asp net core 2.0 mvc pdf : Add pdf files together online application software tool html windows azure online McGraw.Hill.CSharp.4.0.The.Complete.Reference.Apr.201039-part1197

364
Part I: The C# Language
// Construct array given its size.
public RangeArray(int low, int high) {
high++;
if(high <= low) {
throw new RangeArrayException("Low index not less than high.");
}
a = new int[high - low];
Length = high - low;
lowerBound = low;
upperBound = --high;
}
// This is the indexer for RangeArray.
public int this[int index] {
// This is the get accessor.
get {
if(ok(index)) {
return a[index - lowerBound];
} else {
throw new RangeArrayException("Range Error.");
}
}
// This is the set accessor.
set {
if(ok(index)) {
a[index - lowerBound] = value;
}
else throw new RangeArrayException("Range Error.");
}
}
// Return true if index is within bounds.
private bool ok(int index) {
if(index >= lowerBound & index <= upperBound) return true;
return false;
}
}
// Demonstrate the index-range array.
class RangeArrayDemo {
static void Main() {
try {
RangeArray ra = new RangeArray(-5, 5);
RangeArray ra2 = new RangeArray(1, 10);
// Demonstrate ra.
Console.WriteLine("Length of ra: " + ra.Length);
for(int i = -5; i <= 5; i++)
ra[i] = i;
Add pdf files together online - Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provide C# Demo Codes for Merging and Appending PDF Document
add pdf together one file; build pdf from multiple files
Add pdf files together online - VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in .NET Project
c# merge pdf files; combine pdfs online
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 13: Exception Handling 
365
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
Console.Write("Contents of ra: ");
for(int i = -5; i <= 5; i++)
Console.Write(ra[i] + " ");
Console.WriteLine("\n");
// Demonstrate ra2.
Console.WriteLine("Length of ra2: " + ra2.Length);
for(int i = 1; i <= 10; i++)
ra2[i] = i;
Console.Write("Contents of ra2: ");
for(int i = 1; i <= 10; i++)
Console.Write(ra2[i] + " ");
Console.WriteLine("\n");
} catch (RangeArrayException exc) {
Console.WriteLine(exc);
}
// Now, demonstrate some errors.
Console.WriteLine("Now generate some range errors.");
// Use an invalid constructor.
try {
RangeArray ra3 = new RangeArray(100, -10); // Error
} catch (RangeArrayException exc) {
Console.WriteLine(exc);
}
// Use an invalid index.
try {
RangeArray ra3 = new RangeArray(-2, 2);
for(int i = -2; i <= 2; i++)
ra3[i] = i;
Console.Write("Contents of ra3: ");
for(int i = -2; i <= 10; i++) // generate range error
Console.Write(ra3[i] + " ");
} catch (RangeArrayException exc) {
Console.WriteLine(exc);
}
}
}
The output from the program is shown here:
Length of ra: 11
Contents of ra: -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5
C# Word - Merge Word Documents in C#.NET
empowers C# programmers to easily merge and append Word files with mature input Word documents can be merged and appended together according to Add references:
pdf combine pages; .net merge pdf files
C# PowerPoint - Merge PowerPoint Documents in C#.NET
together according to its loading sequence, and then saved and output as a single PowerPoint with user-defined location. C# DLLs: Merge PowerPoint Files. Add
acrobat merge pdf files; how to combine pdf files
366
Part I: The C# Language
Length of ra2: 10
Contents of ra2: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Now generate some range errors.
Low index not less than high.
Contents of ra3: -2 -1 0 1 2 Range Error.
When a range error occurs, RangeArray throws an object of type RangeArrayException.
Notice there are three places in RangeArray that this might occur: in the getindexer accessor, 
in the set indexer accessor, and by the RangeArray constructor. To catch these exceptions 
implies that RangeArray objects must be constructed and accessed from within a try block, 
as the program illustrates. By using an exception to report errors, RangeArray now acts like 
one of C#’s built-in types and can be fully integrated into a program’s exception-handling 
mechanism.
Notice that none of the RangeArrayException constructors provide any statements 
in their body. Instead, they simply pass their arguments along to Exception via base. As 
, you can 
simply let the Exception constructors handle the process. There is no requirement that your 
derived class add anything to what is inherited from Exception.
Before moving on, you might want to experiment with this program a bit. For example, 
try commenting-out the override of ToString( ) and observe the results. Also, try creating an 
exception using the default constructor, and observe what C# generates as its default message.
Catching Derived Class Exceptions
You need to be careful how you order catch clauses when trying to catch exception types that 
involve base and derived classes, because a catch for a base class will also match any of its 
Exception, catching 
Exception catches all possible exceptions. Of course, using catch without an exception type 
provides a cleaner way to catch all exceptions, as described earlier. However, the issue of 
create exceptions of your own.
the derived class first in the catch sequence. This is necessary because a base class catch will 
also catch all derived classes. Fortunately, this rule is self-enforcing because putting the base 
class first causes a compile-time error.
The following program creates two exception classes called ExceptA and ExceptB.
ExceptA is derived from Exception.ExceptB is derived from ExceptA. The program then 
throws an exception of each type. For brevity, the custom exceptions supply only one 
constructor (which takes a string that describes the exception). But remember, in commercial 
code, your custom exception classes will normally provide all four of the constructors 
defined by Exception.
// Derived exceptions must appear before base class exceptions.
using System;
// Create an exception.
class ExceptA : Exception {
public ExceptA(string message) : base(message) { }
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping text by a method loses the original PDF document layout and all the paragraphs are joining together, our C#
acrobat reader merge pdf files; pdf merge
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
Imaging.MSWordDocx.dll", which, when used together with other online tutorial on how to add & insert controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and components
add pdf files together reader; best pdf merger
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 13: Exception Handling 
367
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
public override string ToString() {
return Message;
}
}
// Create an exception derived from ExceptA.
class ExceptB : ExceptA {
public ExceptB(string message) : base(message) { }
public override string ToString() {
return Message;
}
}
class OrderMatters {
static void Main() {
for(int x = 0; x < 3; x++) {
try {
if(x==0) throw new ExceptA("Caught an ExceptA exception");
else throw new Exception();
}
catch (ExceptB exc) {
Console.WriteLine(exc);
}
catch (ExceptA exc) {
Console.WriteLine(exc);
}
catch (Exception exc) {
Console.WriteLine(exc);
}
}
}
}
The output from the program is shown here:
Caught an ExceptA exception
Caught an ExceptB exception
System.Exception: Exception of type 'System.Exception' was thrown.
at OrderMatters.Main()
Notice the type and order of the catch clauses. This is the only order in which they can 
occur. Since ExceptB is derived from ExceptA, the catch for ExceptB must be before the one 
forExceptA. Similarly, the catch for Exception (which is the base class for all exceptions) 
must appear last. To prove this point for yourself, try rearranging the catchclauses. Doing 
so will result in a compile-time error.
One good use of a base class catch clause is to catch an entire category of exceptions. For 
example, imagine you are creating a set of exceptions for some device. If you derive all of 
the exceptions from a common base class, then applications that don’t need to know precisely 
what problem occurred could simply catch the base class exception, avoiding the unnecessary 
duplication of code.
C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
2. How to add and implement Tiff imaging functions in your C# project. 2. Word/Excel/PPT/PDF/Jpeg to Tiff conversion. 2. Merge and append Tiff files using
attach pdf to mail merge; combine pdf
C# Excel - Merge Excel Documents in C#.NET
and appended together according to its loading sequence, and then saved and output as a single Excel with user-defined location. C# DLLs: Merge Excel Files. Add
combine pdf files; add pdf pages together
368
Part I: The C# Language
Using checked and unchecked
A special feature in C# relates to the generation of overflow exceptions in arithmetic 
computations. As you know, it is possible for some types of arithmetic computations to 
produce a rn 
this occurs, the result is said to overflow. For example, consider the following sequence:
byte a, b, result;
a = 127;
b = 127;
result = (byte)(a * b);
Here, the product of a and b exceeds the range of a byte value. Thus, the result overflows 
the type of the result.
occurs by using the keywords checked and unchecked. To specify that an expression be 
checked for overflow, use checked. To specify that overflow be ignored, use unchecked.
In this case, the result is truncated to fit into the target type of the expression.
Thechecked keyword has these two general forms. One checks a specific expression 
and is called the operatorform of checked. The other checks a block of statements and is 
called the statement form.
checked (expr)
checked {
// statements to be checked
}
Here, expr is the expression being checked. If a checked expression overflows, then an 
OverflowException is thrown.
Theunchecked keyword also has two general forms. The first is the operator form, 
which ignores overflow for a specific expression. The second ignores overflow for a block 
of statements.
unchecked (expr)
unchecked {
// statements for which overfl ow is ignored
}
Here, expr is the expression that is not being checked for overflow. If an unchecked 
expression overflows, then truncation will occur.
Here is a program that demonstrates both checked and unchecked:
// Using checked and unchecked.
using System;
class CheckedDemo {
static void Main() {
byte a, b;
C# Image: C# Code to Encode & Decode JBIG2 Images in RasterEdge .
Easy to add C# JBIG2 codec controls to your image and codec into PDF documents for a better PDF compression; text to the new project folder, together with .NET
add two pdf files together; pdf combine files online
VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.
and find text content in multiple page adobe PDF files in .NET Our VB.NET PDF Document Add-On enables you to search for text in target PDF document by using
pdf merger; acrobat combine pdf files
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 13: Exception Handling 
369
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
byte result;
a = 127;
b = 127;
try {
result = unchecked((byte)(a * b));
Console.WriteLine("Unchecked result: " + result);
result = checked((byte)(a * b)); // this causes exception
Console.WriteLine("Checked result: " + result); // won't execute
}
catch (OverflowException exc) {
Console.WriteLine(exc);
}
}
}
The output from the program is shown here:
Unchecked result: 1
System.OverflowException: Arithmetic operation resulted in an overflow.
at CheckedDemo.Main()
As is evident, the unchecked expression resulted in a truncation. The checked expression 
caused an exception.
The preceding program demonstrated the use of checked and unchecked for a single 
expression. The following program shows how to check and uncheck a block of statements.
// Using checked and unchecked with statement blocks.
using System;
class CheckedBlocks {
static void Main() {
byte a, b;
byte result;
a = 127;
b = 127;
try {
unchecked {
a = 127;
b = 127;
result = unchecked((byte)(a * b));
Console.WriteLine("Unchecked result: " + result);
a = 125;
b = 5;
result = unchecked((byte)(a * b));
Console.WriteLine("Unchecked result: " + result);
}
370
Part I: The C# Language
checked {
a = 2;
b = 7;
result = checked((byte)(a * b)); // this is OK
Console.WriteLine("Checked result: " + result);
a = 127;
b = 127;
result = checked((byte)(a * b)); // this causes exception
}
}
catch (OverflowException exc) {
Console.WriteLine(exc);
}
}
}
The output from the program is shown here:
Unchecked result: 1
Unchecked result: 113
Checked result: 14
System.OverflowException: Arithmetic operation resulted in an overflow.
at CheckedBlocks.Main()
As you can see, the unchecked block results in the overflow being truncated. When 
overflow occurred in the checked block, an exception was raised.
One reason that you may need to use checked or unchecked is that the default 
and the execution environment, itself. Thus, for some types of programs, it is best to specify 
the overflow check status explicitly.
14
Using I/O
T
Console.WriteLine( ), but have done so without much formal explanation. Because 
the I/O system is built upon a hierarchy of classes, it was not possible to present its 
in general.
This chapter examines both console I/O and file I/O. Be forewarned that the I/O system 
is quite large. This chapter describes the most important and commonly used features.
C#’s I/O Is Built Upon Streams
C# programs perform I/O through streams. A stream is an abstraction that either produces 
or consumes information. A stream is linked to a physical device by the I/O system. All 
streams behave in the same manner, even if the actual physical devices they are linked to 
differ
to a disk file.
Byte Streams and Character Streams
are byte oriented when it comes to I/O operations. Frequently, though, we humans prefer 
to communicate using characters. Recall that in C#, char is a 16-bit type, and byte is an 8-bit 
type. If you are using the ASCII character set, then it is easy to convert between char and 
byte; just ignore the high-order byte of the char value. But this won’t work for the rest of the 
Unicode characters, which need both bytes (and possibly more). Thus, byte streams are not 
perfectly suited to handling character-based I/O. To solve this problem, the .NET Framework 
defines several classes that convert a byte stream into a character stream, handling the 
translation of byte-to-char and char-to-byte for you automatically.
The Predefined Streams
Three predefined streams, which are exposed by the properties called Console.In,
Console.Out, and Console.Error, are available to all programs that use the System
namespace.Console.Out refers to the standard output stream. By default, this is the 
371
CHAPTER
372
Part I: The C# Language
console. When you call Console.WriteLine( ), for example, it automatically sends information 
toConsole.Out.Console.In refers to standard input, which is, by default, the keyboard. 
Console.Error refers to the standard error stream, which is also the console by default. 
However, these streams can be redirected to any compatible I/O device. The standard 
streams are character streams. Thus, these streams read and write characters.
The Stream Classes
The .NET Framework defines both byte and character stream classes. However, the character 
stream classes are really just wrappers that convert an underlying byte stream to a character 
stream, handling any conversion automatically. Thus, the character streams, although 
logically separate, are built upon byte streams.
The core stream classes are defined within the System.IO namespace. To use these 
ogram:
using System.IO;
The reason that you don’t have to specify System.IO for console input and output is that 
theConsole class is defined in the System namespace.
The Stream Class
The core stream class is System.IO.Stream.Stream represents a byte stream and is a base 
class for all other str
aStream object. Stream defines a set of standard stream operations. Table 14-1 shows 
several commonly used methods defined by Stream.
Several of the methods shown in Table 14-1 will throw an IOException if an I/O error 
eam that is 
read-only, a NotSupportedException is thrown. Other exceptions are possible, depending 
on the specific method.
Method
Description
void Close( )
Closes the stream. 
void Flush( )
Writes the contents of the stream to the physical device.
int ReadByte( )
Returns an integer representation of the next available byte 
of input. Returns –1 when the end of the file is encountered.
int Read(byte[ ] buffer, int offset,
int count)
Attempts to read up to count bytes into buffer starting at 
buffer[offset], returning the number of bytes successfully 
read. 
long Seek(long offset, SeekOrigin origin)
Sets the current position in the stream to the specified 
offset from the specified origin. It returns the new position.
void WriteByte(byte value)
Writes a single byte to an output stream. 
int Write(byte[ ] buffer, int offset,
int count)
Writes a subrange of count bytes from the array buffer, 
beginning at buffer[offset], returning the number of bytes 
written.
T
ABLE
14-1  Some of the Methods Defi ned by Stream
P
A
R
T
I
Chapter 14: Using I/O 
373
P
A
R
T
I
P
A
R
T
I
Notice that Stream defines methods that read and write data. However, not all streams 
will support both of these operations, because it is possible to open read-only or write-only 
streams. Also, not all streams will support position requests via Seek( ). To determine the 
capabilities of a stream, you will use one or more of Stream’s properties. They are shown in 
Table 14-2. Also shown are the Length and Position properties, which contain the length of 
the stream and its current position.
The Byte Stream Classes
Several concrete byte streams are derived from Stream. Those defined in the System.IO
namespace are shown here:
Stream Class
Description
BufferedStream
Wraps a byte stream and adds buffering. Buffering provides a 
performance enhancement in many cases.
FileStream
A byte stream designed for file I/O.
MemoryStream
A byte stream that uses memory for storage.
UnmanagedMemoryStream
A byte stream that uses unmanaged memory for storage.
Several other concrete stream classes are also supported by the .NET Framework, which 
provide support for compressed files, sockets, and pipes, among others. It is also possible 
for you to derive your own stream classes. However, for the vast majority of applications, 
the built-in streams will be sufficient.
Property
Description
bool CanRead
This property is true if the stream can be read. This property is 
read-only.
bool CanSeek
This property is true if the stream supports position requests. 
This property is read-only.
bool CanTimeout
This property is true if the stream can time out. This property is 
read-only. 
bool CanWrite
This property is true if the stream can be written. This property 
is read-only.
long Length
This property contains the length of the stream. This property 
is read-only.
long Position
This property represents the current position of the stream. 
This property is read/write.
int ReadTimeout
This property represents the length of time before a time-out 
will occur for read operations. This property is read/write. 
int WriteTimeout
This property represents the length of time before a time-out 
will occur for write operations. This property is read/write. 
T
ABLE
14-2  The Properties Defi ned by Stream
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested