asp net core 2.0 mvc pdf : Batch combine pdf SDK software service wpf windows winforms dnn McGraw.Hill.CSharp.4.0.The.Complete.Reference.Apr.201035-part1193

324
Part I: The C# Language
if(isprime) {
val = i;
break;
}
}
return val;
}
public void Reset() {
val = start;
}
public void SetStart(int x) {
start = x;
val = start;
}
}
The key point is that even though ByTwos and Primes generate completely unrelated 
series of numbers, both implement ISeries. As explained, an interface says nothing about 
the implementation, so each class is free to implement the interface as it sees fit.
Using Interface References
You might be somewhat surprised to learn that you can declare a reference variable of an 
interface type. In other words, you can create an interface reference variable. Such a variable 
can r
through an interface reference, it is the version of the method implemented by the object 
that is executed. This process is similar to using a base class reference to access a derived 
class object, as described in Chapter 11.
The following example illustrates the use of an interface reference. It uses the same 
interface reference variable to call methods on objects of both ByTwos and Primes. For 
clarity, it shows all pieces of the program, assembled into a single file.
// Demonstrate interface references.
using System;
// Define the interface.
public interface ISeries {
int GetNext(); // return next number in series
void Reset(); // restart
void SetStart(int x); // set starting value
}
// Use ISeries to implement a series in which each
// value is two greater than the previous one.
class ByTwos : ISeries {
int start;
int val;
Batch combine pdf - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
add pdf together; break pdf into multiple files
Batch combine pdf - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
break pdf file into multiple files; pdf merge
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 12: Interfaces, Structures, and Enumerations 
325
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
public ByTwos() {
start = 0;
val = 0;
}
public int GetNext() {
val += 2;
return val;
}
public void Reset() {
val = start;
}
public void SetStart(int x) {
start = x;
val = start;
}
}
// Use ISeries to implement a series of prime numbers.
class Primes : ISeries {
int start;
int val;
public Primes() {
start = 2;
val = 2;
}
public int GetNext() {
int i, j;
bool isprime;
val++;
for(i = val; i < 1000000; i++) {
isprime = true;
for(j = 2; j <= i/j; j++) {
if((i%j)==0) {
isprime = false;
break;
}
}
if(isprime) {
val = i;
break;
}
}
return val;
}
public void Reset() {
val = start;
}
VB.NET Word: Merge Multiple Word Files & Split Word Document
destnPath As [String]) DOCXDocument.Combine(docList, destnPath or separate Word file in batch mode within & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
acrobat split pdf into multiple files; add pdf pages together
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
NET component for batch converting tiff images to PDF documents in C# class. Support to combine multiple page tiffs into one PDF file.
acrobat combine pdf; add multiple pdf files into one online
326
Part I: The C# Language
public void SetStart(int x) {
start = x;
val = start;
}
}
class SeriesDemo2 {
static void Main() {
ByTwos twoOb = new ByTwos();
Primes primeOb = new Primes();
ISeries ob;
for(int i=0; i < 5; i++) {
ob = twoOb;
Console.WriteLine("Next ByTwos value is " +
ob.GetNext());
ob = primeOb;
Console.WriteLine("Next prime number is " +
ob.GetNext());
}
}
}
The output from the program is shown here:
Next ByTwos value is 2
Next prime number is 3
Next ByTwos value is 4
Next prime number is 5
Next ByTwos value is 6
Next prime number is 7
Next ByTwos value is 8
Next prime number is 11
Next ByTwos value is 10
Next prime number is 13
InMain( ),ob is declared to be a reference to an ISeries interface. This means that it can be 
used to store references to any object that implements ISeries. In this case, it is used to refer 
totwoOb and primeOb, which are objects of type ByTwos and Primes, respectively, which 
both implement ISeries.
One other point: An interface reference variable has knowledge only of the methods 
declared by its interface declaration. Thus, an interface reference cannot be used to access 
any other variables or methods that might be supported by the object.
Interface Properties
Like methods, properties are specified in an interface without any body. Here is the general 
form of a property specification:
// interface property
typename {
get;
set;
}
C# Word - Process Word Document in C#
single or batch pages in Word document in C#.NET. Able to sort order of Office Word document pages through C# programming. C# coding to merge / combine two or
append pdf; pdf merge documents
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 12: Interfaces, Structures, and Enumerations 
327
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
Of course, only get or set will be present for read-only or write-only properties, respectively.
Although the declaration of a property in an interface looks similar to how an auto-
implemented property is declared in a class, the two are not the same. The interface declaration 
does not cause the property to be auto-implemented. It only specifies the name and type of 
the property. Implementation is left to each implementing class. Also, no access modifiers 
are allowed on the accessors when a property is declared in an interface. Thus, the set accessor, 
for example, cannot be specified as private in an interface.
Here is a rewrite of the ISeries interface and the ByTwos class that uses a property 
calledNext to obtain and set the next element in the series:
// Use a property in an interface.
using System;
public interface ISeries {
// An interface property.
int Next {
get; // return the next number in series
set; // set next number
}
}
// Implement ISeries.
class ByTwos : ISeries {
int val;
public ByTwos() {
val = 0;
}
// Get or set value.
public int Next {
get {
val += 2;
return val;
}
set {
val = value;
}
}
}
// Demonstrate an interface property.
class SeriesDemo3 {
static void Main() {
ByTwos ob = new ByTwos();
// Access series through a property.
for(int i=0; i < 5; i++)
Console.WriteLine("Next value is " + ob.Next);
Console.WriteLine("\nStarting at 21");
ob.Next = 21;
328
Part I: The C# Language
for(int i=0; i < 5; i++)
Console.WriteLine("Next value is " + ob.Next);
}
}
The output from this program is shown here:
Next value is 2
Next value is 4
Next value is 6
Next value is 8
Next value is 10
Starting at 21
Next value is 23
Next value is 25
Next value is 27
Next value is 29
Next value is 31
Interface Indexers
An interface can specify an indexer. A simple one-dimensional indexer declared in an 
interface has this general form:
// interface indexer
element-type this[int index] {
get;
set;
}
As before, only get or set will be present for read-only or write-only indexers, respectively. 
Also, no access modifiers are allowed on the accessors when an indexer is declared in an 
interface.
Here is another version of ISeries that adds a read-only indexer that returns the i-th
element in the series.
// Add an indexer in an interface.
using System;
public interface ISeries {
// An interface property.
int Next {
get; // return the next number in series
set; // set next number
}
// An interface indexer.
int this[int index] {
get; // return the specified number in series
}
}
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 12: Interfaces, Structures, and Enumerations 
329
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
// Implement ISeries.
class ByTwos : ISeries {
int val;
public ByTwos() {
val = 0;
}
// Get or set value using a property.
public int Next {
get {
val += 2;
return val;
}
set {
val = value;
}
}
// Get a value using an index.
public int this[int index] {
get {
val = 0;
for(int i=0; i < index; i++)
val += 2;
return val;
}
}
}
// Demonstrate an interface indexer.
class SeriesDemo4 {
static void Main() {
ByTwos ob = new ByTwos();
// Access series through a property.
for(int i=0; i < 5; i++)
Console.WriteLine("Next value is " + ob.Next);
Console.WriteLine("\nStarting at 21");
ob.Next = 21;
for(int i=0; i < 5; i++)
Console.WriteLine("Next value is " +
ob.Next);
Console.WriteLine("\nResetting to 0");
ob.Next = 0;
// Access series through an indexer.
for(int i=0; i < 5; i++)
Console.WriteLine("Next value is " + ob[i]);
}
}
330
Part I: The C# Language
The output from this program is shown here:
Next value is 2
Next value is 4
Next value is 6
Next value is 8
Next value is 10
Starting at 21
Next value is 23
Next value is 25
Next value is 27
Next value is 29
Next value is 31
Resetting to 0
Next value is 0
Next value is 2
Next value is 4
Next value is 6
Next value is 8
Interfaces Can Be Inherited
One interface can inherit another. The syntax is the same as for inheriting classes. When a 
ovide implementations 
for all the members defined within the interface inheritance chain. Here is an example:
// One interface can inherit another.
using System;
public interface IA {
void Meth1();
void Meth2();
}
// IB now includes Meth1() and Meth2() -- it adds Meth3().
public interface IB : IA {
void Meth3();
}
// This class must implement all of IA and IB.
class MyClass : IB {
public void Meth1() {
Console.WriteLine("Implement Meth1().");
}
public void Meth2() {
Console.WriteLine("Implement Meth2().");
}
public void Meth3() {
Console.WriteLine("Implement Meth3().");
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 12: Interfaces, Structures, and Enumerations 
331
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
}
}
class IFExtend {
static void Main() {
MyClass ob = new MyClass();
ob.Meth1();
ob.Meth2();
ob.Meth3();
}
}
As an experiment, you might try removing the implementation for Meth1( ) in MyClass.
This will cause a compile-time error. As stated earlier, any class that implements an interface 
e inherited from 
other interfaces.
Name Hiding with Interface Inheritance
When one interface inherits another, it is possible to declare a member in the derived 
interface member with new.
Explicit Implementations
When implementing a member of an interface, it is possible to fullyqualify its name with 
its interface name. Doing this creates an explicit interface member implementation, or explicit
implementation, for short. For example, given
interface IMyIF {
int MyMeth(int x);
}
then it is legal to implement IMyIF as shown here:
class MyClass : IMyIF {
int IMyIF.MyMeth(int x) {
return x / 3;
}
}
As you can see, when the MyMeth( ) member of IMyIF is implemented, its complete name, 
including its interface name, is specified.
There are two reasons that you might need to create an explicit implementation of an 
name, you are providing an implementation that cannot be accessed through an object of the 
class. Instead, it must be accessed via an interface reference. Thus, an explicit implementation 
332
Part I: The C# Language
class that pr
interfaces, both of which declare methods by the same name and type signature. Qualifying 
the names with their interfaces removes the ambiguity from this situation. Let’s look at an 
example of each.
The following program contains an interface called IEven, which defines two methods, 
IsEven( ) and IsOdd( ), which determine if a number is even or odd. MyClass then implements 
IEven. When it does so, it implements IsOdd( ) explicitly.
// Explicitly implement an interface member.
using System;
interface IEven {
bool IsOdd(int x);
bool IsEven(int x);
}
class MyClass : IEven {
// Explicit implementation. Notice that this member is private
// by default.
bool IEven.IsOdd(int x) {
if((x%2) != 0) return true;
else return false;
}
// Normal implementation.
public bool IsEven(int x) {
IEven o = this; // Interface reference to the invoking object.
return !o.IsOdd(x);
}
}
class Demo {
static void Main() {
MyClass ob = new MyClass();
bool result;
result = ob.IsEven(4);
if(result) Console.WriteLine("4 is even.");
// result = ob.IsOdd(4); // Error, IsOdd not exposed.
// and then calls IsOdd() through that reference.
IEven iRef = (IEven) ob;
result = iRef.IsOdd(3);
if(result) Console.WriteLine("3 is odd.");
}
}
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 12: Interfaces, Structures, and Enumerations 
333
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
SinceIsOdd( ) is implemented explicitly, it is not exposed as a public member of MyClass.
Instead,IsOdd( ) can be accessed only through an interface reference. This is why it is 
invoked through o (which is a reference variable of type IEven) in the implementation for 
IsEven( ).
Here is an example in which two interfaces are implemented and both interfaces declare 
a method called Meth( ). Explicit implementation is used to eliminate the ambiguity inherent 
in this situation.
// Use explicit implementation to remove ambiguity.
using System;
interface IMyIF_A {
int Meth(int x);
}
interface IMyIF_B {
int Meth(int x);
}
// MyClass implements both interfaces.
class MyClass : IMyIF_A, IMyIF_B {
// Explicitly implement the two Meth()s.
int IMyIF_A.Meth(int x) {
return x + x;
}
int IMyIF_B.Meth(int x) {
return x * x;
}
// Call Meth() through an interface reference.
public int MethA(int x){
IMyIF_A a_ob;
a_ob = this;
return a_ob.Meth(x); // calls IMyIF_A
}
public int MethB(int x){
IMyIF_B b_ob;
b_ob = this;
return b_ob.Meth(x); // calls IMyIF_B
}
}
class FQIFNames {
static void Main() {
MyClass ob = new MyClass();
Console.Write("Calling IMyIF_A.Meth(): ");
Console.WriteLine(ob.MethA(3));
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested