as
checked
default
is
new
sizeof
typeof
unchecked
VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.
If the source PDF document is with multiple pages, it may be Our VB.NET PDF Document Add-On enables you to search for text in target PDF document by using
acrobat merge pdf files; pdf combine files online
C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
APIs to process Tiff file and its pages, like merge files to Tiff, like Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF, and images. Enable to add XImage.OCR for .NET into C# Tiff
append pdf; batch pdf merger
248
Part I: The C# Language
Although you cannot overload the cast operator ( ) explicitly, you can create conversion 
operators, as shown earlier, that perform this function.
It may seem like a serious restriction that operators such as += can’t be overloaded, but 
it isn’t. In general, if you have defined an operator, then if that operator is used in a compound 
assignment, your overloaded operator method is invoked. Thus, += automatically uses your 
version of operator+( ). For example, assuming the ThreeD class, if you use a sequence 
like this:
ThreeD a = new ThreeD(1, 2, 3);
ThreeD b = new ThreeD(10, 10, 10);
b += a; // add a and b together
ThreeD’soperator+( ) is automatically invoked, and b will contain the coordinate 11, 12, 13.
One last point: Although you cannot overload the [ ] array indexing operator using an 
operator method, you can create indexers, which are described in the next chapter.
Another Example of Operator Overloading
Throughout this chapter we have been using the ThreeD class to demonstrate operator 
overloading, and in this regard it has served us well. Before concluding this chapter, 
however, it is useful to work through another example. Although the general principles 
of operator overloading are the same no matter what class is used, the following example 
helps show the power of operator overloading—especially where type extensibility is 
concerned.
This example develops a four-bit integer type and defines several operations for it. As 
you might know, in the early days of computing, the four-bit quantity was common because 
it represented half a byte. It is also large enough to hold one hexadecimal digit. Since four 
bits are half a byte, a four-bit quantity is sometimes referred to as a nybble. In the days of 
front-panel machines in which programmers entered code one nybble at a time, thinking in 
terms of nybbles was an everyday affair! Although not as common now, a four-bit type still 
makes an interesting addition to the other C# integers. Traditionally, a nybble is an unsigned 
value.
The following example uses the Nybble class to implement a nybble data type. It uses 
anint for its underlying storage, but it restricts the values that can be held to 0 through 15. 
It defines the following operators:
• Addition of a Nybble to a Nybble
• Addition of an int to a Nybble
• Addition of a Nybble to an int
• Greater than and less than
• The increment operator
• Conversion to Nybble from int
• Conversion to int from Nybble
These operations are sufficient to show how a class type can be fully integrated into the C# 
type system. However, for complete Nybble implementation, you will need to define all of 
the other operators. You might want to try adding these on your own.
C# Image: How to Draw Text on Images within Rasteredge .NET Image
txt" to the new project folder, together with .NET short but useful C# code example to add text and powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
batch pdf merger online; pdf split and merge
C# Excel - Merge Excel Documents in C#.NET
and appended together according to its loading sequence, and then saved and output as a single Excel with user-defined location. C# DLLs: Merge Excel Files. Add
pdf combine pages; best pdf merger
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 9: Operator Overloading 
249
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
The complete Nybble class is shown here along with a NybbleDemo, which 
demonstrates its use:
// Create a 4-bit type called Nybble.
using System;
// A 4-bit type.
class Nybble {
int val; // underlying storage
public Nybble() { val = 0; }
public Nybble(int i) {
val = i;
val = val & 0xF; // retain lower 4 bits
}
// Overload binary + for Nybble + Nybble.
public static Nybble operator +(Nybble op1, Nybble op2)
{
Nybble result = new Nybble();
result.val = op1.val + op2.val;
result.val = result.val & 0xF; // retain lower 4 bits
return result;
}
// Overload binary + for Nybble + int.
public static Nybble operator +(Nybble op1, int op2)
{
Nybble result = new Nybble();
result.val = op1.val + op2;
result.val = result.val & 0xF; // retain lower 4 bits
return result;
}
// Overload binary + for int + Nybble.
public static Nybble operator +(int op1, Nybble op2)
{
Nybble result = new Nybble();
result.val = op1 + op2.val;
result.val = result.val & 0xF; // retain lower 4 bits
return result;
}
// Overload ++.
250
Part I: The C# Language
public static Nybble operator ++(Nybble op)
{
Nybble result = new Nybble();
result.val = op.val + 1;
result.val = result.val & 0xF; // retain lower 4 bits
return result;
}
// Overload >.
public static bool operator >(Nybble op1, Nybble op2)
{
if(op1.val > op2.val) return true;
else return false;
}
// Overload <.
public static bool operator <(Nybble op1, Nybble op2)
{
if(op1.val < op2.val) return true;
else return false;
}
// Convert a Nybble into an int.
public static implicit operator int (Nybble op)
{
return op.val;
}
// Convert an int into a Nybble.
public static implicit operator Nybble (int op)
{
return new Nybble(op);
}
}
class NybbleDemo {
static void Main() {
Nybble a = new Nybble(1);
Nybble b = new Nybble(10);
Nybble c = new Nybble();
int t;
Console.WriteLine("a: " + (int) a);
Console.WriteLine("b: " + (int) b);
// Use a Nybble in an if statement.
if(a < b) Console.WriteLine("a is less than b\n");
// Add two Nybbles together.
c = a + b;
Console.WriteLine("c after c = a + b: " + (int) c);
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 9: Operator Overloading 
251
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
// Add an int to a Nybble.
a += 5;
Console.WriteLine("a after a += 5: " + (int) a);
Console.WriteLine();
// Use a Nybble in an int expression.
t = a * 2 + 3;
Console.WriteLine("Result of a * 2 + 3: " + t);
Console.WriteLine();
// Illustrate int assignment and overflow.
a = 19;
Console.WriteLine("Result of a = 19: " + (int) a);
Console.WriteLine();
// Use a Nybble to control a loop.
Console.WriteLine("Control a for loop with a Nybble.");
for(a = 0; a < 10; a++)
Console.Write((int) a + " ");
Console.WriteLine();
}
}
The output from the program is shown here:
a: 1
b: 10
a is less than b
c after c = a + b: 11
a after a += 5: 6
Result of a * 2 + 3: 15
Result of a = 19: 3
Control a for loop with a Nybble.
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Although most of the operation of Nybble should be easy to understand, there is one 
important point to make: The conversion operators play a large role in the integration of 
Nybble into the C# type system. Because conversions are defined from Nybble to int and 
from int to Nybble, a Nybble object can be freely mixed in arithmetic expressions. For 
example, consider this expression from the program:
t = a * 2 + 3;
Here, t is an int, as are 2 and 3, but a is a Nybble. These two types are compatible in the 
expression because of the implicit conversion of Nybble to int. In this case, since the rest 
of the expression is of type int,a is converted to int by its conversion method.
252
Part I: The C# Language
The conversion from int to Nybble allows a Nybble object to be assigned an int value. 
For example, in the program, the statement
a = 19;
works like this. The conversion operator from int to Nybble is executed. This causes a new 
Nybble object to be created that contains the low-order 4 bits of the value 19, which is 3 
because 19 overflows the range of a Nybble. (In this example, such overflow is acceptable.) 
This object is then assigned to a. Without the conversion operators, such expressions would 
not be allowed.
The conversion of Nybble to int is also used by the for loop. Without this conversion, it 
would not be possible to write the for loop in such a straightforward way.
N
OTE
N
OTE
As an exercise, you might want to try creating a version of Nybble that prevents overflow 
Chapter 13 for a discussion of exceptions.
10
Indexers and Properties
T
elationship 
to each other: indexers and properties. Each expands the power of a class by 
enhancing its integration into C#’s type system and improving its resiliency. Indexers 
provide the mechanism by which an object can be indexed like an array. Properties offer a 
streamlined way to manage access to a class’ instance data. They relate to each other because 
both rely upon another feature of C#: the accessor.
Indexers
As you know, array indexing is performed using the [ ] operator. It is possible to define the 
[ ] operator for classes that you create, but you don’t use an operator method. Instead, you 
create an indexer. An indexer allows an object to be indexed like an array. The main use of 
indexers is to support the creation of specialized arrays that are subject to one or more 
constraints. However, you can use an indexer for any purpose for which an array-like 
syntax is beneficial. Indexers can have one or more dimensions. We will begin with one-
dimensional indexers.
Creating One-Dimensional Indexers
A simple one-dimensional indexer has this general form:
element-type this[int index] {
// The get accessor
get {
// return the value specifi ed by index
}
// The set accessor
set {
// set the value specifi ed by index
}
}
253
CHAPTER
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested