asp net core 2.0 mvc pdf : C# pdf merge Library control component .net azure web page mvc McGraw.Hill.CSharp.4.0.The.Complete.Reference.Apr.201036-part1194

334
Part I: The C# Language
Console.Write("Calling IMyIF_B.Meth(): ");
Console.WriteLine(ob.MethB(3));
}
}
The output from this program is shown here:
Calling IMyIF_A.Meth(): 6
Calling IMyIF_B.Meth(): 9
Looking at the program, first notice that Meth( ) has the same signature in both IMyIF_A
andIMyIF_B. Thus, when MyClass implements both of these interfaces, it explicitly 
implements each one separately, fully qualifying its name in the process. Since the only way 
that an explicitly implemented method can be called is on an interface reference, MyClass
creates two such references, one for IMyIF_A and one for IMyIF_B, inside MethA( ) and 
MethB( ), respectively. It then calls these methods, which call the interface methods, thereby 
removing the ambiguity.
Choosing Between an Interface and an Abstract Class
One of the more challenging parts of C# programming is knowing when to create an interface 
not implementation. The general rule is this: When you can fully describe the concept in 
represent your concept in an abstract class.
The .NET Standard Interfaces
The .NET Framework defines a large number of interfaces that a C# program can use. For 
example,System.IComparable defines the CompareTo( ) method, which allows objects to be 
compared when an ordering relationship is required. Interfaces also form an important part 
of the Collections classes, which provide various types of storage (such as stacks and queues) 
for groups of objects. For example, System.Collections.ICollection defines the functionality 
of a collection. System.Collections.IEnumerator offers a way to sequence through the 
elements in a collection. These and many other interfaces are described in Part II.
Structures
As you know, classes are reference types. This means that class objects are accessed through 
a reference. This differs from the value types, which are accessed directly. However, sometimes 
it would be useful to be able to access an object directly, in the way that value types are. One 
reason for this is efficiency. Accessing class objects through a reference adds overhead onto 
significant. To address these concerns, C# offers the structure. A structure is similar to a 
class, but is a value type, rather than a reference type.
Structures are declared using the keyword struct and are syntactically similar to classes. 
Here is the general form of a struct:
C# pdf merge - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
add two pdf files together; acrobat reader merge pdf files
C# pdf merge - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
c# combine pdf; pdf combine files online
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 12: Interfaces, Structures, and Enumerations 
335
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
struct name : interfaces {
// member declarations
}
The name of the structure is specified by name.
Structures cannot inherit other structures or classes or be used as a base for other structures 
or classes. (All structures do, however, implicitly inherit System.ValueType, which inherits 
object.) However, a structure can implement one or more interfaces. These are specified after 
the structure name using a comma-separated list. Like classes, structure members include 
methods, fields, indexers, properties, operator methods, and events. Structures can also define 
constructors, but not destructors. However, you cannot define a default (parameterless) 
constructor for a structure. The reason for this is that a default constructor is automatically 
defined for all structures, and this default constructor can’t be changed. The default constructor 
initializes the fields of a structure to their default value. Since structures do not support 
inheritance, structure members cannot be specified as abstract,virtual, or protected.
A structure object can be created using new in the same way as a class object, but it is 
not required. When new is used, the specified constructor is called. When new is not used, 
the object is still created, but it is not initialized. Thus, you will need to perform any 
initialization manually.
Here is an example that uses a structure to hold information about a book:
// Demonstrate a structure.
using System;
// Define a structure.
struct Book {
public string Author;
public string Title;
public int Copyright;
public Book(string a, string t, int c) {
Author = a;
Title = t;
Copyright = c;
}
}
// Demonstrate Book structure.
class StructDemo {
static void Main() {
Book book1 = new Book("Herb Schildt",
"C# 4.0: The Complete Reference",
2010); // explicit constructor
Book book2 = new Book(); // default constructor
Book book3; // no constructor
Console.WriteLine(book1.Title + " by " + book1.Author +
", (c) " + book1.Copyright);
Console.WriteLine();
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
C#, C# convert PDF to HTML, C# convert PDF to Word, C# extract text from PDF, C# convert PDF to Jpeg, C# compress PDF, C# print PDF, C# merge PDF files, C# view
batch pdf merger online; pdf merge files
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field. Access to freeware download and online C#.NET class source code.
merge pdf files; add pdf files together reader
336
Part I: The C# Language
if(book2.Title == null)
Console.WriteLine("book2.Title is null.");
// Now, give book2 some info.
book2.Title = "Brave New World";
book2.Author = "Aldous Huxley";
book2.Copyright = 1932;
Console.Write("book2 now contains: ");
Console.WriteLine(book2.Title + " by " + book2.Author +
", (c) " + book2.Copyright);
Console.WriteLine();
// Console.WriteLine(book3.Title); // error, must initialize first
book3.Title = "Red Storm Rising";
Console.WriteLine(book3.Title); // now OK
}
}
The output from this program is shown here:
C# 4.0: The Complete Reference by Herb Schildt, (c) 2010
book2.Title is null.
book2 now contains: Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, (c) 1932
Red Storm Rising
As the program shows, a structure can be created either by using new to invoke a 
constructor or by simply declaring an object. If new is used, then the fields of the structure 
will be initialized either by the default constructor, which initializes all fields to their default 
value, or by a user-defined constructor. If new is not used, as is the case with book3, then 
When you assign one structure to another, a copy of the object is made. This is an 
important way in which struct differs from class. As explained earlier in this book, when 
you assign one class reference to another, you are simply making the reference on the left 
side of the assignment refer to the same object as that referred to by the reference on the 
right. When you assign one struct variable to another, you are making a copy of the object 
on the right. For example, consider the following program:
// Copy a struct.
using System;
// Define a structure.
struct MyStruct {
public int x;
}
// Demonstrate structure assignment.
class StructAssignment {
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
C#, C# convert PDF to HTML, C# convert PDF to Word, C# extract text from PDF, C# convert PDF to Jpeg, C# compress PDF, C# print PDF, C# merge PDF files, C# view
c# merge pdf files into one; c# merge pdf
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. A powerful C#.NET PDF control compatible with windows operating system and built on .NET framework.
pdf mail merge plug in; reader combine pdf pages
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 12: Interfaces, Structures, and Enumerations 
337
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
static void Main() {
MyStruct a;
MyStruct b;
a.x = 10;
b.x = 20;
Console.WriteLine("a.x {0}, b.x {1}", a.x, b.x);
a = b;
b.x = 30;
Console.WriteLine("a.x {0}, b.x {1}", a.x, b.x);
}
}
The output is shown here:
a.x 10, b.x 20
a.x 20, b.x 30
As the output shows, after the assignment
a = b;
the structure variables a and b are still separate and distinct. That is, a does not refer to or 
relate to b in any way other than containing a copy of b’s value. This would not be the case 
ifa and b were class references. For example, here is the class version of the preceding 
program:
// Use a class.
using System;
// Now a class.
class MyClass {
public int x;
}
// Now show a class object assignment.
class ClassAssignment {
static void Main() {
MyClass a = new MyClass();
MyClass b = new MyClass();
a.x = 10;
b.x = 20;
Console.WriteLine("a.x {0}, b.x {1}", a.x, b.x);
a = b;
b.x = 30;
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
›› C# PDF: Convert PDF to Jpeg. C# PDF - Convert PDF to JPEG in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF to JPEG Converting & Conversion Control. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET.
reader merge pdf; pdf mail merge
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
RasterEdge offers detailed guidances for each of those page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF
best pdf merger; acrobat merge pdf files
338
Part I: The C# Language
Console.WriteLine("a.x {0}, b.x {1}", a.x, b.x);
}
}
The output from this version is shown here:
a.x 10, b.x 20
a.x 30, b.x 30
As you can see, after the assignment of b to a, both variables refer to the same object—the 
one originally referred to by b.
Why Structures?
At this point, you might be wondering why C# includes the struct since it seems to be a 
less-capable version of a class. The answer lies in efficiency and performance. Because 
structures are value types, they are operated on directly rather than through a reference. 
Thus, a struct does not require a separate reference variable. This means that less memory 
is used in some cases. Furthermore, because a struct is accessed directly, it does not suffer 
from the performance loss that is inherent in accessing a class object. Because classes are 
reference types, all access to class objects is through a reference. This indirection adds 
overhead to every access. Structures do not incur this overhead. In general, if you need 
to simply store a group of related data, but don’t need inheritance and don’t need to operate 
on that data through a reference, then a struct can be a more efficient choice.
Here is another example that shows how a structure might be used in practice. It 
simulates an e-commerce transaction record. Each transaction includes a packet header that 
unit of information, it is organized as a structure. This structure can then be used to create 
a transaction record, or any other type of information packet.
// Structures are good when grouping small amounts of data.
using System;
// Define a packet structure.
struct PacketHeader {
public uint PackNum; // packet number
public ushort PackLen; // length of packet
}
// Use PacketHeader to create an e-commerce transaction record.
class Transaction {
static uint transacNum = 0;
PacketHeader ph;  // incorporate PacketHeader into Transaction
string accountNum;
double amount;
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Text. C# PDF - Extract Text from PDF in C#.NET. Best C#.NET PDF text extraction library and component for free download.
merge pdf online; pdf combine pages
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
PDF ›› C# PDF: Split PDF. C# PDF - Split PDF Document in C#.NET. Explain How to Split PDF Document in Visual C#.NET Application. C# DLLs: Split PDF Document.
split pdf into multiple files; batch merge pdf
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 12: Interfaces, Structures, and Enumerations 
339
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
public Transaction(string acc, double val) {
// create packet header
ph.PackNum = transacNum++;
ph.PackLen = 512;  // arbitrary length
accountNum = acc;
amount = val;
}
// Simulate a transaction.
public void sendTransaction() {
Console.WriteLine("Packet #: " + ph.PackNum +
", Length: " + ph.PackLen +
",\n    Account #: " + accountNum +
", Amount: {0:C}\n", amount);
}
}
// Demonstrate Packet.
class PacketDemo {
static void Main() {
Transaction t = new Transaction("31243", -100.12);
Transaction t2 = new Transaction("AB4655", 345.25);
Transaction t3 = new Transaction("8475-09", 9800.00);
t.sendTransaction();
t2.sendTransaction();
t3.sendTransaction();
}
}
The output from the program is shown here:
Packet #: 0, Length: 512,
Account #: 31243, Amount: ($100.12)
Packet #: 1, Length: 512,
Account #: AB4655, Amount: $345.25
Packet #: 2, Length: 512,
Account #: 8475-09, Amount: $9,800.00
PacketHeader is a good choice for a struct because it contains only a small amount of data 
and does not use inheritance or even contain methods. As a structure, PacketHeader does 
not incur the additional overhead of a reference, as a class would. Thus, any type of 
transaction record can use PacketHeader without affecting its efficiency.
As a point of interest, C++ also has structures and uses the struct keyword. However, 
C# and C++ structures are not the same. In C++, struct defines a class type. Thus, in C++, 
struct and class are nearly equivalent. (The difference has to do with the default access of 
their members, which is private for class and public for struct.) In C#, a struct defines a 
value type, and a class defines a reference type.
340
Part I: The C# Language
Enumerations
Anenumeration is a set of named integer constants. The keyword enum declares an 
enumerated type. The general form for an enumeration is
enumname { enumeration list };
Here, the type name of the enumeration is specified by name. The enumerationlist is a 
comma-separated list of identifiers.
Here is an example. It defines an enumeration called Apple that enumerates various 
types of apples:
enum Apple { Jonathan, GoldenDel, RedDel, Winesap,
Cortland, McIntosh };
A
an integer value. However, no implicit conversions are defined between an enum type and 
the built-in integer types, so an explicit cast must be used. Also, a cast is required when 
converting between two enumeration types. Since enumerations represent integer values, 
you can use an enumeration to control a switch statement or as the control variable in a for
loop, for example.
Each enumeration symbol is given a value one greater than the symbol that precedes it. 
By default, the value of the first enumeration symbol is 0. Therefore, in the Apple enumeration, 
Jonathan is 0, GoldenDel is 1, RedDel is 2, and so on.
The members of an enumeration are accessed through their type name via the dot 
operator. For example
Console.WriteLine(Apple.RedDel + " has the value " +
(int)Apple.RedDel);
displays
RedDel has the value 2
o obtain 
its integer value, a cast to int must be employed.
Here is a program that illustrates the Apple enumeration:
// Demonstrate an enumeration.
using System;
class EnumDemo {
enum Apple { Jonathan, GoldenDel, RedDel, Winesap,
Cortland, McIntosh };
static void Main() {
string[] color = {
"Red",
"Yellow",
"Red",
"Red",
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 12: Interfaces, Structures, and Enumerations 
341
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
"Red",
"Reddish Green"
};
Apple i; // declare an enum variable
// Use i to cycle through the enum.
for(i = Apple.Jonathan; i <= Apple.McIntosh; i++)
Console.WriteLine(i + " has value of " + (int)i);
Console.WriteLine();
// Use an enumeration to index an array.
for(i = Apple.Jonathan; i <= Apple.McIntosh; i++)
Console.WriteLine("Color of " + i + " is " +
color[(int)i]);
}
}
The output from the program is shown here:
Jonathan has value of 0
GoldenDel has value of 1
RedDel has value of 2
Winesap has value of 3
Cortland has value of 4
McIntosh has value of 5
Color of Jonathan is Red
Color of GoldenDel is Yellow
Color of RedDel is Red
Color of Winesap is Red
Color of Cortland is Red
Color of McIntosh is Reddish Green
Notice how the for loops are controlled by a variable of type Apple. Because the 
enumerated values in Apple start at zero, these values can be used to index color to obtain 
the color of the apple. Notice that a cast is required when the enumeration value is used to 
index the color array. As mentioned, there are no implicit conversions defined between 
integers and enumeration types. An explicit cast is required.
One other point: all enumerations implicitly inherit System.Enum, which inherits 
System.ValueType, which inherits object.
Initialize an Enumeration
You can specify the value of one or more of the symbols by using an initializer. Do this by 
following the symbol with an equal sign and an integer constant expression. Symbols that 
appear after initializers are assigned values greater than the previous initialization value. 
For example, the following code assigns the value of 10 to RedDel:
enum Apple { Jonathan, GoldenDel, RedDel = 10, Winesap,
Cortland, McIntosh };
342
Part I: The C# Language
Now the values of these symbols are
Jonathan
0
GoldenDel
1
RedDel
10
Winesap
11
Cortland
12
McIntosh
13
Specify the Underlying Type of an Enumeration
By default, enumerations are based on type int, but you can create an enumeration of any 
integral type, except for type char. To specify a type other than int, put the desired type 
Apple an enumeration based on byte:
enum Apple : byte { Jonathan, GoldenDel, RedDel, Winesap,
Cortland, McIntosh };
NowApple.Winesap, for example, is a byte quantity.
Use Enumerations
At first glance you might think that enumerations are an interesting but relatively 
unimportant part of C#, yet this is not the case. Enumerations are very useful when your 
program requires one or more specialized symbols. For example, imagine that you are 
writing a program that controls a conveyor belt in a factory. You might create a method 
calledConveyor( ) that accepts the following commands as parameters: start, stop, forward, 
and reverse. Instead of passing Conveyor( ) integers, such as 1 for start, 2 for stop, and so 
on, which is error-prone, you can create an enumeration that assigns words to these values. 
Here is an example of this approach:
// Simulate a conveyor belt.
using System;
class ConveyorControl {
// Enumerate the conveyor commands.
public enum Action { Start, Stop, Forward, Reverse };
public void Conveyor(Action com) {
switch(com) {
case Action.Start:
Console.WriteLine("Starting conveyor.");
break;
case Action.Stop:
Console.WriteLine("Stopping conveyor.");
break;
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 12: Interfaces, Structures, and Enumerations 
343
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
case Action.Forward:
Console.WriteLine("Moving forward.");
break;
case Action.Reverse:
Console.WriteLine("Moving backward.");
break;
}
}
}
class ConveyorDemo {
static void Main() {
ConveyorControl c = new ConveyorControl();
c.Conveyor(ConveyorControl.Action.Start);
c.Conveyor(ConveyorControl.Action.Forward);
c.Conveyor(ConveyorControl.Action.Reverse);
c.Conveyor(ConveyorControl.Action.Stop);
}
}
The output from the program is shown here:
Starting conveyor.
Moving forward.
Moving backward.
Stopping conveyor.
BecauseConveyor( ) takes an argument of type Action, only the values defined by Action
can be passed to the method. For example, here an attempt is made to pass the value 22 to 
Conveyor( ):
c.Conveyor(22); // Error!
This won’t compile because there is no predefined conversion from int to Action. This prevents 
the passing of invalid commands to Conveyor( ). Of course, you could use a cast to force 
a conversion, but this would require a premeditated act, not an accidental misuse. Also, 
because commands are specified by name rather than by number, it is less likely that a 
user of Conveyor( ) will inadvertently pass the wrong value.
There is one other interesting thing in this example: Notice that an enumeration type 
is used to control the switch statement. Because enumerations are integral types, they are 
perfectly valid for use in a switch.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested